Sunday, September 21, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

‘Captain America’: Gung-ho glory

Steve Rogers (Chris Evans, center), having seized an opportunity to lead a rescue mission deemed impossible by his superior officer, discovers that his silly, USO-show costume might serve an important symbolic purpose after all. Courtesy photo

By
July 22, 2011 |

‘Captain America’

Four stars

Starring: Chris Evans, Hayley Atwell, Tommy Lee Jones, Hugo Weaving, Stanley Tucci, Toby Jones, Dominic Cooper

Rating: PG-13, and perhaps too harshly, for sci-fi violence and action

We’re in good hands with this fellow.

And I don’t mean Captain America, although he also has our backs. I’m referring to director Joe Johnston, who has the perfect touch for this sort of material: precisely the proper blend of dramatic heft, low-key humor and well-choreographed action scenes.

Johnston understands the balance necessary for us to buy into fantasy, and he also sets a mean period stage; we always feel part of whatever era and locale his projects exploit. And he clearly has a fondness for retro superhero sagas, having delivered an impressively authentic and entertaining — and sadly undervalued — adaptation of “The Rocketeer,” back in 1991.

Armed here with a pitch-perfect script — Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, take a bow — and a skilled ensemble cast, Johnston has delivered a well-told fantasy saga that feels as innocently high-spirited and pridefully patriotic as America itself, during the turbulent days of World War II.

Following a suitably intriguing prologue, we meet scrawny Steve Rogers (Chris Evans): the epitome of a 98-pound Brooklyn weakling, but no less determined to sign up for his chance to help end Hitler’s Nazi reign. But no recruiting office wants an undersize mutt who also suffers from asthma and a dozen other physical issues, and Steve should know; he has tried every “Uncle Sam wants YOU” station within easy travel, using a variety of aliases.

Best friend James “Bucky” Barnes (Sebastian Stan), already sporting a uniform and poised to ship out, gently insists that Steve should accept the inevitable. But that isn’t about to happen, and Steve’s dogged persistence catches the attention of Dr. Abraham Erskine (Stanley Tucci), a scientist who fled Germany after seeing the writing on the wall, and who has brought his rather unorthodox research to the States.

Erskine likes Steve’s pluck, but is drawn more to the young man’s courage, integrity and kindness. The downtrodden and bullied, Erskine explains, understand the need for compassion, even when engaged in conflict. This makes such a man a much better candidate for … well, for the sort of laboratory-conceived transformation that has delighted Hollywood all the way back to Victor Frankenstein’s lightning-enhanced skills at resurrection.

Production designer Rick Heinrichs has a field day with these lab gizmos, and he’s equally adept at reviving 1940s-era New York; the result feels like a film that might have been made 65 years ago (albeit with our modern Tinseltown tech). That’s also Johnston’s touch, of course; he carefully ensures — for the most part — that his cast and characters don’t sound or look like refugees from the 21st century.

Anyway, Steve winds up in a clandestine military unit run by Col. Chester Phillips (Tommy Lee Jones, always welcome) and his British assistant, Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell, perhaps remembered from 2008′s big-screen “Brideshead Revisited”). Erskine’s procedure is successful, but at a dire cost; thanks to the untimely intervention of a Nazi infiltrator, the lab is wrecked beyond repair. Rather than being the first of a new breed of super-soldier, Steve winds up the only one of his kind.

To be more precise, the infiltrator actually is an agent of Hydra, an elite nasty-ops unit within Hitler’s Third Reich, run by the megalomaniacal Johann Schmidt (Hugo Weaving) … soon to be known by a much more fearsome nickname.

Sadly regarding Steve as little more than a publicity stunt, Col. Phillips assigns him to build morale at war bonds shows. This seems a bit daft, although Jones pulls off the expository dialogue necessary to sell this brief detour. Actually, Jones could sell ice to Eskimos; his dry, mordant line delivery has been perfect ever since his Academy Award-winning supporting role in 1993′s “The Fugitive.” And he gets the best lines here, as well: most particularly one involving whom to kiss … and when.

But this long and circuitous road to Steve’s emergence as an action-ready symbol of American fortitude isn’t merely a delaying tactic; the well-scripted delay serves an important purpose. Numerous interpersonal character dynamics get established; we come to care about these folks, and to a surprisingly strong degree.

As a result, when Steve finally jumps at an excuse to wear his embarrassing bond-rally uniform in actual combat … well, it’s hard not to cheer.

Evans, a quietly persuasive actor in desperate need of material better than the limp dreck with which he has been associated until now — disposable junk such as “Street Kings” or “Push,” and the inappropriately jokey “Fantastic Four” entries — definitely rises to this occasion. He’s wholly believable as a man whose integrity is several sizes too large for his initially gaunt physique, and he sells the subsequent what-has-happened-to-me transformation.

Most crucially, Evans also projects the essential wholesome, heartfelt moral conviction. This is no trivial matter, and he cannot be praised enough; few actors have been able to match the ingenuous honor that Christopher Reeve brought to Superman, back in the day; it ain’t easy to speak of “truth, justice and the American way” without drawing snickers, particularly in these cynical times. But Evans nails it.

Let it also be said that CGI magic has become pretty darn awesome. Evans starts off as a convincingly skinny squirt before bulking up into a hunk whose chest cannot help tempting a reflexive gesture from Atwell’s Peggy Carter: one of this film’s numerous delightful little bits.

Weaving, a fan favorite ever since the “Matrix” trilogy, is marvelously malevolent as the gleefully insane — but no less ferociously scary — Schmidt. Tucci once again displays his subtle acting chops as Erskine; his late-night chat with Steve, prior to the next day’s big experiment, is unexpectedly poignant and powerful. It’s the sort of scene we’d never see in one of Michael Bay’s brain-dead “Transformers” flicks … and, therefore, the sort of scene that makes “Captain America” a much better movie.

Atwell is appropriately spunky as Carter, and she spars well with Evans; they get a lot of mileage out of the word “fondue.” Toby Jones is properly ferrety as Schmidt’s own genius scientist, Dr. Zola.

I figured we got lucky, during this summer of superheroes, when “Thor” was delivered with such panache. Well, “Captain America” is every bit that film’s equal: engaging, well acted, credibly staged and lots of fun.

Marvel Comics guru Stan Lee — and yes, he pops up briefly, as he always does — couldn’t ask for more. Neither can we.

— Read more of Derrick Bang’s film criticism at http://derrickbang.blogspot.com. Comment on this review at www.davisenterprise.com

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