Thursday, April 24, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

DHS drama department set to revive ‘Pippin’

By
From page A11 | November 05, 2013 | Leave Comment

Check it out

What: “Pippin”

Where: Brunelle Performance Hall at DHS, 315 W. 14th St.

When: 7 p.m. Nov. 8-9, 15-16; 2 p.m. Nov. 10

Tickets: $ 16 general, $12 seniors, $10 students
Info: Visit dshs.djusd.net

The Davis High School drama department will present the recent Broadway revival musical, “Pippin,” this month in the Brunelle Performance Hall at DHS.

The show, set in the Middle Ages, draws from modern influences such as the new carnival themes, while staying true to its roots in naturalism.

Prince Pippin begins his journey going to war to please his father King Charlemagne. Throughout the play, Pippin desperately seeks the meaning of life, knowing he was born for a higher purpose. With the aid of a troupe of actors led by the dynamic Leading Player, Pippin grows to understand himself through romance and danger, realizing that his happiness mainly lies on the simple things of life.

Noah Papagni has the lead role of Pippin, and Devon Hayakawa is the Leading Player. Playing Charlemagne is Cole Yambrovich, supported by Clayton Johnston as Lewis, Shannon Mo as Fastrada, Mandy Chen as Berthe, Sarah Allen-Sutter as Catherine and Ryan Everitt as Theo.

The players will be performed by Camille Aguilar, Mia Alvarez, Sean Burnison-Lurins, Justine Cenzer, Daniel Chen, Geneva Duran, Amber Gizinos, Lois Kang, Janelle Kimzey, Megan Kraft, Daniel Merritt and Josh Garrett. The dancers will be Dustin Choi, Petra Favorite, Eleanor Campbell, Sophie Chertok, Daniel Cox, Aditya Tuladhar and Veronica Murillo.

Gwyneth Bruch is the director, and William Zinn is the musical director. Kathy Peter is the technical director, Samantha Reno is the set designer, Mary Hickman is the costumer and Arina Ushakova is the light designer. Students in the Davis High ROP stage craft class will manage set construction.

First produced in the early 1970s, the show’s Broadway revival in March 2013 brought much acclaim and success to the musical. “Pippin” remains the only show in the history of Broadway to have two actors of different genders win a Tony for the same character.

Bruch recalls choosing this musical due to its ’70s feel and her fond memories watching it.

“It’s got a lot of whimsy in it. The dancing is fun, the movement is fun … there’s a lot of hippie elements to the musical, which is fun,” Bruch said.

“Pippin” offers many new challenges to amateur and experienced actors alike, as many of the characters are much more conflicted and older than an average high school student.

Allen-Sutter — who portrays Pippin’s love interest Catherine — plays a single mother who takes pride in her ordinary and average life. This musical will be her first play, and she feels excited and eager.

“I am not a single mother … but this doesn’t mean (Catherine) isn’t a relatable character,” Allen-Sutter said. “I find myself able to relate to her on many levels, just not in her outright personality and lifestyle.”

Choreographer Cara Rains has incorporated Bob Fosse-style dancing into many of the numbers, adding to the magic and modern touch of the play.

“(There’s) some awesome dancing and a sprinkle of magic,” Allen-Sutter said. “So far, I’ve really been enjoying myself and it’s been a great experience. I’ve gained a lot more confidence.”

Yambrovich, a junior, also finds the age difference with his character a special challenge. Acting as King Charlemagne, the father of Pippin, Yambrovich will have to use the deeper tones of his voice, which he describes as funny yet terrifying.

“Playing a fatherly role is a new experience, but at the same time it is exciting because of the change of pace,” Yambrovich said. “It’s hard to relate to someone that has fought multiple battles and has had children … but I’m looking forward to wearing a sweet beard!

” ‘Pippin’ is different from other shows I’ve done because everything is outlandish and freaky but that just makes it really fun.”

The musical’ invites audience interaction as the fourth wall is broken, with the narrating Leading Player addressing the audience. Hayakawa, a junior, hopes to add dimension and humor to the pivotal character.

“I truly love performing and giving my audience a good time just like the Leading Player,” he said. “He’s a character who has sort of an obsession with the ‘perfect show’ and sometimes understanding the morals for this character is difficult. (The show) is very dance-based, while having to carry quite a few solos at the same time. But it’s definitely do-able!”

Papagni had mainly done smaller roles before being tapped for this lead. Bruch’s strong reaction to his audition (and many others) allowed for “Pippin” to become the first play to not require callbacks.

“Noah blew me out of the room, it was such an audition. I’m ecstatic,” Bruch said. “We have a wonderful cast. … All the directors agreed on every role; it was amazing. I feel like there’s very good karma wrapped up in the show.”

In addition to new faces on stage, Pippin debuts the designs of Mary Hickman, who has already done some work locally. Taking a more naturalistic interpretation, Bruch hopes to convey the simple lessons learned while removing some of the traditional aspects. The musical also has been revised to be more appropriate for family audiences.

Allen-Sutter sees this piece as the perfect stepping stone into theater, something she has always wanted to try.

“(My role) will help me get used to the stage, gain stage presence and learn how to develop a character,” Allen-Sutter said.

Though the roles are demanding and from a time period that most students cannot relate to, Bruch is confident they will rise to the challenge, finding many things in common regardless of age.

“Because, ultimately, Pippin’s search for his meaning in life really applies to all of us,” Bruch said. “He wants something greater, but in the end he discovers that maybe simple is OK, maybe just relationships and being an authentic person is enough, and you don’t have to go and win a war or be the hero or fly like an eagle, you can just be the best person in your life.”

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

.

News

Will city move forward on public power review?

By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1

 
 
4-H members get ready for Spring Show

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Obama to Russia: More sanctions are ‘teed up’

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2, 3 Comments

 
2 pursuits, 2 arrests keep Woodland officers busy

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

 
 
Conference puts focus on Arab studies

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Youth sports in focus on radio program

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Rummage sale will benefit preschool

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Concert benefits South Korea exchange

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Davis honors ‘green’ citizens

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
Water rate assistance bill advances

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Program explores STEM careers for girls

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5, 4 Comments

 
Embroiderers plan a hands-on project

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Central Park Gardens to host Volunteer Orientation Day

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5 | Gallery

 
Volkssporting Club plans North Davis walks

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Hotel/conference center info meeting set

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
MOMS Club plans open house

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

 
Cycle de Mayo benefits Center for Families

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A8

Author to read ‘The Cat Who Chose to Dream’

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A12

 
.

Forum

Things are turning sour

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B5

 
Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

The high cost of employment

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6, 1 Comment

 
High-five to Union Bank

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Broken sprinklers waste water

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Three more administrators?

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Neustadt has experience for the job

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Here’s a plan to save big on employee costs

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6, 4 Comments

Davis is fair, thoughtful

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Ortiz is the right choice for Yolo

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

.

Sports

DHS tracksters sweep another DVC meet

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Another DVC blowout for DHS girls soccer

By Evan Ream | From Page: B1, 2 Comments | Gallery

Young reinvents his game to help Aggies improve on the diamond

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
DHS boys shuffle the deck to beat Cards

By Thomas Oide | From Page: B1 | Gallery

DHS/Franklin II is a close loss for Devil softballers

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

 
Baseball roundup: Giants slam Rockies in the 11th

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
UCD roundup: Aggies lose a softball game at Pacific

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3

Jahn jumps to Sacramento Republic FC

By Evan Ream | From Page: B8

 
.

Features

.

Arts

 
Bach Soloists wrap up season on April 28

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A11

Congressional art competition open to high school students

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

 
Emerson, Da Vinci to present ‘Once Upon a Mattress’

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

 
Winters Plein Air Festival begins Friday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

 
.

Business

.

Obituaries

.

Comics

Comics: Thursday, April 24, 2014

By Creator | From Page: B6