Friday, October 24, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

‘Dogs of War’ looks between the lines of Shakespeare

The cast of "The Dogs of War" include Shilpa T-Hyland, back row left, Monica Ammerman, Alex Seal, Megan Caton, Wendy Wyatt-Mair, Dan Cato Wilson, Aaron Jessup and Amiee Ouellette, and front row, Alex Greenfield, left, Amanda Vitiello, John Osuji, Micaela Cirimeli and Hannah Sharafian. Abigail Alcala/Courtesy photo

By
From page A11 | May 08, 2013 |

In the know

What: “The Dogs of War”

Where: Wyatt Pavilion Theatre, UC Davis.

When: 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, May 16-18 and 23-25; and 2 p.m. Sundays, May 19, 26

Tickets: Suggested $5 donation at the door; limited seating — first-come, first-served.

Rating: PG-13

Using the text of Shakespeare’s “Wars of the Roses” plays, “The Dogs of War” — adapted and directed by Josy Miller — features often-cut scenes of soldiers, women, children and ghosts, re-examining images of war through common people.

This gritty and visceral interpretation of the Bard’s work, presented by UC Davis Institute for Exploration in Theatre, Dance and Performance, opens Thursday, May 16, and runs through Sunday, May 26, at the Wyatt Pavilion Theatre on campus.

Miller is a doctoral candidate in performance studies. Her Shakespeare adaptation, “The Dogs of War,” emerged through a series of conversations with department of theater and dance professor Peter Lichtenfels concerning what is “not said” in Shakespeare’s plays.

“We explored what the text indicates and invites but does not explicitly articulate,” Miller said. “We found scene after scene of common people whose voices were being silenced — or simply left out — by the ‘authoritative’ voices of those in power, particularly around the subject of war. The goal became to recover these voices and give them a space in which they could be heard.”

Although “The Dogs of War” title reflects a line from Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar,” describing soldiers as material incarnations of pure violence, Miller found relevance in it for reclaiming the voices of all commoners.

“Over and over again in the histories, common people — and soldiers in particular — are compared to dogs. Sometimes this is in derogatory ways, but sometimes in ways that elevate them as embodiments of violence,” Miller said.

Miller employs the use of a chorus to map the (un)history of the populace for the audience through “Richard II,” “Henry IV — Parts 1 and 2”, “Henry V,” “Henry VI — Parts 1, 2 and 3” and “Richard III.” Miller’s script is arranged in a way that offers a new episodic story.

Her greatest inspiration derived from several scenes: Henry V’s monologue to the citizens of Harfleur, another scene in which he visits his soldiers in disguise and hears their concerns about the conflict in which they are currently engaged — and their blame of the king; also a “Henry VI, Part III” scene in which the king observes a man dragging a body onstage to steal what belongings he can, only to realize that he has killed his father; and the sequence immediately thereafter in which a man brings a dead body onstage for the same purpose — and this turns out to be the body of his son.

Such scenes disrupt the narratives of the “necessary” or “heroic” war that so often pervade the production of the Wars of the Roses plays. Miller’s “The Dogs of War” explores what would happen if these scenes constituted a play in themselves, if there were no castle to provide a safe retreat. Miller wanted to know what would happen if the audience had to stay with the soldiers on the battlefield. She includes intricately choreographed sword fighting and projection design sure to appeal to viewers who are used to the fast pace of the digital era.

The ensemble cast, working together over four months, played a large part in shaping the production. Master of fine arts candidate Amanda Vitiello-Jensen, who portrays Lord Douglas, chief justice, citizen/messenger and Joan La Pucelle, finds Miller’s long rehearsal process exhilarating and unusual: “Josy has specific ideas but also allows us the freedom for our own contributions. She’s an extraordinary director!”

Miller hopes not only that Shakespeare enthusiasts will attend and provide feedback, but also that people who consider Shakespeare elitist or inaccessible or boring, will come and experience a coarser, scrappier and livelier interpretation of the Bard’s work.

There will be a talk-back with the director immediately following the opening night performance on May 16.

Comments

comments

Enterprise staff

.

News

 
Courageous Thompson tapped for cycling shrine

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: A1 | Gallery

UC researchers: How low-water can our landscapes go?

By Katie F. Hetrick | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Testimony begins in Winters murder trial

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1 | Gallery

A-Z: Downtown Davis is the place to celebrate

By Kimberly Yarris | From Page: C1

 
Hong Kong protesters to vote on staying in streets

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Cloud business lifts Microsoft’s quarterly results

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Can you give them a home?

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3 | Gallery

Scientists work to save endangered desert mammal

By Kat Kerlin | From Page: A3 | Gallery

 
Host families needed for students and teachers from Mexico

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

Halloween Dance set Friday for teens

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Yoga and chanting workshop planned

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Downtown menu: coffee, boba tea, dessert

By Wendy Weitzel | From Page: C3

 
Day of the Dead folk art class set

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Flea Market planned Sunday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Enjoy A Taste of Capay at historic ranch

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Red-hot tunes set at Blues Harvest

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Learn how to fill a cornucopia with flowers

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Video highlights Props. 1 and 2

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
‘Homeopathy at Home’ program planned

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Celebrate origami at Davis library

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Garden sale and open house features water-wise demos

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: C4

Meet Poppenga at dog park Sunday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Bay Bridge art project needs $4 million to keep shining

By San Francisco Chronicle | From Page: A5 | Gallery

Weir honored, a year early

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
Explorit: Poison-proof your home with free lecture

By Lisa Justice | From Page: A6

For a good cause

By Fred Gladdis | From Page: A6

 
Americans, internationals make connections

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A6

Sutter auxiliary seeks volunteers

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

 
School board hopefuls discuss homework policy

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A7

Project Linus seeks donations

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
Walkers welcome to join Sierra Club outings

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

.

Forum

The magic is long gone

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
What’s next with Ebola?

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

More theories on the abstention

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

 
Rights beget responsibilities

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

Water returns to its source

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

 
A solution to the drought

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

Experience nature’s treasures

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

 
Subs have other concerns

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

 
Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A10

.

Sports

Bump, set, playoffs: Blue Devil girls clinch spot in postseason

By Thomas Oide | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Aggies expect a bonny meeting in Sacramento

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1

DHS footballers take on Pleasant Grove

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

 
Bye No. 2 comes at perfect time for nicked-up UCD

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Shhh. Are Aggie women BWC’s best-kept secret?

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1

 
UCD roundup: Preseason awards roll in for Aggie hoopster Hawkins

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

 
Sharks suffer from road woes

By The Associated Press | From Page: B12

.

Features

.

Arts

‘St. Vincent:’ Quite a character

By Derrick Bang | From Page: A11 | Gallery

 
Rumpledethumps to play at Village Homes Performers’ Circle

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11 | Gallery

DMTC plans ‘My Fair Lady’

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11

 
Czech Philharmonic Orchestra to perform

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

Calling all artists for upcoming show

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

 
.

Business

 
Car Care: Five things to ask yourself when shopping for a new vehicle

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B7

.

Obituaries

Lewis Melvin Dudman

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Ann Foley Scheuring

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

.

Comics

Comics: Friday, October 24, 2014

By Creator | From Page: B3