Tuesday, September 16, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Alexander String Quartet marks Mondavi anniversary with Schubert series

By
From page A13 | October 02, 2012 |

That’s the ticket

What: Alexander String Quartet

When: 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday

Where: Vanderhoef Studio Theatre at the Mondavi Center

Tickets: $54 general, $27 students, www.mondaviarts.org or 530-754-2787

The Alexander String Quartet — a regular visitor at the Mondavi Center since the venue was dedicated in fall 2002 — takes up the string quartets of Franz Schubert for the group’s 10th season of concerts in Davis.

The first program will be Sunday. The 2 p.m. performance will feature the group with noted lecturer and author Robert Greenberg; the 7 p.m. performance will include a post-concert discussion, with the members of the quartet fielding questions from the audience.

The music will be the same at both performances: Schubert’s String Quartet No. 12 in C Minor, D. 703 (“Quartettsatz”); the String Quartet No. 13 in A Minor, D. 804 (“Rosamunde”); and the String Quartet No. 8 in B-flat Major, D. 112.

Schubert produced a phenomenal amount of music during a life cut short by illness at age 31.

“In his all-too-brief life, Schubert created a body of music the size and quality of which leaves us shaking our heads in wonder,” Greenberg says. “In the last 16 years of his life, from the age of 15 to 31, Schubert produced, among other works: nine finished and “unfinished” symphonies; 10 orchestral overtures; 22 piano sonatas; six masses; 17 operas; 637 songs; over 1000 works for solo piano and piano four-hands; around 145 choral works; and 45 chamber works, including 15 string quartets and one string quintet.”

Greenberg added “The tiny (about 5-foot-1), pudgy, bespectacled Schubert was a compulsive composer. He rather innocently described his routine this way: ‘I work every morning. When I have finished one piece I begin another.’

“Schubert was a workaholic, one who combined the amateur’s pure joy of music-making with a professional’s discipline and technical abilities. To paraphrase Sir Charles Barkley, Schubert was ‘a small round mound of profound sound.’ ”

Paul Yarbrough, viola, noted that this first program includes the comparatively obscure String Quartet No. 8, dating from 1814, when Schubert was still in his teens: “Conventional wisdom has it that these early works are hardly worthy of consideration as Schubert’s compositional skills were still too nascent. So much for conventional wisdom.”

This year is the first time the four members of the Alexander String Quartet have performed the Quartet No. 8, and Yarbrough said “we all found it surprising in many ways, not least in terms of the difficulty of playing this music, which was composed for Schubert’s own family quartet (amateurs) to play. (The music is) enchanting and often profound, not what one expects from a teen.”

Also on the program is the String Quartet No. 13 (“Rosamunde”), which is famous. Sandy Wilson, cello, said, “The ever-popular ‘Rosamunde’ has at various times been a staple in our regular repertoire” — many consider it to be Schubert’s finest piece for two violins, viola and cello.

“But the String Quartet No. 8 from 1814, and the C minor ‘Quartetsätz’ from 1820, are completely new to us all. The delight in discovering and playing (these unfamiliar pieces) is what really bemuses and entertains me personally. It’s hard to play these pieces without smiling, and the potent influence of witty Haydn and ingenious Mozart adds an intoxicating perfume to the process. Add to that Schubert’s own inimitable song-smithing, and the mix is irresistible.”

Both of Sunday’s performances are in the Mondavi Center’s Vanderhoef Studio Theatre. Tickets are $54 general, $27 students, available at www.mondaviarts.org or 530-754-2787. Although the 2 p.m. performance is listed as “sold out,” a handful of turned-back tickets usually materialize at the box office and go on sale during the 30 minutes prior to the performance.

Comments

comments

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

     
    Davis school nurses are stretched thin

    By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    Sierra Club gathers for morning walks

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

     
    DPNS has afternoon openings

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

     
    Paws for Thought: Socialize your new pup at UCD’s Yappy Hour

    By Evelyn Dale | From Page: A3 | Gallery

    DHS parents go back to school

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

     
    New DHS Hall-of-Famers

    By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A3

    Exploration of dementia lecture set for Sept. 25

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

     
    Sick-pay benefits expanded to millions

    By San Francisco Chronicle | From Page: A4

     
    Bad roads cost Californians billions

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A4

    Farmers market continues at Sutter Davis

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4 | Gallery

     
    Yolo County’s looking for a few good advisers

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Search the Internet at Connections Café

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

     
    Garage, bake sales benefit outdoor education trip

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A5

    Sutter qigong classes start Sept. 22

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

     
    Halloween costume sale benefits preschool

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

    Hundreds flee wildfires; homes burn

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A5 | Gallery

     
    Harmony Award nominations sought

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

     
    Da Vinci seniors take on Constitution essay

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

    .

    Forum

    Sounds like a swell party

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    Maybe not the best rebound guy

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    Nate Beeler cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

    Many reasons to back Sunder

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    I support Madhavi Sunder

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

    A leader with heart and vision

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    Carbon fee and dividend plan is the answer

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

    .

    Sports

    Open Cup final has local flavor

    By Evan Ream | From Page: B1

     
    Devil volleyball victories keep piling up

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    DHS needs just 10 boys to top Elk Grove

    By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Finding the good in a tough DHS football loss

    By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1

    More pressure on QB would be nice for Aggies

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1

     
    Raber: glad to join in bringing readers golf column

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B1

    Highlights galore in Junior Blue Devil weekend

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

     
    Sports briefs: Big Monday for Masiel as DHS golfers win league opener

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B8 | Gallery

    .

    Features

    .

    Arts

    ‘Jane Eyre’ to screen at I-House

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

     
    Anais Mitchell to play Third Space

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

    ‘Shrek, The Musical’ shines at DMTC

    By Bev Sykes | From Page: A11 | Gallery

     
    Irish fiddlers come to Davis house show

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

    Jenny Lynn and Her Real Gone Daddies play at Picnic in the Park

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11 | Gallery

     
    Woodland artist hosts event at her new studio

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

    .

    Business

    .

    Obituaries

    .

    Comics

    Comics: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 (set 1)

    By Creator | From Page: B5

     
    Comics: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 (set 2)

    By Creator | From Page: B7