Thursday, April 17, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Runflat tires: many pumped up about them

Car Care Pic 111

(BPT) – The last thing any driver wants is a flat tire. It’s also the last thing tire manufacturers want to happen. Even though tires are a lot more high-tech than the average consumer imagines, tire makers are well aware that flats can deflate the public’s opinion of a tire. That’s why tire engineers have been working overtime to make tires stronger and more resistant to road hazards. Unfortunately, though, sometimes the nasty nail in the road still wins … until now, thanks to runflat tires.

“A runflat tire is essentially designed to carry the load of the vehicle when the tire’s punctured and enables the vehicle to continue to be driven at a reduced speed for a limited distance,” says Andrew Briggs, director of product planning for Yokohama Tire Corporation, makers of a variety of truck and car tires, including runflats. “Thanks to runflats, consumers can have peace of mind and don’t have to worry about being stranded on the road because of a flat tire.”

Although runflats have been around since the 1990s, the technology has taken quantum leaps in the last few years, says Briggs. “For example, our AVID ENVigor -ZPS (Zero Pressure System) delivers high-performance and security. Because of the tire’s reinforced sidewall, it can be driven up to 50 miles at 50 miles per hour after the loss of air. In addition to the mobility aspects, there are financial positives as well. If pressure is lost with a conventional tire, wheel damage can occur, which can be very expensive.”

Drivers often ask how they’ll know whether they have a flat if they have runflat tires on their car. “Runflat tires can only be installed on vehicles with a tire pressure monitoring system, or TPMS,” Briggs says. “The TPMS will alert drivers about the air loss, and because of the way runflats are constructed, drivers can feel confident they can reach their destination without having to change the tire.”

Along with TPMS, more car makers, such as BMW, Lexus and Mini are switching to runflat tires on new models. “Besides being handier for consumers, they save vehicle weight and space,” says Briggs. “There’s no longer the need for a spare tire, a jack and tools.”

According to Briggs, consumers will see more high-tech runflats and other types of tires in the future. “Tire technology is always evolving,” he says. “As an example, we’re currently using the oil from orange peels in some of our compounds to improve gas mileage and handling. Point being, we’re always working to make tires better, last longer and, yes, continue to perform even after loss of air pressure.”

Briggs says whether you have runflats or traditional tires, maintaining them is important and can save money at the gas pump. Here are some of his tire tips:

* Keep your tires properly inflated. Once a month, when the tires are cold (at least three to four hours after the vehicle has been driven), check tire pressure with a reliable tire gauge. Be sure the valve stems have a plastic or metal cap to keep dirt out and seal against leakage.

* Tires must be replaced when the tread is worn down to 2/32 of an inch to prevent skidding and hydroplaning. An easy test: place a penny into a tread groove. If part of Lincoln’s head is covered by the tread when placed head-down into the tread, you’re driving with the proper amount of tread. If you can see all of his head, you should buy a new tire.

* Tire alignment should be checked once a year. Misaligned tires can cause the car to scrub, which lowers mileage and creates unnecessary tire wear.

* Drivers should use extreme caution when driving at zero pressure and should avoid aggressive handling actions and any unusual service condition, such as trailer towing or hauling heavy loads.

For additional tire care and safety tips, visit www.yokohamatire.comor www.rma.org.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

.

News

Davis wins USA Today Best Cycling Town honor

By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1

 
Benefit set to help local bike legend

By Adrian Glass-Moore | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Jury deliberates murder, elder-abuse charges

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1

 
State’s health care sign-ups beat projections

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2, 1 Comment

For the record

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

 
California residents divided on drought solution

By San Francisco Chronicle | From Page: A2

 
For the record

By Dave Ryan | From Page: A2

Three killed in attack on Ukrainian base

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2 | Gallery

 
Downtown post office set to reopen

By Thomas Oide | From Page: B3

Run or walk to prevent child abuse in Yolo County

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

 
Nominations sought for charity paint giveaway

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3

 
Scholar will discuss human trafficking in Friday talk

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Per Capita Davis: Now, for some good news

By John Mott-Smith | From Page: A4

 
Birch Lane hosts 50th anniversary party

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Hannah Stein reads poetry at gallery

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Davis Food Co-op to offer free bags on Earth Day

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Get in the picture with school board candidate

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
KDVS hosts on-air fundraiser April 21-27

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Tickets on sale for Pence Garden Tour

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Fundraiser planned for Allen’s campaign

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4, 3 Comments

Food Co-op board plans open house

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Davis Downtown hosts candidate forum

By Dave Ryan | From Page: A4

Learn more about Google Glass at talk

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Barbecue celebrates winter shelter program

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

Sign of things to come

By Fred Gladdis | From Page: A8

 
Davis Soroptimists celebrate 60 years

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

.

Forum

Fancy meeting you here …

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B5

 
Don’t miss a Trokanski dance

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Frank Bruni: The oldest hatred, forever young

By New York Times News Service | From Page: A6, 4 Comments

 
Expert: Free parking is a myth

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6, 1 Comment

Have they really learned?

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
A great community effort

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6, 2 Comments

Public Health Heroes honored

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

.

Sports

Huge inning propels Pleasant Grove past DHS

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

 
Giants edge Dodgers

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Foster steps down as Lady Blue Devil basketball coach

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
River Cats’ streak reaches six wins

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

Landry evolves into UCD women’s lacrosse leader

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Youth roundup: Martinez, Chan come up big at gymnastics regional

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

Kings drop season finale to Suns

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Angels get past A’s in extras

By The Associated Press | From Page: B8 | Gallery

.

Features

.

Arts

Wineaux: Good deals off the beaten path

By Susan Leonardi | From Page: A7

 
Rockabilly phenom to play at The Palms

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

HellaCappella showcases a cappella singing

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

 
‘One’ singular sensation to open at DMTC

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

25th annual state clay competition exhibit at The Artery

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

 
.

Business

.

Obituaries

Tapan Munroe

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
.

Comics

Comics: Thursday, April 17, 2014

By Creator | From Page: B6