Thursday, August 28, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

From the ground up: Let’s talk charcuterie

By
From page A7 | October 02, 2013 |

Ann Evans (left) and Georgeanne Brennan attend a whole lamb butchering class offered by The Fatted Calf in Napa. Courtesy photo

If you want to talk charcuterie and all things meat and butchering, speak with Taylor Boetticher and Toponia Miller, owners of Fatted Calf Charcuterie in Napa and San Francisco. We’ve both taken butchering classes from Boetticher, most recently a lamb butchering class in which we, along with 10 other eager would-be butchers, broke down a lamb carcass to its primal parts. We boned out a shoulder, discovered and then removed the aitch bone from a leg before boning, separated the rack of chops, and then turned all the trimmings into crepinettes – seasoned ground lamb wrapped in caul fat.

Part of the fun of classes at the Fatted Calf are the meaty snacks, like mortadella, lardo, smoked duck breast, Pâté Rustique and coppa, served up with a special chutney, bread from the Model Bakery next door, and red and white wine (after the knives are stilled).

We can’t recommend the classes highly enough, but they sell out fast. (For information about upcoming classes, daily and weekly menus and special events visit www.fattedcalf.com.) However, just published is their tome, “In the Charcuterie: The Fatted Calf’s Guide to Making Sausage, Salumi, Pâtés, Roasts, Confits, and Other Meaty Goods” (Ten Speed Press, September 2013).

The book begins with the pantry: “Meat makes up the core of the charcuterie, but our pantry provides us with a palette of flavors with which to work,” opens the chapter. We’re given a primer on nitrates, nitrites, and nitrate-free, all about salts, and how and when to use them, specific spices, and spice techniques, followed by a section on herbs and alliums. The chapter also includes mushrooms, fruits and brandy.

Next comes provisioning the larder: “Imagine the perfect larder in a low, dark corner on the north-facing side of the house. Its clean tiled walls are lined with tidy shelves stocked with jars of suet and drippings; baskets of apples, potatoes, onions, and winter squashes; a tub of golden butter; crocks of sausage and duck confit. Suspended from a hook is a haunch of pork with a thick rind of fat, ready to be turned into creamy lard, a heady broth, perhaps a smoked ham. Cool and comforting, the larder affords an assurance that you will be able to provide for your table.”

We are already contemplating how to create that larder, live that life, cure our own everything — and we are only 25 pages into the 342-page book. Filled with step-by-step photos as needed, the book is loaded with recipes such as “Pork Shoulder Pot Roast Stuffed with Garlic, Greens,” “Walnuts, Duck and Lemongrass Sausage Patties,” and such basics as how to make your own pastrami, cure pork jowl (guanciale, a specialty of central Italy), and an international sausage seasoning chart.

The book covers just about everything you need to know to work with meat from the whole beast up, whether duck, rabbit, lamb, beef, or pork, including where to buy specialty ingredients and equipment. And, besides all the meat, there are recipes for accoutrements, like pickled red onions, dill pickles and Cowboy Beans.

Boetticher and Miller met when they were both culinary students at the Culinary Academy of America at Hyde Park. From there, they apprenticed in Italy to the legendary Tuscan butcher, Dario Cecchini, followed by a move to the San Francisco Bay Area where Boetticher worked in charcuterie at Café Rouge on Fourth Street in Berkeley. Eventually they rented a commercial kitchen space in San Francisco’s South of Market area, where they turned out patés, crepinettes, confits and more; they sold them at farmers markets and restaurants around the Bay Area before opening their own butcher shop and charcuterie at Napa’s Oxbow Market several years ago.

Georgeanne first met Boetticher during his early period when both were part of a weekend pig slaughter and all things pork at the Apple Farm in Philo, founded by Sally Schmidt, the original owner of the French Laundry. Georgeanne was invited because at the time, she was one of the few around who had experience in capturing the blood and making boudin noir, French style blood sausage, which she and Boetticher then did together.

“He has deliciously refined my version,” says Georgeanne, who now buys Boetticher’s boudin noir at his Napa store. “I get to have it without having to make it,” she says.

Over that pork weekend Boetticher produced, with Georgeanne helping, a porchetta, in which a pork belly — still attached to the now-boned loin — is wrapped around a rich slathering of garlic, crushed fennel and rosemary. The fatty pork belly bastes the meat as it cooks, and the pork skin becomes crisp and succulent. This recipe, along with blood sausage, is in his book, and we have a much simplified version in our Davis Farmers Market Cookbook.

“In the Charcuterie” is a book that is equally valuable for the professional as it is for the home cook, which is a rare combination. We encourage you to find your own style with charcuterie, whether it be a simple seasoning on a roast or butchering a whole hog. You’ll find it very rewarding.

— Ann M. Evans and Georgeanne Brennan are coauthors of the award-winning “Davis Farmers Market Cookbook, Tasting California’s Small Farms,” (2012.) They have a food and agricultural consultancy, Evans & Brennan, LLC. Their national blog “Who’s Cooking School Lunch?” features personal stories of front line men and women cooking school lunch. Reach the blog at www.whoscookingschoolunch.com and Ann and Georgeanne at info@evansandbrennan.com.
————
The recipe

Pancetta-Wrapped Pork Tenderloin, from “In the Charcuterie”
Ingredients
1 trimmed pork tenderloin, about 1 pound
Fine sea salt and freshly ground pepper
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons white wine
3 to 4 tablespoons finely chopped fresh rosemary
About 2 ounces thinly sliced pancetta, homemade (page 295) or store-bought

Putting it together
Preheat the oven to 425°F.

Season the tenderloin on all sides with salt and pepper. In a small bowl, stir together the mustard and wine. Using a pastry brush or your hands, cover the tenderloin liberally with the mix. Sprinkle the rosemary evenly over the roast.

Place a 10-inch square sheet of waxed paper or parchment paper on a work surface. Neatly cover the paper with the pancetta slices, overlapping them by about 1/2 inch. Lay the tenderloin 1 inch in from the edge of the sheet closest to you, placing it parallel to the edge. Fold the bottom 1 inch over the tenderloin, and then roll the paper around the tenderloin. The pancetta should be tightly wrapped around the tenderloin. Remove the paper.

Outfit a baking sheet or a roasting pan with a rack, and place the roast on the rack. Roast for about 20 minutes, until the pancetta is golden and crisp and a meat thermometer inserted into the center of the thickest part of the roast registers 140°F.

Remove from the oven and let rest for 5 to 10 minutes. Slice into rounds 
1 inch thick.

Serves 2 or 3

— Ann M. Evans and Georgeanne Brennan are coauthors of “The Davis Farmers Market Cookbook, Tasting California’s Small Farms.” (2012) They have a food and agricultural consultancy, Evans & Brennan, LLC, specializing in farm fresh food in school lunch. Follow them on their national blog, Who’s Cooking School Lunch? (www.whoscookingschoolunch.com) or reach them at info@evansandbrennan.com.

Comments

comments

Georgeanne Brennan

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

    School’s back, with gradual return to smaller classes

    By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    New live-work project approved for Del Rio Place

    By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1 | Gallery

    Marcy finds her place in the DHS Hall of Fame

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    Testimony in Marsh trial starts Tuesday

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1 | Gallery

    Lawmakers approve groundwater management bill

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    Quake is major test for hard-luck city

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2 | Gallery

     
    For the record

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

    Russian columns enter Ukraine

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    Low-income Davis homeowners can save money and go green

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

    Employee parking permits downtown streamlined

    By Dave Ryan | From Page: A4

     
    Prospective foster parents welcome

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Davis Media Access: Get involved in community media

    By Autumn Labbe-Renault | From Page: A4

     
    ‘Art of Acting’ offered at Senior Center

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Tai chi classes set at Davis Senior Center

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Do you have a project for the noon Rotary club?

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Learn about Girl Scouting at meeting

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
     
    Museum wants your old Davis High School yearbooks

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

    Stroll Through History highlights Beamer Park

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    All are welcome at monthly sing-along

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

    Hosts sought to befriend international visitors

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    .

    Forum

    Lunch at the big table, again

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    Put flowers in our hair

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

    Give cops the ability to protect

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    Don’t let MRAP be a tool for bigger mistakes

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

    Yes, mother’s milk is best

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

     
    Tom Meyer cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

    Perfectly good playground?

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    Work on gun control instead

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

    Military has too much money

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    .

    Sports

    DHS boys look to win seventh soccer section title

    By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    New attitude, new stadium for 2014 UCD field hockey

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Gould, Shaw won’t dwell on it, but Biggs remembers The Upset

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    No. 8 keeps Republic unbeaten streak at 8

    By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Sports briefs: Aggie men ranked 11th in water polo poll

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2

     
    Dunning picks Cupcake Week

    By Bob Dunning | From Page: B2

    Youth roundup: Judges like what they see from Davis Diamonds

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

     
    Baseball roundup: Huge inning helps Cats in Nashville

    By Staff and wire reports | From Page: B8

    .

    Features

    Local teacher and artist turns 100

    By Lily Holmes | From Page: A10 | Gallery

     
    100 years’ worth of stories

    By Lily Holmes | From Page: A10 | Gallery

    .

    Arts

    Well-known artist will be juror for exhibition

    By Lily Holmes | From Page: A11

     
    Outdoor art classes to close out summer

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

     
    Ethereal dream pop to illuminate Sophia’s Thai Kitchen

    By Anthony Siino | From Page: A11 | Gallery

     
    .

    Business

    .

    Obituaries

    Margarita Elizondo

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A2

     
    .

    Comics

    Comics: Thursday, August 28, 2014

    By Creator | From Page: B6