Friday, August 22, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

From the ground up: Look for the lamb

AnnEvansC

By
From page A5 | January 08, 2014 |

Yolo, Solano, Napa and Sonoma counties have long been known for their lamb. Most any time you make a drive heading west through Winters, over the hills on Highway 128 and on through the Wine Country, you’ll see grazing sheep and lambs as part of the landscape.

What is more recent is the appearance of lamb burgers on the restaurant-scape, and we’ve recently had the pleasure of sampling them, beginning at Broderick Restaurant and Bar in West Sacramento, The Buckhorn Steakhouse in Winters for another version, and on to Healdsburg for another take at the Michelin-recommended Bistro Ralph on the plaza. All the burgers were thick, over-the-top delicious, each with a different flavor profile and condiments, and all on soft, brioche-style buns.

At the Broderick, recently taken over by the owners of the popular food truck the Wicked ‘Wich, the lamb burger is self-described on the menu as “Lebanese spiced ground lamb.” It comes with a slather of goat cheese, oven-roasted tomato and balsamic-dressed arugula.

Lamb burgers, a new item on The Buckhorn Steakhouse bar menu, were developed by co-owner Melanie Bajakian, and the seasonings reflect her Armenian roots; allspice onions and parsley, spread with tarragon aioli. Diners can opt for a trio of lamb burger sliders, or a full-size version accompanied by house-fried chips and a garnish of honey mustard-dressed endive.

At Bistro Ralph, the seasonings are Mediterranean but with a nod to local; Point Reyes blue cheese or Laura Chanel’s goat cheese is an option, with a heap of french fries. Plus, the Wednesday special on the menu is lamb meatloaf.

Throughout the world, lamb, mutton and goat are among the world’s most consumed meats, in part because of the animals’ ability to thrive in sparse conditions. New Zealand, with its mountains and grasslands, is famous for its lamb, and it is the primary meat there and in Australia. The animals also are a part of the arid regions of the Middle East, Africa and the steppes of Russia and Mongolia. And, don’t forget the rugged lamb-loaded British Isles, where lamb and mutton are longtime staples.

So why then, with the diverse American population that reflects all of these regions, is it that Americans eat very little lamb — less than a pound per capita, compared to 54 pounds of beef per capita? One would think that because lamb is so lean — on average, a 3-ounce serving of lamb has only 75 calories and, and according to the American Lamb Council, meets the Food and Drug Administration’s definition for lean — it would be an attractive alternative to beef. However, according to the Agricultural Marketing Resource Center, most Americans do not consume any lamb, and additionally, the U.S. consumers prefer high-value lamb cuts such as leg roasts, racks and loin cuts.

Personally, I think it has something to do with a cultural collective memory of a Depression population who passed on to future generations the idea that lamb had a strong, gamey taste. And, I suspect that what they thought of as lamb actually was mutton, a mature sheep, which does have a stronger flavor than lamb. Although I like a nice grilled mutton chop if I can find one, it is an acquired taste.

Memories of bad experiences, even second-hand, are hard to shake. Therefore, in a restaurant, why take a chance of ordering something you are pretty sure you won’t like, or in a market, buying a cut of meat you don’t know how to cook or don’t know what it would taste like if you did?

Consequently, lamb is not regularly stocked in retail butcher shops, and a special order may be necessary. And, even then, it is difficult to get the so-called lesser cuts — which are less expensive, but require some cooking skill — like the shanks, neck, breast and flap, shoulder roasts, kidneys (which I am longing for) and other offal.

Ann and I, who both enjoy lamb, are encouraged to see lamb burgers on menus, standing alongside the time-honored and beloved hamburgers, and we hope to see the lamb trend expanding. It’s easier to try a gustatory experience with lamb when it’s presented casually, accompanied by condiments we already know and appreciate, like aioli and arugula, than as a major dinner item like leg of lamb.

It’s also easier to begin cooking with lamb when it’s ground, like the familiar hamburger, than it is to launch into Stuffed Breast of Lamb or Deviled Lamb Kidneys. But don’t be surprised once you taste lamb in its burger form to find yourself tracking down other cuts to cook.

— Ann M. Evans and Georgeanne Brennan have a food and agricultural consultancy, Evans & Brennan, LLC. Follow their blog, Who’s Cooking School Lunch? (www.whoscookingschoolunch.com) or reach them at info@evansandbrennan.com.
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The recipe
Lamb Burgers

As we’ve indicated, lamb is amenable to many different seasonings. This one is a basic Mediterranean version, with some condiment variations suggested. For maximum flavor and juiciness, lamb burgers should be on the rare side, between 130 and 135 degrees F. To check the internal temperature, insert an instant-read thermometer into the center of the burger, halfway through.

The ingredients:
1 pound lean ground lamb
1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons minced fresh Italian parsley
1 to 2 tablespoons minced fresh rosemary
4 thin slices pancetta or thin bacon (optional)
4 pain de mie (brioche-style) soft buns or other buns

Putting it together:
In a bowl, combine the lamb, salt, pepper, parsley and rosemary and mix well. Divide into four balls, then flatten to make a patty about three-quarters to 1 inch thick. Wrap the optional pancetta or bacon around the edge of each patty and fasten with a toothpick. Wrap in plastic wrap or foil in a single layer and refrigerate 1 hour or up to 4 hours, before cooking.

Preheat a barbecue grill or build a fire of coals or wood. When the fire is hot, brush the grill and wipe it with vegetable oil. Place the bun halves on the grill cut side down and brown lightly, about 2 minutes. Remove.

Place the patties on the grill and cook until seared and browned, 3 to 4 minutes. Turn. Cook for 2 minutes, then test for internal temperature. Continue to cook until the desired temperature of between 130-and 140 degrees F. is reached. Serve hot with condiments of your choice. Makes 4 lamb burgers.

Condiment suggestions:
* Jalapeño jelly
* Fig jam
* Roasted tomatoes
* Goat cheese
* Pickled red onion slices
* Arugula
* Butterhead or Romaine lettuce
* Aioli
* Horseradish mustard
* Mint pesto

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Georgeanne Brennan

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