Sunday, January 25, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Gourmet meals can be grilled over a fire pit

A large, sturdy fork can cook an entire meal, from chicken breast to veggies.
Aimee Blume/Scripps Howard News Service photo

By Aimee Blume

Backyard fire pits have become very popular — and if you have one, there’s no reason not to cook on it. We’re having a blast with ours and just purchased some very large and heavy-duty hot-dog roasting forks.

But why stick with hot dogs and marshmallows when it comes to toasting forks?

If you get some nice sturdy ones, you can cook nearly anything you’d grill right over the fire pit or campfire. A whole meal for one person can fit on one toasting fork.

You can use the prongs as skewers for shish kebab. Stack pieces of sausage, chunks of beef or chicken with cherry tomatoes, mushrooms, chunks of pepper — anything you’d put on a kebab — and toast it right over the embers, no grill or grate necessary.

Larger items, such as chicken breasts and even strip steaks, can be speared crosswise so both tongs penetrate the food. Then it can be turned over the heat with no danger of it spinning or slipping off the fork.

If you want to do “hot dogs,” try a really interesting variety, such as smoked sausages or imported Polish kielbasa, or fat knockwurst or mettwurst.

Start with the longest-cooking items, such as chicken legs or stuffed chicken breasts. After they have cooked for a few moments, add quicker-cooking items such as strip steak or shrimp, parboiled carrots, precooked potatoes or fresh sausage, and continue to cook, then finish up with quick-cooking goodies such as corn on the cob or buttered wedges of fresh cabbage.

For added interest, brush ingredients with seasoned butter while grilling or (of course) wrap with bacon.

Using a grilling fork means you can make minute adjustments to the heat your food is receiving; move it up or down for more- or less-intense heat. If food is blackening before it’s cooked in the center, raise the fork higher above the flames. If the food is staying cold and nothing is happening, lower the fork.

Adjust the fork from side to side to let thicker portions of food cook over the hottest part of the fire while the thinner ends stay cooler and don’t dry out, or rotate it to gives the outer tips a bit of time in the hot spot.

A full-meal-loaded fork can be heavy. Take the old fisherman’s trick of sticking a forked stick into the ground at the edge of the fire for propping up the fork, then set back and enjoy a nice summer beverage while keeping an eye on your dinner.
(Aimee Blume writes for The Evansville Courier & Press in Indiana.)

Whole glazed carrots

Ingredients:
4 large carrots, peeled
Salt
1 tablespoon butter, melted
2 tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh sage
Freshly ground black pepper

Putting it together:
Bring a large pot of water to a boil, add salt and cook carrots until barely tender. Drain.
Place carrots crosswise on large grilling fork and cook well above flames.
In a small bowl, mix the butter, honey, fresh sage, pepper and salt to taste. When the carrots are lightly brown and tender, brush with the glaze, turning often and repeating, until the carrots are caramelized and very tender.
Serves 4.

Cajun butterd corn

Ingredients:
8 medium ears sweet corn
2 tablespoons butter
1/4 teaspoon Cajun seasoning
1/4 teaspoon coarsely ground pepper
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon cornstarch
1/4 cup reduced-sodium chicken or vegetable broth

Putting it together:
Clean corn and begin cooking on grill or fork over the fire. Cook just until kernels begin to brown in places.
Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, melt butter. Stir in the Cajun seasoning, pepper, garlic powder and cayenne; cook and stir for 1 minute. Combine cornstarch and broth until smooth; gradually whisk into butter mixture. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 1 to 2 minutes or until slightly thickened. Drain corn; serve with seasoned butter mixture
Nutritional Analysis: 1 ear of corn with 1-1/2 teaspoons seasoned butter equals 105 calories, 4 g fat (2 g saturated fat), 8 mg cholesterol, 63 mg sodium, 18 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 3 g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 1 starch, 1/2 fat.
Serves 4.
— Adapted from Taste of Home

Cajun stuffed chicken breasts

Ingredients:
2 fresh Andouille-style sausages, removed from casings, or about 8 ounces fresh uncased sausage (substitute fresh chorizo if you like)
1 cup chopped onion
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts, large enough to spear both ends on the tongs of your grilling fork
2 tablespoons butter or oil
Cajun seasoning and salt to taste

Putting it together:
In a large frying pan, fry the sausage and onion together, crumbling the sausage. Drain well and add parsley.
Take the chicken breasts and, starting from the most narrow end, cut a pocket into the flesh. The opening should be on the narrow end only. Stuff the breasts with equal amounts of chorizo-onion mixture. This works best if the stuffing is still warm when you put it in the chicken. Make sure to cook immediately. If not cooking immediately, chill filling and chicken well.
Thread chicken onto grilling forks, using one tine to skewer shut the opening. Brush with butter or oil and sprinkle liberally with Cajun seasoning, and cook over the flames, until the chicken is firm when pressed and both chicken meat and stuffing have reached 165 on a meat thermometer.
Serves 4.

Comments

comments

Scripps Howard News Service

.

News

Bridges of Yolo County: Wear, tear … repair?

By Elizabeth Case | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Four days of unusual, adventuresome music

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Spanish police arrest 4 suspected members of a jihadi cell

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

Rockets kill 30 in Ukrainian city as rebels launch offensive

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Abe ‘speechless’ after video claims IS hostage dead

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

GOP presses state bills limiting gay rights before ruling

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Abortion opponents express renewed hope at California rally

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

Share your love (story) with us

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Sip wines at St. James’ annual tasting

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

Fake schools draw federal scrutiny

By The Associated Press | From Page: A3 | Gallery

 
Winter produce available at Sutter market

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

Vote for your favorites in Readers’ Choice poll

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Donations to be distributed during homeless count

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A4

 
Speaker will share computer security tips

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Logos Books celebrates 5 years, offers language groups

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Australian olive oil company opens U.S. headquarters in Woodland

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

Explore at the YOLO Outdoor Expo

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Pedal around Davis on weekly bike ride

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Yolo animal shelter seeking rawhide donations

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A5

Woodland Healthcare employees take Great Kindness Challenge

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

 
At the Pond: Nest boxes give birds new homes

By Jean Jackman | From Page: A6 | Gallery

California ranks worst in nation for guidance counselors

By The Associated Press | From Page: A7

 
Davis, Woodland are saving water

By Elizabeth Case | From Page: A12

Words and Music Festival events

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A12

 
.

Forum

Family isn’t keen on relationship

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: A8

 
 
Caring for the aging mouth

By Samer Alassaad | From Page: A8

Big utilities’ nightmare begins to play out

By Tom Elias | From Page: A10

 
Mayor’s Corner: Let’s renew Davis together

By Dan Wolk | From Page: A10

We have the right to choose

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

 
We don’t have to suffer

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

City helped immensely

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

 
Rick McKee cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A10

When measles spreads from Disneyland, it’s a small world after all

By New York Times News Service | From Page: A11

 
From innovation parks to innovative buildings and planning

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11

.

Sports

Wildcats’ inaugural kids development league exceeds expectations

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Aggies get top 2015 gymnastics score, but fall short

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Loud crowd sees DHS boys win

By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Lady Devils hold off Pacers, stay perfect in league

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

UCD men take two tennis matches

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B8

 
Watney in ninth at Humana Challenge

By Staff and wire reports | From Page: B8

.

Features

.

Arts

.

Business

Davis man focusing on cannabidiol business

By Will Bellamy | From Page: A9

 
Marrone Bio’s Regalia approved for new uses in Canada

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9

 
UCD grad makes insurance ‘hot 100′ list

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

Yolo County real estate sales

By Zoe Juanitas | From Page: A9

 
.

Obituaries

.

Comics

Comics: Sunday, January 25, 2015

By Creator | From Page: B8