Sunday, August 31, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Inquire within: Workshop will prepare teens for summer employment

Employees are needed to help with a new summer theater camp. Courtesy photo

By
From page A8 | January 15, 2013 |

There’s frost on the ground and a chill in the air, but that doesn’t mean it’s too soon to start thinking about summer.

In fact, Davis teens interested in landing a summer job best start thinking ahead, and the city of Davis is here to help.

The city hires more than 100 new employees ages 14 and up for summer recreation jobs every year. Those jobs range from lifeguards, swim instructors and snack bar attendants at city pools to working in the city’s dance and gymnastics programs, a new theater camp and popular Camp Putah. The common thread: Nearly all involve working with children.

As it has in previous years, the city’s Community Services Department will host a jobs skills workshop later this month to help teens maximize their odds of landing one of those jobs.

But this year, the workshop will have a broader focus than in past years: this year it’s about helping teens land any job — not just one with the city.

“It’s less about getting a job with us — though we do hire a lot of people, and more about making this a service for young people,” said Community Services Coordinator Christine Foster. “We want to prepare you for any job.”

That means providing tips on everything from how to fill out an application and interview to how behave as an employee.

“We focus on the issues we run into,” said Foster, who hires and oversees staff for teen, outdoor and youth sports programs. “How to present yourself: Are you chewing gum? Are your pants sagging? Is your phone going off?”

City staff will provide a presentation on getting a job, goal-setting and keeping a job, as well as skits and scenarios focused on interviews and appropriate employee behavior.

Following the presentations, staff will conduct mock interviews with any interested teens.

It all takes place on Wednesday, Jan. 30, beginning at 4 p.m. at the Veterans Memorial Theater, 203 E. 14th St.

Teens are urged to arrive at least 15 minutes early in order to sign up for a mock interview, which city staff say is the most important part of the workshop.

Last year Community Services staff conducted more than 100 mock interviews during the workshop and they expect to do as many, if not more, this year. Those who go through the interviews receive a checklist showing what they did well and what they should work on, ranging from maintaining eye contact to avoiding slang and making sure the cell phone is turned off.

Program coordinator Sandra Montgomery, who hires staff for all of the city’s aquatics programs, urges teens not to be intimidated by the interviews.

“It’s a learning experience and great way to get feedback,” she said.

And the presentations and skits provided beforehand will set the stage for great mock interviews.

“If they’re paying attention during the presentation, they’ll nail the mock interview,” Foster said.

“Last year some of them got really nervous about doing a mock interview,” she added. “But if you do anything that day, do the mock interview. You get a sneak peek into the questions and honest feedback.”

Program coordinator Ajay Raj, who will be hiring for a new theater camp, adds that a bad mock interview is purely a learning experience.

“We don’t hold it against you,” he said.

Unlike previous years, city staff will not be accepting job applications the day of the workshop; rather, available jobs will be posted online the following day.

But staff will be providing tips on filling out those applications.

“We’ll give pointers on how to make your application stand out, even if you have no job experience,” Foster said.

For example, teens will be urged to focus on leadership positions they’ve held at school or on a sports team, or community service projects they’ve completed, if they’ve never held a job before.

When job positions are posted online following the workshop, teens should be prepared to move quickly: the city will accept only the first 50 applications for many positions.

“I expect some of those to close within a week,” Montgomery said.

But anyone interested in lifeguard or swim instructor positions needs to act now: Required Red Cross certification classes are already filling up and must be completed prior to employment.

“When they apply, they need to show proof (that they are taking or are registered for the certification class),” Montgomery said.

Register for certification classes at http://community-services.cityofdavis.org/aquatics-program/safety-classes.

The summer aquatics program remains one of the bigger employment opportunities for teens with different requirements for each job.

Lifeguards, for example, must be at least 15 years old and possess certification in lifeguard training and First Aid/CPR. They work between 30 and 40 hours a week and earn from $8.82 to $10.31 per hour.

Swim instructors must be at least 16 years old, have experience working with children, and a competitive swimming background is preferred. Swim instructors work between 15 and 25 hours per week and earn $8.82 to $11.04 per hour.

Both lifeguards and swim instructors have mandatory in-service training days in May and June.

Swim instructor aides, meanwhile, must be 14 years old by June 1, be familiar with basic swim strokes and experience working with children is preferred. They work about 10 hours per week and earn between $8 and $9.35 per hour.

Teens who love the idea of working at a city pool, but prefer to stay out the water, should consider positions as pool cashiers or snack bar attendants. Applicants must be 15 years old by June 1 and have basic knowledge of math, record-keeping, customer service techniques and basic computer skills. Prior experience and food safety training is desired for snack bar attendants. Both jobs also have mandatory in-service training days in May and June.

Some of the new jobs that will be available this year include leaders for birthday parties held at the city gym. Applicants must be 16 years old and able to handle a group of as many as 25 children for gymnastics- and dance-themed birthday parties. Leaders will earn between $8.40 and $10.31 per hour and work Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays.

Like many of the city’s recreation jobs, birthday party leaders will be needed year-round, so that summer job can turn into something long-term for dedicated employees. That’s also the case for dance and gymnastics instructors as well as gymnastics camp leaders.

The city’s popular summer camps will be in need of many leaders, as usual. Rainbow Summer, Summer Quest, Arts and Crafts Camp, Kids in the Kitchen and Voyagers all need leaders who are at least 15 years old, full of positive energy and enthusiasm and good with children. The positions pay between $8 and $10.31 per hour. Senior leaders must be 17 years old.

Jamie Elliott, program coordinator of the city’s alternative recreation program, always needs more employees in the summer. These hires assist children with disabilities who are participating in the city’s many recreation programs.

“They don’t have to have experience working with special needs kids,” Elliott said, “but they have to love working with kids.”

Because the job entails accompanying a child to various city camps and programs, the job requires some degree of independence and flexibility, and Elliott generally hires older teens and college students.

Interviews for all of the city jobs will get underway by March with hiring for some positions — like aquatics jobs — completed in time for the spring swim programs.

To read full descriptions of all of the jobs and begin the application process, log on to the city website http://administrative-services.cityofdavis.org/part-time-employment-opportunities on Thursday, Jan. 31.

For additional information on the job skills workshop, contact the Community Services Department at 530-757-5626.

— Reach Anne Ternus-Bellamy at aternus@davisenterprise.net or 530-747-8051. Follow her on Twitter at @ATernusBellamy.

Comments

comments

Anne Ternus-Bellamy

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

     
    Davis audience hears from civil-rights hero

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    Legislators wrap up with water, ethics, guns bills

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2 | Gallery

     
    Bob Dunning: This new kid might have a future

    By Bob Dunning | From Page: A2

    Five U.S. airstrikes target Islamic State fighters

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    EU threatens Russia with more sanctions

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

    Rotary clubs offer Davis High students some life lessons

    By Evan Arnold-Gordon | From Page: A3 | Gallery

     
    Robbery, pursuit in Central Davis lead to one arrest

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A3

    Bauer garden marks one year

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    Dinner will raise funds to help farmers in Burkina Faso

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Walkers welcome to join Sierra Club outings

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Beamer Park featured at Stroll Through History

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Yolo Federal to hold photo contest

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Katehi will speak at Chamber’s community luncheon

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Bean Feed supports for Yolo Democrats’ activities

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

     
    Tuleyome Tales: Be safe on wilderness trails

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5 | Gallery

     
    Small wineries suffer big losses in quake

    By San Francisco Chronicle | From Page: A6 | Gallery

    Grande site has been a convoluted saga

    By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A7

     
    Say goodbye to summer with a ‘Final Blast’ at Explorit

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

     
    Bay Bridge project’s rainy-day money is nearly gone

    By San Francisco Chronicle | From Page: A15 | Gallery

    .

    Forum

    Already made herself at home

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    Ad-free email? You can still find it at Davis Community Network

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

    Keep our green waste piles

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

     
    How to make a good living

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

    Nate Beeler cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A10

     
    Changing local election dates benefits Democrats

    By Tom Elias | From Page: A10

    City panel working to tighten scrutiny of taxpayer dollars

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11

     
    Try round-robin storytelling at crafts fair

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11

    Speak out

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

     
    Health problems mean he’s checked out

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: A14

    Marriage doesn’t mean we agree on everything

    By Marion Franck | From Page: A14

     
    This epidemic should scare us

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A14

    .

    Sports

    New coach, new tougher league for DHS football

    By Thomas Oide | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Coach likes what she sees from Devil field hockey squad

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    UCD notebook: Coaches positive about FCS schools ‘playing up’

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Devils open with an impressive volleyball victory

    By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Stanford scores early, often in opener versus UCD

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Sports briefs: Aggie harriers secure season-opening sweep

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

    Baseball roundup: Cats win late to pull even with Aces

    By Staff and wire reports | From Page: B8

     
    .

    Features

    .

    Arts

    .

    Business

    Comings and Goings: Is fro-yo craze melting?

    By Wendy Weitzel | From Page: A13 | Gallery

     
    Sutter Davis Hospital honored again as a ‘best place to work’

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A13

    Community pools its purchasing power to reduce the cost of solar

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A20

     
    Engage3 attracts investment for shopping app

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A20

    California growers can use MBI’s new bioinsecticide

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A20

     
    Sudwerk, Davis Food Co-op join for ‘co-hop-eration’ brew

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A20 | Gallery

    .

    Obituaries

    Wanda P. Daley

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    .

    Comics

    Comics: Sunday, August 31, 2014

    By Creator | From Page: B8