Wednesday, September 17, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Keep children safe when traveling

By
From page C2 | April 22, 2014 |

Parents traveling overseas with children should know health risks and how to avoid them.

An estimated 1.9 million American children travel internationally each year, and the number is increasing. In general, children face most of the same health risks as their parents, but the consequences can be more serious. Some conditions can be difficult to recognize in children, especially in those who aren’t talking yet.

If you are planning to travel to another country with your kids, be familiar with the risks of travel to help them stay safe and healthy.

* Diarrhea is among the most common illnesses experienced by children who are traveling. For infants, the best way to prevent diarrhea is breastfeeding. Older children visiting developing countries should follow basic food and water precautions: eat only food that is cooked and served hot, peel fresh fruits and vegetables or wash them in clean water, and drink only beverages from sealed containers or water that has been boiled or treated. Children should wash their hands or use alcohol-based hand cleaner frequently.

Diarrhea can be serious in infants and small children because of the risk of dehydration. The best treatment for diarrhea in children is to give plenty of fluids; medicine is not usually required. Oral rehydration salts (available online or in stores in most developing countries) may be used to prevent dehydration. Over-the-counter drugs that contain bismuth (Pepto-Bismol and Kaopectate) should not be used in children, and antibiotics are usually reserved for serious cases. A child who appears to be severely dehydrated, or who has a fever or bloody stools, should get immediate medical attention.

* Malaria and other diseases spread by bugs: Children who travel to areas where malaria is a risk should take drugs to prevent malaria, just like their parents. A doctor can tell you which malaria medicine is best for your child. Many of these drugs have a bitter taste, but a pharmacist can pulverize the capsules and put the powder in a flavorless gelatin capsule. Because of the risk of overdose, malaria drugs should be stored in childproof containers and kept out of the reach of children.

Malaria drugs are not 100% effective, and other diseases (such as dengue, leishmaniasis, and trypanosomiasis) also are spread by insects, so children (and their parents!) need to avoid bug bites. Children should wear bug spray and long pants and sleeves. Permethrin can be applied to clothes for extra protection. At night, children should sleep in screened, air-conditioned rooms or under a bed net.

* Rabies is more common in children than in adults because children are more likely to try to pet strange animals. Children need to be told to stay away from all animals; however, they also need to be assured that if they do get bitten, they won’t get in trouble and should tell an adult immediately. Any animal bite should be washed thoroughly with soap and water and must receive medical attention as soon as possible.

* Accidents: Car crashes are the leading cause of death in children who travel, and drowning is the second-leading cause of death. Children should always ride in age-appropriate car seats when traveling. Parents should plan to bring car seats with them because they may not be available in many countries. Children should be supervised closely and should always wear a life-preserver around water.

* Routine and travel vaccines: If possible, children should complete their routine childhood vaccines on the normal schedule before traveling overseas. However, if they must travel earlier, accelerated schedules are available for many vaccines. Some travel vaccines cannot be given to very young children, so it’s important to check with a travel medicine doctor, who should consult the child’s pediatrician, as early as possible before travel.

— Courtesy of The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Comments

comments

Special to The Enterprise

.

News

New water rates take effect in November

By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1

 
A pot o’ gold for Rainbow City revival

By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Marsh trial guilt phase enters home stretch

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1

 
Weakened Odile heads toward U.S.; tourists evacuated

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

Three women stuck in Putah Creek while paddleboarding

By Elizabeth Case | From Page: A2

 
Bob Dunning: News about our modest college town

By Bob Dunning | From Page: A2

Crews battle wildfire’s explosive growth

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2 | Gallery

 
AAUW hosts conversation with Gilardi

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Master Gardeners will answer questions Sunday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Storyteller will draw on music, dance

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Show off your electric vehicles on Sunday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Learn about youth leadership program on Sept. 28

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Sign up now for free Community Yard Sale

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Saylor meets constituents at Peet’s

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Free introductory yoga, chanting workshop offered

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Rotary seeks project requests

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Sign up soon for a new year of Writing Buddies

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

 
Register to vote by Oct. 20

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Senior Center to host jewelry sale

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
.

Forum

Time to go get help

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
Bicycle bells needed for safety

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Are we going to wait until someone here dies?

By Rich Rifkin | From Page: A6

 
Firefighters went above, beyond

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Grocery bags are biohazards

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Can’t we work collaboratively?

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Please vaccinate your children

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

Mental-health treatment lacking

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Braly’s column lightens the heart

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

.

Sports

UCD women take third at elite golf event

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

 
Aggie men stay in 10th to finish St. Mary’s Invite

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

Formidable UCD defense melts Hornets

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Devils go the distance to triumph at Chico

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Diamondbacks slam Giants

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2 | Gallery

 
Baseball roundup: Peavy, Posey lead Giants past Arizona

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2 | Gallery

Sounders win U.S. Open Cup in overtime

By Staff and wire reports | From Page: B2

 
AYSO roundup: Ultra Violet illuminates a victory

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

Alliance roundup: Soccer success comes on the road and at home

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

 
Legacy roundup: Gunners get a win over Woodland

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

 
.

Features

Name Droppers: Bamforth leads international brewing institute

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

 
Name Droppers: UC Davis announces eight new fellows

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

Just desserts? A sweet treat is worth the effort

By Julie Cross | From Page: A10

 
.

Arts

Apply now for Davis Community Idol

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Classic ‘Hello, Dolly!’ wows at Woodland Opera House

By Bev Sykes | From Page: A9 | Gallery

 
Davis students prepare dishes for Empty Bowls fundraiser

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

Nine Davis artists chosen to show in KVIE Art Auction

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
Sacred Harp singers will gather

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9 | Gallery

.

Business

.

Obituaries

.

Comics

Comics: Wednesday, September 17, 2014

By Creator | From Page: A8