Thursday, October 2, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Don’t cut funding for adult day health care

By
February 18, 2011 |

Gov. Jerry Brown has proposed that the state stop providing Medi-Cal payments to adult day health care programs in an effort to offset a $25.4 billion state budget deficit.

According to the California Department of Aging, an adult day health care program is a licensed community-based day care program providing health, therapeutic and social services to frail elderly persons or adults with disabilities. There are more than 300 adult day health care centers in the state. The centers are licensed by the California Department of Public Health and certified for participation in the Medi-Cal program by the California Department of Aging.

The Yolo Adult Day Health Center and Alzheimer Day Care Resource Center, both services of Woodland Healthcare, are designed to promote the independence and self-esteem of adults. Assistance is provided to help manage health conditions related to illness, injury, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia. Both programs offer diverse health, social, rehabilitation and recreational services.

Here are the top six reasons to protect Medi-Cal funding for adult day health centers:

* The adult day health care model of multi-disciplinary team care is widely touted as the solution to management of chronic conditions and rising health care costs. Adult day health centers serve 37,000 low-income vulnerable elderly or disabled adults in California. In Yolo County, 334 will be displaced. Of those, 50 will be in nursing homes in 30 days and an estimate of six will have a serious psychiatric crisis within 30 days. Medicare and health insurance do not pay for long-term care benefits such as adult day health care.

* According to a May 2010 report by The Lewin Group, elimination of adult day health care would cost the state $51 million more than it saves because of cost-shifting to other more expensive settings; loss of tax revenue resulting from the closure of 310 small businesses (two in Yolo County); and loss of employment ( 51 current Adult Day Health Center employees) and worker productivity due to caregivers  having to quit their jobs or reduce their work hours to care for their family members (estimate 18 caregivers will have to quit jobs). This loss would continue into future budget years.

* A federal court ruled in 2010 that the state is responsible for the care of these adult day health care patients and also for the provision of alternative services to institutional care. In court briefs, the state has claimed it does not bear responsibility for assisting displaced frail elders, mentally ill or disabled adults with finding other services, even though it has approved their level of need for care.

The same public interest senior law groups that won a temporary injunction for adult day health care patients in 2010 most likely would litigate to protect the health and well-being of these patients should the benefit be eliminated, under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the U.S. Supreme Court Olmstead v. L.C. decision, which requires that states make reasonable program and policy modifications to prevent unnecessary institutionalization.

* The state would forfeit $177 million annually in federal matching funds. As an alternative, the California Association of Adult Day Services has submitted a proposal that includes streamlining state oversight, reducing billable days and enforcing eligibility requirements with an estimated savings of $24 million. This is in addition to the $65 million in savings already realized with adult day health care reforms between 2008 and present.

* Restarting these programs, should funding be restored at a future date, would be prohibitive because of significant bureaucratic and regulatory barriers and unreimbursed costly start-up expenses estimated to be $1 million per site. The Legislature invested $3.4 million in “start-up” grants to encourage the opening of adult day health centers for this reason.

* There is no comparable medically based long-term care service to adult day health care except for a nursing home. In-home support services does not provide medical care or therapy services.

— Dawn Myers Purkey is manager of Woodland Healthcare’s Adult Day Health Center in Woodland. For more information, contact her at (530) 666-8828 or dawn.purkey@chw.edu

Comments

comments

Dawn Myers Purkey

.

News

 
Jury: Marsh legally sane during murders

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1 | Gallery

Undocumented Student Center offers help to immigrants

By Julia Ann Easley | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Rairdan supports more inquiry-based learning

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Standing In: Don’t write? I may as well stop breathing

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A2

Woodland man convicted in domestic violence case

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

 
Apply soon to be a Master Gardener

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

Mondavi Center hosts all-star lineup of classical, jazz, dance and more

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C3 | Gallery

 
Willett students sensitized to those who are different

By Maria Clayton | From Page: A3 | Gallery

Friends of the Library host biggest book sale of the year

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Give blood and get a free movie ticket

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Pedal around Davis on weekly bike ride

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
‘Edible City’ discussion planned

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

TSA bomb training may be noisy

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Katehi will address Rotarians on Monday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
‘ADHD — Myth or Reality’ addressed at UCD talk

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
AIM testing dates set this fall, winter

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A4

Tour Honey Bee Haven on Friday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Woodland City Cemetery tours planned

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
UCD athletics have break-from-work entertainment for everyone

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: C5 | Gallery

 
Quotes from the Marsh double-murder trial

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A5 | Gallery

Quad abuzz with students

By Tanya Perez | From Page: A7 | Gallery

 
Wetlands visitors may see ducks arriving

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A10 | Gallery

Boy Scouts host family event in park

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A10

 
How did the Aggies get their name?

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C12

.

Forum

Hey, it’s free childcare …

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
The right vote for education

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Just what Davis schools need

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

 
Nolan’s a calm voice of reason

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Will you open your heart, and your home?

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

 
.

Sports

Devil girls play dynamite pool defense

By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Davis volleyballers finish strong at Franklin

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

Hard-working Blue Devil boys get a water polo win

By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
A’s fall as AL wild-card game lives up to its name

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

DHS girls tennis team tames Lions

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Legacy roundup: Milliennium takes Manteca tournament

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2

AYSO roundup: Beans, Capay can’t shake each other in U19 play

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

 
Alliance roundup: Los Azules, Italia win tourneys

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

Sports briefs: Real Salt Lake has too much for Republic

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B8

 
.

Features

From the ground up: Rediscovering classic cheesecake

By Ann Evans | From Page: A10 | Gallery

 
.

Business

.

Obituaries

Leonard D. Blackford

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Anne Elizabeth Elbrecht

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

.

Comics

Comics: Wednesday, October 1, 2014

By Creator | From Page: A8