Tuesday, July 22, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

No distractions on global warming

By
From page A10 | June 11, 2014 |

The author of the letter “Data sets show little warming” apparently totally missed the meaning of the Science magazine article that he quotes in order to show the failure of the recent Earth’s surface temperature data to demonstrate global warming. The Science article, titled “Climate Outsider Finds Missing Global Warming,” shows that the rates of warming over the past 15 years have been underestimated due to a dearth of data for the Arctic, and inadequate techniques to accommodate for the data gaps.

Rather than showing that global warming is not demonstrated by current temperature data reports, it shows that the calculated average temperatures should have been higher, and more closely in agreement with global warming models, not contradicting them. In addition, the recent IPCC summary report clearly shows that even the uncorrected temperature data give strong evidence of surface warming, though they can be misinterpreted by selecting isolated results.

Thus, the writer’s first paragraph should read: The federal government is not blocking the development of needed energy resources, it is protecting present and future generations from increasingly severe suffering and property damage stemming from human-caused global warming. Global warming deniers, on the other hand, are not protecting proper economic development, they are enriching present-day carbon dioxide emitters from the need to pay to clean up or eliminate up their emissions, at the expense of that growing suffering and damage stemming from their inaction.

Aside from this uninformative letter, global warming is assuredly with us, and needs attention, not distractions. As should be well known, average Earth temperature is only one indicator of global warming. Unusually severe storms, wildly changing weather patterns, increasing alpine and glacial melting rates, sea level increases and species movements and extinctions all point to a clear pattern of dangerously increasing heat content of the troposphere.

And also, it is not an “implausible theory” that human-caused introduction of massive amounts of greenhouse gases is interfering with the Earth’s ability to radiate excess heat away from its surface, it is the accumulation of good scientific observation and understanding of the real world, that is revealing a growing major problem.

The Enterprise should not be giving space to long-refuted deniers’ claims about global warming, or, if it does so, it should properly examine them, and demonstrate to its readers why they should be ignored.

Stephen Fass
Davis

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | 14 comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

  • Greg JohnsonJune 10, 2014 - 10:41 am

    The Enterprise should not be giving space to long-refuted deniers’ claims about global warming, or, if it does so, it should properly examine them, and demonstrate to its readers why they should be ignored.................Wrong Stephen! Everybody should be given space, and readers should decide for themselves.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Jim LeonardJune 10, 2014 - 11:37 am

    Greg, I strongly agree with you. All points of view, even wrong ones, are valuable and should be aired. By the way, I agree that global warming is real and is largely of human origin.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • June 11, 2014 - 10:15 am

    Agreed! Only lefty liberals can have an opinion on global warming. All others must be censored!

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Joe Fass (full disclosure - son of Stephen)June 11, 2014 - 7:54 pm

    Opinions about the facts of global warming are about as relevant as your beliefs about gravity, and there's no reason for newspapers to serve as a public platform for those who insist they can fly.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • June 11, 2014 - 11:13 am

    Notice the tortured logic that is being used here, to wit: "The Science article ... shows that the rates of warming over the past 15 years have been underestimated due to a dearth of data for the Arctic, and inadequate techniques to accommodate for the data gaps....Rather than showing that global warming is not demonstrated by current temperature data reports, it shows that the calculated average temperatures should have been higher, and more closely in agreement with global warming models, not contradicting them." In other words, the data taken doesn't agree with our theory, so therefore it is inherently flawed for some reason! LOL You don't have to believe in the global warming theory to know that air pollution is a bad thing. Look at China, as an example of what happens if a gov't fails to address air pollution. But it does not make sense to expend millions of dollars in politically correct companies touted as solutions to "global warming" that are not sound, e.g. Solyndra.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Joe Fass (full disclosure - son of Stephen)June 11, 2014 - 8:27 pm

    Tortured logic? You're just twisting words, trying to imply bias. But it's a simple idea: better modern measurements agree even better with climate models, lending even more credence to the IPCC's assessment of the dire straits we're in.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Stephen FassJune 12, 2014 - 10:01 am

    To commenters: Is it censorship to not air incorrect statements? Or is it giving "all the news that is fit to print", and avoiding spreading that which is not fit? Giving equal time to incorrect statements is avoiding judging what is correct and what is not, I believe. The original letter of June 8 claims that the Science article shows that evidence of global warming does not confirm scientists' warnings. But a quick trip to the Davis library and the back-issues of Science revealed that the article actually says, "Standard data sets of worldwide surface temperatures underestimate recent global warming...". The article supported global warming theory by correcting data handling errors, and disputes claims of a slowdown of world average temperature rise around 2008. Checking sources is responsible journalism; adhering to supposed "fairness" is irresponsible.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Greg JohnsonJune 12, 2014 - 11:47 am

    o commenters: Is it censorship to not air incorrect statements? Or is it giving "all the news that is fit to print", and avoiding spreading that which is not fit?...................That if the beginning of a very slippery slope. We are currently devolving into a situation where leaders think they know best and should impose their will on the rest of us. We are viewed as too stupid to have legitimate opinions. Continuing in this direction will be very bad news for the country.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Puddin TaneJune 12, 2014 - 1:13 pm

    If you're ill informed, then your opinion is less legitimate than someone who has an opinion formed through observation and analysis. That's why debating science as we do politics is a fool's errand, your opinions mean nothing in the face of empirical evidence. As Joe said above, you can have the opinion that gravity isn't real and that you can fly, but that doesn't make it factually correct. Greg, do you honestly think that it's worthwhile to continuously put up with ideas that have been repeatedly discredited? By your logic, flat-earthers deserve to have a respected seat at the table of discussion.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Greg JohnsonJune 12, 2014 - 7:53 pm

    Puddin, this science is not as cut and dried as gravity. A few years ago, I read that 97% of climate scientists believed that man contributed to climate change. About 80-90% of earth scientists, and about 2/3 of oil company scientists. The last stat is the most compelling to me, as I'm sure these people would love to be deniers. But, I imagine 100% of physicists believe in gravity. In the late 60's, I remember predictions that the air would be so bad by the year 2000 that you wouldn't be able to go outside to pick up your newspaper. My dad talked about scientists warning of the coming ice age when he was young. Nobody knows how things will change-buffers or positive feedback loops- and there is a continuum of opinions from deniers to alarmists. What scares me more than anything is the uncertainty. If we knew exactly what would happen when, we could agree and come to an appropriate agreement. Until then, no opinions should be suppressed. Particularly in this town, people are smart enough to think for themselves.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Joe FassJune 15, 2014 - 1:59 pm

    This is an aggravating part of the environmental movement: warnings by scientists sometimes trigger some political action, like increased regulation of emissions. Undoubtedly, this is a big part of the reason why you can look back and say that things didn't turn out as badly as feared. So, successes of the environmental movement are used against it, by people who resisted the actions that ensured a better future (now, present). Do you think the CFC ban was unnecessary, seeing as how the ozone hole has (?) stabilized?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • JerryJune 15, 2014 - 2:25 pm

    What a scam this whole climate change thing is. If things get better it's because the climate alarmists will claim it's because of the actions that were taken, if things stay the same or get worse they'll say it was too late. They can't lose.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Puddin TaneJune 12, 2014 - 11:39 am

    Amen to Joe and Stephen Fass! The problem with this and other scientific issues is that the general public is trained to view everything as a political debate where facts are discerned from opinion. This obviously doesn't work with science, because science is based on what you and observe and can test, not what you believe. As Joe accurately said, "opinions about the facts of global warming are about as relevant as your beliefs about gravity" - what's the point in continuously disproving the same denialist arguments?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Paul BradyJune 13, 2014 - 9:02 pm

    Arctic heat source: This is hard to believe! A grad student in Crystallography or similar claims the Arctic temperatures were too low, and correcting them up explains why warming has been smaller than expected! But the area inside the Arctic circle is only 3% of the Earth's area! So the change in Arctic temperature would have to be huge to change the Global temperature which is an average over the whole surface of the earth. The Global increase needed is almost 0.2C or 0.3F globally. So the Arctic rise would have to be 6 deg C or 10 deg F! How could such a huge heat anomaly be missed! In any case this is moot. The decline of CO2 production is only 25 years away according to several expert sources: energywatchgroup.org, Exxon-Mobil, BP, etc. Please see: Energy Outlook 2014-2040 - XOM: Summary By 2040 XOM expects to see: - 2 billion more people on the planet. - 130 percent larger global economy. - About 35 percent greater demand for energy – which could have more than doubled without gains in efficiency. - Non-OECD countries like China and India lead the growth in energy demand. - About 60 percent of demand supplied by oil and natural gas. - Natural gas surpass coal as the second-largest fuel source. - 90 percent growth in demand for electricity. - Energy-related CO2 emissions plateau and gradually decline. As someone who spent an early life as a geophysicist in the oil fields and in Houston research labs I have great respect for the opinions of Exxon- Mobil scientists who predict the decline, and they are not alone. There will be no warming crisis, but ocean levels may be a concern. It has been warmer for 10,000 years, the ice caps and glaciers that were thousands of feet thick down as far as South Dakota continue to melt, and the oceans have risen more than 300 feet, and may continue to rise when the warming has stabilized and begins to decline. The Dutch have shown how to erect large moveable storm barriers such as we need to protect cities such as NYC and New Orleans.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
.

News

Somewhere, over the rainbow

By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A1

 
More homes for sale in Davis, at higher prices

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1, 5 Comments | Gallery

Girls sleep safely at Myanmar school, thanks to generous Davisites

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Davis teen succumbs to head injuries

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1, 5 Comments

Police seek suspect in Woodland robbery spree

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

 
Poppenga files to run for Davis school board

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A2

Pets of the week

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2 | Gallery

 
Federal appeals court deals blow to health law

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Driver dies in rural crash

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

Appeals panel upholds race in admissions for UT Austin

By New York Times News Service | From Page: A3

 
Parents’ Night Out planned Friday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Saylor welcomes visitors at ‘office hours’

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Summer produce, yummy treats featured at Sutter market

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3 | Gallery

STEAC needs donations of personal care items

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3, 1 Comment

 
Drop off school supplies at Edward Jones offices

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Explore the night sky at Tuleyome Astronomy Night

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Tickets on sale now for DHS Hall of Fame dinner

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A5

Yolo County CASA seeks volunteer child advocates

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
.

Forum

Korean teenagers welcome us with open arms

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Time to support people with disabilities

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4, 1 Comment

Shame on the Palestinians

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A4, 8 Comments

 
Kimble left a swimming legacy

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A4, 1 Comment

Any treasures at The Cannery?

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A4, 2 Comments

 
Questions about city revenue

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A4, 2 Comments

John Cole cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A4

 
Son-in-law has them worried

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

Not up for full-time caregiving

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
.

Sports

Tour leader Nibali: A ‘flag-bearer’ against doping

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
Yolo Post 77 looks to avenge last year’s outcome

By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Thompson shines as Republic falls

By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

River Cats overpower Chihuahuas

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

 
Area sports briefs: Heintz returns to UCD

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2

MLB roundup: Duvall, Kontos help Giants beat Phillies

By The Associated Press | From Page: B8

 
.

Features

.

Arts

Winters Fourth Friday Feast celebrates cycling

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

 
Lincoln Highway rolls into Central Park

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7 | Gallery

 
Rock Band campers perform at E Street Plaza

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

Acme Theatre to present ‘The Rememberer’

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

 
Video highlights walking The Camino

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7 | Gallery

‘Grease’ is the show at WOH

By Bev Sykes | From Page: A7 | Gallery

 
.

Business

.

Obituaries

.

Comics

Comics: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 (set 1)

By Creator | From Page: B5

 
Comics: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 (set 2)

By Creator | From Page: B7