Wednesday, January 28, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Adoption is just the beginning of a family story

By
From page A13 | November 24, 2013 |

Angel, 11, and Zachariah, 4 — both holding books — were officially adopted on July 15, 2013, by their Yolo County foster parents, Joe and Rosanna Castro, joining birth brother JJ. At right is Yolo Superior Court Judge Steven M. Basha. Courtesy photo

Angel, 11, and Zachariah, 4 — both holding books — were officially adopted on July 15, 2013, by their Yolo County foster parents, Joe and Rosanna Castro, joining birth brother JJ. At right is Yolo Superior Court Judge Steven M. Basha. Courtesy photo

By Julie Howley

Although November is National Adoption Month, many of us need no reminders because we live it day to day; we are adoptive families. The 2000 census estimates that there are 2.1 million adopted children nationwide. Over the past 10 years in Yolo County alone, more than 600 children have been adopted from foster care after family reunification efforts failed.

Adoption is about children who need a safe and loving place to call home — a forever family. It is also about education and awareness that each child enters adoption having experienced a loss, and for many, it is in combination with early trauma.

Many think that once an adoption is finalized it is the happy ending. However, the story is just unfolding. To really help the children, it is essential that we educate ourselves and others about the issues that surround kids who have been in foster care. They come into care because something very bad has happened — they have been placed at imminent risk. They often have a birth family struggling with issues such as addiction and domestic violence that leads to abuse, neglect or abandonment.

Dealing with loss, grief, developmental and physical challenges, blended families and identity issues requires continuing support far beyond receiving a new birth certificate and a permanent address.

Programs offered by Woodland Community College Foster & Kinship Care Education help families that open their homes to fostering and also to adoption.

For foster infants and their foster or kinship parents, there are classes to build safety, attachment and communication, including BabySigns, Trust Building through Water Safety and Family Movement & Wellness. These opportunities allow parents to build stronger bonds with their children and meet other families traversing a similar path.

For foster and adopted teens, there is Friday evening Teen Circle where youths and their foster/adoptive parents come together for education and support. These workshops allow kids and their foster, kinship or adoptive parents to work together on open communication and toward healing from the early losses and grief experience by being removed from a family and placed into care.

The Foster & Kinship Care Education program, with the support of grants from First 5 Yolo and Yocha Dehe Wintun Community Foundation, coordinates a variety of foster family and foster/adoptive activities that allow foster and adoptive kids and their families’ opportunities to gather and have fun — from a harvest picnic to indoor skating to a Sacramento River Cats game.

Children need to know they are not alone. They are not the only ones who have strong emotions and painful memories. They are not the only ones who have a birth family that is different from their foster/adoptive family. They are not alone.

Educating ourselves is another way to support these children. Classes on attachment, parenting, dependency and the courts, building communication and pregnancy prevention are all part of the Foster & Kinship Care Education program. Each class provides essential education often needed by foster, kinship and adoptive parents, helping them successfully navigate the world that includes raising children not theirs by birth.

Parents learn ways to cope with the myriad issues that these children bring to a family. They meet other parents and share knowledge about what works, or what doesn’t, and services in the area that might be helpful.

Programs like these bring families together, kids together and help support and educate all of us. During November, while we celebrate the miracle of adoption, remember all the children waiting for a home of their own.

To learn more about the Woodland Community College Foster & Kinship Care Education program, visit www.yolofostercare.com or call Cherie Schroeder, instructional specialist, at 530-574-1964.

Comments

comments

Special to The Enterprise

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

     
    Shrem Art Museum is a work of art itself

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    Police ID suspect in South Davis hit-and-run crash

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1

     
    Thieves swipe Gold Rush-era nuggets

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    Blizzard-stricken East digs out amid second-guessing

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2 | Gallery

    UC Davis doctors strike

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

     
    CASA seeks volunteers to advocate for kids

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

    Community invited to Fenocchio memorial

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

     
    Teens Take Charge program accepting applications

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

    SHE to lead Center for Spiritual Living in sound healing

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

     
    Take a hike with Tuleyome on Feb. 7

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

     
    The Soup’s On for NAMI-Yolo

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Sip wines at St. James’ annual tasting

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    Kiwanis Crab, Pasta Feed benefits local charities

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Registration open for PSA Day at Davis Media Access

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Brick sales will benefit Hattie Weber Museum

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

    Capay Valley Almond Festival will tempt your taste buds

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

     
    State fails to track billions in mental health funds

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A7

    Rebekahs’ crab feed benefits local families

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

     
    Covered California enrollment events planned

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

    Learn pattern darning tips at guild meeting

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

     
    Suds for a bug: Contest is over

    By Kathy Keatley Garvey | From Page: A7

    CSU chancellor calls for increasing graduation rates

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A7

     
    .

    Forum

    Family feels cut off here

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    It’s the final freedom

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    Tom Meyer cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

    Move past the stereotypes

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    A stunning contradiction here

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

    Let’s speak with accuracy

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    Think again on euthanasia

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

    .

    Sports

    Devil snowboarders place second in short and slushy GS

    By Margo Roeckl | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Williams-less Gauchos will test Aggie men

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1

     
    Davis club ruggers open with nationally celebrated Jesuit on Friday

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Lady Blue Devils take care of business

    By Thomas Oide | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    DHS ski team takes second on a déjà vu day

    By Tanya Perez | From Page: B8 | Gallery

    .

    Features

    Name droppers: Arboretum director wins leadership award

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Lemon tree, very pretty: Our most local fruit?

    By Dan Kennedy | From Page: A10 | Gallery

    .

    Arts

    Granger Smith to play at The Davis Graduate

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

     
    Young musicians to perform Winter Concerto Concert

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

    Art science speaker series event set for Feb. 5

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    Red Meat, Deke Dickerson bring rockabilly honky-tonk twang to The Palms

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9 | Gallery

    .

    Business

    .

    Obituaries

    Death notice: Betty J. Cogburn

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    Mary Beth Warzecka

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

    .

    Comics

    Comics: Wednesday, January 28, 2015

    By Creator | From Page: B6