Friday, March 27, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Kids, avoid the summer slide

By Laysha Ward

Pop quiz: What’s the most critical time of the year for American students?

If you guessed back-to-school season or final exams week, you’d be wrong. Believe it or not, summer vacation has an enormous impact on everything from mathematics to reading development for young learners.

Just a couple months of away from the classroom can result in significant learning losses for students. For more than 100 years, researchers have found standardized test results are dramatically lower immediately following summer break than they are before school lets out. And when students lose ground early in their education, it can have a dramatic effect on their long-term prospects.

That’s the bad news. The good news is there is a lot that parents and caring adults can do to ensure that summer vacation doesn’t bring an education slump. Here are five easy ways you can help prevent the “summer slide.”

* Look for books that correspond to your child’s interests.
Choosing the right reading material is also a crucial part of getting kids to read during the summer. Is your son obsessed with dinosaurs? Does your daughter love mysteries? Find books that feed these curiosities. And familiarize yourself with what your kids will be learning in the fall and make a point of discussing those topics throughout the summer. Whether it’s long division or American history, offering students a preview of the coming school year will ensure they’re prepared.

* Incorporate reading into your child’s summertime routine.
As any parent can tell you, summer is often the most difficult time of year to find constructive projects for kids. On a hot summer day, try stopping by the local library to see what programs and activities are available. Or bring a bag of books along next time you take a trip to the park.

* Find new ways of making learning fun.
Technology can play a big part in making learning fun. E-readers, tablets and smartphones allow young learners to enjoy digital books. Introducing an exciting piece of technology can go a long way toward holding a child’s interest.

Also, be on the lookout for opportunities to introduce math into your child’s everyday life. This can be as simple as measuring household items, teaching how to tell time, noting the temperature every day, or adding up prices at the supermarket.

* Tap into local resources to enhance your child’s reading opportunities.

Check with local schools, community centers, and universities to find summer learning programs that will keep your child engaged over the long break. When planning a vacation, try heading to a place that offers educational opportunities. Historic sites, museums, national parks, and zoos all provide young learners with chances to enrich themselves in fun ways.

* Consider volunteering to help students outside your immediate family fall in love with reading.
Many parents are well aware of the value of continued summer education, but they just don’t have the time or resources to provide one for their own kids. Helping them out can make a profound difference. Even small acts — like reading with a nephew, tutoring at a summer school or volunteering at a local library — can generate major educational returns and help ensure that the students in your life don’t suffer the summer slide.

The “summer slide” can have a devastating effect on student achievement. Luckily, it’s a problem that parents and caring adults, can do something about. Taking steps to ensure that your child is intellectually stimulated all year ’round can bring benefits that will last a lifetime.

— Laysha Ward is president of community relations for Target.

Comments

comments

Special to The Enterprise

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

    Anti-gay initiative puts AG in a bind

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A1

     
    County supervisors consider options for historic courthouse

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1 | Gallery

    Two found dead of apparent shooting in West Davis home

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    New Paso Fino design trims lots

    By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1

    Woodland police warn of kidnapping phone scam

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

     
    Co-pilot may have hidden illness, German prosecutors say

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    Senate’s Harry Reid announces he won’t seek re-election

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

    Need a new best friend?

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3 | Gallery

     
    Lawyer disputes police’s hoax claim in California kidnapping

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A3

    Empower Yolo offers peer counselor training

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    Davis Flower Arrangers meet Wednesday

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Sign up for Camp Shakespeare

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    State loosens sex offender residency restrictions

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A5

     
    Neighbors invited to adopt Willow Creek Park

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

    Sing along on April Fool’s Day

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

     
    Three nabbed in counterfeiting probe

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A6

    .

    Forum

    Can he get life back on track?

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    Blame Reid for impasse

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A7

     
    Practice cancer prevention each day

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

    Turnabout is fair play

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A7

     
    Be aware and be afraid

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A7

    .

    Sports

    UCD’s Hawkins, Harris to shoot at Final Four

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Home sweet home: Aggie women win a tennis match

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

    Devil boys grind out a net win at Franklin

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

     
    DHS baseballers fall to Vintage in eight innings

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

    UCD men edge Hawaii on the court

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

     
    DYSA roundup: Recent youth softball games feature big hitting

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

    Sacramento get its second straight win

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

     
    Sharks get a key win over Detroit

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B10 | Gallery

     
    .

    Features

    .

    Arts

    UCD Student Fashion Association presents charity fashion show

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

     
    ‘Get Hard’ comes across as rather limp

    By Derrick Bang | From Page: A8 | Gallery

    Monticello announces April live-music shows

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    Leonardo Tuchman’s work shows at UC Davis Craft Center Gallery

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9

    Sacramento Youth Symphony holding open auditions

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9

     
    Preview Art Studio Tour participants’ work at The Artery

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

    Smokey Brights to perform at Sophia’s

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    ‘Deserted Destinations’ is April exhibit at Gallery 625

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9 | Gallery

    .

    Business

    Camry Hybrid takes a step forward

    By Ann M. Job | From Page: B3

     
    .

    Obituaries

    Celebrate Rusty Jordan’s Life

    By Creator | From Page: A4

     
    .

    Comics

    Comics: Friday, March 27, 2015

    By Creator | From Page: B4