Sunday, November 23, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Music’s healing power scores more evidence

By Lee Bowman

The playlist of evidence that music has a special role in our lives and health has been getting longer in the past few months.

Certainly, not everyone likes the same music, and music therapy tries to respect that. But one recent study shows that the brains of most people listening to the same music respond in the same way.

A brain-imaging study done at Stanford University used classical music by a somewhat obscure 18th-century English composer named William Boyce to measure how 17 people in their late teens and 20s responded. All were right-handed (the rarer lefty brain may have a different landscape) and had little or no musical training and no knowledge of Boyce’s work.

For more than nine minutes, each person listened to sound samples containing some elements similar to music — rhythm and off-key tones — as well as actual segments of Boyce’s symphonies. The imaging showed that several auditory structures in the midbrain and thalamus showed significant synchronization with the music, but little or no response to the pseudo-music.

The study, published online in April in the European Journal of Neuroscience, showed that different structures seemed active in tracking music over shorter and longer stretches, and the music also activated planning centers for motor skills, setting the brain up to guide things like singing, dancing and clapping.

Another study found new evidence for music’s soothing effects in hospital intensive-care units.

Researchers at Ohio State University reported that patients on mechanical ventilators, given the option to listen to music from a personalized playlist, were able to lower their self-assessed anxiety levels by an average of 36 percent. The number of sedative doses and the amount of sedation fell by similar amounts after five days.

The researchers studied 373 patients in several Minneapolis-St. Paul-area hospital ICUs. A third received music therapy, with a therapist compiling a playlist of each patient’s favorite recordings to continuously loop on a bedside CD player. A third of the patients were offered noise-canceling headphones to put on whenever they wished. The final third, the control group, received standard care.

While those using the noise-canceling headphones showed some improvement, those who heard music had a much stronger effect. Researchers said the music seemed to allow patients to focus on something more pleasant and lower anxiety about their treatment, while helping to reduce the disorientation and psychological effects common with prolonged sedation and inability to speak because of the respirator.

On a much smaller scale, a Japanese study published in March showed that the responses of the immune systems of mice to music could reduce their rejection of heart transplants. They showed that both opera and classical music could increase the time before transplanted organs failed, but that exposing them to single-frequency monotones or New Age music provided no benefit.

Many other studies in recent years have shown that different types of music encourage different outcomes in humans. Soothing tunes tend to more effectively address conditions such as pain, stress and sleeplessness, while more upbeat tunes can boost mood and improve mobility.

Several recent consumer and psychological studies have confirmed that we go for somber, sad music when we’ve experienced a loss but turn to happier, more upbeat music when we’re actively trying to become more positive.

(Contact Scripps health and science writer Lee Bowman at BowmanL@shns.com. Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service, www.shns.com.)

Comments

comments

Scripps Howard News Service

.

News

Hollywood readies its big guns for the holidays

By Derrick Bang | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Need for local foster parents grows

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1

 
Tactical robot decreases officer risks

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1 | Gallery

Couple arrested on drug, firearm possession charges

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

 
Woman confronts suspicious follower

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

Bob Dunning: Signs, signs, everywhere a sign

By Bob Dunning | From Page: A2

 
For the record

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

Berkeley, Santa Cruz students protest fee hikes

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Auction-bound student artwork stolen in downtown heist

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A3, 1 Comment | Gallery

UCD awarded $100M to lead program to predict, prevent pandemic threats

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

 
Breakfast with Santa tickets are going fast

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Free boot camp, yoga fundraiser this week

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Enterprise observes holiday hours

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Bell-ringers still needed this holiday season

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Give blood and get a free movie ticket

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Thanksgiving feast is open to all

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Workshop will answer financial aid questions

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Probationers, parolees graduate from Yolo transitional program

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4 | Gallery

 
Round up at the registers for Davis schools

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
Yolo Food Bank invites locals to run with the flock

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Museum announces holiday schedule

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
At the Pond: Stop, look and listen

By Jean Jackman | From Page: A5 | Gallery

Project Linus seeks donations

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A6

 
Swing your partner!

By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A6

Fairfield School enjoys a festive feast

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7 | Gallery

 
Right at home: gifts you can use and use up

By The Associated Press | From Page: A8

Dec. 10 jeans drive benefits STEAC

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A9

 
Davis Community Church history recounted in Sunday talk

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A10 | Gallery

Open your heart

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

 
Bob Hope interview pulled from ‘the vault’

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A12

.

Forum

There’s only one way to fix this

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
Students barking up the wrong tree

By Our View | From Page: A14

Rick McKee cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A14

 
Heartbroken over treatment of teacher

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A14, 1 Comment

Google, tell me. Is my son a genius?

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A14

 
Daryl Cagle cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A15

Cordial political discourse: Seven years later, the thoughts resonate

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A15

 
Easing the stress during college application season

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A15

When the computer stares back

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: A16

 
How I want to be remembered

By Marion Franck | From Page: A16

 
Watch out for holiday weight gain

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A16

.

Sports

Aggie men finish off Furman

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

 
Upset-minded Lions bounce UCD from WWPA tourney

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

New, old-look helmets not enough to lift UCD footballers

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Late shot sinks Aggie women

By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Turnovers costly as UC Davis loses Classic, 41-30

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
UCD roundup: Seniors play well in Aggie volleyball loss

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

Wire briefs: Kings get past depleted T-Wolves

By The Associated Press | From Page: B6

 
With volleyball playoff berth, DHS accomplished its 2014 goal

By Evan Ream | From Page: B6 | Gallery

.

Features

.

Arts

.

Business

 
Don’t pass up the parking gift downtown

By Wendy Weitzel | From Page: A13

Doby Fleeman: Give thanks for our innovation culture

By Doby Fleeman | From Page: A20

 
Honey, spreads showcased at open house

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A20

.

Obituaries

.

Comics

Comics: Sunday, November 23, 2014

By Creator | From Page: B8