Sunday, September 14, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
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The future of food: sustainable and locally sourced

By
From page A9 | August 03, 2014 |

MarketW

Shoppers at the Davis Farmers Market enjoy chatting with local farmers as they choose their produce on Saturday mornings and Wednesday afternoons in Central Park. Enterprise file photo

Farm-fresh

What: National Farmers Market week, as proclaimed by the USDA, is Aug. 3-9; Davis enjoys markets at three locations

When and where: Davis Farmers Market, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays and 4:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays in Central Park, Third and C streets; Sutter Davis Hospital Farmers Market, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursdays through Aug. 28 at the hospital entrance, 2000 Sutter Place; and the UC Davis Farmers Market, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Wednesdays during spring and fall quarters on the Silo patio on campus

By Alice Waters
Over the past half-century, the fast-food industry, aided by government subsidies, has come to dominate the food marketplace. That development has given us an obesity epidemic and, with the growth of so-called factory farms, has degraded the environment.
More recently, in a reaction against fast food and Big Ag, the sustainable-food movement, with a focus on local food networks and healthy eating, has gained a foothold in restaurants and farms across the country. What began as an underground movement has now gone mainstream.
Looking forward, I believe that ever-growing numbers of Americans — led by passionate chefs, farmers and activists — will choose the latter of these two paths: a sustainable food future. Let me describe how I believe, ideally, that future will look.
Farmers markets
The number of farmers markets and young people taking up farming will multiply geometrically. As such, we will see at least one farmers market in every town in the country and, in turn, the revitalization of many areas.
At the same time, small mom-and-pop restaurants will enjoy a resurgence. These owners — with little enthusiasm for franchises — will be interested primarily in quality of life and in building a community around their businesses.

These restaurants will build relationships directly with farms and will want to increase the quality and variety of their produce. As a result, I expect to see a greater variety of fruits and vegetables becoming available in the market.
Growing demand will push farmers to be innovative, as will climate change. That will mean more greenhouses in the colder parts of the country, growing food in urban areas and choosing crops that can withstand extreme weather.

This movement poses a threat to fast-food businesses and industrial food companies, both of which, I predict, will continue to shape-shift and co-opt their values for profit. As long as their products continue to be supported by government subsidies, they will be successful. The reality is that the sustainable-food movement’s reach will grow only to a point and ultimately will be limited to those with access, means and education — unless legislators dramatically change food and agriculture policy.
I think that those in government will come back to their senses in the coming years and begin to subsidize farms instead of factories. As access to real food becomes increasingly divided between the haves and the have-nots, food security will become even more of a social-justice issue.
Back to school

I am confident that we will see a growing consensus about the most effective way to transform food in America: building a real, sustainable and free school-lunch program. Decision-makers will agree that the most sensible place to reach every child and to have the most lasting impact is with a program of “edible education.”

Having worked in that field for more than 20 years via the Edible Schoolyard Project, I know what’s possible: Providing children with delicious meals made from organic ingredients transforms their attitudes about, and behavior toward, food for life.
Beyond the individual nutrition outcome of each child, an institutional food program with principled buying criteria (food that is locally sourced and organic) becomes a subsidy system for real food — a subsidy system that sees schools become the engine for sustainability.
I know that those on both sides of the political aisle finally realize that in food we find the root problem of many of our nation’s ills. I am not sure yet that they realize that food has the solution.

— Alice Waters is a chef, author and the proprietor of Chez Panisse restaurant in Berkeley. This opinion piece was published originally in The Wall Street Journal on July 7.

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