Sunday, March 29, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

If at first you don’t succeed …

By
From page A6 | February 01, 2013 |

The issue: Both Presidents Obama and George W. Bush tried and failed to pass immigration reform plans, but this third try has a chance

Maybe the Republicans’ recent dismal showing among Hispanics, a constituency of growing political muscle, brought congressional Republicans to their senses. In November, Latino voters went for President Barack Obama over the GOP’s Mitt Romney, 71 percent to 27 percent.

The Republicans clearly had a problem, and the shrill talk — of mass roundups, “self-deportation” and shipping the U.S.-educated children of illegal immigrants back to lands where they had never or just briefly lived — was only making matters worse.

FOR WHATEVER reason, several key Senate Republicans have joined four Democrats to develop the framework of a plan for comprehensive immigration reform.

There are many details still to be worked out and the political obstacles, especially in the House, remain formidable but not insurmountable. The relatively mild political outcry that greeted Obama’s series of executive orders allowing the children of illegal immigrants to legally work and attend school in the United States offers some evidence of a changing climate.

The Republican senators behind the plan include a spectrum of respected conservatives: John McCain and Jeff Flake of Arizona, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and, perhaps most significant, freshman Marco Rubio of Florida, a rising star of Cuban descent frequently mentioned for a spot on the party’s national ticket.

The Democrats are Majority Whip Dick Durbin of Illinois; Charles Schumer of New York, No. 4 in the party leadership; Robert Menendez of New Jersey; and Michael Bennet of Colorado.

An early test of the group’s viability will be how many other mainstream lawmakers sign on to their plan — a lot of other bipartisan groups have found themselves alone when the inevitable political blowback starts — and, of course, how much support they get from the White House, which is unveiling a plan of its own.

THE SENATORS’ PLAN creates a path to citizenship — a difficult one, to be sure — for the roughly 11 million illegal immigrants already here; provides green cards to foreign students obtaining advanced degrees in science, math, engineering and technology; makes it easier for lower skilled and agricultural workers to enter the country temporarily to take manual jobs that Americans shun; and creates electronic IDs and an effective employer-verification system.

Both Presidents Obama and George W. Bush tried and failed to pass immigration reform plans. But the political calculus has indeed changed, and perhaps this third try will succeed where the others failed.

Comments

comments

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

    Motive for murder-suicide remains a mystery

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1, 1 Comment | Gallery

     
    Davis sewage to get new digs

    By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1

    Where do Davis recyclables go?

    By Felicia Alvarez | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    UCD faculty receive lowest pay in the system

    By Tanya Perez | From Page: A1

    Human Relations Commission hosts Chávez celebration

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A2

     
     
    Davis Flower Arrangers meet Wednesday

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A6

    ‘Music as Medicine’ is radio show topic

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A6

     
    Friendship the topic on radio program

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A6

     
    .

    Forum

    Milt Prigee cartoon

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B4

     
    Some ‘survey’ …

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

    These results were meaningless

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

     
    Survey not representative

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

    Answers on the green waste program

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B4

     
    A phone call could have fixed this

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B4

    Universities need more funding

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B5

     
    Mayor’s corner: Looking ahead to spring

    By Dan Wolk | From Page: B5 | Gallery

    A Little Respect for Dr. Foster

    By Nicholas Kristof | From Page: B5

     
    Father of the bride snubbed

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

    Which experiences count as ‘once in a lifetime’?

    By Marion Franck | From Page: A8

     
    After a month of no TV news, I’m feeling much better

    By Debra DeAngelo | From Page: A8

    Take a hike for your heart

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

     
    .

    Sports

    Aggie softball splits doubleheader

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

     
    Davis softballers suffer setback, remain optimistic

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

    Republic stun Galaxy with repeated history

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

     
    Bad fourth quarter sinks boys lacrosse

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

    Aggies’ walkoff win clinches series against Riverside

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Burns scores shootout winner to lift Sharks

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B2 | Gallery

    UCD roundup: Aggie women’s tennis dominates at home

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B10 | Gallery

     
    .

    Features

    .

    Arts

    .

    Business

    Millennials are changing our community

    By Rob White | From Page: A9

     
    With new owner, DAC will Get Fit

    By Wendy Weitzel | From Page: A9 | Gallery

    Grant writing for non-profits workshop set

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9

     
    .

    Obituaries

    .

    Comics

    Comics: Sunday, March 29, 2015

    By Creator | From Page: B8