Friday, April 24, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

U.S. ranks low on health measures

By
From page A14 | January 27, 2013 |

The issue: Dollars and lives are at stake

If you live to be 75, you’re likely to outlast the Swiss and elders of most other wealthy nations.

AT THAT GOLDEN age, if achieved, Americans can finally look forward to outliving people in Switzerland, Japan and Australia, according to a report issued this month by the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council.

Until we reach that milestone, Americans die at younger ages than people in almost all other high-income democracies. Life expectancy at birth for men in the United States in 2007 was 75.6 years — 17th out of 17 nations included in the review; for U.S. women, life expectancy of 80.7 years, ranked only ahead of Denmark.

Americans have a pattern of poorer health than in most of our “peer” nations going back several decades that leads to more deaths at birth, in childhood, among teens, younger adults and through middle age. Nearly two-thirds of the difference in life expectancy for men in the United States versus other countries is due to deaths before age 50.

THE REASONS cited range from high infant mortality and low birth weight to high death and disability rates from violence, traffic accidents and drug overdoses to high rates of obesity, diabetes, heart and lung disease.

On the bright side, we smoke and drink less than many of the other wealthy nations, have fewer deaths from cancer and have lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Many headlines from the study have focused on violence. The U.S. has about six violent deaths per 100,000 residents a year — the most by far. Finland, with slightly more than two per 100,000 comes in second.

The report notes the widespread availability of guns, communities built around cars and driving, and consumption of too many calories for our own good.

BUT THERE are also some key differences between the United States and its peers. Most of the others have some type of national health coverage. The U.S. spends about $8,000 per person on health care each year, about twice as much as the other nations in the study.

Yet one in six Americans lacks health insurance and even more have difficulty accessing regular care.

The report points out that dollars as well as lives are at stake in the disparities. America’s ability to compete economically over the long term requires a healthier population and a health system that’s less of a drain on the national wallet.

Comments

comments

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

    New design submitted for conference center

    By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    Water and power have a troubling interdependency

    By New York Times News Service | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    Bob Dunning: Fairness is an afterthought for them

    By Bob Dunning | From Page: A2

    Los Angeles march to commemorate Armenian killings

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    Hostage deaths a reminder of risk of ‘deadly mistakes’

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

    Walkers head out three times weekly

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4Comments are off for this post

     
    Got bikes? Donate ‘em!

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Need a new best friend?

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

    Beginning tai chi classes start May 5

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    College Night set April 30 at DHS

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    School board hears report on health services

    By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A5

     
    Tour of co-ops precedes Sacramento conference

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

    Mamajowali will perform at benefit house concert

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A6 | Gallery

     
    Explorit: Celebrate International Astronomy Day

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

    Learn basics of composting in Woodland

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

     
    Winkler Dinner raises funds for enology, viticulture activities

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8 | Gallery

    Raptor Center welcomes visitors at May 2 open house

    By Trina Wood | From Page: A8 | Gallery

     
    Take a peek at region’s past at Tremont Mite Society’s social

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8 | Gallery

    BeerFest expands to include cider

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

     
    Mapping where human action is causing earthquakes

    By New York Times News Service | From Page: A9

    Hummingbird health: Appreciating the little things

    By Kat Kerlin | From Page: A12 | Gallery

     
    .

    Forum

     
    Thanks for supporting the arts

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

    Bike Swap another success

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

     
    Drink is a tasteless insult

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

    Tom Meyer cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: B4

     
    The fight for gender pay equity

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B4

    It’s a depressing beat

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    .

    Sports

    Lehner talks about the UCD student-athlete experience

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1

     
    Reeling Blue Devils stop skid against Sheldon

    By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Aggie Spring Game environment will up the gridiron fun factor

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Rare DHS track loss still full of highlights

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

     
    DYSA roundup: Lester, Osborne lead Storm over Dixon

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

    Lady Demons’ fundraiser a smash hit

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

     
    Pro baseball roundup: River Cats lose their fourth straight

    By Staff and wire reports | From Page: B12

    .

    Features

    .

    Arts

     
    ‘Ex Machina': The perils of playing God

    By Derrick Bang | From Page: A10 | Gallery

    Ceramicist works will be featured at The Artery

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11 | Gallery

     
    .

    Business

    Chamber expands Korean sister-city opportunities

    By Felicia Alvarez | From Page: A5 | Gallery

     
    Car Care: Tips for buying your first ATV

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B6

    Subaru goes rear-wheel drive with sporty BRZ coupe

    By Ann M. Job | From Page: B7 | Gallery

     
    .

    Obituaries

    Whitney Joy Engler

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    Valente Forrest Dolcini

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

    .

    Comics

    Comics: Friday, April 24, 2015

    By Creator | From Page: B5