Wednesday, July 30, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

A call to contribute: Locals sought for long-term cancer research effort

Davis resident Kurt Snipes, incoming president of the California Division of the American Cancer Society, checks the number of Davis online enrollees for Cancer Prevention Study 3. Davis enrollment will take place Thursday, April 18, at the Davis United Methodist Church, 1620 Anderson Road. Joanie Erickson/Courtesy photo

By
From page A3 | March 31, 2013 |

You can help

What: Sign up to participate in the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Prevention Study 3

When: 3-6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 18

Where: United Methodist Church of Davis, 1620 Anderson Road

How: To schedule an enrollment appointment time and for more information, visit www.greatersacramentocps3.org or call 888-604-5888

Davis resident Kurt Snipes is passionate about getting more than 1,000 people from the greater Sacramento area to enroll in the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Prevention Study 3 (CPS-3).

It’s not just because he is the incoming president of the California Division of the American Cancer Society. It’s not just because he heads up the Cancer Surveillance and Research Branch of the California Department of Public Health. And, it’s not just because his grandfather, father and sister have all had cancer.

It is because if we don’t do something about reducing cancer risk, nearly one out of every two Californians born today will develop cancer at some point in their lives, and it’s likely that one in five will die of the disease.

“This is simply not acceptable,” Snipes says. “I hope the Davis community will join me in registering to participate in CPS-3 and help determine the causes of cancer so we can better prevent the disease in the lives of our children and grandchildren.”

Residents of Davis, Woodland and surrounding communities have an unprecedented opportunity to participate in a historic study that has the potential to change the face of cancer for future generations. Men and women between the ages of 30 and 65 who have never been diagnosed with cancer are needed to participate in the study. CPS-3 will enroll a diverse population of 300,000 people across the United States and Puerto Rico.

Local residents can sign up between 3 and 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 18, at the United Methodist Church of Davis, 1620 Anderson Road.

These volunteers will help researchers better understand the lifestyle, environmental and genetic factors that cause or prevent cancer.

“We may not be around for the results, but it will help our kids and their kids. When you think of all the participants in studies before who have given us so much in the way of knowledge about obesity, diet and fitness, we thought it was a good thing to do,” says one Northern California study participant.

To enroll in the study, individuals complete two steps, one in person and one at home. As part of the in-person enrollment, individuals complete a brief written survey, have their waist measured, sign an informed consent and give a small blood sample. The enrollment process is complete when individuals finish the more comprehensive baseline survey. Over the course of the study — which is anticipated to last 20 to 30 years — participants will be asked to fill out follow-up surveys every few years that will be sent to their home.

“Many individuals diagnosed with cancer struggle to answer the question, ‘What caused my cancer?’ In many cases, we don’t know the answer,” says Alpa V. Patel, Ph.D., principal investigator of CPS-3. “CPS-3 will help us better understand what factors cause cancer, and once we know that, we can be better equipped to prevent cancer.

“Our previous cancer prevention studies have been instrumental in helping us identify some of the major factors that can affect cancer risk,” Patel continues. “CPS-3 holds the best hope of identifying new and emerging cancer risks, and we can only do this if members of the community are willing to become involved.”

Researchers will use the data from CPS-3 to build on evidence from a series of American Cancer Society studies that began in the 1950s that collectively have involved millions of volunteer participants. The Hammond-Horn Study and previous Cancer Prevention Studies (CPS-I and CPS-II) have played a major role in understanding cancer prevention and risk, and have contributed significantly to the scientific basis and development of public health guidelines and recommendations.

Those studies confirmed the link between cigarette smoking and lung cancer, demonstrated the link between larger waist size and increased death rates from cancer and other causes, and showed the considerable impact of air pollution on heart and lung conditions.

The current study, CPS-II, began in 1982 and is still ongoing. But changes in lifestyle and in the understanding of cancer in the more than two decades since its launch make it important to begin a new study.

The initial enrollment process takes about 30 minutes at the local event and another 45 to 60 minutes at home to fill out the more comprehensive baseline survey. Periodic follow-up surveys of various lengths are expected to be sent every few years to individuals. The voluntary, long-term commitment by participants is what will produce benefits for decades to come.

“Taking an hour or so every few years to fill out a survey — and potentially save someone from being diagnosed with cancer in the future — is a commitment that thousands of volunteer participants have already made,” Patel says. “We’re looking for more like-minded individuals in the Davis and Woodland area to join this effort that we know will save lives and improve the outlook for future generations.”

Adds Snipes, “Cancer is a lot more common and has a greater impact on all of us than many people think. Cancer prevention is key. Nearly two-thirds of all cancers can be prevented by modifying our risk factors. Think about the power of eliminating two-thirds of all cancers by changing the way we live our lives.

“Numbers are important. It is crucial to get as many people enrolled as possible so we can study the modifiable risk factors by different segments of the population and can break the data down by sub-categories. This is critical research. To help meet the national goal of 300,000 people, we need at least 1,000 enrollees from the Sacramento area.”

To schedule an enrollment appointment time and for more information, log on to www.greatersacramentocps3.org or call toll-free 1-888-604-5888.

Comments

comments

Special to The Enterprise

.

News

 
Family enterprise builds a home for music

By Elizabeth Case | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Mosquito districts sprays tonight

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

 
Bob Dunning: Poll dancing, direct from Las Vegas

By Bob Dunning | From Page: A2

Health premiums rose significantly in 2014

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Biggest book sale to date opens Friday at Davis library

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Share your love of nature with young wetlands visitors

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4 | Gallery

 
Tasting event benefits Yolo Land Trust

By Lily Holmes | From Page: A4

Movies in the Park return this fall

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Tee off for Davis’ continued prosperity

By Lily Holmes | From Page: A4

Center for Families hosts Summer Carnival

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Vintage car show planned this fall

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Davis native named a Schweitzer Fellow

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
DHS Class of ’94 set 20th reunion

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Tips, techniques will give you a green thumb

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
Grief support focuses on journaling

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

How the Bockler wasp got its name

By Kathy Keatley Garvey | From Page: A5 | Gallery

 
Kiwanis golf tournament supports local agencies

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Drop off school supplies at Edward Jones offices

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
Wine-tastings will benefit YCCC

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

UC Davis alumnus hopes to bring amateur radio to Nepal

By Rachel Uda | From Page: A7 | Gallery

 
Yolo County CASA seeks volunteer child advocates

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

Recycle old paint cans for free

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
.

Forum

Not sure which direction to go

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
Violence as entertainment

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Shocked at vampires story

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Paul Krugman: Corporate artful dodgers

By Paul Krugman | From Page: A6

Nicholas Kristof: The world’s coolest places

By Nicholas Kristof | From Page: A6

 
Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

Gravel mining affects us all

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
.

Sports

Fiona Buck pushes the limits in para-athletics

By Felicia Alvarez | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
A’s rally to win

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

Morse homers but Giants lose 6th straight

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
Nightmare on Ballpark Drive for River Cats

By Will Bellamy | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Schaub settles in as Raiders starting QB

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
.

Features

.

Arts

Brady earns top honors at State Fair

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
Smither releases new CD Saturday at The Palms

By Kate Laddish | From Page: A9 | Gallery

RootStock kicks off ‘Día de Albariño’

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
Folk musicians will jam in the Arboretum

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

YoloArts to host a state of change exhibit

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
UCD professor Andy Jones named Davis’ new poet laureate

By Rachel Uda | From Page: A9 | Gallery

 
Molten art on display at Davis Arts Center

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

.

Business

.

Obituaries

Calvin D. Rourke

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
.

Comics

Comics: Wednesday, July 30, 2014

By Creator | From Page: B6