Sunday, July 27, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

BART workers back on strike

By
From page A2 | October 18, 2013 |

OAKLAND (AP) — Commuters in the San Francisco Bay Area got up before dawn on Friday and endured heavy traffic on roadways, as workers for the region’s largest transit system walked off the job for the second time in four months.

People were lined up well before 5 a.m. Friday at a Bay Area Rapid Transit train station in Walnut Creek for one of the charter buses BART was running into San Francisco. Traffic at the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge toll plaza into San Francisco and the roads leading to it also appeared heavier than normal for the early morning.

Other alternatives to BART include ferries and Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District buses.

The walkout began at midnight Thursday, the culmination of six months of on-again, off-again talks that fell apart. BART and the unions came “extremely close” to agreement on economic, health care and pension issues, but the parties were far apart on work rule issues, said Roxanne Sanchez, president of Service Employees International Union Local 1021.

The impasse came after a marathon negotiating session with the participation of federal mediators.

About 400,000 riders take BART every weekday on the nation’s fifth-largest commuter rail system. The system carries passengers from the farthest reaches of the densely populated eastern suburbs to San Francisco International Airport across the bay.

Antoinette Bryant of Amalgamated Transit Union told The Associated Press early Friday that her workers were on strike as of midnight, while Cecille Isidro of the SEIU confirmed to the San Francisco Chronicle that the unions were striking.

Agency spokesman Rick Rice also confirmed the strike by the unions in an email early Friday, but he said that the trains would finish their runs early Friday so riders wouldn’t be stranded.

“They don’t need to strike,” he said. “They could instead take BART’s offer to a vote of their members or continue to discuss options that could lead to a resolution.”

The unions said one of the work rules that BART wanted to change was employees’ fixed work schedules. Some employees work four-day, 10-hour shifts while others work five-day, eight-hour shifts. Union officials said BART wanted to schedule people as they saw fit.

BART officials say work rules refer to past practices that require approval from unions and management to change. The rules make it difficult to implement technological changes or add extra service on holidays because of a special event, the agency says.

Sanchez said the unions suggested taking the remaining issues to arbitration but management refused.

BART General Manager Grace Crunican countered that the agency needed to alter some of those rules to run the system efficiently. She said BART also needed to control costs to help pay for new rail cars and other improvements.

“We are not going to agree to something we can’t afford. We have to protect the aging system for our workers and the public,” Crunican said.

She urged the union leaders to let their members vote on management’s offer by Oct. 27.

A four-day strike in July saw commuters lining up early in the morning for BART’s charter buses and ferries across the bay, and enduring heavy rush-hour traffic.

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency said it has developed plans to help people to get around, including providing two expanded carpool locations.

The key issues during most of the talks had been salaries and worker contributions to their health and pension plans.

Talks began in April, three months before the June 30 contract expirations. The unions initially asked for 23.2 percent in raises over three years. BART countered with a four-year contract with 1 percent raises contingent on the agency meeting economic goals.

The unions contended that members made $100 million in concessions when they agreed to a deal in 2009 as BART faced a $310 million deficit. And they said they wanted their members to get their share of a $125 million operating surplus produced through increased ridership.

On Sunday, BART negotiators presented a final offer that includes an annual 3 percent raise over four years and requires workers to contribute 4 percent toward their pension and 9.5 percent toward medical benefits.

The value of BART’s proposal is $57 million, BART spokeswoman Alicia Trost said.

Workers represented by the two unions, including more than 2,300 mechanics, custodians, station agents, train operators and clerical staff, now average about $71,000 in base salary and $11,000 in overtime annually, the transit agency said. BART workers currently pay $92 a month for health care and contribute nothing toward their pensions.

————

By Terry Collins

Comments

comments

The Associated Press

.

News

Zombies by rail: It’s not just a show, it’s a trip

By Evan Arnold-Gordon | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Community gardens stretch food dollars, study finds

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A1 | Gallery

Humphrey Fellows will host Global Forum

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Fatal Covell Boulevard crash recalled in court

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1

Ukraine launches offensive to retake Donetsk

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Rairdan joins race for Davis school board

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

State can’t say if it’s meeting drought goal

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Wildfire spurs evacuation of 700 homes

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Israel extends Gaza truce through Sunday

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

New ordinance aims to prevent nut thefts from orchards

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A4

 
Biggest book sale to date opens Friday at Davis library

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Luna family matriarch turns 100

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

 
Freeway crash injures two drivers

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A5

 
Museum wants your old Davis High School yearbooks

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
Mace Innovation Center is focus of meeting

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Affordable housing forum planned in Davis

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

 
 
Discussion of oil by rail EIR planned Sunday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

State awards $40,000 for historic property survey

By Lily Holmes | From Page: A8

 
Protesters gather at Primate Center

By Tanya Perez | From Page: A8

Vanguard hosts economic development director

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
Get a sneak peek at documentary trailer

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

Free blood pressure screenings offered

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
Davis Chamber Choir sings short summer program

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A9

Tasting event benefits Yolo Land Trust

By Lily Holmes | From Page: A9

 
At the Pond: From Davis, it’s easy to get back to nature

By Jean Jackman | From Page: A10 | Gallery

Tickets on sale now for DHS Hall of Fame dinner

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

 
.

Forum

Feels like a million miles away

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: A7

 
Check doctors’ vitals before they check yours

By The Associated Press | From Page: A7

Here’s what you need for a perfect wedding

By Marion Franck | From Page: A7

 
Husband’s let himself go

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: A14

 
Pat Oliphant cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A16

So, what’s in a week’s worth of waste?

By Michelle Millet | From Page: A16

 
Questions on water rights

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A16, 1 Comment

Golf tourney was a big success

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A16

 
Campus turns on the tap

By Our View | From Page: A16

New playground is wonderful

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A17

 
Just Us in Davis: Little Rock Nine hero to celebrate with Davis youths

By Jann L. Murray-Garcia | From Page: A17 | Gallery

We can do more to help

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A17

 
.

Sports

New Korematsu teacher is an American Ninja Warrior

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Sutherland presents 1st clinic; golf column on its way

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Gray wins 6th straight, A’s 4 HRs beat Texas 5-1

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
Kershaw throws 2-hitter as Dodgers beat Giants 5-0

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

Furyk opens 3-shot lead in Canadian Open

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
Nibali set to cruise to Tour victory

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Area sports briefs: River Cats take Game 1 of doubleheader

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B4

 
.

Features

.

Arts

.

Business

Companies will collaborate on crop insect control

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A13

 
Developer’s commitments: affordable and green

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A13 | Gallery

UC Davis Health System earns ‘Most Wired’ award

By Charles Casey | From Page: A15

 
Bartholomew hires new associate

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A15

Yolo County real estate sales

By Zoe Juanitas | From Page: A15

 
Go back to school with Great Clips

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A15

Lagerstrom represents Davis at Mary Kay seminar

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A15

 
.

Obituaries

Jonathan Eric Hollander

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Carlton Hope Meister

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

.

Comics

Comics: Sunday, July 27, 2014

By Creator | From Page: A6