Tuesday, April 21, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Brown pleads for votes for struggling tax hike

Gov. Jerry Brown warns of painful cuts in Sacramento unless voters approve his $6 billion-a-year tax increase as he speaks in Los Angeles on Wednesday.  AP photo

Gov. Jerry Brown warns of painful cuts in Sacramento unless voters approve his $6 billion-a-year tax increase as he speaks in Los Angeles on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Recent polling has found Proposition 30 in danger of failing in Tuesday's election. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

By
From page A2 | November 01, 2012 |

LOS ANGELES (AP) — With time running out and his odds growing longer, California Gov. Jerry Brown pleaded with voters Wednesday to support his $6 billion-a-year tax increase and warned of deep cuts unless residents send more money to Sacramento.

In sometimes uncharted remarks that included fleeting references to the bleak movie “Blade Runner” and Nobel Prize-winning author Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Brown said residents face a stark choice with Proposition 30 — invest in the future or sap its potential.

Poll finds Prop. 30 slips below majority

SACRAMENTO (AP) — California’s undecided voters will determine the fate of Gov. Jerry Brown’s tax initiative as the latest public opinion survey shows support slipping below the majority needed for passage.

The Field Poll released Thursday found support for Brown’s Proposition 30 at 48 percent while 38 percent say they oppose the initiative. Another 14 percent remain undecided.

The poll also surveyed Proposition 38. The competing tax initiative trails with 34 percent in favor compared to 49 percent against.

Field Poll Director Mark DiCamillo says Brown still has a chance of passing Proposition 30 if he can sway some of the undecided voters and turn out supporters.

Field surveyed 1,566 registered voters by telephone from Oct. 17-30. The poll has a sampling error margin of plus or minus 3.6 percentage points.

By Judy Lin

“Believe in California,” the Democratic governor said at a forum organized by Town Hall Los Angeles, a civic group. With the additional investment from taxpayers, he said, “California will shine.”

Tuesday’s election amounts to a critical test for Brown’s leadership 11 months into his first year in office, and he acknowledges the race is tight.

The proposal has been slipping in polls, hovering near or dipping below the 50 percent mark needed for passage — a troubling sign since support for tax proposals tends to slide as Election Day nears.

Anxiety is rising among Democrats, though they see Brown as a savvy campaigner who’s run for offices as varied as Oakland mayor and president.

“I think a tax increase, whether in good times or bad, is always a challenge,” said Democratic consultant Roger Salazar. “There is hope Jerry will do what Jerry always does, which is rally folks to get this thing passed.”

The proposition would gather an estimated $6 billion annually by boosting the sales tax a quarter cent for four years, while raising income taxes for seven years on people making more than $250,000 annually.

It’s a tough sell.

In a state with a struggling economy and double-digit unemployment, the governor is asking voters to raise their own taxes and send the money to the widely unpopular Sacramento statehouse. Polls show most Californians cringe at state government after witnessing years of runaway deficits, legislative gridlock, and headlines about reckless spending and pension abuses.

If approved, the tax boost could be one of many for residents around the state. In Los Angeles, for example, one proposal would slap taxpayers with an additional half-cent sales tax, lifting the rate to 9.25 percent, as City Hall wrestles with soaring pension and retiree health care costs.

Brown has been pitching the plan as a way to guarantee funding for schools.

“It’s either money into the schools, or money out,” he said Wednesday in arguing for support of the proposition.

However, while some of the money raised would go toward education, it also would free up billions of dollars for the state’s general fund, meaning the Democratic-controlled Legislature could spend it on health care, pensions or other programs.

At different points Wednesday, he suggested that passage of the tax increase could free up other funds for mental illness programs or state courts. “It would be much better if 30 passes,” he said, referring to courtroom budgets.

————

By Michael R. Blood, AP political writer

Comments

comments

The Associated Press

.

News

 
Woodland murder suspect claims history of abuse

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1

Public forum will explore community choice energy options

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A1

 
Log cabin home is labor of love

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1 | Gallery

The camp around the corner: Day camp benefits kids and families

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

 
Ready to give a resident camp a try? Tips to ease the homesick blues

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

Vote with your dollars at Davis Food Co-op

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

 
UCD study: Colorblind bilingual programs can perpetuate bias

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

 
Davis Kids Klub offers a true summer camp

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

Immigrant teens share their dreams at YIIN dinner

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A7 | Gallery

 
Buddhist groups host SanghaFest on Saturday

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

AAUW hosts Yamada speech on Tuesday

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

 
Round up at the registers for Davis schools

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8Comments are off for this post

Free Family Bike Clinic set Sunday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
Online courses a cure-all? UCD study says think again

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

Show tunes take center stage at sing-along

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
Alternatives to violence explored

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

Paws for Thought: Hero dogs go above and beyond

By Evelyn Dale | From Page: A8 | Gallery

 
Rotary Club hosts whisky tasting

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

Spend a morning with the mayor

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
Celebrate Mexican culture at I-House

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
Achievement gap to be addressed at symposium

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9

Suicide awareness walk set April 25 at UC Davis

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
Tour de Cluck tickets on sale now

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

Patwin is ‘Where The Wild Things Walk’

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9 | Gallery

 
Pets of the week

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A10 | Gallery

.

Forum

Gratitude all around for the Breakfast for Heroes

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

 
Broad new vaccination law is a must

By Tom Elias | From Page: B4

Seniors, you CAN get there from here

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B4 | Gallery

 
Hey, do you want that glaucoma fixed?

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5Comments are off for this post

.

Sports

DHS thunders past the Herd

By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Wong leads UCD charge in Big West women’s golf tourney

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

UCD boxing club making a name on the national scene

By Dylan Lee | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
DHS girls basketball pioneer Iten dies

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Devils edge closer to Delta League soccer title

By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
 
.

Features

.

Arts

Rockabilly music will fill the park Wednesday

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11 | Gallery

 
One-man show ‘Buyer and Cellar’ brings non-stop laughter

By Bev Sykes | From Page: A11 | Gallery

Hear Wealth of Nations at winery

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

 
‘Frozen’ Mini-Musicals to be presented

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

Baldini to conduct Camellia Symphony

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11 | Gallery

 
DMTC sets auditions for ‘Evita’

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

Stories told at Third Space

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11

 
UCD assistant professor to give lecture at de Young Museum

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

.

Business

.

Obituaries

Robert Leigh Cordrey

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
Ruth Rodenbeck Stumpf

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

Alice Catherine Micheltorena

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

 
.

Comics

Comics: Tuesday, April 21, 2015 (set 1)

By Creator | From Page: B5

 
Comics: Tuesday, April 21, 2015 (set 2)

By Creator | From Page: B7