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Court considers school’s May 5 U.S. flag ban

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From page A2 | October 18, 2013 | 4 Comments

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal appeals court on Thursday wrestled with the novel question of whether it was offensive for Northern California high school students to display the American flag during a school day dedicated to celebrating Mexican heritage.

The three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals didn’t tip its hand on how it would decide in sharply questioning lawyers on both sides of the issue during a 30-minute hearing in San Francisco.

Public school officials have broad powers to establish dress codes, such as restricting certain colors in clothing or barring the wearing of sports jerseys, in areas where gangs are considered a problem. But the American flag case poses different questions about how far school officials can go in reacting to a potential problem by spontaneously barring what students wear, even if that includes a T-shirt bearing the iconic American flag.

“Dress codes are legal as long as they are content neutral,” said Eugene Volokh, a University of California, Los Angeles law professor and free speech expert. “This case is different and has nothing to do with the dress codes.”

Instead, Volokh said the American flag case will turn on whether the administrators overreacted in barring the American flag in the face of a perceived threat of violence.

So the question before the court Thursday was whether public school administrators can ban patriotic displays of the American flag on shirts on “Mexican Heritage Day” at a campus plagued by violence and racial strife. The administrators at Live Oak High School in Morgan Hill, about 20 miles south of San Jose, said they were concerned that the shirts would lead to violence and verbal altercations. They told the students to turn the shirts inside out or go home. The students went home, and a month later, their parents filed a lawsuit, alleging the school and its administrators violated their children’s free speech rights.

The May 5, 2010, incident sparked a national debate, prompting satellite news trucks to camp outside the school for several days as pundits across the political spectrum argued the issue over the airwaves.

“It’s all about not being ashamed to wear the American flag,” Kendall Jones, a parent of one of the students, said to reporters outside the hearing Thursday. “What’s wrong with that?”

Inside the courtroom, Judge Virginia Kendall argued that school officials have a responsibility to prevent violence and disruptions on campus, noting that students allegedly warned the vice principal that trouble was brewing because of the American flag T-shirts.

“Do you have to wait until they duke out in the courtyard,” before administrators can step in and ban the shirts, Judge Virginia Kendall asked.

The students’ attorney Robert Muise argued that the “potential” the shirts would cause disruptions on campus was a “risk” the school had to take in deference to the students’ free speech rights to wear the American flag T-shirts.

The school’s attorney Don Willenburg argued that the school was within its right to ban the shirts for just that single day.

“No one was prevented from expressing views,” Willenburg said.

Judge Sidney Thomas suggested the case may need to be returned to a lower court and sent to a jury to determine whether the shirts posed an actual threat that day.

A lower court tossed out the students’ lawsuit in December 2011, ruling that school administrators have wide legal latitude to ensure the safety and effective operation of their campuses and a “perceived threat” of violence vindicated the principal’s decision.

The lower court judge who tossed out the case, the now-retired Chief Judge James Ware, noted that “our Constitution grants public school children only limited First Amendment rights when they enter the schoolhouse gates,” while conceding this case has landed in “important legal territory.”

Volokh calls such punishment a “heckler’s veto.” In public, speakers are protected from such a restriction and allowed to voice most opinions. On-campus students don’t enjoy the same free speech rights.

“A school may restrict a student’s speech,” Volokh said, “to prevent unruly disruptions.”

Still, Volokh said administrators can — and sometimes do — go too far and overreact to a perceived threat that may not cause a big enough on-campus stir to warrant the censorship.

“The fact of the matter is that these Americans were punished for wearing the American flag at an American school,” Volokh said.

————

By Paul Elias

The Associated Press

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Discussion | 4 comments

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  • Noreen MazelisOctober 18, 2013 - 3:49 pm

    If the non-Americans at this American school are "offended" by a display of the American flag, they should leave this country and attend school elsewhere. We can do without this school's administrators and Judge Virginia Kendall as well.

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  • Michael C.October 19, 2013 - 10:22 am

    The real problem here is not students wearing clothing displaying the American flag, but rather those who take offense at a display of the American flag on the territory of the United States of America. After all, this is the United States of America, not Mexico or some other country. Those who take offense at the display of the flag of the country in which they are living have a very real problem, at a minimum a very hypersensitive juvenile approach to the world and intolerance towards others. Frankly, they need to grow up, and our education system needs to figure out how to instill pride of country in our youth without denigrating others. Unfortunately, at the moment we appear to be instilling pride of other countries and cultures while denigrating our own. Those living in America who cannot tolerate a display of the American flag need to seriously think about moving to some other country--where, by way, they are extremely unlikely to find the tolerance we display here.

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  • JoeOctober 19, 2013 - 2:09 pm

    Well said Noreen and Michael. My feelings exactly. This decision should be a no-brainer. But you never know what the activist liberal 9th Court od Schmeels might rule. This is what happens when leftists run you state and country.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • candy tuttOctober 19, 2013 - 8:32 pm

    I read this article twice, and the issue as I perceive it is that on Cinco de Mayo, which granted is a Mexican Holiday, Latino youth take pride in displaying their red, white and green flag with the eagle and the serpent -- and that American students are taking offense at this and retaliating by waving the Stars and Stripes literally in the faces of those of Mexican descent. I have attended cultural festivals where flags of Scotland, Ireland, Greece and Portugal were proudly displayed - without incident. In my opinion, the issue is something in the attitude of those doing the celebrating which is seen as divisive.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
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