Sunday, February 1, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Midwest heat wave prompts early school dismissals

By
From page A2 | August 27, 2013 |

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — An unusual, late-summer heat wave has enveloped much of the Midwest, putting schools and sports events on hold.

Schools in Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, the Dakotas and Illinois let out early on Monday as temperatures crept toward the mid-90s — beyond in some places. After-school sports practices and evening games were canceled in St. Paul, Minn., and misting stations kept people cool at the Minnesota State Fair, where about 90 fairgoers had been treated for heat-related illnesses over the weekend.

The heat wave is supposed to last through much of the week, the National Weather Service said. Heat of this magnitude is unusual for this time of year, but not unprecedented. In Des Moines, Iowa, temperatures on Aug. 26 have reached 100 degrees at least six times since 1881. The weather service said South Dakota was experiencing its hottest final week of August on record.

School districts took precautions to avoid putting students and teachers in sweaty — and possibly dangerous — situations.

In central Iowa, Marshalltown Community School District administrators canceled afternoon preschool classes on Monday and Tuesday and were planning to release other students two hours early. Parts of all 10 of district buildings have air conditioning, but some rooms aren’t connected.

“The buildings can heat up pretty fast, especially when you have kids in there,” district spokesman Jason Staker said. “It’s not a good environment for students or teachers.”

Five elementary schools in Fargo, North Dakota, canceled classes through Wednesday because the buildings weren’t fully air-conditioned. Temperatures inside them on Sunday ranged from 85 degrees to 90 degrees, Fargo Schools Superintendent Jeff Schatz said.

In South Dakota, the Sioux Falls School District continued with classes as scheduled, but spokeswoman DeeAnn Konrad said teachers kept window blinds closed and turned off lights in classrooms. The district was also prepared to move students into cooler rooms at nearby churches and a Christian school, she said.

School administrators in the western Nebraska town of Alliance decided to send students home early after local forecasters predicted temperatures in excess of 90 degrees. Some classes in the 1,600-student district are held on the third floor, and temperatures rise when students fill the room.

“It can get uncomfortable even when the temperatures are in the upper 80s,” superintendent Troy Unzicker said.

Minneapolis students attended school all day, but administrators canceled after-school activities and distributed 750 cases of water to schools. Officials also sent industrial fans to the 18 buildings that lack air conditioning, district spokeswoman Rachel Hicks said. Parents were advised to dress their kids in light clothing, while staffers watched for symptoms of heat-related illnesses.

With temperatures again forecast in the mid-90s in Minneapolis, classes Tuesday were going ahead as planned. The district said parents could keep their children at home if they felt it necessary.

In Des Moines, organizers of a downtown farmers market set for Wednesday postponed the event out concern over the extreme heat

The Iowa Department of Public Health issued a statewide advisory for vulnerable populations, including young children and the elderly. Sometimes our natural defense against extreme heat — sweat — won’t suffice, Dr. Patricia Quinlisk said.

“Especially when the humidity is high, sweat will not evaporate as quickly, preventing the body from releasing heat quickly,” she said.

————

By Grant Schulte. Associated Press writer Steve Karnowski in Minneapolis contributed to this report.

Comments

comments

The Associated Press

.

News

Well-loved library has services for all ages

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
The end of an era for The Enterprise, as pressroom closes

By Kimberly Yarris | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Jewish fraternity vandalism classified a hate crime

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1

Man arrested after body parts found in suitcase

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Islamists post beheading video

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

More than a foot of snow possible for Midwest, Northeast

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
 
UCD Med Center patient tested negative for Ebola

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Kudos to the Thomsons

By Sue Cockrell | From Page: A3

 
Arboretum ‘I do’

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
The story of Mark and Maria

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

Summer lovin’

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

 
Stories come alive at the library

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

Stepping Stones supports grieving youths

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9Comments are off for this post

 
Vote for your favorites in Readers’ Choice poll

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

Japanese students seek Davis host families

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
And bingo was the game-o

By Tate Perez | From Page: A9

Lee will speak Wednesday about city issues

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
Training starts Tuesday for Jepson Prairie Preserve tour guides

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

Lecture looks at women in Egypt

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9

 
Questions and answers about breast cancer set

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

Davis Arts Center welcomes students’ work

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

 
Tuleyome Tales: Searching for the elusive McNab cypress

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11 | Gallery

.

Forum

Three old ideas going, going, gone

By Marion Franck | From Page: A10

 
How much drinking is too much?

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

 
They’re experienced and honest

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A12

Toy drive was a big success

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A12

 
One-way street solves dilemma

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A12

Council, follow your own policies

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A12

 
Ensure that you’re protected against measles

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A12

Act would let patients control their own fates

By Our View | From Page: A12

 
Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A12

Wi-Fi in our schools could result in health impacts

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A13

 
Life goes on in Rutilio Grande, despite country’s gang violence

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A13 | Gallery

.

Sports

 
Depth charge: DHS girls defeat Elk Grove

By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Blue Devil boys lose on Herd’s buzzer-beating trey

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

 
UCD women survive against winless UCSB

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

Foursome will represent Davis at national soccer tournament

By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
UCD roundup: Aggies make a racket but fall to Sac State, Pacific

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

Kings get past Pacers

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Sharks blank Blackhawks

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

.

Features

.

Arts

.

Business

Doby Fleeman: Toward a more perfect Davis

By Doby Fleeman | From Page: A12

 
Ullrich Delevati, CPAs, adds senior accountant

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A12

And the survey says: Success for Davis Chamber

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A12

 
Putah Creek Winery launches ‘Give Back Tuesday’

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A12

Seminar will cover business challenges

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A13

 
Japanese fondue dips into Davis scene

By Wendy Weitzel | From Page: A13 | Gallery

Novozymes, Cargill continue bio-acrylic acid partnership as BASF exits

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A13

 
.

Obituaries

.

Comics

Comics: Sunday, February 1, 2015

By Creator | From Page: B8