Sunday, April 19, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

White House threatens to veto Boehner’s ‘Plan B’

By
From page A2 | December 19, 2012 |

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House threatened Wednesday to veto House Speaker John Boehner’s backup plan for averting the “fiscal cliff,” saying it was time for Republicans to stop political posturing and continue trying to reach a compromise deficit-cutting package.

Boehner, R-Ohio, proposed his so-called Plan B on Tuesday, a measure that would block tax cuts from being triggered Jan. 1 on everyone but those whose incomes exceed $1 million. The White House said Boehner’s package did not raise enough revenue from the country’s top earners, would leave too big a deficit-reduction burden on the middle class and omitted tax breaks used by families and businesses.

“The president urges the Republican leadership to work with us to resolve remaining differences and find a reasonable solution to this situation today instead of engaging in political exercises that increase the possibility that taxes go up on every American,” White House Communications Director Dan Pfeiffer said in a written statement.

Boehner is planning a House vote on his proposal on Thursday, hoping that it will raise pressure on President Barack Obama to make concessions as both sides continue reaching for a bipartisan deal on averting the “fiscal cliff.” Without an agreement among lawmakers, hundreds of billions of broad tax increases on nearly all taxpayers and budget-wide spending cuts will be triggered in early January.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., also tried raising pressure on Obama, saying the president was risking his chance to strike a major budget deal with the GOP.

“He has a real opportunity to show he can govern,” McConnell said on the Senate floor. “He’s letting that opportunity slip away.”

House GOP leaders are facing a problem with their Plan B strategy — they are laboring to line up enough support for the measure in the face of conservatives reluctant to boost anyone’s taxes. Even if it could survive in the House, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., has declared it dead in his chamber and now the White House has promised to veto it should it somehow reach Obama’s desk.

The backup plan by Boehner, R-Ohio, would do nothing to head off deep cuts in defense and domestic programs scheduled to begin taking effect in January. And it contains none of the spending reductions that both President Barack Obama and Boehner have proposed in their efforts to strike a compromise.

“The speaker is trying to get as much leverage as he can to deal with the president,” said Rep. Charles Boustany, R-La., describing the pressure Republicans were hoping it would put on the White House. But he added that he wasn’t sure the plan was the best way to get that leverage.

“I’m still trying to figure that out,” Boustany said.

Others were more supportive. Rep. Patrick Tiberi, R-Ohio, said Plan B would let Republicans vote to protect as many people as possible from tax hikes while leaving Democrats with the blame if it failed.

If the Senate decides not to vote on the House bill or ignores it, “That’s not our problem,” Tiberi said. “The ball’s in Harry Reid’s court.”

Besides letting tax rates rise only on incomes exceeding $1 million, Boehner’s Plan B also would boost the top rate on capital gains and dividends from their current 15 percent to 20 percent for earnings over $1 million, preventing higher increases. It would continue current tax levels on inherited estates — less than Obama wants — and prevent the alternative minimum tax from raising taxes owed by 28 million middle- and upper-class families.

Boehner unveiled his backup plan on Tuesday. He did so even though he and Obama have come tantalizingly close to finding a politically palatable combination of revenue increases and budget savings that could slice around $2 trillion from projected federal deficits over the coming decade.

Both sides say those efforts will continue.

Obama has reduced his demands for tax increases to $1.2 trillion over 10 years, to be imposed on incomes exceeding $400,000 annually. In so doing, the president abandoned his campaign season insistence that he would raise taxes on individuals earning over $200,000 and couples making more than $250,000.

Boehner has boosted his revenue offer to $1 trillion, including raising income tax rates on incomes over $1 million. That is a major concession from the leader of a party that has made opposition to higher rates a fundamental tenet for a quarter century.

“I think it’s a mistake for the Republican Party,” said Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, a leader of House conservatives. “So that’s what I think a lot of members are struggling with.”

Obama has also departed from his party’s orthodoxy by proposing smaller annual cost-of-living increases for Social Security recipients. The new formula for measuring inflation would affect other benefit programs as well and push more people into higher income tax brackets.

The president’s embrace of a plan that would over time cut Social Security benefits has aroused outcries from liberal groups that defend programs for the elderly and poor and that generally support Democrats.

“I promise you, seniors and their families will notice” the benefit reductions, said Pamela Tainter-Causey, spokeswoman for the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare, one of scores of groups mobilizing opposition to the proposal.

Obama also was pushing for extended unemployment benefits and billions in spending aimed at stimulating the economy.

The president says his plan would cut spending by $1.2 trillion over a decade, including saving $400 billion from health care benefits that could include Medicare for the elderly and Medicaid for the poor.

Boehner wants deeper Medicare savings. And he says Obama is more unbalanced, seeking $1.3 trillion more in taxes and $930 billion in lowered spending.

Besides lingering disputes with the president, the speaker’s efforts to reach an accord with Obama face another difficulty — uncertain support from Boehner’s own lieutenants. One opponent was the influential Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., the party’s defeated vice presidential nominee, said a House GOP aide. The aide was not authorized to publicly discuss the situation and spoke only on the condition of anonymity.

————

By Alan Fram. Associated Press writers Andrew Taylor, Jim Kuhnhenn and Stephen Ohlemacher contributed to this report.

Comments

comments

The Associated Press

.

News

KDVS fund drive includes on-air pledging, plus parties and food

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Aggie Pride on parade at UC Davis Picnic Day

By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
City wants a study of sewer rates

By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1

Hard-of-hearing student needs community’s help

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
 
Art helped sell California’s agriculture

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3 | Gallery

 
Students, families can get after-hours Internet access

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Lawyers seek resolution to Davis molest case

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A4

 
Sign up now for Celebrate Davis!

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4Comments are off for this post

Your brain’s aging and a new report urges ways to stay sharp

By The Associated Press | From Page: B5

 
Garamendi hosts conference for women

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

‘Invaluable public servant’ retires after 20 years

By Tanya Perez | From Page: A5 | Gallery

 
Injury-proof yourself for effective exercise

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

Understanding risks can help women prevent leading health threats

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

 
Grad Night tickets on sale online

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
Schenker speaks about ‘Magical Mexico’

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

Yolo County DA honors crime victims at annual tribute

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

 
Holman offers Publishing 101 seminar

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

Radio-controlled airplanes will race April 25-26

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
Woodland bike rides set every Saturday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

Get some advice at Connections Café

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
Eyewitness speaks about Israel’s election

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

Free gardening advice offered

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
NAMI group offers family support

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

Join the 10,000-vegetable challenge!

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9Comments are off for this post

 
Yolo County Neighborhood Court seeks new volunteers

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

Birding tour will benefit Putah Creek Council

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10 | Gallery

 
Watershed Wonders activities return to Putah Creek

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

UCD looks at building a better brain as we age

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

 
‘Vault’ highlights ‘Kathak’

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

Two drought-preparedness water bills pass out of Senate committees

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11

 
Picnic Day favorites: dogs, bikes science

By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A13 | Gallery

Strike up the band, and the bubbles!

By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A14 | Gallery

 
.

Forum

Ready for the parting glass

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
 
Yolo Crisis Nursery still needs help

By Our View | From Page: B6

Drink up, kids, but make your choice a healthy one

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B6

 
Leash your dogs; it’s the law

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B6

John Cole cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: B6

 
Let’s not turn our backs on the Earth

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B7

This Earth Day, make a pledge to cool your home

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B7

 
Speak out

By Debbie Davis | From Page: B7

.

Sports

Over the hump? DHS baseball team wins late

By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Lambdin, Marshall lead Aggies at Mt. SAC

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

Fast Aggie start negated by 14-0 USC lacrosse run

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Stagnant second-half offense sinks Devil girls

By Thomas Oide | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Republic FC gets another win at Bonney

By Evan Ream | From Page: B2

 
UCD roundup: Aggies sweep a water polo double dip

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

Busy Clancy, Hall spark Devil tracksters at Mt. SAC

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

 
Former DHS star Drexel returns to create havoc for Aggies

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B4 | Gallery

Pro baseball roundup: Oakland blanks Kansas City

By The Associated Press | From Page: B14

 
Sports briefs: Blue Devils split a pair of tennis matches

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B14 | Gallery

.

Features

.

Arts

.

Business

Marrone Bio Innovations strengthens its sales team

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A12

 
New phase opens at Brookfield Cottages

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A12

Tucos closes; new Japanese, pizza, subs debut

By Wendy Weitzel | From Page: A12 | Gallery

 
WISH grant funds available to eligible homebuyers

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A12

.

Obituaries

Jody Zewe

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Herman Timm

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

Ruth Rodenbeck Stumpf

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Robert Leigh Cordrey

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

Alice Catherine Micheltorena

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
.

Comics

Comics: Sunday, April 19, 2015

By Creator | From Page: B8