Friday, September 19, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Bay Area for-profit colleges shut down

By
From page A4 | August 05, 2014 |

By John Coté
A San Jose for-profit college company closed its doors last Monday, including its schools in San Francisco, Hayward and Los Angeles, according to the state Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education.
BioHealth College in San Jose, which also operates Bryman College locations in the three other California cities, shut down 10 days after filing for bankruptcy. The company operated five schools serving 278 students combined, said Russ Heimerich, a spokesman for the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education.
“The students should come out financially whole,” Heimerich said, “but they will not be able to get their investment in time back.”
Credits from the programs, such as courses for becoming a dental assistant, massage therapist or pharmacy technician, are unlikely to transfer to another institution, Heimerich said.
No one answered calls to Bryman College’s San Francisco location or the BioHealth College San Jose location.
BioHealth College was founded by Sam Shirazi in 2003, according to the company’s website.
Shirazi boasts on the site of possessing “over 25 years of experience in the vocational education industry,” including founding Computer Training Academy Inc., or CTA, in 1990.
Shirazi sold CTA to Corinthian Colleges in 2000, and stayed on as an executive board member, according to BioHealth College’s website. He launched BioHealth College in 2003.
This month, former federal prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald agreed to act as an independent monitor for Corinthian Colleges, the troubled Santa Ana-based for-profit company that served 72,000 students, 27,000 in California.
Corinthian, which operates Everest College, Heald College and WyoTech schools, has agreed to sell or close its campuses amid a U.S. Department of Education investigation into allegations of falsifying job placement data used in marketing claims to prospective students, and allegations of altered grades and attendance.
Corinthian gets $1.4 billion a year in federal student aid and told the Securities and Exchange Commission in June that it expected to go bankrupt and shut down because the Education Department is delaying payments. The department said it was sanctioning Corinthian because the company hadn’t provided all the documentation required in the investigation.
— Reach John Coté at jcote@sfchronicle.com

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