Sunday, February 1, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

City shows life without another sales tax

By
From page A1 | April 13, 2014 |

Learn more
What: City Council meeting
When: 6:30 p.m. Tuesday
Where: Community Chambers, City Hall, 23 Russell Blvd.

Enjoy the twinkling lights downtown at night? The same level of public safety? Parks maintenance? That nice woman who answers your questions at the city clerk’s office?

Better vote for Measure O, the city’s proposed half-percent sales tax increase and extension of the existing half-percent sales tax to 2020.

The city released a report Thursday of revised budget figures and a panoply of potential places the City Council could cut services and positions — including $332,410 in total cuts to police and fire budgets — in a bid to get council orders on where to cut if Measure O doesn’t pass and let the public know exactly what they might be missing from city government.

“You’ve got to disclose as much as you can before the city election,” City Manager Steve Pinkerton said.

The numbers have changed since December, becoming a hair’s breadth rosier for the city: Instead of a $5.1 million structural deficit, increased revenues place the deficit at $4.99 million. Yet, the proposed menus of cuts offered as recommendations by the city only cover $1.16 million of the deficit hole, according to a city staff report. A $3.8 million hole would still remain even if the council follows the spirit of the city’s platter of cuts.

“This was to get feedback,” Pinkerton said. “What direction should we take?”

There are two general paths the council can take. One broad path would impose cuts across the board — estimated in February as a 12 percent cut — while another would hold public safety harmless and dig deeper to the tune of 25 percent into other parts of the city operation.

If Measure O passes, the estimate is that it will give the city an additional $3.61 million in revenue to add to a general 2.8 percent increase in total sales tax receipts during the last nine years.

The council’s overarching plan is to No 1: push for additional money with some kind of parcel tax at the November general election connected to infrastructure needs like crumbling roads. And No. 2: Move down an estimated five or 10 year road to getting high technology and manufacturing businesses into town with a business park.

Pinkerton said while revenues are up slightly, so are expenses the report lists like health care and pension costs for employees, plus costs for water use at city parks because of the dry winter.

The layout of the potential cuts goes department by department, in most cases reducing positions targeted to part-time, and in some cases removing them entirely. The assistant police chief position is one.

“It’s not the final decision,” Pinkerton said. “It’s giving various options.”

Meanwhile, the city has been pleading its case to civic groups and the public at large through utility bill budget explanations. In them, the city points out it has already cut $11 million from the general fund in the last five years and reduced its workforce by 22 percent.

— Reach Dave Ryan at [email protected] or call 530-747-8057. Follow him on Twitter at @davewritesnews

Comments

comments

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

    Well-loved library has services for all ages

    By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    The end of an era for The Enterprise, as pressroom closes

    By Kimberly Yarris | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    Jewish fraternity vandalism classified a hate crime

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1

     
    Man arrested after body parts found in suitcase

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

    Islamists post beheading video

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    More than a foot of snow possible for Midwest, Northeast

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    UCD Med Center patient tested negative for Ebola

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

     
    Kudos to the Thomsons

    By Sue Cockrell | From Page: A3

    Arboretum ‘I do’

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    The story of Mark and Maria

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

    Summer lovin’

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

     
    Stories come alive at the library

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

    Japanese students seek Davis host families

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    And bingo was the game-o

    By Tate Perez | From Page: A9

    Lee will speak Wednesday about city issues

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    Training starts Tuesday for Jepson Prairie Preserve tour guides

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

    Lecture looks at women in Egypt

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9

     
    Stepping Stones supports grieving youths

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9Comments are off for this post

    Vote for your favorites in Readers’ Choice poll

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    Tuleyome Tales: Searching for the elusive McNab cypress

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11 | Gallery

    Questions and answers about breast cancer set

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

     
    Davis Arts Center welcomes students’ work

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

    .

    Forum

    Help a veteran feel loved

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: A10

     
    Three old ideas going, going, gone

    By Marion Franck | From Page: A10

     
    How much drinking is too much?

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

    Ensure that you’re protected against measles

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A12

     
    Act would let patients control their own fates

    By Our View | From Page: A12

    Tom Meyer cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A12

     
    They’re experienced and honest

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A12

    Toy drive was a big success

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A12

     
    One-way street solves dilemma

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A12

    Council, follow your own policies

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A12

     
    Wi-Fi in our schools could result in health impacts

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A13

    Life goes on in Rutilio Grande, despite country’s gang violence

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A13 | Gallery

     
    .

    Sports

    Depth charge: DHS girls defeat Elk Grove

    By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Blue Devil boys lose on Herd’s buzzer-beating trey

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

    UCD women survive against winless UCSB

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

     
    Foursome will represent Davis at national soccer tournament

    By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Kings get past Pacers

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

    Sharks blank Blackhawks

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

     
    UCD roundup: Aggies make a racket but fall to Sac State, Pacific

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

    .

    Features

    .

    Arts

    .

    Business

    And the survey says: Success for Davis Chamber

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A12

     
    Putah Creek Winery launches ‘Give Back Tuesday’

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A12

    Doby Fleeman: Toward a more perfect Davis

    By Doby Fleeman | From Page: A12

     
    Ullrich Delevati, CPAs, adds senior accountant

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A12

    Novozymes, Cargill continue bio-acrylic acid partnership as BASF exits

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A13

     
    Seminar will cover business challenges

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A13

    Japanese fondue dips into Davis scene

    By Wendy Weitzel | From Page: A13 | Gallery

     
    .

    Obituaries

    .

    Comics

    Comics: Sunday, February 1, 2015

    By Creator | From Page: B8