Wednesday, October 1, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

City to overhaul its sprinkler heads, other water-wasters

civic poolW

Members of the Davis Aquatic Masters swim laps Thursday morning at the Civic Center Pool, Fifth and B streets. The aging pool reportedly has been leaking thousands of gallons of water per day. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

By
From page A1 | August 22, 2014 |

What’s good for the goose is good for the gander when it comes to the city advising residents on how to conserve water.

Owning up to multitudinous errant sprinkler heads and watering methods that end up flooding fields, washing sidewalks and providing a steady stream for gutters during a record drought, the city has added itself to a virtual list of folks that need some help with conservation, promising a large-scale rethinking and refitting of its irrigation systems.

At the same time, the City Council is due to take up the issue of recent stringent state requirements for residents to conserve water at its Sept. 2 meeting. Passed July 28, those regulations might make it against the rules to wash your driveway or sidewalk with water, operate any kind of decorative water feature that doesn’t recycle its liquid and make it punishable by up to a $500 fine to let those sprinklers run until water floods the sidewalk and gutter.

The council is due to take those new rules into account and see what they mean, exactly, for Davis.

Over time, the Public Works Department will be hunting for old and damaged sprinkler heads and nozzles out of an estimated crop of thousands. According to a recent news release, by next spring the city will look to replace 1,500 of the worst ones with new, more efficient sprinkler apparatus.

But there’s more.

The city is aiming to replace old irrigation timers with new, so-called SMART or central-based controllers that more accurately go along with weather patterns.

So far, 26 controllers have been swapped out in greenbelts and parks, and 75  more will be replaced by next spring. Out of 285 irrigation controllers, the city wants 130 of them central-based. It also wants to install 20 real-time alarms that would be triggered when the irrigation system is using too much water.

With added focus on conservation measures, which the city hopes will drop its water use by 40 percent, officials say they need to hire a water conservation specialist, re-assign some city staff for ongoing irrigation repairs and perhaps expand the landscape contractor’s irrigation responsibilities.

How do you check to see if the new controllers are working? The city says it already has retrofitted several parks, including Oak Grove, Whaleback and Chestnut parks with the new central-based controllers, plus the irrigation systems were outfitted with new sprinkler nozzles and high-efficiency rotors.

Still, there’s more.

Recent media reports have indicated there is a crack in Civic Center Pool that is leaking 7,000 gallons of water per day. Although the city admits some water is being lost from the aging pool, Samantha Wallace, city community services superintendent, said dye tests have been inconclusive as to whether there is a crack.

The Civic Center Pool was built before World War II when the current City Hall was the original Davis High School. However, while the city waits for an engineer to look over things, the pool is still in use, for good reason.

“A pool structure is not designed to go without water for any long period of time,” Wallace said, adding that a dry pool could develop cracks.

While that’s being done, the city also launched a new website called savedaviswater.org and wants locals to submit creative conservation techniques and ideas to info@savedaviswater.org.

Looking to track your own water use? Go to davis.waterinsight.com to get a tailor-made reading — past and present — of your water use and what you can do about it.

— Reach Dave Ryan at dryan@davisenterprise.net or 530-747-8057. Follow him on Twitter at @davewritenews

Comments

comments

.

News

Jury: Marsh legally sane during murders

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Undocumented Student Center offers help to immigrants

By Julia Ann Easley | From Page: A1 | Gallery

Rairdan supports more inquiry-based learning

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Standing In: Don’t write? I may as well stop breathing

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A2

 
Woodland man convicted in domestic violence case

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

Apply soon to be a Master Gardener

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

 
Katehi will address Rotarians on Monday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Mondavi Center hosts all-star lineup of classical, jazz, dance and more

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C3 | Gallery

Willett students sensitized to those who are different

By Maria Clayton | From Page: A3 | Gallery

 
Friends of the Library host biggest book sale of the year

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Give blood and get a free movie ticket

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Pedal around Davis on weekly bike ride

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

‘Edible City’ discussion planned

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
TSA bomb training may be noisy

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

AIM testing dates set this fall, winter

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A4

 
Tour Honey Bee Haven on Friday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Woodland City Cemetery tours planned

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
 
‘ADHD — Myth or Reality’ addressed at UCD talk

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Quotes from the Marsh double-murder trial

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A5 | Gallery

 
UCD athletics have break-from-work entertainment for everyone

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: C5 | Gallery

Quad abuzz with students

By Tanya Perez | From Page: A7 | Gallery

 
Wetlands visitors may see ducks arriving

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A10 | Gallery

Boy Scouts host family event in park

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A10

 
How did the Aggies get their name?

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C12

.

Forum

Hey, it’s free childcare …

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
Will you open your heart, and your home?

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

 
The right vote for education

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Just what Davis schools need

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

Nolan’s a calm voice of reason

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
.

Sports

DHS girls tennis team tames Lions

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Devil girls play dynamite pool defense

By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Davis volleyballers finish strong at Franklin

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

 
Hard-working Blue Devil boys get a water polo win

By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

A’s fall as AL wild-card game lives up to its name

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Legacy roundup: Milliennium takes Manteca tournament

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2

AYSO roundup: Beans, Capay can’t shake each other in U19 play

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

 
Alliance roundup: Los Azules, Italia win tourneys

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

Sports briefs: Real Salt Lake has too much for Republic

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B8

 
.

Features

From the ground up: Rediscovering classic cheesecake

By Ann Evans | From Page: A10 | Gallery

 
.

Business

.

Obituaries

Leonard D. Blackford

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Anne Elizabeth Elbrecht

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

.

Comics

Comics: Wednesday, October 1, 2014

By Creator | From Page: A8