Sunday, April 19, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Conaway hands over land for water project

ConawayW

Signing the property transfer agreement Tuesday afternoon are, from left, Woodland Mayor Skip Davies; Bob Thomas of Reclamation District 235; Angelo Tsakopoulos, managing partner of the Conaway Preservation Group; Kyriakos Tsakopoulos, president and CEO of the Conaway Preservation Group; and Davis Mayor Joe Krovoza. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

By
From page A1 | December 04, 2013 |

Local, state and federal officials gathered on the shores of the Sacramento River on Tuesday to witness an important step on the road to construction of the Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency surface water project.

With pen in hand at the ceremonial event, Angelo Tsakopoulos, managing partner of the Conaway Preservation Group, signed over the deed to the riverfront property where the water agency, in partnership with Reclamation District 2035, plans to build the intake facility that will pump a new source of drinking water for both Davis and Woodland.

“This has been a great example of government working at its best,” said Kyriakos Tsakopoulos, president of Conaway Ranch. “Working with the people that finds a solution that meets all of our considerations, again, the environment and clean water for our people.”

The cost of the easement was included in the deal for the Sacramento River water rights that the cities of Davis and Woodland made with Conaway in 2010.

Under that deal, the cities will pay Conaway $2.6 million starting in 2016, with a 2 percent increase annually for the next 24 years, at which point the cities will own the rights permanently. The deal guarantees Davis and Woodland 10,000 acre-feet of water every year.

But the facility won’t pump only drinking water. It also will provide a reliable water supply to the region’s agricultural industry. Further, it will add what environmentalists say is a much-needed fish screen on the Sacramento River.

In fact, it’s largely for those mutual benefits that the water agency and RD 2035 will be able to pay for the $42 million intake facility, which will be constructed in West Sacramento off of County Road 177.

It took a partnership between municipal, agricultural, state and federal stakeholders to devise a project that could provide those benefits, said Woodland Councilman Bill Marble, and that partnership, which so far has been successful in its mission to build this intake facility, should be celebrated.

“Where else in the western United States, perhaps in the entire United States, would you see an agricultural and a municipal intake being joined into one environmentally friendly facility?” he asked. “I challenge you to find that.”

For the past few years, water agency leaders have promised that the funding for the intake would come almost entirely from state and federal sources — agencies that would want to support a project that improves water quality and wildlife habitat.

Because the 100-year-old plant currently operating on the site is the largest unscreened water intake facility north of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, and because of the improved water quality, state and federal agencies pegged the project as a top candidate to receive funding, agency officials have said.

“The environment’s going to benefit, salmon are going to benefit, and tens of thousands of people in the communities of Woodland and Davis are going to benefit from the reliable surface water that’s going to be provided,” said Pablo Arroyave, regional deputy director for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation has promised $16.7 million to the project, half of which it allocated in September 2012. The state is expected to match that total through its Central Valley Project Restoration Fund, which allocates funds to projects that restore habitats for fish and other wildlife.

The state Senate Budget Committee approved $10 million of that overall $16.7 million commitment earlier this year.

“It’ll be one of those things that, over time, people will say: ‘Well what was the controversy about?’ because it will be clean water for many years,” said John Laird, the state’s secretary for natural resources.

State and federal agencies still allocate a total of about $14 million for the intake, otherwise the cities of Davis and Woodland would be on the hook for the remaining cost. Davis and Woodland already must split an $8 million share of the project.

The surface water project as a whole, which will cost Davis $106 million, largely will replace both Davis and Woodland’s ground well drinking water supplies once the system is built and on line in early 2017. The costs of building this new drinking water infrastructure will force water rates in Davis to triple over the next five years.

— Reach Tom Sakash at [email protected] or 530-747-8057. Follow him on Twitter at @TomSakash

Comments

comments

Tom Sakash

Tom Sakash covers the city beat for The Davis Enterprise. Reach him at [email protected], (530) 747-8057 or @TomSakash.
  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

    Aggie Pride on parade at UC Davis Picnic Day

    By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    City wants a study of sewer rates

    By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1

    Hard-of-hearing student needs community’s help

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    KDVS fund drive includes on-air pledging, plus parties and food

    By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
     
    Art helped sell California’s agriculture

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3 | Gallery

     
    Sign up now for Celebrate Davis!

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4Comments are off for this post

    Students, families can get after-hours Internet access

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Lawyers seek resolution to Davis molest case

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A4

    Garamendi hosts conference for women

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

     
    ‘Invaluable public servant’ retires after 20 years

    By Tanya Perez | From Page: A5 | Gallery

    Your brain’s aging and a new report urges ways to stay sharp

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B5

     
    Injury-proof yourself for effective exercise

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

    Understanding risks can help women prevent leading health threats

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

     
    Get some advice at Connections Café

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

    Eyewitness speaks about Israel’s election

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

     
    Free gardening advice offered

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

     
    Grad Night tickets on sale online

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

    Schenker speaks about ‘Magical Mexico’

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

     
    Yolo County DA honors crime victims at annual tribute

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

    Holman offers Publishing 101 seminar

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

     
    Radio-controlled airplanes will race April 25-26

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

    Vote with your dollars at Davis Food Co-op

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

     
    Woodland bike rides set every Saturday

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

    Join the 10,000-vegetable challenge!

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9Comments are off for this post

     
    NAMI group offers family support

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

    Birding tour will benefit Putah Creek Council

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10 | Gallery

     
    Watershed Wonders activities return to Putah Creek

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

    Yolo County Neighborhood Court seeks new volunteers

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

     
    UCD looks at building a better brain as we age

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

    ‘Vault’ highlights ‘Kathak’

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

     
    Two drought-preparedness water bills pass out of Senate committees

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11

    Picnic Day favorites: dogs, bikes science

    By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A13 | Gallery

     
    Strike up the band, and the bubbles!

    By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A14 | Gallery

    .

    Forum

     
    John Cole cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: B6

     
    Yolo Crisis Nursery still needs help

    By Our View | From Page: B6

    Drink up, kids, but make your choice a healthy one

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B6

     
    Leash your dogs; it’s the law

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B6

    Speak out

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: B7

     
    Let’s not turn our backs on the Earth

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B7

    This Earth Day, make a pledge to cool your home

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B7

     
    .

    Sports

    Fast Aggie start negated by 14-0 USC lacrosse run

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Stagnant second-half offense sinks Devil girls

    By Thomas Oide | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Over the hump? DHS baseball team wins late

    By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Lambdin, Marshall lead Aggies at Mt. SAC

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

    Republic FC gets another win at Bonney

    By Evan Ream | From Page: B2

     
    UCD roundup: Aggies sweep a water polo double dip

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

    Busy Clancy, Hall spark Devil tracksters at Mt. SAC

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

     
    Former DHS star Drexel returns to create havoc for Aggies

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B4 | Gallery

    Sports briefs: Blue Devils split a pair of tennis matches

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B14 | Gallery

     
    Pro baseball roundup: Oakland blanks Kansas City

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B14

    .

    Features

    .

    Arts

    .

    Business

    Marrone Bio Innovations strengthens its sales team

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A12

     
    New phase opens at Brookfield Cottages

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A12

    Tucos closes; new Japanese, pizza, subs debut

    By Wendy Weitzel | From Page: A12 | Gallery

     
    WISH grant funds available to eligible homebuyers

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A12

    .

    Obituaries

    Jody Zewe

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    Ruth Rodenbeck Stumpf

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

    Herman Timm

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    Robert Leigh Cordrey

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

    Alice Catherine Micheltorena

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    .

    Comics

    Comics: Sunday, April 19, 2015

    By Creator | From Page: B8