Wednesday, April 16, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Council due to decide fluoride issue on Tuesday

By
From page A1 | September 29, 2013 | 1 Comment

After months of community debate on water fluoridation, the City Council has the task Tuesday of determining whether the cavity-fighting compound should be added to the city’s drinking water supplies.

The special council meeting will start at 6:30 p.m. in the Community Chambers at City Hall, 23 Russell Blvd. It can be watched live on Comcast Channel 16, AT&T U-Verse Channel 99 and streamed on the city’s website at www.cityofdavis.org/media.

Should the council approve fluoridation, city staff estimate it would add about $2 per month to water utility bills in Davis. Proponents believe fluoridation would provide affordable preventative dental care to the public and opponents say it is an inefficient way to deliver that service, amid many other arguments and counterarguments.

Water charges in town are already expected to triple over the next five years, and continue to rise thereafter, after the council pumped up rates in March to raise enough cash to cover the city’s share of the Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency surface water project. That share is estimated at $110 million.

If the project stays on schedule, construction would start later this year and the new drinking water would arrive in Davis by 2016. The project will pump water from the Sacramento River, treat it at a plant shared by Davis and Woodland, and pipe it to each community.

The capital costs of fluoridating the surface water supply would be about $240,000 — though that number could grow to $300,000 if Woodland decides to not fluoridate its own supply. But the real cost for Davis is in fixing the deep wells with the compound.

To fluoridate the city’s six deep-water wells, engineers calculate a price tag of anywhere from $837,000 to $2 million in up-front capital costs.

Operation and maintenance costs of fluoridating Davis’ water supply, meanwhile, for both deep wells and the surface water plant would be about $230,000 to $240,000 per year.

While water bills likely would increase by a couple of bucks each month, if the council OKs fluoride, the city would not have to restart the rate-setting process, as the rates the council adopted in March still would cover the cost of fluoridation.

Water rates set by the Proposition 218 process are the maximum amounts a city can charge residents for water.

City staff will not make a recommendation one way or the other on fluoridation Tuesday, but Herb Niederberger, the city’s general manager of utilities, development and operations, and Dianna Jensen, the city’s principal civil engineer, do mention in their staff report that under state law, Davis is not required to fluoridate its water supply.

Cities in California are obligated to fluoridate drinking water only if outside funds are available to pay for it. If no funds are available, such as the case in Davis, the jurisdictions are exempt.

While staff has removed itself from the issue — though it did recommend not making a decision on the matter earlier this month because of the uncertain costs associated with fluoride — fluoridation has, in fact, been endorsed by the city’s Water Advisory Committee.

The conversation on fluoridation began this summer, when the WAC took up the issue, holding three lengthy meetings to allow the community to make their case for and against.

Public health officials and local advocates for fluoride argued that, when added to a public water supply, fluoride reduces cavity rates and dental decay and helps cities and their residents save substantial costs on dental care.

Opponents have countered that injecting fluoride into a water supply is not effective — citing studies demonstrating family income levels are a much higher predictor of cavity rates. They’ve also warned of the potential higher risk of fluorosis, a spotting of the teeth that occurs due to high exposure to fluoride.

After nine hours of public hearing over three meetings, the Water Advisory Committee eventually voted 6-1-1 in favor of a recommendation to the City Council that the city should fluoridate its drinking water.

— Reach Tom Sakash at tsakash@davisenterprise.net or 530-747-8057. Follow him on Twitter at @TomSakash

Tom Sakash

Tom Sakash covers the city beat for The Davis Enterprise. Reach him at tsakash@davisenterprise.net, (530) 747-8057 or @TomSakash.
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | 1 comment

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

  • Jeff MarchSeptember 29, 2013 - 11:02 am

    The Davis City Council is scheduled to rule this Tuesday whether to authorize annual operating costs of a quarter of a million dollars -- and up to $2 million in initial capital expenditures -- to fluoridate the city's water supply. The intention is to purportedly "benefit" people who supposedly have access to adequate dental care. That contention is flawed. Everyone has access to dental care and personal dental hygiene though flossing and use of fluoridated toothpaste or fluoride rinse. Individuals prioritize how to spend their money within their financial means. Fluoridation of the water supply undermines individual choice. By choice, I uses ACT fluoride rinse, an 18-ounce bottle of which costs about $4.50 and lasts nearly two months -- but I don't drink it, or cook with it, or shower in it, or pour it on my lawn. The City Council members were elected not to play the role of Robin Hood, but to defend the interests of the city's residents at large, with fiscal responsibility. Citywide fluoridation would unfairly impose further financial difficulties on middle-income families already struggling to meet their financial obligations. Fluoridation of the municipal water supply would be terribly inefficient. Nearly 30 years ago, the U.S.Department of Housing and Urban Development published a handbook (http://pubs.usgs.gov/chapter11/chapter11D.html) that reported "the largest components of inside household use are toilet flushing (39 percent) and bathing (30 percent)." The Department of Public Works for Lincoln, Nebraska, determined percentages for household indoor water: toilet flushing, 42 percent; showering and bathing, 30 percent; laundry, 14 percent; dishwashing, 6 percent; bathroom sinks, 3 percent; and finally, drinking and cooking, 5 percent (http://www.extension.unl.edu/c/document_library/get_file?folderId=221677&name=DLFE-3225.pdf). "Interesting water facts" that the Oldham County Water District in Kentucky posted on its website include these statistics: "About 74% of home water usage is in the bathroom, about 21% is for laundry and cleaning, and about 5% is in the kitchen." (http://www.oldhamcountywater.com/interesting-water-facts.html). The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department reports "Toilet flushing is by far the largest single use of water in a home. Without counting lawn watering, typical percentages of water use for a family of four are: toilet flushing 40%, bath/showering 32%, laundry 14%, dishwashing 6%, cooking/drinking 5% and bathroom sink use 3%" (http://www.dwsd.org/pages_n/water101.html). And a "Teaches' Guide" that the California Department of Water Resources published (http://www.water.ca.gov/education/docs/TeacherGuide.pdf) attributes the following percentages for household water consumption: outdoor uses, 38%; toilets, 22%; bathing, 18%, laundry, 12%; faucets, 5%; drinking and cooking, 5%. Despite variances in other figures, all of those agencies are in agreement that drinking and cooking account for only 5 percent of household water consumption. The federal government banned incandescent electric bulbs because -- guess watt -- they convert only 5 percent of the energy they consume into visible light. Yet the Davis City Council is considering instituting a costly new program that would by all accounts have an efficiency rating of 5 percent, and which would subvert my freedom of choice. For all these reasons and more, this proposal deserves to be rejected.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

     
    ‘Eco-Heroes’ help get us from here to there

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A1, 2 Comments | Gallery

     
    Alleged serial killings highlight GPS limits

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    CHP seeks owner of lost cash

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

     
    Home building up in March after frigid winter

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    Davis elder-abuse case wraps up

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

    Family fiction in miniature showcased at bookstore event

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3 | Gallery

     
    Local professor subdues unruly man on flight

    By Adrian Glass-Moore | From Page: A3, 1 Comment

    Yolo Crisis Nursery is in crisis; please help

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    Meditation, Buddhism classes offered

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Seniors can get tips for getting around town

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    School has garden plots for rent

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Sugar overload, on ‘Davisville’

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Rotarians, students, teachers, parents collaborate on planter boxes

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

    Garden doctor: Veggie gardening available year-round

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

     
    Animal expert explains dogs’ thinking

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

    Check out the night sky

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5 | Gallery

     
    Hop to it: Easter Bunny meets Davis history tour

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

     
    Central Park Gardens to host Volunteer Orientation Day

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7 | Gallery

     
    .

    Forum

    Still supporting this guy

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B5

     
    Tom Meyer cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

    Urban forest under siege

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6, 5 Comments

     
    Drought care for our trees

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6, 1 Comment

    .

    Sports

     
    UCD staff allows 19 hits in Causeway rout

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    DHS softball struggles in nonleague outing

    By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Devils open Boras Classic by splitting games

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    JV/frosh roundup: DHS sweeps a trio of baseball games

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

    Baseball roundup: River Cats get by Grizzlies at Raley

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B3

     
    Giants beat L.A. in 12

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B3

    Sports briefs: Stanford sends Aggies home with a lacrosse loss

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B8 | Gallery

     
    .

    Features

     
    .

    Arts

    Craft Center exhibit explores ‘Possibilities’

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9

     
    RootStock to host wine themed plein aire exhibit

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

    The California Honeydrops to bring danceable groove to The Palms

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

     
    See Flower Power exhibit at Gallery 625

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

    Red Union Blue inks record deal

    By Landon Christensen | From Page: A9 | Gallery

     
    .

    Business

    .

    Obituaries

    .

    Comics

    Comics: Wednesday, April 16, 2014

    By Creator | From Page: B6