Friday, February 27, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Diseased tree cut down at Third and F

Crews from Stockton-based West Coast Arborists cut up pieces of a diseased tree they were removing Thursday on the southwest corner of Third and F streets in downtown Davis. The carob tree had developed a fungal conk. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

By
From page A4 | January 27, 2012 |

The city of Davis was forced to cut down a carob tree on the southwest corner of F and Third Streets Thursday after its structural fibers had begun to rot due to disease.

Passersby may have noticed crews using a cherry picker to reach upper portions of the tree and cut it into pieces.

The city discovered fungal conks had taken root on the 48-year-old tree, indicating that the tree had started to deteriorate from the inside.

According to the city’s arborist, Rob Cain, the tree was removed because the disease had compromised its structural integrity, jeopardizing the safety of passing pedestrians.

Cain explained how the tree became infected.

“There’s been some large pruning wounds done on it in the past, so as those wounds do not close over, those are open infection sites,” Cain explained. “Whatever fungal spores that get blown around through downtown can land in those open wounds and with the right environment, go ahead and infect the tree.

“That’s why we try not to make too big of cuts on our trees when we’re cutting them because the big wounds take a long time to seal over.”

Cain says the city has no plans of replacing the deceased tree with another carob tree because the planting area is too tight for that large of a tree, but other species will be considered.

The carob tree stood about 30 feet tall and measured 15 to 20 inches in diameter. Cain doesn’t recall any similar infections taking place in trees in the city.

Aside from safety concerns, if the city decided not to cut down the tree, it could have infected neighboring trees as well.

“The spores from the fungal conk, the fruit, if those basically spread to a neighboring tree — say the neighboring tree has a wound — then it could infect a neighboring tree,” Deputy City Manager Kelly Stachowicz said.

Though, the situation Stachowicz described is not as likely to occur in the downtown area, as it’s a disease more common to a forest with a high density of trees.

The tree’s removal cost the city approximately $300. According to Cain, the appraised value of similar trees is about $4,000.

— Reach Tom Sakash at [email protected] or (530) 747-8057. Follow him on Twitter @TomSakash.

Comments

comments

Tom Sakash

Tom Sakash covers the city beat for The Davis Enterprise. Reach him at [email protected], (530) 747-8057 or @TomSakash.
.

News

Learn about pollinators, gardens and honey at Yolo Basin fundraiser

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
New greenhouse will add to ‘Farm to Mouth’ program

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1

Can you give them a home?

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2 | Gallery

 
For the record

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

 
Explorit: Humming right along

By Lisa Justice | From Page: A3

Gerber nominations close Saturday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Flower arrangers feature S.F. designer

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Celebrate Africa on Saturday at I-House

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Chamber explores how to pay for Davis’ needs

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Robb Davis to speak about homelessness, energy

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Spring sing-along is March 4

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Wolk and Dodd team up to provide Napa earthquake tax relief

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Class of 1970 plans 45-year reunion

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

A fill-up mishap

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

 
Bicycle safety course to be offered in Davis

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
Take a night walk at Cache Creek

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Documentary on immigration issues will be screened

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

 
Two free yoga classes offered March 12

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Learn about your brain on March 14

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
Workshop will teach sustainable gardening methods

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

.

Forum

.

Sports

Encouraging start for DHS boys tennis team

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Off day for Aggie men at UCSB

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Lady Devils are on to the SJS semis

By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Aggie women fall to 4th after lackluster showing

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Inquiring minds want to know about Aggies

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1

 
Late goal lifts Red Wings over Sharks

By The Associated Press | From Page: B4 | Gallery

 
Watney struggling at windy Honda Classic

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B12

.

Features

.

Arts

YoloArts’ Gallery 625 presents ‘The Poetry of Dots’

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10 | Gallery

 
The Artery presents ‘Stepping Into Nature’

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A10 | Gallery

Monticello announces March schedule

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

 
International Film Series to present ‘Jaffa’

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

‘Focus': A sharply conceived caper

By Derrick Bang | From Page: A11 | Gallery

 
The Woodland Opera House announces 2015-16 season

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A12 | Gallery

.

Business

Nissan’s Z remains an affordable performer

By Ann M. Job | From Page: B3

 
.

Obituaries

Vernon E. Burton

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Dieter W. Gruenwedel

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

Death notice: Celia E. Recchio

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
.

Comics

Comics: Friday, February 27, 2015

By Creator | From Page: B5