Thursday, July 24, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Natsoulas asks community to help public art flourish

William Maul, foreground, mixes paint Saturday afternoon as his fellow artists bring to life one of his paintings, "It Can Happen NOW ... TO YOU!," on a wall fronting the E Street alley behind Peet's Coffee & Tea. On the scaffolding are Jennifer Pochinski, left, and Kerry Rowland-Avrech and underneath are Myron Stephens, left, and James Chaffee. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

By
From page A1 | May 13, 2012 |

You can help

What: Flourish Davis: a benefit to support art in public places

When: 6 p.m. Saturday

Where: John Natsoulas Gallery, 521 First St., downtown Davis

By the end of the day Sunday, Davis artist William Maul, in collaboration with several other local artists, will have completed the first mural of a 10-piece series that will adorn buildings and city walls throughout downtown Davis.

This work of art is in the alleyway behind the E Street near the entrance to Peet’s Coffee & Tea, 231 E St.

The cost of the mural — a copy of one of Maul’s original paintings that depicts an actress screaming from a scene in an old horror flick, “The Devil Thumbs a Ride” — normally would run somewhere from $20,000 to $30,000. However, Maul and his team of painters are working for absolutely nothing.

Such is often the case for an artist who wants to adorn downtown Davis these days.

“There’s not art in public places money,” says John Natsoulas, the gallery owner who is part of the Cultural Arts Committee that coordinated the 10-mural ensemble. “The city is in trouble, so here we are, we’re coming up with our own resources.”

Natsoulas will pay for the supplies — the paint, the brushes and the lights — out of his own pocket as he has done for other public art projects downtown like the transmedia sculpture artwalk, which he unveiled a few months ago.

But as the city grapples with a lean budget, artists like Maul must work with the understanding that, unless Natsoulas or another private interest fronts the money — which Maul says is rare — the only compensation for their work will come in the form of painting a bit of Davis history.

For Maul, however, that’s a valuable commodity.

“I kind of see it, for me personally, as a bit of a legacy,” says the painter, who moved back to Davis in 1995 after living in the city in the late 1980s. “It’s a way to leave your mark that’s more visible.”

Natsoulas believes, however, that aside from the fact that artists deserve more for their work, public art projects in town simply won’t happen without more support.

And though he remains committed to helping in any way he can, the gallery owner can’t afford to support an entire community’s worth of art.

“I think nationally we’re going to get attention because we’re getting the art on loan, we’re painting murals on properties for free; there’s no community in the world that can do this,” Natsoulas says.

And Natsoulas says if the community wants to see more projects like the mural series, or an arts and entertainment district or other forms of art in public places come to life, Davis residents will need to step up and answer the call.

As a first step in asking the public to help out, the gallery owner has planned a benefit Saturday called Flourish Davis to directly support art in public places throughout the city. The event will begin at 6 p.m. at the John Natsoulas Gallery, 521 First St. in downtown Davis.

“We’re trying to say, ‘Restore the arts in Davis,’ ” Natsoulas says. “I think my challenge is if (residents) are supportive of arts in Davis, come (to the event). Listen to what the artists have done and what they want to do.”

Guests will be able to bid in a silent auction on artwork donated by local artists as well as on gifts given by local merchants and restaurateurs. All of the proceeds will go to the Cultural Arts Committee, which will use the money to fund various projects it has planned.

“It could be the start of something big,” Natsoulas says. “If we get enough money, enough people show up, we’re actually going to accomplish something. Davis will be a piece of art.”

However, Natsoulas hasn’t given up hope on the city and its ability in the future to fund local art programs.

At the benefit, Natsoulas will circulate a petition to restore the Civic Arts Commission budget. Last year, the City Council cut the Arts Contracts program, an $18,500 chunk of the art commission’s funds.

Before the auction — which also will feature live music — Natsoulas and Mayor Joe Krovoza will unveil two new sculptures that will be a part of the transmedia sculpture walk.

One is a large-format sculpture called “Circus” by Susannah Israel and the other is a sculpture built last week by artists attending the annual California Conference for the Advancement of Ceramic Art, to address budget cuts to the arts in this state. It currently sits outside of the Natsoulas Gallery.

The city has not yet specified locations for the two pieces.

The artists who will contribute to the 10-mural series are Maul, Joe Bellacera, Don Fritz, James Chaffee, Ted Fontaine, Guy Diehl, Kelly Detweiler, Jennifer Pochinski, Kerry Rowland-Avrech and Myron Stephens.

To learn more about Maul, visit his website at www.williammaulart.com.

— Reach Tom Sakash at tsakash@davisenterprise.net or (530) 747-8057. Follow him on Twitter @TomSakash

Tom Sakash

Tom Sakash covers the city beat for The Davis Enterprise. Reach him at tsakash@davisenterprise.net, (530) 747-8057 or @TomSakash.
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | 2 comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

  • Michael BischMay 13, 2012 - 8:12 pm

    Way to go Bill, John, the volunteer artists, the Cultural Action Committee, and the property owners supporting the mural project. The community owes all of you a great debt of gratitude for bringing yet more culture to our community. I hope you enjoy a tremendously successful fundraiser on Saturday. PS: Another great article, Tom.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • MontoMay 19, 2012 - 6:30 am

    William Maul’s “It can happen NOW…TO YOU” is the first interactive mural in the world. On the surface of the mural are three RFID tags that allows the public to retrieve, display, and share videos that show the Davis Mural Team in action (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zbUSalP3zs). In addition, using an NFC cell phone, individuals, artists, and citizens can leave stories, poetry, and music. Leave a message. Burn an impression. The issue is sharing experiences.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

    Teens lead the way in fight against cancer

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
     
    Ag officials predict bumper almond crop

    By Elizabeth Case | From Page: A1 | Gallery

    Official: Air Algerie flight ‘probably crashed’

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    New-home sales plummet in June

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    CSU pumps brakes on enrollment growth

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

    Victim of fatal crash identified

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

     
    Diplomas all around for professor and sons

    By Dave Jones | From Page: A3, 1 Comment | Gallery

     
    Consumption guidelines for Cache Creek fish updated

    By Elizabeth Case | From Page: A3

     
    Davis Flea hosts night market Sunday

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Free technology help offered to seniors

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Contestants sought for Yolo County Fair Queen contest

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Parents can learn all about IEPs

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Museum sells market bags as fundraiser

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    City of Davis recruits for its advisory commissions

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Local singer/songwriter will perform Friday on KDRT

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

    Colleges woo Native Americans with new programs

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A5 | Gallery

     
    Zip Book: Request it, read it, return it

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

    .

    Forum

    Battle lines are drawn

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    Tom Meyer cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

     
    Act now to support middle school students

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

    Don’t tell me I can’t help him

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    Water trains through Davis

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6, 3 Comments

    Water storage must be a priority

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6, 1 Comment

     
    .

    Sports

    UCD coach has navigated a Maze of experiences

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Lethargic and roster-thin, Post 77 loses Area 1 opener

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1

    Pence outscores Phillies

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Quincy Amarikwa: years in the making

    By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Area sports briefs: Nelson earns All-Academic honors

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3

     
    Youth roundup: Aftershock finishes second in tournament

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3

    Majka makes winning look easy

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B10 | Gallery

     
    .

    Features

    Name Droppers: Transportation fellowship goes to Aggie

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

     
    .

    Arts

     
    ‘South Pacific’ storyline still making waves

    By Bev Sykes | From Page: A7 | Gallery

    ‘The Miracle Worker’ auditions set for WOH

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

     
    .

    Business

    .

    Obituaries

    Death notice: James Thomas Feather

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A2

     
    .

    Comics

    Comics: Thursday, July 24, 2014

    By Creator | From Page: B8