Friday, March 27, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Community college classes tougher to get into

By
March 28, 2011 |

By Nanette Asimov

Thinking of taking math, science or English at a California community college next fall? You may want to try Florida instead. Or Tennessee.

Anywhere but California.

Students in this state are almost twice as likely as those in other states to be shut out of community college courses they need, says a national survey of 1,434 undergrads ages 18 to 59 to be released today.

Classes were so packed last fall that 47 percent of the 260 California community college students surveyed said they couldn’t enroll in one or more of those they needed, according to the Pearson Foundation study.

By contrast, 28 percent of community college students outside of California had the same problem.

“California has unusually low tuition, and the state’s built on easy access” to college, said Seth Reichlin, senior vice president of market research for Pearson Education, a curriculum publisher.

“The front door’s open, but the classroom door’s closed.”

It’s nothing that Jack Scott, chancellor of the community college system, isn’t painfully aware of.

“Many, many students come to us and can’t find the classes they need,” Scott told the Assembly’s budget subcommittee last month, estimating that 140,000 students were turned away last year. “We’re as popular as we’ve ever been, so it’s the best of times, and the worst of times.”

With 2.7 million students, California’s community college system is still the nation’s largest.

Here’s what the new survey says about them, compared with students in other states.

The vast majority in California, 90 percent, are returning students, rather than first-time freshmen. In other states, 85 percent are returning students.

California students “have high ambitions,” says the survey, because 75 percent plan to transfer to four-year schools. Just 53 percent of students elsewhere say the same.

Yet fewer California students attend full time: 37 percent to 46 percent. That may be because in-state students report having more financial pressures than those in other states — even dropping courses because of it.

In California, 20 percent of students dropped at least one course last semester, compared with 14 percent elsewhere. Regardless of where they went to school, about 60 percent of students said they quit because of the professor.

But California students were more likely to also blame life’s pressures: work obligations (40 percent to 19 percent in other states), financial reasons (35 percent to 18 percent), and family obligations (26 percent to 21 percent).

“If you have to worry about putting dinner on the table versus going to class, it’s a pretty easy decision,” said Alex Pader, president of the Student Senate for California Community Colleges, who is enrolled at both American River community college in Sacramento and at Sacramento State University.

Pader also serves on a state task force of 21 education experts trying to improve community college transfer rates and student success in an era of deep budget cuts.

The community college system of 112 campuses gets more than $9 billion a year from the state. Lawmakers will reduce its allocation by $290 million in 2011-12, and by another $129 million in 2012-13. That could drop further if Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposal to extend existing taxes never makes it to the ballot box or if voters defeat it.

Meanwhile, the community college price tag is rising to $36 a unit from $26 next fall.

— Reach Nanette Asimov at [email protected]

Comments

comments

San Francisco Chronicle

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

    Anti-gay initiative puts AG in a bind

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A1

     
    County supervisors consider options for historic courthouse

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1 | Gallery

    Two found dead of apparent shooting in West Davis home

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    New Paso Fino design trims lots

    By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1

    Co-pilot may have hidden illness, German prosecutors say

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    Senate’s Harry Reid announces he won’t seek re-election

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

    Woodland police warn of kidnapping phone scam

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

     
    Need a new best friend?

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3 | Gallery

     
    Lawyer disputes police’s hoax claim in California kidnapping

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A3

    Davis Flower Arrangers meet Wednesday

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Sign up for Camp Shakespeare

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Empower Yolo offers peer counselor training

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    State loosens sex offender residency restrictions

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A5

     
    Neighbors invited to adopt Willow Creek Park

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

    Sing along on April Fool’s Day

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

     
    Three nabbed in counterfeiting probe

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A6

    .

    Forum

    Can he get life back on track?

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    Blame Reid for impasse

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A7

     
    Practice cancer prevention each day

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

    Turnabout is fair play

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A7

     
    Be aware and be afraid

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A7

    .

    Sports

    UCD men edge Hawaii on the court

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

     
    UCD’s Hawkins, Harris to shoot at Final Four

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Home sweet home: Aggie women win a tennis match

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

     
    Devil boys grind out a net win at Franklin

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

    DHS baseballers fall to Vintage in eight innings

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

     
    DYSA roundup: Recent youth softball games feature big hitting

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

    Sacramento get its second straight win

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

     
    Sharks get a key win over Detroit

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B10 | Gallery

     
    .

    Features

    .

    Arts

    UCD Student Fashion Association presents charity fashion show

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

     
    ‘Get Hard’ comes across as rather limp

    By Derrick Bang | From Page: A8 | Gallery

    Smokey Brights to perform at Sophia’s

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    ‘Deserted Destinations’ is April exhibit at Gallery 625

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9 | Gallery

    Monticello announces April live-music shows

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    Leonardo Tuchman’s work shows at UC Davis Craft Center Gallery

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9

    Sacramento Youth Symphony holding open auditions

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9

     
    Preview Art Studio Tour participants’ work at The Artery

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

    .

    Business

    Camry Hybrid takes a step forward

    By Ann M. Job | From Page: B3

     
    .

    Obituaries

    Celebrate Rusty Jordan’s Life

    By Creator | From Page: A4

     
    .

    Comics

    Comics: Friday, March 27, 2015

    By Creator | From Page: B4