Thursday, September 18, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

marsh

By
September 18, 2014 |

WOODLAND — For a couple of hours, Daniel Marsh feigned ignorance to police about a recent double homicide in his hometown, saying he’d heard just a few details from the news and at school about the couple slain in their South Davis condominium.

 

“An elderly couple, or something — I know that somebody broke in and stabbed these two people, but I don’t really know anything else,” Marsh said in a video-recording of his interview with a Davis police detective and FBI agent on June 17, 2013, the day of his arrest in connection with the murders of Oliver “Chip” Northup and Claudia Maupin.

 

Marsh told Detective Ariel Pineda he’d been at his mother’s house the weekend of the April 14, 2013, killings, “probably playing video games or playing guitar,” though may have ventured out to a Guitar Center store with friends at one point. As for the crime, “I had nothing to do with it. It was just a lazy weekend.”

 

What Marsh didn’t know at that point was two friends had turned him in, reporting to police earlier that day that he had admitted his role in the Cowell Boulevard stabbings in the days after they occurred.

 

Marsh eventually confesses to the murders in the video, the admissibility of which defense attorney Ron Johnson challenged earlier this year by claiming Marsh’s statements were involuntary. He reiterated his objection Wednesday, but Judge David Reed upheld his ruling that jurors would see the recording.

 

They got about a third of the way through the roughly five-hour video before court adjourned for the day.

 

Though just 16 years old at the time, Marsh appeared comfortable with his adult interrogators, waiving his Miranda rights before offering details about his troubled family history and several-year battle with depression. He seemed to hedge when Pineda asked where Marsh’s father had been living at the time of the murders, but eventually disclosed that “I think we were neighbors with the people that got killed.”

 

“It freaked them out,” Marsh said of his father and sister, who lived there at the time. “You wake up and find out the people next to you are dead — it could have been us.”

 

The conversation later turned to compulsion-driven crimes, with Marsh telling FBI Special Agent Chris Campion that “the psychology behind it is fascinating.” He also noted that “people do horrible things, but that doesn’t necessarily make them horrible people.”

 

About an hour into the video Pineda offered to let Marsh make a phone call, but the teen declined. Later, when his cell phone rang, Marsh pulled it from his pocket to silence it before proceeding with the interview.

 

Internet presence detailed

 

Using the handle “Toki,” Marsh compiled hours of videos and hundreds of images on his Tumblr social media page, much of which even a seasoned police investigator described as “very graphic.”

 

“A lot of beheadings, a lot of dead bodies, that type of gore,” said Brent Buehring of the Yolo County District Attorney’s Office high-tech unit, the final witness to be called Wednesday in the prosecution’s case against Marsh.

 

The 17-year-old is being tried as an adult on two counts of first-degree murder with special circumstances. He has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity under the theory that mental illness combined with the side effects of antidepressant medications triggered his homicidal urges.

 

Although most of images Buehring described were not displayed in court, the investigator said he traced many of them to a website Marsh frequented that features gruesome photos of injuries and deaths, including eviscerations similar to what his alleged victims had sustained.

 

And while some of the film clips appeared to be movie portrayals of violence, “there were plenty of real live people getting their throats slit, getting stabbed, getting shot,” Buehring testified.

 

Questioned about Marsh’s postings in the days surrounding the murders, Buehring noted an image of the words “legalize murder” scrawled onto a wall on April 11, 2013, three days before the killings. A day later he posted, “My head is a very dark place.”

 

In addition to the gore-related websites, data from Marsh’s laptop computer revealed research into horror movies, school shootings and, on May 26, 2013, a visit to Google Maps that charted the distance from Marsh’s Lillard Drive home to 4005 Cowell Blvd., the latter address a digit off from where Northup and Maupin were slain.

 

Evidence seized

 

As Marsh’s police interview was underway, Davis police and FBI investigators served a search warrant at the Lillard Drive house, where Davis police Detective Ron Trn recalled finding the alleged murder weapon — a six-inch buck knife — and Marsh’s bloodied jacket and gloves in the cluttered garage.

 

Attorneys stipulated in court Wednesday that DNA samples taken from the stained clothing matched that of Northup, 87, and Maupin, 76.

 

Police also found a pair of black shoes, the soles of which had been concealed underneath duct tape imprinted with a skull-and-crossbones pattern. Marsh reportedly told investigators he covered the soles so he wouldn’t leave shoeprints behind — a technique he may have culled from his participation in the Davis Police Department’s youth academy in the summer of 2010.

 

Marsh never missed a day of the academy, which included two days of instruction about crime-scene investigations, according to another attorney stipulation.

 

Following a break in the trial today and Friday, the case resumes Monday with testimony from Dr. James Merikangas, a Maryland-based neurologist and psychiatrist whose evaluation of Marsh is expected to back the insanity defense theory. Jurors may view the remainder of the interview video later in the day.

 

— Reach Lauren Keene at lkeene@davisenterprise.net or 530-747-8048. Follow her on Twitter at @laurenkeene

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Respond to Bob Dunning’s column

By
September 17, 2014 |

Bob-

I enjoy reading your column each day. You certainly track the pulse of the community and shed an entertaining light on a wide range of topics impacting Davis. And I eagerly look forward to your weekly college football picks. However, much like you missed on many of your picks for the major bowl games last year, you missed on the jab you took at School Board candidate Madhavi Sunder by criticizing her yard signs in last week’s column.
Although you expressed your aversion to the colorful signs, they were good enough to get you to take notice of them appearing all around town, which is reflective of the fact that Madhavi and her team have worked tirelessly to build a groundswell of backers. The more important consideration is that Madhavi is committed to helping tackle the most important issues that face the district, including the strengthening of our neighbor schools while further developing other unique programs made available to all of our children. The results of this activism will continue to fortify our school district as one of the best in the state. Anyone who has spent time with Madhavi will tell you that NO ONE will fight harder for Davis schools! She will put in the time and energy necessary to serve our young students. She is open-minded and will consider all sides of any given issue. This gives me comfort that all decisions she is involved in will be reached through a robust and thoughtful process.
We are lucky that Madhavi is a leading candidate for the school board as she brings a level of professionalism and commitment needed for this important public service position. So please let me know if I can push a Madhavi Sunder sign or two into your yard sometime soon – you should be happy that they will match all of your Oregon State Beaver paraphernalia scattered around your property!

Joncarlo Mark

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Letters to the Editor

School board hopefuls field questions at candidate forum

By
September 18, 2014 |

The seven school board hopefuls seeking three four-year terms on the Davis school board in the upcoming November election fielded a variety of questions during a candidate forum on Wednesday night — as did recently-appointed school board trustee Alan Fernandes, who is running unopposed for a two-year term (and as a result, his name will not appear on the November ballot, but he nonetheless chose to participate in the candidate forum).

This year’s field of school board candidates is the largest in at least 20 years, which made for a rather long session. And because there were so many candidates responding to each question, the candidates got less than two minutes — and in one instance barely 30 seconds — to respond.

The seven candidates seeking the three four-year terms are (in reverse alphabetical order):

–Madhavi Sunder, law professor at UC Davis.

–Chuck Rairdan, longtime administrator with a federal agency (the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

–Bob Poppenga (rhymes with “bay”), a professor with the UC Davis veterinary school.

–Mike Nolan, an attorney who also “became a homemaker,” raising several children who attended local schools.

–Jose Granda, a longtime engineering professor at Sacramento State, and a consistent opponent of local school district parcel tax measures.

–Barbara Archer, a communications professional for a Yolo County organic grower.

–Tom Adams, manager 0f a curriculum-related department at the California Department of Education in Sacramento.

 

 

–The candidates were asked if they speak Spanish. Fernandes, Poppenga, Sunder and Archer said no. Nolan said “very little.” Rairdan said he speaks “a little,” but is by no means fluent. Adams (whose daughter came up through the district’s Spanish Immersion program) said that when he tries to speak Spanish, his daughter said “it hurts her ears.” Granííída, who was born in Equador, replied “Sí, con mucho gusto” (which could be translated as “Yes, with pleasure” or alternately “with enthusiasm.”)

Wednesday’s forum was sponsored by Davis Media Access and the Davis Vanguard, and will be rebroadcast on Davis cable television at intervals between now and November 4. At least two other community groups are considering sponsoring forums for school board candidates, but no dates or times for those events have been announced. The local unit of the League of Women Voters, which has sponsored school board candidate forums in years past, disbanded earlier this year.

 

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Unitrans persists through changing times

By
September 16, 2014 |

In 1968, when the Associated Students of UC Davis decided to start a bus system for UCD students, they considered contracting with a school bus operator.

But the little-kid image associated with a yellow school bus “wasn’t what students wanted,” said Unitrans general manager Anthony Palmere. “The idea was to make the service attractive to students.”

Instead, the ASUCD purchased two London double decker buses so students could ride in style.

“It was the 1960s and London meant the Beatles,” Palmere said. “(Having the double deckers) made it seem like a cooler thing to do, to ride on a London bus.”

The program began with two buses on two routes. More buses were soon added, and in 1972, the system began offering rides to the public.

The program took off. Unitrans now transports more than 3.5 million passengers each year,  more than 20,000 riders on the average day. And three vintage London double decker buses are still in service.

“The vintage double deckers are an icon for us, but they do have some limitations,” Palmere said. The buses aren’t as accessible for people with physical disabilities, and are not air-conditioned–a critical flaw during hot summer days.

Plus, the London buses are laid out for London streets. The steering wheel is on the right, while passengers board on the left. This means riders must walk into the street to board the bus.

The system’s terminal, at Memorial Union, was built to accommodate the London buses–which meant that the fleet’s 46 modern buses were the ones forced to let their passengers out into the street, Palmere said.

That’s why UCD opted to remodel the terminal this year, reorienting the loading system so that “all buses drop passengers off at the curb,” Palmere said. The new terminal will open September 29, and riders are assured that “there’s still one space for the vintage buses,” Palmere said.

That’s good news for Unitrans drivers like Shazib Haq, for whom driving double deckers is part of the appeal of the job.

“They don’t have power steering, and you’re driving on the right hand side,” Haq said. “(But) the vintage ones are a real treat to drive.”

Like all Unitrans drivers, Haq is a UCD student. That’s another special thing about Unitrans: in addition to being the only United States bus system with London double decker buses, the system is primarily run by undergrads.

Unitrans is a partnership between ASUCD and the city of Davis, Palmere said. The city provides funding through state and federal grants and keeps trees trimmed along the double decker bus routes; UCD keeps the program running. It’s not unique for a city and a university to cooperate in this way to provide public transit, Palmere said, but it is unusual.

According to Haq, who is both driver and operations manager, most of the supervisors, support staff, and mechanics are students. Longer-term staff positions, such as higher-level mechanic positions and Palmere’s post as general manager, aren’t held by students, Haq said.

In many cases, drivers also ride.

Mia Colvin is a third-year student and a Unitrans driver. She takes the bus daily, she said; she doesn’t have a car.

Alvin Ong, another driver, sometimes rides the double deckers “just for fun,” he said. “Sitting on the top level, in front, you see Davis unfolding.”

Colvin and Ong attribute the service’s popularity among undergraduates to a fee hike: in 1990, UCD students voted to impose a fee that pays for the service whether the student uses it or not. As a result, undergraduates ride for free when they show their UCD ID.

Riders who aren’t students can purchase a variety of bus passes–including annual, monthly, and 10-ride passes–from the Unitrans Business Office (5 South Hall, on the UCD campus), the Davis City Hall Annex, or UCD Transportation and Parking Services.

Ridership drops during the summer months, when most UCD students are away. On a recent Saturday afternoon, a bus on the P line was nearly empty. But as the bus drew nearer to campus and Downtown Davis, it began to fill.

Riders boarded in twos and threes, some in worn Vans with backpacks casually slung over one shoulder, others wearing heeled sandals and oversized sunglasses. A few were absorbed in their smartphones, earbuds in; others chatted. One man took a catnap, fedora pulled low over his eyes.

Ong and Colvin said that riders can help the bus run on time.

“Always have your student ID out (if you’re an undergrad),” Colvin said. Riders fumbling with passes or fares delay the bus’s departure.

“Ask the driver if you don’t know where you’re going,” Ong said. “We’re very friendly.” And passengers who know their stop and pull the “Stop Request” cord at the right time help keep drivers’ jobs smooth.

Driver Cortney Rebholtz said passengers should signal the driver if they feel they’ll have trouble stepping into the bus from the curb. Drivers can “kneel” the bus, which only takes  a few seconds and lowers the bus to the curb.

Rebholtz, who’s been a Unitrans driver for three years, says that meeting people is part of the joy of the job.

“You have regulars,” she said. “You start recognizing people going about their lives, and they recognize you, they talk to you.”

“It’s a fun job. I’d rather sit behind the wheel than behind a desk.”

 

 

 

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A Welcome Challenge

By
September 28, 2014 |

Welcome, readers! Another year has gone by and fall is upon us. The morning air is crisp, the night sky darkens before the kids are in bed and there’s a palpable resurgence of energy buzzing about the dorms as move-in weekend arrives. Around town celebrations have been planned to welcome newcomers and reunite neighbors, downtown shines up its store fronts, bike lanes see increased traffic and grocery store lines get quite a bit longer. To us, this time of year also means putting out our Welcome to Davis editions. Putting together interesting stories and fun facts about our town, its history, the university and what Davisites like to do in their downtime makes for, well, a ‘Welcome’ challenge.

So, how do we inspire newcomers and townies to get out and play, be involved and enjoy all that our area has to offer in just four editions?

This year’s answer: A picture is worth a thousand words.

Being a newspaper, of course we are committed to the written word (and hope that you read every last one). In addition to all the stories, reports and lists of information you need to know, want to know and didn’t-know-you-wanted-to-know-before-you-read-it, are the professional talents of photographers Wayne Tilcock, Fred Gladdis and Sue Cockrell. We know you’ll enjoy the “Snapshots” of special events, recreational opportunities and tidbits of knowledge that make Davis a special place.

Also new this year is a question-and-answer project we conducted at Central Park. Volunteers were asked one of four questions: 1) Word association: What comes to mind when you hear the word Davis? 2) Number of wheels: How many bicycles do you have in your household? 3) Davis essentials: What does an incoming freshman need? 4) Your happy place: What’s your favorite place in Davis to take visitors? You will find their answers illustrated photographically throughout the edition’s four sections.

* Today’s issue, “Only in Davis,” explores some of the things that make Davis unique. From backyard chicken coops, to a thriving farm-to-fork movement to compelling public art, this issue teaches you how to embrace being a Davisite.
* On Tuesday, “Our Community” will focus on the numerous opportunities to become involved through service clubs, political causes, athletic clubs and the arts.
* Wednesday’s “On Campus” highlights little-known facts of UC Davis, campus events you won’t want to miss and how to get involved with all things Aggie.
* On Thursday, we wrap it up with “On the Go,” highlighting transportation trends and options and recreation opportunities around the town and surrounding areas.

Our strong educational system, the University of Davis, availability of healthcare services, public transportation, service clubs and cultural diversity are all sources of pride for us. We hope that as you stroll through these pages, you’ll be reminded of and inspired by the thriving, active and beautiful community that we live in.

Again, welcome to Davis.

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Enterprise staff

Auto Draft

By
September 17, 2014 |

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Thomas Oide

Thomas Oide is a senior at Davis High School, the editor-in-chief of the DHS student-run newspaper, The HUB, and a staff writer at 12thmanrising.com.

Cool Davis: working on local solutions to global warming

By
September 28, 2014 |

By Nick Buxton

When it comes to climate change, you can hear a lot of excuses or fine talk from political and business leaders, but usually little practical action. It can be dispiriting given the consequences we know could result. Fortunately, Davis is a community that does not indulge in despair. Rather, it believes in pro-actively looking for solutions that lower our community’s carbon footprint.

With an active, smart, creative and engaged population, Davis has the potential to model the kind of change we need at the national and international level. In 2010, the City of Davis adopted a Climate Action and Adaptation Plan that committed the city to reduce carbon by 15 percent below 1990 levels by 2015. It also was the first city in California, perhaps the United States, to commit to achieving carbon neutrality by 2050. A community-led initiative, Cool Davis, was set up to work toward those goals. The coming year (2014/2015) promises to be its most active yet as it pushes forward to meet its goals. However, it will need the community’s ideas, time and commitment to make it happen.

Cool Davis has become a household name thanks to the active involvement of residents, students, businesses and nonprofit groups across the city. More than 60 community organizations have joined its coalition and over 1500 residents have signed pledges to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Cool Davis organizes a whole host of creative projects and fun events throughout the year with its partners that include many local sustainable initiatives from the work of the Davis Bicycles! campaign to the Farm to School program. Its annual flagship festival — to be held 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 11, in Davis Central Park — has become a “must-attend” event for showcasing many of these initiatives.

Cool Davis has benefited a great deal from its close relationship with sustainability pioneers in UC Davis. Researchers at the University have worked with the campaign to develop strategies to make Davis a “zero carbon” city. Students have also played an active role in supporting the campaign’s goals within the university. They have initiated many of the city’s green initiatives over the years from the Unitrans bus system to Project Compost.

The result of all this hard work has led to Davis being recognized with a whole tranche of awards. Davis was even declared California’s “Coolest City” by the state Air Resources Board in June 2013 after 450 Davis households participated in a race to cut emissions with eight other cities. UC Davis meanwhile beat 95 colleges and universities to win the coveted No. 1 Cool School by Sierra Magazine for 2012-2013.

Cool Davis is gearing up for its most ambitious campaign yet in the coming year, looking to recruit 5,000 households in reducing carbon emissions by 2014 and looking to engage 75 percent of Davis households by the end of 2015. The reality of climate change and the high-carbon lifestyle in the United States means we have much to do to make Davis truly sustainable. The campaign will focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions in three areas: home energy use, transportation and consumption habits.

The campaign will only be successful if lots of people get involved. There are a whole range of committees and groups to get involved in based on interests and skills. Those who have the gift of the gab can join the Community Outreach Team; musicians and artists are needed in the Creative Fun Team; avid Facebookers and tweeters will find a home with the Communications Team; and statisticians and number crunchers can join the Data Management team.

There really is something for everyone! Getting involved enables participants to meet people across Davis committed to both the city and the planet we live on. As one resident, Cindy Dirkx put it: “Cool Davis embodies my own ideal of community responsiveness to our changing world: smart, engaging and caring people who believe we can move towards a sustainable world and who are acting on that belief.”

Find out more:
Cool Davis website — http://www.cooldavis.org
Cool Davis volunteer opportunities — http://www.cooldavis.org/volunteer
City of Davis Climate Action Work — http://community-development.cityofdavis.org/sustainability-and-open-space-conservation/
Yolo and Solano Climate Action Advocacy Group — http://yolanoclimateaction.wordpress.com/
Davis chapter of California Student Sustainability Coalition — http://daviswiki.org/California_Student_Sustainability_Coalition (Don’t miss their inspiring state-wide convergence to be held here in Davis on November 14th-16th)
UC Davis Sustainability work — http://sustainability.ucdavis.edu
Fossil Free UC Davis (student campaign) — https://www.facebook.com/FossilFreeUCDavis

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Special to The Enterprise

Fitness is a HIIT in Davis: Interval training, drop-in rates keep interests up

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

By
September 30, 2014 |

Are your muscles confused? Maybe they should be.

That’s the word from owners of two of Davis’ top fitness centers, who say varying your exercises with short bursts of intensity helps your body prepare for the unexpected. And, it keeps you from getting bored — and quitting.
“I think what people tend to get stuck in is the same exact exercise routine, where your heart rate is at the same level, and you’re doing same thing every day,” said Lisa Herrington, co-owner of FIT House. She goes to a lot of fitness conferences, where more than 80 percent of the workshops focus on interval training.
“It’s just a way for people to push themselves with a certain time limit in mind, and then back it off,” she said.
That’s where muscle confusion fits in. If you climb on an elliptical machine regularly, your muscles remember, and you stop improving. With varied intervals that incorporate upper and lower body, you gain strength, endurance and cardio fitness, and you’re better prepared for daily tasks like carrying the groceries or doing yard work.
“You’re asking your body to do more than it’s accustomed to, so when you go back to what you are used to doing, it’s easier,” Herrington said.
Some of the buzzwords for this are high-intensity interval training (HIIT), functional intense training (FIT), high-energy athletic training (HEAT), and Tabata intervals. These include activities like boot camps, indoor cycling and personal training, where they incorporate a pattern of high-exertion cardio exercise followed by a working recovery. The exercise style can be used to boost running, swimming and weight lifting programs as well.
HIIT exercises every major muscle group for a total body workout. It improves strength, speed, endurance and agility, often with faster results than low-intensity workouts. These programs burn more calories — in a shorter period of time — than a longer, moderate aerobic training. And, you can do anything if you know you’ll get to rest in 2 minutes, right?
Nick Walejeski, owner of Get Fit Davis, said HIIT is “huge right now” because “people know they are going to work their total body. We’re not looking to isolate one muscle group. It’s maximum calorie expenditure in the shortest period of time. And it gets everything. People just love that.”
Participants are more likely to push harder than they would at home, he said. “People come in here and they know they can feed off their instructors’ energy and the energy of the others in the class.”

Be fit – and safe
It’s also important not to over-train, Walejeski said. Classes should work on “opposing muscle groups, so (participants) are not overloading their body and putting themselves at risk for injury.” This means three to five exercises in one circuit, with things like pushups, rows and step-ups, using the upper and lower body, and core.
The workout can be adapted to any body type or fitness level. But with any fitness program, caution is advised. Newcomers should always introduce themselves to the instructor and discuss their level. If there are past or present health conditions or injuries, a note from your doctor may be required.
If the intensity is higher than you’re used to, don’t fake it. Good instructors will offer modifications to bring down the level or avoid reinjuring a sensitive joint.
“You don’t want to jump right in and ask your heart to do double time without working up to it,” Herrington said.

Drop-in, not out
Thinking about starting a fitness routine? New payment options are making it easier.
Local fitness centers are adapting to society’s shorter attention span, luring us off the couch for short-term commitments, hoping it will evolve into a lifelong habit. Most local centers — whether a yoga studio or full-service health club — offer drop-in rates (usually $5 to $20). Those, along with class-series purchases, help people vary their workouts or try something new — without a long-term contract.
Walejeski said most people in Davis who work out regularly use at least two fitness studios or memberships, even though Get Fit offers full access to machines and weights, as well as things like boot camp, yoga, Zumba, Pilates, Spin, interval and personal training and kickboxing.
The drop-ins or multi-class passes allow people to incorporate the many different styles of yoga offered around town, and things like Running For Women, Kaia FIT, CrossFit, BodyPump, Zumba, barre or whatever strikes their fancy that day. And fitness experts encourage that.
“People get a little bit stuck, so focused on something, and forget about the rest of the components of fitness,” Herrington said. “A well-balanced program incorporates all of those things: intervals, balance, core, and the mind-body element like yoga.”
That’s how FIT House came about, Herrington said. It’s not a place you can just hop on the treadmill. She saw Davis people driving to Sacramento or San Francisco to take a barre, yoga or Spin class, and asked, “Why not offer it in Davis?” Along with personal training, FIT House offers spinning, power yoga, barre, Pilates, boot camp and circuit classes.
And that’s the most important advice about fitness. Finding what works for you, and not giving up.
Herrington hates to see people walking away, thinking they failed. “Fitness is a journey. Take it slowly. Do what you can do. Look forward to the destination. And put the time in to get better.”
— Wendy Weitzel is a freelance writer and editor in Davis. Reach her at wendyedit@gmail.com.

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Wendy Weitzel

Wendy Weitzel

Wendy Weitzel is a longtime journalist and Davis resident. She is a former managing editor of The Davis Enterprise, working there from 1998-2008. She has written her Comings & Goings business column since 2001. Today, she does freelance writing, editing, marketing and design.

Rents, home prices rising in Davis as university expands, economy recovers

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

By
September 30, 2014 |

Empty nesters and families with children are deciding the time is now to buy a house in Davis.

Apartments for lease and homes for sale can be found in Davis — but they are in comparatively short supply, and a bit more costly than they were last year at this time.

The basic housing stock of Davis has remained largely unchanged during the past year — there were no major new home developments, and no major new apartment complexes opened.

But enrollment — and staffing — at UC Davis have been rising, as the university makes progress toward its goal of adding 5,000 international students by the year 2020. And the university’s expansion, together with the upturn in housing prices at the state and national level as the economy gradually improves, are gradually nudging rents and home prices higher.

The numbers tell the tale in terms of homes for sale:

* In 2012, between January and August, the average sales price for a Davis home was $445,684 — with the price per square foot running $255, and the average home for sale staying on the market for 78 days.

* In 2013, during that same January to August time slot, the average sales price for a Davis home was $503,929 — with the price per square foot running $285, and the average home for sale staying on the market for 35 days.

* This year, between January and August, the average sales price for a Davis home was $567,487 — with the price per square foot running $312, and an average home for sale staying on the market for 29 days.

(These figures were provided by Coldwell Banker/Doug Arnold Real Estate, and include single family homes as well as condos and duplex units).

When figures are tallied for only single family homes, the average price for Davis homes sold in the last for months has run in the $620,000 to $650,000 range during the past five months.

While home prices are rising, Davis home prices have not yet matched the peak that was reached around 2007 (and this is a contrast to portions of the San Francisco Bay Area, where some Silicon Valley communities are now seeing prices higher than the 2007 level).

But the rising prices and comparatively swift pace of sales have led a number of real estate professionals to characterize Davis as “a seller’s market” once again, with some instances of multiple offers bidding above the asking price for certain homes.

Ed Maeda, manager of Lyon Real Estate’s offices in Davis and Woodland, told The Enterprise that he’s seeing a number of trends in the current market.

Maeda said there are a number of “empty nesters” in Davis (whose children have graduated from college and started their careers) who are selling their comparatively large two-story homes in Davis, and buying one-story homes in Woodland. “There aren’t a lot of larger one-story homes in Davis,” Maeda pointed out. “They can go to Woodland and find a brand-new one-story house for under $500,000.” And since these local “empty nesters” are no longer raising school-age children, the program-rich offerings at the Davis public schools are of less immediate concern.

He said there are also some “empty nesters” from the Bay Area who are selling their homes there, and buying a smaller home in Davis “in order to be closer to their son or daughter, and grandchildren, who live in Davis.” The easy access to cultural events at the Mondavi Center is another plus for some of these buyers.

Maeda added that he’s seeing a number of families with kids moving into smaller three-bedroom homes in many Davis neighborhoods. The Davis school district is certainly feeling this trend — the school district’s enrollment rose by about 100 students this fall, even though the number of dwellings in Davis remained virtually the same.

This year has also seen an uptick in sales of high-end homes, with transactions in the $1 million-plus range popping up on a more or less monthly basis.

“And we are starting to see prospective buyers coming in from the Bay Area again,” Maeda said. He attributes this trend partly to the comparatively higher cost of homes there, which has priced out some households. “Some of my agents have also told me that they have spoken with families (visiting open houses in Davis) who have commented about the recent earthquake in Napa,” Maeda said.

He added that his agents are starting to see a number of Asian parents who have come to town to make a down payment on a condo or a duplex unit — typically in a location close to campus — for a son or daughter who will be attending UC Davis.

In terms of the financial side of home sales, Maeda said “we are continuing to see a number of all-cash offers” on Davis homes for sale. “And sometime, in a multiple offer situation, the all-cash offers tend to win out,” he remarked.

For prospective buyers who are taking out a mortgage, “the interest rates are still pretty good,” Maeda said. “It’s tougher to qualify for a mortgage now (as compared with seven or eight years ago). But if you are a good buyer with a good credit history, you’ll do OK. They just ask for more paperwork.”

In terms of home sales for 2015, there are some unknown factors — several of them connected to The Cannery, a new development which will ultimately include more than 500 homes (a mix of single family and denser multi-unit dwellings). Model homes at The Cannery are expected to be in place sometime during 2015 — but thus far, it is not clear how those new homes will be priced, or what sort of homeowners association fees or monthly Mello-Roos payments will be involved. “We just don’t have that information at this time,” Maeda said — but he acknowledged that there are some Davis homeowners who are thinking about selling their current house and moving into a new home in The Cannery, which would send ripples through many neighborhoods around town.

Home sales in Davis are typically driven by the academic calendar — the market starts to warm up in spring, runs hot during summer, cools down in the fall, and is pretty quiet from December into February.

In terms of apartment rentals, “the rental inventory in Davis is very competetive,” Maeda said. There were no big new apartment complexes opening this fall. A survey conducted on behalf of the UC Davis Housing Office (based on data gathered in late 2013, with results released in March of this year), found an apartment vacancy rate of 3.5 percent — a figure that would be considered “low” in most cities.

The apartment vacancy rate in Davis has see-sawed over the years, reaching a high of 4.2 percent in 2005, and plummeting to a breathtaking low of just 0.7 percent in 2007. (The apartment vacancy rate increased a bit during the recession years of 2008 through 2011, in part because more cash-strapped college students opted to share a bedroom with a roommate, rather than have a room of their own.)

The survey also found an average monthly rent of $911 for studio apartments, $1,005 for one-bedroom apartments, $1,275 for two-bedroom apartments, and $1,764 for three-bedroom apartments. These rents are slightly higher than the preceding year’s survey, and noticeably higher than average rents for many categories of student apartments two years ago.

Davis apartment rents are, by and large, higher than rents in many parts of Sacramento — but significantly lower than rents in Bay Area university towns like Berkeley or Palo Alto.

As Davis renters are well aware, most local apartments operate on a one-year lease, rather than a month-by-month arrangement. Many UC Davis students sign leases in April or May for units that they will occupy in September. There is typically a big “move out” rush at the end of August — it can be very difficult to rent a U-Haul truck locally at that time. But with the apartment vacancy rate hovering at around 3.5 percent, there are at least a few student-oriented rentals available at almost any point in the year.

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Heller letter

By
September 18, 2014 |

Candidates for office are often described as having passion and commitment. The use of these words sometimes fits the person, but in the case of Barbara Archer, I’m confident that they aptly describe her because I’ve seen her in action, whether working on the Measure C campaign or engaged in volunteer activities for the Emerson/Da Vinci campus. She brings an infectious enthusiasm to the projects she works on and a drive and commitment to getting things done for the betterment of our district and community. She truly has passion and commitment for the kids; for this reason I’m voting for Barbara Archer for the Davis School Board.

Sincerely,
Ahna Heller

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Letters to the Editor

Marrone Bio faces lawsuits after announcement of internal probe

By
September 18, 2014 |

At least four lawsuits alleging the Davis biotech company misled investors have been filed against Marrone Bio Innovations. Earlier this month, the Davis-based biotech company announced an internal investigation into a $870,000 transaction from fall 2013. In the brief filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Marrone Bio warned all financial reports from this year “should no longer be relied upon”.

Pomerantz LLP was the first to bring a class-action lawsuit, the same day Marrone announced its audit. The other companies include Block & Leviton LLP, Rigrodsky & Long, P.A. and Rosen Law Firm. All allege the companies filed false and misleading financial reports, and invite inquiries from plaintiffs who bought stock between January and September 2014.

On September 3, Marrone Bio’s stocks fell 44 percent down from $5.65 to hover around $3. Previously, the company had announced a lower-than-expected second quarter revenue, which was blamed on inclement weather like the droughts and flooding that have stricken U.S. farming operations this year.

“It’s obvious we’ve been inaugurated very brutally into the world of public companies,” said Pam Marrone, CEO, in a previous interview.  “The company is very strong, the fundamentals are wonderful. We are not our stock prices.”

Marrone Bio, which went public last fall, specializes in bio-based pest management and crop health products. This year, it opened a manufacturing plant in Michigan and launched two products, Venerate, an insecticide, and Regalia Rx, a fungicide.

 

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Elizabeth Case

Street Food Rodeo

By
September 18, 2014 |

Street Food Rodeo
Friday, September 26, 2014
5pm-9pm
Westlake Plaza, 1260 Lake Blvd. Davis, CA 95616

The Davis Dirt is delighted to announce that the Street Food Rodeo is rolling back into West Davis, California!
On Friday, September 26th, nine of the best food trucks from the region will roundup at Westlake Plaza. Davisites crave innovative, fresh and affordable street food, and their calls are being answered.
Here’s what’s cooking: Free admission, live music by The Bottom Dwellers, Track 7 beer garden, kids area, straw bale seating and nine food trucks!

Food Trucks:
Ciao Chow Food Truck ~ Asian influenced cuisine including chow mein, egg rolls, sliders & rice plates.
Fuzion Eatz ~ Gourmet wraps, rolls and bowls with exciting sauces and toppings.
La Kora Taqueria ~ Fresh Mexican food with homemade tortillas made on the spot.
Local Kine Shave Ice ~ Authentic Hawaiian style shaved.
Heavenly Dog Hot Dogs ~ Bacon wrapped, habanero aioli & peanut butter dogs, to name a few.
The Culinerdy Cruzer ~ Futuristic comfort foods.
Slightly Skewed ~ Asian-style skewers & street foods.
Hefty Gyros ~ Some of the best gyros this side of the olive trees.
Wandering Boba ~ Milk tea, fruit infused tea, slushies, bubble tea & tasty snacks.
…PLUS an ice cream cart (thanks to Westlake Market) and pizza by the slice (thanks to Lamppost Pizza)!

Come eat, drink and be merry, Western style!

This event has been kindly sponsored by its neighbors at Stonesfair Apartments, Lamppost Pizza, Westlake Market, and Consero Solutions.

What: Street Food Rodeo
When: Friday, September 26, 5pm-9pm
Where: Westlake Plaza, 1260 Lake Blvd., Davis, CA 95616

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Enterprise staff

Day trip photos for Welcome

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

By
September 18, 2014 |

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Enterprise photojournalists

BC: Early detection and screening

By
September 18, 2014 |

**Needs title**
===============

Early detection
Even if you feel healthy now, just being a woman and getting older puts you at risk for breast cancer. Finding breast cancer early may save your life.

What is screening?
Screening is a test used to find a condition (such as breast cancer) in a person without symptoms.

Breast cancer screening tests
Mammogram — Mammography is the best screening tool used today to find breast cancer. It uses X-rays to create an image of the breast, called a mammogram. Mammogram images can be stored on film or on a computer. A mammogram can find breast cancer early when it is small and the chances of survival are highest. Women age 40 and older at average risk, should have a mammogram every year.

Clinical breast exam (CBE) — A CBE is done by a health care provider who checks your breasts and underarm areas for any lumps or changes. It should be part of your regular medical checkup. If it is not, ask for it. If you are 40 or older, have your mammogram close to the time of your CBE. For women ages 20-39, have a CBE at least every three years.

For women 40 and older, CBE combined with mammography is more accurate than either screening test used alone.

Know what is normal for you
The signs of breast cancer are not the same for all women. Many women find their breasts feel lumpy. Breast tissue naturally has a bumpy texture that varies from one woman to another. For some women, the lumpiness is more obvious than for others. In most cases, this is no cause to worry. If the lumpiness can be felt throughout the breast and feels like your other breast, it is likely just normal breast tissue.

Lumps that feel harder or different from the rest of the breast tissue (or the tissue of the other breast) or that feel like a change are a concern. If you feel or see any change in your breasts or underarms, see your health care provider.

Overall, mammography is the best breast cancer screening tool used today. It can find breast cancer at an early stage, before it can be felt. As new screening tools are developed, and we learn more about a person’s own risk, we may learn who will likely benefit most from any given screening test. Today, there are specific screening guidelines for people at higher risk. Yet, only general guidelines for those at average risk. As we learn more, more guidelines for those within the “average risk” group may come about. Today, women should discuss their screening options with their health care providers.

Questions to ask
Talk with your health care provider about your risk of breast cancer. Ask which screening tests may be right for you.

Here are some questions you might want to ask:
1. When should I start getting mammograms?
2. If you are 40-49 and your health care provider does not recommend a mammogram: Would I benefit from getting a mammogram? What are the risks and benefits of mammography for me?
3. How often should I get a mammogram?
4. Where can I go to get a mammogram?
5. What if I cannot afford a mammogram?
6. How often do I need a clinical breast exam?
7. Am I at higher risk for getting breast cancer? Do I need other screening tests?
8. Does my mammogram show that I have dense breasts?

- Courtesy of the Susan G. Komen foundation, www.komen.org.

For info box:
Signs you should not ignore
Be aware of any change in your breast or underarm area. If you notice any of the following signs, see your health care provider.
* Lump, hard knot or thickening inside the breast or underarm area
* Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening of the breast
* Change in the size or shape of the breast
* Dimpling or puckering of the skin
* Itchy, scaly sore or rash on the nipple
* Pulling in of your nipple or other parts of the breast
* Nipple discharge that starts suddenly
* New pain in one spot that does not go away

- Courtesy of the Susan G. Komen foundation, www.komen.org.

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Special to The Enterprise

Yolo DA Announces seventh annual Fraud Awareness Fair

By
September 18, 2014 |

A fair organized to help residents recognize scams was announced by Yolo County District Attorney Jeff Reisig on Wednesday.

The Fraud Fair is an opportunity for residentsto learn how to recognize, avoid and report the latest financial scams, according to a press release. State and local law enforcement agencies along with insurance and banking institutions will offer fraud prevention information, resources and training on how to avoid becoming a victim.

The Fraud Fair will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 15, at the City Hall Galleria, 1110 West Capitol Avenue in West Sacramento. The free event runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

For more information please contact Kevin Clark at 530-666-8416 or kevin.clark@yolocounty.org.

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Enterprise staff

Archer letter

By
September 18, 2014 |

Candidates for office are often described as having passion and commitment. The use of these words sometimes fits the person, but in the case of Barbara Archer, I’m confident that they aptly describe her because I’ve seen her in action, whether working on the Measure C campaign or engaged in volunteer activities for the Emerson/Da Vinci campus.

She brings an infectious enthusiasm to the projects she works on and a drive and commitment to getting things done for the betterment of our district and community. She truly has passion and commitment for the kids; for this reason I’m voting for Barbara Archer for the Davis School Board.

Sincerely,
Ahna Heller

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Letters to the Editor

Regents: Investment meeting

By
September 18, 2014 |

8 min of afternoon session

UC Chief Investment Officer Jagdeep Singh Bachher.

“UC Ventures” appears to be the third thing he will talk about.

Slide: “UC Ventures, Benefiting from UC Innovation”

Funding is only one component that needs to be done.

Need to actively promote entrepreneurial incubators and accelerators

Capital is one part of it.

What can capital do?

It is an important ingredient to succeed

We are in Silicon Valley, the hub of …

Think of some of the great companies that have come out of UC

Here’s what I learned as I met at campuses…

Other investors have made billions on UC’s innovation.

It’s pretty clear there are opportunities, they have been profitable, and they exist in our organization

We should do more

Put capital to work at all levels

All the way through becoming big companies who are attracting venture capitalists

How can we be an active participant in this engine of xxx

“What we loudly and clearly heard from everyone is that innovation is a local phenomenon”

We have five inventions a day…
“Very robust pipeline of investable entities.”

We use external managers

we can participate along with them

where are the opportunities?
57 percent life sciences
22 percent information technology
21 percent, materials, energy and agriculture

Investing $250M in UC Innovation
perspective
We already invest $2B in venture capital
this is part and parcel of that

We can attract a great team from a network of 1.7M alumni

We all agreed it should be an independent operation from the office of the CIO

We are asking for approval to help prove the *concept* of UC Ventures

the hard work of putting this together begins now

SLIDE: “Leveraging our competitive advantages”
Deep pool of capital and a long-term investment horizon

privileged access to UC opportunities

UC’s unrivaled network and domain expertise

How do we do more with what we have? How do we become an active participant in what is already a world leader in” … this innovation network

Regent compliments:
No. 1 recommendation by technology innovation group (I think)

Investing in our own discoveries

Regent: Richard Blum
“I don’t want to throw a lot of cold water on this”
We’re not exactly in the venture business, but we’ve done tings like this…

I thnk the university has left things on the table

Lots of companies started in teh university

Inventions done at the universtiy, why didn’t the universities have an interest in these companies for nothing. “We’re entitled to a piece of that company.”

Talks of “Big ideas” at UCB, I think. We pick a few to fund. None have turned a profit yet.

One of your problems is that if a faculty member comes up with an idea, why would (he) care about UC Ventures? Why wouldn’t I go to Kleiner-Perkins who have pros who’ve been doing this forever?

Taking these companies profitable requires a very difficult set of skills

Jagdeep’s answer: I fully agree with much of your observations.
this is a very challenging thing to do.

In two-to three years will be just dipping out toes into this. Long-term plan
=========
Regent: need to understand some of the risk, some of the downsides…what has happened as other universities have tried to do this?

Would we be hiring researchers who are more interested in making money than helping humanity?

Jagdeep” This is a concept right now, and we commit to come back regularly to show how the concept becomes a business plan. we will show how it all evolves.
Harvard and Stanford are doing this, different people trying dif things…early in this concept

“execution and implementation is very VERY important”

“The thought process getting us where we are today has been over three to four months…wanted to share where we are today…meant to be a complement to what else is being done”

UC will partner with venture capitalists
“We want to “crowd-in” to work with the venture capitalists and the companies” not be crowded out

Regent Gavin Newsom:
asked about “conflict of interest” something about SFO
Computer kept buffering…didn’t hear this!

Pattiz:
I love this idea, but that’s when my antenae go up…this has heartbreak written all over it.
Not that it’s not worth doing it…but a very difficult process

“Bureaucratic to the max”

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Auto Draft

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September 17, 2014 |

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Elizabeth Case

Snapshot: How do the gardens grow?

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

By
August 28, 2014 |

Have you ever wanted to grow your own food but don’t have the land?

The city of Davis sponsors the Davis Community Garden at 1825 Fifth St. There are 113 garden plots; most are 18 feet by 20 feet, although a few are half-plots. The city provides the land, water, some facility maintenance and some administrative support.

The annual registration fee is $70 ($35 for half-plots, when available). All garden registrations are renewed annually. Registration materials are mailed to current gardeners at the beginning of each year; if a plot is not renewed, it will be made available to new gardeners.

For more information on how to get your own plot, call Jane Schafer-Kramer at 530-750-7943, or e-mail communitygardens@cityofdavis.org.

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Enterprise staff

Bob Dunning: List suggests Davis is not very livable

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

By
September 18, 2014 |

Hot on the heels of the embarrassment caused by The New York Times describing our fair city as a “modest college town,” we now have the further shame of being entirely left off livability.com’s list of the 10 “Most Livable” small to mid-sized cities in the United States.

It’s actually worse than that – much, much worse – but I wanted to break it to you slowly.

According to the folks in charge of this poll, “As Livability’s editors and writers crisscross the U.S. in search of great stories, we find that time and again, the best tales are told in the Main Street diners, corner churches, park benches and even the mayor’s offices of small to mid-sized cities and towns.”

Well there you have it. I mean, we don’t have a Main Street Diner, many of our churches are not on corners, they just took out the benches in our neighborhood park because they apparently attract bad behavior, and our mayor doesn’t even have an office he can call his own.

Adds Livability: “Far from letting time pass them by, these communities are doubling down on livability for their residents.”

That’s great, but the only thing the city of Davis is doubling down on is our skyrocketing water rates.

“We were advised by the leading thinkers, writers and doers in the place-making space.”

That settles it. Despite our many assets, Davis is clearly lacking in thinkers, writers and doers. No wonder we didn’t crack these rankings.

Topping the list is Madison, which I presume is Yolo County’s very own Madison, nestled between Winters and Esparto as the gateway to the Capay Valley. Or they could mean Madison, Wisconsin. It’s hard to tell them apart, since badgers run wild in both cities.

Madison is followed by Rochester (Minnesota), Arlington (Virginia), Boulder, Palo Alto, Berkeley, Santa Clara, Missoula (Montana), Boise and Iowa City.

Palo Alto’s population of 64,514 is almost identical to that of Davis, though it’s average home price of $1,000,000 actually makes it less livable in the minds of my East Davis neighbors.

Missoula’s population of 66,982 is right around ours as well, and if our college football team could ever beat their college football team, it would go a long way toward us breaking into the top 10.

The football theme is not to be dismissed lightly here. It’s impossible to miss the fact that No. 5 Palo Alto and No. 24 Fort Collins both have football teams that have done violence to UC Davis’ win-loss record this fall.

Ah, but I’ve let the cat out of the bag with that No. 24 reference. I did warn you early on that the news is much worse than not being listed somewhere between 1 and 10. Truth be told, Livability ranked 100 small to mid-sized cities and we were nowhere to found from 11 to 100 either.

Nearby Santa Rosa is listed at 78, thanks in part to the presence of Santa Rosa Junior College. Now, with all due respect to the talented faculty, staff and students at historic SRJC, Davis is home to the ninth best public university in the country. But maybe Santa Rosa has more corner churches and park benches.

Hayward – yes, Hayward – the armpit of the East Bay, is No. 90, in part, we are told, by the campus of Chabot College, and Ashland, Oregon comes in at No. 60 due to the fact it contains “several historic buildings.” I just knew we shouldn’t have torn down Narcissa Pena’s old house downtown.

The closest thing to us making this list was the reference to a “vibrant nightlife scene” in the “Aggieville” district of No. 70 Manhattan, Kansas. Again, another big-time football school.
If only we had a Main Street Diner, or even a Main Street, all would be well with the world.

Reach Bob Dunning at bdunning@davisenterprise.net

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Camellia Symphony begins fall season, with Baldini conducting

By
September 18, 2014 |

The Camellia Symphony Orchestra — which performs in the recently modernized Sacramento City College Performing Arts Center in Sacramento — begins its new season with a concert on Saturday (Sept. 27) at 7:30 p.m.

And for Davis residents, the orchestra will contain a number of familiar faces. The conductor is Christian Baldini, who lives in Davis, and leads the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra. The concertmistress is Jolán Friedhoff, likewise a Davis resident, who teaches violin at UC Davis, and is seen at many Mondavi Center performances. In the clarinet section is Bill Hollingshead, who is a longtime member of the UC Davis Concert Band, as well as bands in Woodland and elsewhere.

And the soloist will be cellist Susan Lamb Cook — a longtime resident of Sacramento, and a member of the Sacramento Philharmonic (an orchestra which, alas, is on hiatus this fall), who teaches cello at UC Davis.

Susan Lamb Cook will be featured in the “Variations on a Rococo Theme” for cello and orchestra, composed in the 1870s by Pyotr Tchaikovsky — which soon became established as one of his most popular pieces. Also on the program will be the landmark “Eroica” Symphony by Ludwig van Beethoven (his Third Symphony, dating from 1805). Opening the program will be the “Little Suite” by Polish composer Withold Lutoslawski (1913-1994) — an 11-minute piece from the early 1950s, incorporating folk melodies, including a brief polka.

The Sacramento City College Performing Arts Center is on the Sacramento City College campus, at  3835 Freeport Blvd. in Sacramento.  Tickets are $30 general, $28 seniors, $15 students with ID, and $8 children (age 12 and under). Season tickets (four concerts) are 25 percent off the single ticket price. For information, go to www.camelliasymphony.org or call (916) 929-6655.

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Snapshot: Quiet out there!

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

By
August 20, 2014 |

The city of Davis has — by its own admission — a “robust noise ordinance.” It’s also full of addendums and exceptions, which may be found online at http://qcode.us/codes/davis/.
How stringent is the ordinance? In 1994, it gained national headlines when a resident was ticketed for “audible snoring.”
The amount of noise allowed depends on the when and where the sound is being created and by whom: garbage trucks are allowed to be noisy in the morning, while individuals in a residential area at 1 a.m. are not.
Permits are available for social and community gatherings and may be found on the city’s website, www.cityofdavis.org.

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Enterprise staff

Auto Draft

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September 17, 2014 |

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Snapshot: Picnic Day, a chance to get to know UCD

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

By
October 01, 2014 |

Picnic Day, the annual open house at UC Davis, is the third Saturday in April.

It’s when anybody who has ever lived in Davis or attended UCD comes back to town and wanders around campus and downtown. It includes a giant parade in the morning and events and exhibitions all over the place. The parade starts with words from the chancellor and the Picnic Day parade marshals, followed by a performance by the California Aggie Marching Band-Uh.

Two of the highlights of Picnic Day are the Battle of the Bands and the Doxie Derby. Student bands and dance groups can be seen on any of the various stages. The event tries to capture many things that are quintessentially Davis. It is an agricultural showcase and open house for school organizations.

Picnic Day is run by students and is believed to be the largest student-run event in the country.

Picnic Day got its start in 1909, when the then-University Farm invited folks from the community to check out its dairy barn. About 2,000 people turned up with picnic lunches. Fast-forward to the modern event where as many as 100,000 visitors have flooded the campus and the community.

Picnic Day features more than 200 events; many are tried-and-true favorites and others are new this year. Most activities take place between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

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September 17, 2014 |

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Local Event at Tucos Restaurant to benefit endangered gorillas

By
September 18, 2014 |

Chef Pru Mendez will host an evening at Tucos restaurant in downtown Davis on Wednesday, Sept. 24 to benefit the Gorilla Doctors. The event, “Small Plates, Big Thanks,” is scheduled for 5-7 p.m.

Guests will enjoy a unique opportunity to enjoy a glass of wine with Gorilla Doctors Co-Directors Dr. Kirsten Gilardi and Dr. Mike Cranfield and learn some of the challenges and triumphs they face on the road to helping a species thrive against the odds.

Gorilla Doctors is a unique partnership between the Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center at UC Davis and the non-profit Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project. Gorilla Doctors studies and cares for endangered gorillas in Rwanda, Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. When a gorilla has been wounded or has contracted a life-threatening illness, Gorilla Doctors intervenes to save its life.

“We are looking forward to the opportunity to connect with our friends in Davis and hopefully make some new ones while enjoying and Chef Pru’s fantastic cooking,” Gilardi said.

A limited number of tickets are available at $50 per person, $30 of which will be a tax-deductible donation to Gorilla Doctors. The event will feature a special menu of hors d’oeuvres by Mendez coupled with rare and local wines; all food and beverage is included in the ticket price.

Mendez, Owner and Chef of Tucos restaurant, said that he is “so excited and honored to be helping such talented and caring people do such important and dangerous work protecting our treasured great apes. I can’t wait to celebrate with everyone at Tucos!”

For more information about Gorilla Doctors visit www.gorilladoctors.org, or to attend the event, tickets can be purchased through Eventbrite.

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Special to The Enterprise

MRAP in NY Times

By
September 18, 2014 |

17 Sept 2014
Dear Enterprise:

Our MRAP made it to the NY Times on Sept 13—with photos of Lt. Thomas W. Waltz of the Davis Police existing our city’s four-wheeled “atTank. Google Adam Nagourney, “‘Fit for Combat,” NY Times Sept. 13, 2014″ to view a photo of Mayor Dan Wolk and more photos of our “mine-resistant, ambush-protected” behemoth, with quotes all around. The on-line version includes an 11-minute video sketch of the origins of of SWAT teams in the 1965 Watts insurrection and looks at SWAT teams around the nation.

Dan Berman, Davis

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Letters to the Editor

Auto Draft

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September 17, 2014 |

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Davis School Arts Foundation accepting applications for grants

By
September 17, 2014 |

Davis School Arts Foundation has begun accepting grant applications for the 2014-2015 school year.

The deadline for grant applications is Oct. 24. Applicants will be notified of their grant status at the end of November.

All Davis Joint Unified School District educators are encouraged to apply. For parents, artists, musicians, and community members who have a project that they would like to share with a classroom or school, they may team up with a teacher to apply for a grant.

DSAF is a local non-profit, all-volunteer organization that has been dedicated to keeping the arts in Davis public schools for over 30 years. Through generous donations, DSAF is able to provide grants to support visual and performing arts, music and chorus in our schools.

For more information about DSAF, the grant process and to apply, visit  www.dcn.davis.ca.us/go/dsaf.

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Enterprise staff

Farmers Market offers local goods

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September 18, 2014 |

Local food products are the stars at Sutter Davis Hospital Farmers Market on Thursday, Sept. 25th from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The market is located at the hospital’s shade-covered entrance at 2000 Sutter Place with plenty of free parking.

Locally produced items available include honey, produce, eggs, baked goods, extra virgin olive oil and olive oil beauty products.

Current market items and producers include: local organic honey from Sola Bee Farms in Woodland; extra virgin olive oil and handmade olive oil-based products from Squashed Olives in Vacaville; grapes, peaches and nectarines from Neufeld Farms in Kingsburg; local eggs and assorted summer produce from Chavez Farms in Esparto; vine-ripened tomatoes, squashes, potatoes, onions, garlic, greens and other produce from Toledo Farms in Lodi; plus whole grain breads, cookies and apple tarts from Upper Crust Bakery in Davis.

The hospital’s Market accepts EBT cards, WIC and Senior coupons. Shoppers with no cash in hand can also purchase market scrip using debit or credit cards.

Sutter Davis Hospital Farmers Market is now open year-round, rain or shine, and offers free parking.

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September 17, 2014 |

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September 17, 2014 |

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Woodland Healthcare now offering flu vaccines

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September 18, 2014 |

Woodland Healthcare is now offering seasonal adult and pediatric flu vaccines, by appointment only, at both the Woodland and Davis medical offices.

The cost is $30 (fee paid at time of service if not covered by insurance). It is recommended that those receiving a flu vaccine wear a short sleeved shirt.

The Davis office is located at 2330 W. Covell Blvd. For more information, or to schedule an appointment in Davis, call 530-668-2600.

The Woodland office is located at 632 W. Gibson Road. For more information, or to schedule an appointment in Woodland, call 530-668-2600.

Additionally, two Saturday walk-in flu clinics will be available during the following days and times: 8 a.m.-noon on Saturday, Sept. 20, at the Davis office; and 8 a.m.-noon on Saturday, Oct. 4, at the Woodland office.

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September 17, 2014 |

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Davis essentials: What does an incoming freshman need?

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

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October 01, 2014 |

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BC: Early detection and screening

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September 17, 2014 |

Early detection
Even if you feel healthy now, just being a woman and getting older puts you at risk for breast cancer. Finding breast cancer early may save your life.
What is screening?
Screening is a test used to find a condition (such as breast cancer) in a person without symptoms.
Breast cancer screening tests
Mammogram — Mammography is the best screening tool used today to find breast cancer. It uses X-rays to create an image of the breast, called a mammogram. Mammogram images can be stored on film or on a computer. A mammogram can find breast cancer early when it is small and the chances of survival are highest. Women age 40 and older at average risk, should have a mammogram every year.
Clinical breast exam (CBE) — A CBE is done by a health care provider who checks your breasts and underarm areas for any lumps or changes. It should be part of your regular medical checkup. If it is not, ask for it. If you are 40 or older, have your mammogram close to the time of your CBE. For women ages 20-39, have a CBE at least every three years.
For women 40 and older, CBE combined with mammography is more accurate than either screening test used alone.
Know what is normal for you
The signs of breast cancer are not the same for all women. Many women find their breasts feel lumpy. Breast tissue naturally has a bumpy texture that varies from one woman to another. For some women, the lumpiness is more obvious than for others. In most cases, this is no cause to worry. If the lumpiness can be felt throughout the breast and feels like your other breast, it is likely just normal breast tissue.
Lumps that feel harder or different from the rest of the breast tissue (or the tissue of the other breast) or that feel like a change are a concern. If you feel or see any change in your breasts or underarms, see your health care provider.
Overall, mammography is the best breast cancer screening tool used today. It can find breast cancer at an early stage, before it can be felt. As new screening tools are developed, and we learn more about a person’s own risk, we may learn who will likely benefit most from any given screening test. Today, there are specific screening guidelines for people at higher risk. Yet, only general guidelines for those at average risk. As we learn more, more guidelines for those within the “average risk” group may come about. Today, women should discuss their screening options with their health care providers.
Questions to ask
Talk with your health care provider about your risk of breast cancer. Ask which screening tests may be right for you.
Here are some questions you might want to ask:
1. When should I start getting mammograms?
2. If you are 40-49 and your health care provider does not recommend a mammogram: Would I benefit from getting a mammogram? What are the risks and benefits of mammography for me?
3. How often should I get a mammogram?
4. Where can I go to get a mammogram?
5. What if I cannot afford a mammogram?
6. How often do I need a clinical breast exam?
7. Am I at higher risk for getting breast cancer? Do I need other screening tests?
8. Does my mammogram show that I have dense breasts?

- Courtesy of the Susan G. Komen foundation, www.komen.org.

For info box:
Signs you should not ignore
Be aware of any change in your breast or underarm area. If you notice any of the following signs, see your health care provider.
* Lump, hard knot or thickening inside the breast or underarm area
* Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening of the breast
* Change in the size or shape of the breast
* Dimpling or puckering of the skin
* Itchy, scaly sore or rash on the nipple
* Pulling in of your nipple or other parts of the breast
* Nipple discharge that starts suddenly
* New pain in one spot that does not go away

- Courtesy of the Susan G. Komen foundation, www.komen.org.

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Catie Curtis photo

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September 17, 2014 |

 

Catie Curtis plays  The Palms Playhouse on Friday, Sept. 19. Curtis has played her folk music with Kris Kristofferson and has played the White House multiple times.

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Number of wheels: How many bicycles do you have in your household?

By
September 30, 2014 |

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

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Enterprise staff

Firefighters remind Davis residents: Working smoke alarms save lives

By
September 18, 2014 |

For release on:
October 1, 2014

For more information contact:
Evelyn George, Fire Inspector
530-757-5683
(egeorge@cityofdavis.org)

City of Davis Fire Department Reminds Davis Residents:
Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives! 
Working smoke alarms can make a life-saving difference in a fire. That’s the message behind this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives: Test Yours Every Month!”
Along with firefighters and safety advocates nationwide, Davis Fire Department is joining forces with the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) during Fire Prevention Week, October 5-11, to remind local residents about the importance of having working smoke alarms in the home and testing them monthly.
According to the latest NFPA research, working smoke alarms cut the chance of dying in a fire in half. Meanwhile, almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
“In a fire, seconds count,” said Tim Annis, Fire Marshal. “Roughly half of home fire deaths result from fires reported at night between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. when most people are asleep. Home smoke alarms can alert people to a fire before it spreads, giving everyone enough time to get out.”
This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign includes the following smoke alarm messages:
Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
Interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home. This way, when one sounds, they all do.
Test alarms at least monthly by pushing the test button.
Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old or sooner if they don’t respond properly.
Make sure everyone in the home knows the sound of the smoke alarm and understands what to do when they hear it.

The Davis Fire Department will be hosting the following activities throughout the month of October to promote “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives!” Through these educational, family-oriented activities, residents can learn more about the importance of working smoke alarms and testing them monthly. :
Open House at Farmer’s Market on October 18th
Visiting all first grade classes to promote fire safety
Offering a presentation at the Senior Center on (date), and going to Senior Communities, to promote NFPA’s “Remembering When” program;
Sponsoring a display case at City Hall in honor of Fire Prevention Week
Participating in Davis Night Out on October 12th

.
To find out more about Fire Prevention Week programs and activities in (Your Town/City), please contact the (Your Town/City) Fire Department at (provide your phone number or appropriate contact information). To learn more about smoke alarms and “Working Smoke Alarms Saves Lives”, visit NFPA’s Web site at www.firepreventionweek.org.

#  #  #

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Special to The Enterprise

Smoke alarms oped (Oct. 5-11 week)

By
September 18, 2014 |

Smoke alarms Op/ed
by Tim Annis, Fire Marshal
When was the last time you tested the smoke alarms in your home? Was it last week? Last month? A year ago?
If you’re like many people, you may not even remember. Smoke alarms have become such a common feature of U.S. households that they’re often taken for granted, and aren’t tested and maintained as they should.
However, working smoke alarms are a critical fire safety tool that can mean the difference between life and death in a home fire. According to the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), smoke alarms can cut the chance of dying in a home fire in half. Meanwhile, NFPA data shows that home fires killed more than 2,300 people in 2012; many of these deaths could have been prevented with the proper smoke alarm protection.
As a member of the fire service for 24 years, I’ve seen the devastating effects of fire first-hand; the burn injuries, the loss of homes and possessions are distressing. What’s even worse is witnessing a family’s anguish after a loved one has been killed in a fire. It’s heartbreaking.
As the official sponsor of Fire Prevention Week, October 5-11, 2014, NFPA is promoting “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives: Test Yours Every Month!” to better educate the public about the true value of working smoke alarms. In support of these efforts, City of Davis Fire Department will be hosting local campaign activities throughout the month of October.
My sincere hope is that all Davis residents participate in one or more of our Fire Prevention activities, and make sure there are working smoke alarms installed throughout their homes. These simple steps can help make a life-saving difference, and prevent the potentially life-threatening impact of fire.
Here are additional smoke alarm tips to follow:
Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
Interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.
Test alarms each month by pushing the test button.
Replace all smoke alarms, including alarms that use 10-year batteries and hard-wired alarms, when they are 10 year old or sooner if they do not respond properly.
Make sure everyone in the home knows the sound and understands what to do when they hear the smoke alarm.
To learn more about the “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives: Test Yours Every Month!” campaign, visit NFPA’s Web site at www.firepreventionweek.org.
Tim Annis
Fire Marshal/Division Chief
City of Davis Fire Department

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Special to The Enterprise

Jones letter

By
September 18, 2014 |

Regarding the September 17th letter to the editor from Third Space Media President Lauren Cole Norton, I was distressed to read of the poor or even confrontational treatment that a local arts enthusiast experienced when seeking to share fliers of upcoming musical events at the Third Space performance venue in Davis. Without regard to the size and color of the fliers that highlight such cultural events, I agree with Ms. Norton that volunteers from Third Space or any arts organization in Davis should be treated with respect.

A recent “Arts and Economic Impact” study by Americans for the Arts looked at 14 regions in California. In a city about the size of Davis, Walnut Creek, more than $32 million was spent by arts organizations and their audiences in the city, and that money supported 865 jobs whose households earned almost another $20 million. And Walnut Creek doesn’t have the advantages provided to Davisites by a Mondavi Center or, for that matter, a Third Space.

Every Davis business, and especially every Davis restaurant, benefits from an influx of cash made possible by Davis arts organizations, including our galleries, theatres, and music venues, many of which are run by volunteers. Not only should we show appreciation for those selfless enthusiasts who invest their time and money in first-rate arts and cultural organizations such as the Davis Shakespeare Ensemble and The Artery, but as a city we should prioritize and coordinate a greater municipal, corporate and private investment in these altruistic organizations from which all of us, especially Davis businesses, will benefit.

Dr. Andy Jones
Davis Poet Laureate
Chair, Davis Cultural Arts and Entertainment Committee

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Letters to the Editor

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September 17, 2014 |

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Word association: What comes to mind when you hear the word Davis?

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

By
September 28, 2014 |

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September 17, 2014 |

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Are we there yet?

By
September 17, 2014 |

When I was signing up for my first quarter ever of college classes at UC Irvine, the adviser who helped me was pretty insistent that I do not take more than 12 units. Any more than that, and I would be in danger of not being able to keep up.

So I signed up for three, four-unit classes — Spanish, and a humanities core course that was worth four units for the lecture, and four for the discussion section. And ohmygod was I bored a lot, and did I ever waste some time. I watched a ton of soap operas (All My Children, followed by One Live to Live, followed by General Hospital.) I slept in a lot, and I didn’t do my homework a lot.

You know the old adage, “If you need something done, give it to a busy person?”

Had to get a job so I would stop procrastinating. Once I had a set work schedule, I knew I had to do my homework in those times when I wasn’t at work and wasn’t in class. Who had time for Erica Kane’s antics?

This tendency has continued throughout my whole life, and I am now about as productive as I’ve been in the past 18 years.

Haven’t worked full-time since my older son was born. Although my Enterprise work schedule was sometimes very full, I often could get what I needed done in a 20-hour span. So obviously I would race right home and make big dinners, organize closets and take the dog on long walks to get her wiggles out.

Nope, there was time to do that later.

Now I am officially busy. And I’ve cleaned out our office, which had become a pit of despair. No office supplies could be found (just go buy more), no desk space was cleared off for writing (use a TV tray and sit in the living room) and xxx

I have made dinners almost every night since I’ve started this job, rather than relying on take-out food. I exercise the dog every morning before I leave for work.

I have hung the hooks in my closet that I’ve been needing for years (!), I’ve taken loads of things to the SPCA thrift store, I’ve caught up on dirty clothes and linens that were overtaking the laundry room,

Other things…

I pulled out the kids picture frames that have spaces for their kindergarten through eighth-grade photos and I might even be able to finish them. I’ve found most of the years of photos, too !

Why does it have to be this way?
===========
Economist: Sept. 11

Submitting essays: The jeopardy of just-in-time
Sep 11th 2014, 11:59 by D.N.

“HARD work might pay off after time,” says the adage, “but procrastination will always pay off right now.” While inherently plausible, it would be unwise to adopt this advice as a lifestyle guide. The possible consequences of such a strategy have been spelt out in a paper just released by the University of Warwick in Britain.

David Arnott, a professor at the university’s business school, says he long believed that late submissions were reflected in lower grades. With a colleague, he devised a study looking at 777 undergraduate marketing students over a five-year period. It tracked the submission of online essays for end-of-term assignments for two modules: one from the first-year, the other the third-year (no students were included in both groups).

The pair were concerned that students’ study habits, particularly a tendency towards procrastination, could have a detrimental impact on their grades. This would mean that tests were, in effect, not only a measure of their marketing knowledge, but also of their propensity to put things off. If true, simple interventions like varying the nature of submissions or simply warning students of the perils of procrastination could raise grades.

Unsurprisingly, but no less worrying for that, the data bore out these expectations. Results of submission time were collated in 18 time categories from “up to the last 24 hours” down to “the last minute” (see chart, taken directly from the study, below). Early submitters fared best. Those who handed in their work at least a day ahead of the deadline could expect a mean mark of around 64% (it didn’t make much difference if students submitted essays even earlier than that). Those who waited until the very last minute, however, saw their mean mark fall to 59%—which took them to a lower grade.

There are various theories why students may procrastinate, from task aversion (commonly seen as laziness) to a fear of failure (sometimes expressed as perfectionism). Mr Arnott discounts the search for perfection, instead believing simply that “those that are well organised and buckle down submit early”. Until wider studies are conducted looking at different courses, for example, it is not possible to say for sure how debilitating procrastination actually is. Reason, perhaps, to put off worrying about what to do about it.

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October’s Thursday Live! offers a Beatles tribute and sing-a-long

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September 18, 2014 |

Thursday Live! will give everyone a chance to sing along to many of their favorite Beatles songs on Oct. 2. Many of Davis’ finest musicians and singers will be on hand to assist in remembering the words and tunes.

Helping channel the Fab Four will be: Frankie & The Fabletones; Bill Fairfield & Friends; Cold Shot; Hardwater; Wealth of Nations; The Scones; Tree-O; and others.

Thursday Live! is a continuing series of free concerts held the first Thursday of each month at the Davis Odd Fellows Hall located at 415 2nd Street. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. and is open for all ages. Donations are encouraged, with all money going to the musicians.

“We will also be celebrating the fifth anniversary of Thursday Live! with cake for everyone,” said Juelie Roggli, member of the Odd Fellows Music and Concerts Committee. “The Odd Fellows want to thank the community for being so supportive over the years and making Thursday Live! an event folks look forward to each month.”

Thursday Live! is sponsored each month by the Davis Odd Fellows Music and Concerts Committee with help from KDRT. For more information, or to be added to the email list, contact Roggli at juelrog@gmail.com or at 530-219-5444.

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September 17, 2014 |

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September 17, 2014 |

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Ray “Catfish” Copeland Band play Davis Farmers Market’s Picnic in the Park

By
September 18, 2014 |

The Ray “Catfish” Copeland Band bring their American roots music to Picnic in the Park on Wednesday, Sept. 24th in Central Park. Music starts at 4:30 and ends at 7:30 pm.

Fresh off appearances at the Sacramento Music Festival and the Isleton Cajun and Blues Festival, the band just released a new CD “Got Love If You Want” that will be available for purchase at Picnic in the Park. The band plays old school rock and Americana, inspired with a cool 1960s vibe.

Market open 4:30 to 8:30 pm. Davis Food Co-op sponsors the music; Sutter Davis Hospital sponsors Picnic in the Park.

The Market is packed with organic and conventional late summer and fall produce — strawberries, melons, grapes, peaches, plums, pluots, avocados, greens, lettuces, summer squashes and beans, potatoes, onions, garlic, bok choy, herbs — plus local cheese, wine, dried fruit and nuts, plus baked goods and flowers.

Bring your own picnic or grab dinner at more than a dozen Davis food booths, including, The Hotdogger, Bare Juices, Monticello Seasonal Cuisine, Davis Food Co-op, Montoya’s Tamales, Our House, Village Bakery, The Buckhorn, Raja’s Tandoor, Kathmandu Kitchen, Thai Recipes, East West Gourmet, Sugar Daddies, Fat Face, Upper Crust Bakery, Davis Bread & Desserts, and Kettlepop. Davis Soroptimists offer local beer and wine, raising money for local charities.

Visitors can entertain kids with Central Park’s new ag-themed playground and bicycle-powered carousel, plus the Rocknasium’s climbing structure, bouncing bungalows, face-painting, pony rides, and balloon genius, Dilly Dally the Clown.

Check out the music schedule for Picnic in the Park at http://www.davisfarmersmarket.org/picnic or follow us on Facebook for updates.

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Enterprise staff

Gen Events MASTER

By
August 16, 2012 |

Saturday, Sept. 20

Bring a picnic blanket and join fellow Davis families for “The Lego Movie,” a free family movie beginning at dusk under the trees in Central Park, Fourth and C streets. Cotton candy will be available for sale. Movies are shown on a large inflatable screen thanks to the Davis Sunset Rotary Club.

Friday, Sept. 26

Today is the deadline to apply for the “Davis Children’s Nutcracker.” Applications are due at 5 p.m. at the Community Services Office, 600 A St., Suite C. Applications are on Page 51 of the Fall Recreation Schedule or available in the Community Services Office.  All children ages 6-12 are invited to apply. The cast will be limited to 250 children with a certain number of parts allocated to each age group. Preference will be given to children who applied for last year’s show and did not get in. Names are drawn by lottery. Parents of children admitted to the cast will receive an information packet with details regarding auditions, rehearsal calendar and cast preference form. If your child is between the ages of 10 and 12, they will have the opportunity to audition for a lead role. Rehearsals will take place at the Veterans’ Memorial Center, 203 E. 14th St. All cast members must be available for rehearsals Mondays through Fridays, Dec. 1-21.

Children ages 1-17 are invited to the city of Davis “Friday Night Live” from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Civic Center Gym, 23 Russell Blvd. The fee is $5. Whether your child wants to work on gymnastics skills or jump around on the trampoline, gymnastics and dance staff will be available for coaching questions, supervision and fun. Children under age 4 must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call 530-757-5626.

The city of Davis, in collaboration with the Stephens Branch Library, will host a teen movie night from 5 to 9 p.m. in the library’s Blanchard Room, 315 E. 14th St. On the bill is a double feature: “Godzilla” and “The Fault in our Stars.” Pizza and popcorn will be provided (as well as tissue, because you’re going to need it). This event will be supervised by city of Davis teen program staffers and is free. All teens must bring a 2014-15 city liability waiver to attend this event. The waiver can be found at community-services.cityofdavis.org under “Forms and Publications.”

Saturday, Sept. 27

Help Willett Elementary School send all of its sixth-graders on their upcoming outdoor education science trip to Sly Park. Visit the garage sale and bake sale taking place from 8 a.m. to noon in the Davis school district parking lot at Fifth and B streets. Anyone wishing to donate items to the sale may drop them off that morning between 7 and 8 a.m. or contact parent volunteer Dana Welch at 530-902-1998 or dpwelch5@comcast.net to arrange delivery. Items should be priced. Computers, large furniture and clothing will not be accepted, although coats and snow gear will be.

Come play some 3-on-3 basketball at a free basketball tournament beginning at 10 a.m. at the Woodland Community & Senior Center, 2001 East St. in Woodland. The second annual tournament is hosted by the city of Woodland in collaboration with the YGRIP (Youth Gang Reduction, Intervention and Prevention Program) and the Woodland Police Department. Players ages 11 and older can pre-register their own team of two to three youths and one to two adults by Friday, Sept. 19, to secure a spot. Many of the adult players are volunteers from multiple law enforcement agencies, so youth players also can register on their own to be placed on a team. One adult and two youths are on the court at all times and teams substitute players during games. The event guarantees each team at minimum of three 10-minute games. In addition, there will be free food, music and raffle prizes. To register or for more information, call the Woodland Community Services Department at 530-661-2000 or visit www.cityofwoodland.org/3on3.

Sunday, Sept. 28

The Davis High School Cheer Team will sponsor a Cheer Clinic from 1 to 4 p.m. in the high school’s old gym. The cost is $30 in advance and $35 at the door. Kids ages 6-13 are invited to learn cheers, jumps, tumbling and dance from the Davis High School cheerleaders and their coaches. Space is limited so pre-registration is encouraged. Participants receive a T-shirt, a free ticket to the Oct. 3 football game and a chance to join the DHS cheerleaders on the field to cheer and perform on Friday night. Contact Megan Hupe at 530-753-0424 or meganhupe@yahoo.com.

Monday, Sept. 29

Girls in kindergarten through 12th grade and their families are invited to an “All About Girl Scouts” meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Girl Scout Cabin, 2840 Temple Drive in East Davis. This is an interactive opportunity to learn more about Girl Scouts, make friends and have fun. Guests will take part in a sample Girl Scout troop meeting, have an opportunity to talk to troop leaders, play games, do an activity and have questions answered. Unable at attend? Contact: Erin at 916-453-5249 or erin.nasca@girlscoutshcc.org.

Tuesday, Sept. 30

Children interested in learning more about what 4-H has to offer are invited to an information night at 7 p.m. at the Stephens Branch Library, 315 E. 14th St. Representatives of the three Davis 4-H clubs — Golden Valley, Norwood and West Plainfield — will be on hand to answer questions. 4-H is open to all children ages 5 to 19.

Friday, Oct. 10

Children ages 1-17 are invited to the city of Davis “Friday Night Live” from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Civic Center Gym, 23 Russell Blvd. The fee is $5. Whether your child wants to work on gymnastics skills or jump around on the trampoline, gymnastics and dance staff will be available for coaching questions, supervision and fun. Children under age 4 must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call 530-757-5626.

Friday, Nov. 7

It’s Parents Night Out from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Civic Center Gym, 23 Russell Blvd. Give the kids a break and take the night off! Children ages 6 to 17 are invited for an evening of gymnastics fun and games and no gymnastics experience is required. Snacks will be provided. The cost is $10 if registered by Nov. 6; $15 at the door. For more information, call 530-757-5626.

Friday, Nov. 14

Children ages 1-17 are invited to the city of Davis “Friday Night Live” from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Civic Center Gym, 23 Russell Blvd. The fee is $5. Whether your child wants to work on gymnastics skills or jump around on the trampoline, gymnastics and dance staff will be available for coaching questions, supervision and fun. Children under age 4 must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call 530-757-5626.

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Anne Ternus-Bellamy

Be Well Expo 10/5

By
September 18, 2014 |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BeWELL EXPO COMES TO NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

BeWell Expo 2014
Sunday, October 5th – noon to 5 p.m.
Scottish Rite Center
6151 H Street, Sacramento
www.BeWell-Expo.com

BeWell Expo was launched in Los Angeles in 2012, was held in Orange County in 2013, and this year is brought to Northern California by producer and former El Macero resident, Diane Buccola. Diane began her career in the spa business in 1999 when she opened the original Skin Renewal Center on Covell Boulevard in Davis.

Having worked on the production team of the previous two BeWell Expos in Southern California, Buccola became convinced that this innovative concept would be a good fit for the Sacramento/Davis area. Says Buccola “While we certainly delighted in seeing (the singer) Cher and her entourage enjoying the expo, what struck me the most was how eager women of all ages are to get their hands on accurate information about proper skin care and wellness that doesn’t involve invasive treatments and surgical procedures.” Fortunately, the magazine behind this event (Les Nouvelles Esthetiques & Spa magazine of Miami, Florida) agreed with Buccola, and BeWell Expo 2014 will be held at the Scottish Rite Center in Sacramento on Sunday, October 5th from noon to 5 p.m.
INTERACTIVE EVENT
Because the professional skin care, spa and wellness industries do not typically advertise to the general public via mainstream media the same way that over-the-counter product manufacturers do, consumers are often misled into believing that there are “magic” products and “one-size-fits-all” services. Oftentimes, left to their own devices and/or unqualified online resources, consumers can make unsuitable and sometimes dangerous choices. Women in particular are experiencing botched surgeries, overly-aggressive treatments, unsafe injections and overpriced and ineffective products.

What you will find at BeWell Expo are interactive exhibitors, demonstrations, samples, licensed professionals, free services, and lots of education. What you won’t find at BeWell Expo are plastic surgeons, tanning bed vendors and non-professional skin care products.

Some of the biggest and best professional skin care and wellness companies from around the country are coming to Sacramento to exhibit at BeWell Expo, and local businesses were invited to exhibit at a discounted rate. Ticket prices were specifically kept low so as to encourage local residents to attend. Says Buccola, “With enough of a turnout, I might be able to convince the magazine to grow BeWell Expo into an annual event in our area.”

3 STRANDS NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION
A portion of the proceeds goes to 3 Strands, a non-profit organization whose mission is to stop human trafficking of girls and young women globally. BeWell Expo attendees can meet the organization’s representatives at the 3 Strands exhibitor booth where their hand-made bracelets will be available for purchase. www.3StrandsGlobal.com

ATTENDEE REGISTRATION
Tickets are $20 and are available through the BeWell Expo website (www.BeWell-Expo.com). Purchases made before September 28th will be mailed out. Tickets purchased after that date may be picked up at the event.

BeWell Expo 2014
Sunday, October 5th – noon to 5 p.m.
Scottish Rite Center
6151 H Street, Sacramento

For more information about exhibiting or sponsoring this event,
please contact BeWellExpo@aol.com.

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Special to The Enterprise

Rob White: What is an ‘innovation center’?

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Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

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Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

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Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

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noise ordinanceW

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Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

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Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

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Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

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September 18, 2014 |

“What is an Innovation Center?”
Innovate Davis
Sept 21, 2014

By Rob White
City of Davis – Chief Innovation Officer

There has been a lot of discussion lately about how an “innovation center” might help Davis create new job opportunities for residents while increasing revenue for city services. The concept of an innovation center (or park) would be to provide a location where local tech and research companies might grow and expand and where new companies working with UC Davis might locate.

Several conditions in the community have created the need for this discussion, including the public acknowledgement by Schilling Robotics that it needs to significantly increase its facility size in just a few years in order to stay in Davis. Other tech and research companies that are growing at a rapid rate have also indicated that they need to increase their facilities size and the recent move by Bayer CropScience (formerly AgraQuest) to West Sacramento is an example of that growth.

One way to address the potential for Davis to retain these high-paying jobs and the positive economic impact on our community was for the city to release a ‘request for expressions of interest’ (RFEI) for innovation center concepts last May. The intention was to see what ideas or proposals might be generated that could address the need to retain these companies and their investments.

As a result of the RFEI process, three concepts were submitted for three different areas adjacent to or near Davis. These included the Mace Ranch Innovation Center (at the northeast corner of Mace Blvd and Interstate 80), the Davis Innovation Center (northwest of Sutter Davis Hospital), and the Davis Ranch Innovation Center (near the soccer fields on Interstate 80, east of Davis).

Each of these proposals is going through refinements and at least two of them are conducting community outreach. The Mace Ranch and Davis Innovation Center proponents are expected to submit full development applications to the city this month, at which time the city will formally start a process of review and community engagement.

Though the Davis City Council has been discussing the concept for several years, questions from the community about how an innovation center (or innovation park) is different from a commercial or industrial business park are not uncommon.

One way to explain the difference is to look back at the City Council’s actions that established the Innovation Park Task Force in 2010. At that time, the city was very deliberate in wanting to use current terminology to describe a place where research and development were the primary activities and not warehousing or processing plants. The city wanted to be sure that the use of the term innovation park would be more akin to a research park, though it could include advanced manufacturing facilities like Schilling Robotics and DMG Mori.

The definition of an innovation park was further refined in July 2012 by the UC Davis Studio 30 report that was commissioned by the city. Specifically, the report describes a “21st Century Innovation Park” as a place that “designed primarily for R&D facilities, high-technology and science-based companies and support services.”

The information in the Studio 30 report was garnered from an extensive literature review and also relied heavily on the Association of University Research Parks (AURP) October 2007 report entitled “A Study of Characteristics and Trends of research Parks in North America.” This report has since been updated by AURP and Battelle in a 2013 report entitled “Driving regional Innovation and Growth: 2012 Survey of North American Research Parks.”

Additionally, the Brookings Institute recently published a report in May 2014 entitled “The Rise of Innovation Districts: A New Geography of Innovation in America.” This report describes the characteristics of modern innovation centers and is a guide for current best practices.

Our opportunity to create a center for research and technology development in agriculture, medicine, advanced manufacturing and other disciplines connected to UC Davis is unparalleled in the Central Valley. So it is from this evolution that Davis has adopted the moniker “innovation center” with specific purpose and intention because our community has not expressed an interest in creating just another “business park”.

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Name Droppers MASTER FILE

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December 20, 2013 |

Sharon Coulson retired two years ago after nearly 30 years as the director of the Associated Students Coffee House at UC Davis, but she is still a big deal in the National Association of College and University Food Services, which recently gave her another award.

In 1999 she received an award for outstanding service on the national level, and in 2013 she got a lifetime member award. In July, she picked up the association’s highest individual honor, the Theodore W. Minah Distinguished Service Award, recognizing exemplary and enduring contributions to collegiate food service and the association.

Over three decades, she served as the Pacific Region secretary and strategic planning liaison, as a coach-mentor for the Food Service Management Institute, and as the chair of the Campus Dining Today editorial board, in addition to serving on various committees and project teams.

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Paul Singh of UC Davis, has joined the Institute of Food Technologists’ board of directors.

Singh, an engineer, is a distinguished professor in the department of food science and technology. He uses computer-aided modeling in his research of heat and mass transfer in foods during drying, thermal processing, immersion frying, air-impingement processing, freezing and frozen storage.

He also studies food breakdown during digestion using computational fluid dynamics, in vitro and in vivo systems. This research is aimed at understanding the role of food material properties and designing future foods for health.

————

Professor Emeritus Chip Martel of UC Davis has been inducted into the American Contract Bridge League’s Hall of Fame. Martel came to UCD in 1980 and helped establish the department of computer science.

Bridge columnist Phillip Alder of The New York Times described Martel as “one of the best players ever.” He’s won nine medals (five gold, three silver and a bronze) in world championships, and two golds, a silver and a bronze as either coach or nonplaying captain of U.S. teams. He’s won 30 nationals titles and been second 19 times.

His wife, Jan, is also in the Hall of Fame.

————
Gov. Jerry Brown has appointed Danjel Bout, a UC Davis graduate, as assistant director of response at the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services.

Bout, 41, of Cool, has been strategic plans branch chief at the California National Guard since 2013, where he has been military liaison to the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services since 2012 and has served in several positions since 2004, including battalion operations officer, federal legislative liaison officer, company commander and battalion logistics officer.

He was exercise evaluator at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of the Inspector General’s California Office of Homeland Security from 2006 to 2007 and a critical infrastructure analyst at the California Anti-Terrorism Information Center from 2003 to 2004.

Bout earned a Ph.D. in organizational psychology from Walden University and a master’s degree in psychology from UCD. He has served on active reserve in the U.S. Army National Guard since 1998 and served in the U.S. Army Reserve from 1997 to 1998 and on active duty in the U.S. Army from 1994 to 1997.

He is a member of the International Association of Emergency Managers, the National Emergency Management Association, the American Psychological Association and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $119,796. Bout is registered without party preference.

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Faculty associations at UC Davis have honored two of their own: Linda Bissonrecipient of the Charles P. Nash Prize, and Thomas Cahill, recipient of the Distinguished Emeritus Award.

The Davis Division of the Academic Senate, the Academic Federation, the Davis Faculty Association and the Nash family have been presenting the Nash Prize since 2008, the year after Charlie Nash’s death. He was a professor of chemistry and a longtime faculty leader.

The prize honors a faculty member who epitomizes Nash’s commitment to shared governance, and his advocacy on behalf of faculty interests and welfare.

Bisson, who holds the Maynard A. Amerine Endowed Chair in Viticulture and Enology, served as Academic Senate chair in 2006-07, 2007-08 and again in 2011-12.

The UC Davis Emeritus Association bestows its Distinguished Emeritus/a Award annually, honoring the recipient’s outstanding scholarly work or service since retirement.

An atmospheric scientist, Cahill is an international authority on the makeup and transport of airborne particles. His work since retirement includes analyses of the pollution that spewed from the ruins of the World Trade Center after the Sept. 11 terrorist attack.

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Kara Anne Emery of Davis graduated from Baylor University with a doctor of psychology.

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Air Force Airman 1st Class Robin P. Knight, a 2006 graduate of Davis High School, graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas.

The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness and basic warfare principles and skills.

Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

Knight earned distinction as an honor graduate.

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San Diego State University is launching an Honors College in fall 2015, which has accepted two local residents:

*Aaron Levin-Fay, an SDSU freshman from Da Vinci High, who plans to major in athletic training; and

*Molly Thomas, an SDSU sophomore from Davis High School, who wants to major in hospitality and tourism.

In addition to the stellar grade-point averages, SAT and ACT scores required for admission, students in the college’s Honors Program are also expected to show a commitment to achievement and to giving back to the communities in which they live and work.

Honors students will participate in transformational educational experiences, including study abroad, leadership programs, undergraduate research with faculty mentors and internships.

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UC Davis experts Ken Shackel, Jan Hopmans, Patrick Brown and Lawrence Schwankl are part of a team of scientists to be honored by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture and the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities for helping growers throughout California and the west save time, money, and water.

The team’s project, known as “Microirrigation for Sustainable Water Use,” will receive the 2014 Experiment Station Section Award of Excellence in Multistate Research at the Association of Land-Grant Universities’ annual meeting in Orlando, Florida, on November 3.

Their long list of accomplishments include developing drip-irrigation technology, designing infrared thermometers to measure plant-canopy temperature, calibrating soil-water sensors, measuring water evaporation rates for different crops under different climate conditions and helping growers adopt and adapt to new technologies.

The award comes with a $15,000 prize.

————

High school sophomore Sarah Parker of Davis will attend Bard College at Simon’s Rock for fall of 2014.
“After a thorough and holistic review, Sarah’s readiness to engage in a highly rigorous college curriculum, potential for academic and personal success, and ability to enrich our campus community were evident in her application,” Director of Admission, Chandra Joos deKoven said.

————

Paula Kubo of Davis attended the Intergenerational Adventures in Flight Road Scholar Program at the Cosmosphere July 26-31, 2014.
The five-day program is for adults and their children or grandchildren to learn about space science and aviation. During camp, they take a flight lesson aboard a Cessna 172 with a certified flight instructor, train in the Cosmosphere’s spaceflight simulators, build robots and rockets and explore modern aircraft manufacturing on a tour of an aircraft facility in Wichita.
Participants tour the Cosmosphere’s world renowned Hall of Space Museum, experience thrilling films in the Carey Dome Theater and see the stars in the Justice Planetarium. The program concludes with intergenerational teams flying a space shuttle mission in the Cosmosphere’s Falcon simulator, the most realistic simulator experience outside of NASA.

————

Kayla Robinson of Davis received the Dean’s Award for academic excellence at Colgate University.
The award for academic excellence is given to students with a 3.30 or higher grade-point average while enrolled in 3.75 or more course hours.

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Michael Kim graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, South Carolina.
During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches and field training exercises.
He earned a bachelor’s degree in 2009 from UC Davis.

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Diane Ullman, professor of entomology at UC Davis, is the 2014 recipient of the Entomological Society of America’s distinguished achievement award in teaching.

Ullman will receive the award at the ESA’s 62nd annual meeting, to take place Nov. 16-19 in Portland, Ore.

Ullman is known for innovative, multidisciplinary teaching strategies that connect science and art programs that mentor the next generation of scientists and help undergraduates succeed. Key examples are the Art/Science Fusion Program (using experiential learning to enhance scientific literacy), the Career Discovery Group Program (training mentors to help students explore careers and select majors), and the national Thrips-Tospovirus Educational Network (training graduate students and postdoctoral scholars to mentor new scientists).

Ullman’s research revolves around insects that transmit plant pathogens, in particular plant viruses. She is best known for advancing international knowledge of interactions between thrips and tospoviruses and aphids and citrus tristeza virus. Her contributions have played a fundamental role in developing novel strategies for management of insects and plant viruses.

Ullman excels at developing new courses, programs and teaching methods, using traditional and non-traditional means. She employs a unique multidisciplinary approach to teaching.

The Art/Science Fusion Program, developed initially in the Department of Entomology and Nematology, is an innovative teaching program that crosses college boundaries and uses experimental learning to enhance scientific literary for students from all disciplines. Her program promotes environmental literacy with three undergraduate courses, a robust community outreach program, and sponsorship of the Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous (LASERs).

————

Self Lender, LLC, a consumer financial start-up company launched by chief executive officer James K. Garvey, a UC Davis graduate, received recognition at the TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2014 conference in San Francisco.

Self Lender was one of the 26 teams chosen to compete in the Start-up Battlefield contest. It was named runner-up for Accenture’s Open Innovation Enterprise Disrupter Award.

The company helps U.S. consumers build credit, save money and gain access to affordable, financial products.

Its users can create a small, interest-free, zero cost, installment-based debt obligation that goes on their credit report. A user can select a monthly payment amount of $25 to $250, and a term of either 3, 6, 9 or 12 months. After making all scheduled payments, the users receive their entire loan amount back, and months of payment history applied on their credit report. It costs $3 per month to join Self Lender.

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— Do you know of someone who has won an award or accomplished something noteworthy? Email it to newsroom@davisenterprise.net or send it to Name Droppers, The Davis Enterprise, P.O. Box 1470, Davis, CA 95617

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September 17, 2014 |

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September 16, 2014 |

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Public Lands Day 9/27

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September 17, 2014 |

National Public Lands Day
Enjoying the Berryessa Snow Mountain region
By Charlotte Orr
Saturday, September 27th – Celebrate National Public Lands Day right in your own backyard. The Berryessa Snow Mountain region is less than an hour’s drive from Davis, and includes 350,000+ acres of federal public lands to enjoy.

The Berryessa Snow Mountain region stretches nearly one hundred miles from the shores of Lake Berryessa to the flanks of Snow Mountain in the Mendocino National Forest. This undiscovered landscape provides wonderful opportunities to hike, horseback ride, and hunt, camp, fish, bird watch, use motorized vehicles on designated routes, enjoy both motorized and non-motorized boating, water recreation, and much more.

The Berryessa Snow Mountain region has a botanical biodiversity that makes it the center of the California global hot spot. Come visit the blue oak woodlands, Shasta red fir forests, chaparral, rivers, riparian areas, and jaw dropping explosion of annual spring wildflowers. This stunning outdoor wonderland provides habitat for nearly half of California’s dragonfly species, a wealth of butterflies, river otters, trout, tule elk, deer, mountain lions, bears, osprey, and California’s second largest population of wintering bald eagles.

Here are a few ways you can celebrate National Public Lands Day:
Go fish: September 27th is also National Hunting and Fishing Day. Check both celebrations on your list by going fishing in the Berryessa Snow Mountain region. Putah Creek is a great place to practice your catch and release fishing for wild trout. Don’t forget to only use artificial flies and lures with barbless hooks.

Sign-up for a Hike or Trail Day: Tuleyome has an exciting list of hikes and trail days coming up in the Berryessa Snow Mountain region. These events are free to the public and led by experienced hike docents. Learn more about these hikes at www.tuleyome.org and sign-up online at www.MeetUp.com/Tuleyome-Home-Place-Adventures

Ask President Obama to Take Action: Permanent protection of this quintessential piece of California’s wild outdoor heritage will improve coordination between federal agencies, help adjustments to climate change, keep our water clean and provide additional federal funding opportunities for conservation management, invasive species eradication, and recreational enhancement. Ask President Obama to permanently protect the Berryessa Snow Mountain region by signing a postcard of support at www.berryessasnowmountain.org

Upcoming Tuleyome Hikes and Trail Days in the Berryessa Snow Mountain Region
Hikes
· Saturday, October 18, 2014
· Saturday, December 6th 2014: Berryessa Peak Hike
· Saturday, January 10th 2015:: Cold Canyon Hike
· Saturday, February 7th 2015:: High Bridge Trail
· Saturday, April 11th 2015:: Redbud Trail
· Saturday, May 2nd 2015: Berryessa Snow Mountain Wildflower Tour
· Saturday, June 6th- Sunday, June 7th 2015: Snow Mountain Camping Trip (Weather permitting)

Trail Days
· December 20th 2014: Volunteer trail restoration day at Stebbins Cold Canyon.
· January 24th 2015: Volunteer trail restoration day at Stebbins Cold Canyon.
· February 21th 2015: Volunteer trail restoration day at Stebbins Cold Canyon.
· March 21st 2015: Volunteer trail restoration day at Stebbins Cold Canyon.
· April 18th 2015: Volunteer trail restoration day at Stebbins Cold Canyon.
· May 16th 2015: Volunteer trail restoration day at Stebbins Cold Canyon.

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Tuleyome is a 501(c)(3) conservation non-profit dedicated to protecting the wild and agricultural heritage of the Northern Inner Coast Range and Western Sacramento Valley for existing and future generations.

Charlotte M. Orr

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McDonald’s oped

By
September 17, 2014 |

When I first applied to McDonald’s, I did it as a joke more than anything else. Sure, there was a small possibility that maybe, when all hope was lost, I would resign myself to the reign of the internationally recognized golden arches. Until then, I pitched the idea of working in the fast food industry as a joke to my friends. I would have rather pulled out every hair on my body follicle by follicle.
Now here I sit on a sickeningly bright red bench by the play place. I only have 20 more minutes of break left before I retreat back to the drive thru window for another four painful hours. As a now established McCrew member my pride may be diminished, but my perspective is quite the opposite.
Growing up in Davis, I am fortunate enough to have been exposed to years of eating at farmer’s markets, shopping at locally owned stores, and attending excellent public schools. McDonald’s never seemed to fit the picture I imagined for myself, and certainly did not emblemize my town.
Yet tucked away along Chiles Road there rises the undeniably yellow sign for the one and only Davis McDonalds: an essential antithesis of the city in which is resides. The restaurant is obviously not local, the food is greasy and nutrient poor, and many employees do not have a college degree to their name.
Without knowing much else, many McDonald’s customers treat the employees much worse than they would treat a stranger on the streets. Workers can always count on insults, screaming, threats, and even food throwing to be a part of the daily routine. At this point, someone would have to be devilishly creative if they wanted to hurt an employee beyond the usual McMisery.
These employees, who receive less respect than the foul food they serve, should receive equal or more praise than any of the local Davis storeowners, the vendors at farmer’s market, or the students pursuing higher education. The crewmembers’ stories and their irrefutable representation of this city cannot be found in a search engine and are certainly unrecognized.
Many employees at McDonald’s do not have a college degree. After living in Davis for so long, with higher education essentially shoved down every kid’s throat, the natural reaction to someone without a degree is one of disrespect. There’s a glimmer of judgment in most customers’ eyes as though they’re all wondering how incapable you must be to work a job so societally low.
One shift, as I began to speak, the customer dramatically jolted back and told me how shocked she was that I was “actually smart.” Instances like that tend to be the rule more than the exception as person after person would ask why someone like me was working at McDonald’s. Everyone tended to ask in a way that suggested I did not belong there, and somehow most other workers did.
No one “belongs” at McDonalds. The fast food industry in general is not a cubbyhole where society shoves all the inept humans, although some people treat it as such.
The other day I had my break at the same time as the cook Fiora*. She is a grandmother, and has worked at McDonald’s for a cringingly long amount of time. Originally from Mexico, Fiora saw McDonald’s as one of her only viable work options in America.
Because she works in the kitchen, Fiora does not even have the chance to prove her intelligence to customers. This aging woman, the same one who makes 20-piece chicken nuggets at ungodly hours, can very confidently recount the whole periodic table along with atomic numbers and masses, and she will not blink an eye.
One of the managers, Anna*, began working in Mexico when she was nine years old. At 19, she moved to America where she could only find work at McDonald’s. Now she is 46, divorced, and supporting her son on her meager wages.
It becomes an inside joke between workers that we are actually intelligent people because so many customers think the opposite. As angry customers hurl verbal daggers at our lack of intelligence, I can always find a co-worker wearing the same ironic smirk I am.
One person in particular will always return my coy smile: my manager for the graveyard shift, Sophia*.
She can tell you hundreds of stories about rude customers, including one who launched their food back into the drive thru window. Like the other workers, Sophia gets discounted as someone who was unable to make enough of herself to land a real job.
Meanwhile, she works regular eight-hour shifts through the night and attends UC Davis during the day. Her only time to sleep is at lunch, or in the three hours she has before and after school. Sophia also pays for her own education despite her roots in a town where college is not a popular path to pursue.
Yes, the bright McDonald’s red and yellow definitely clash with Davis’ all green scene. The food is indeed poor, and under-education in the workplace is undoubtedly significant. However what deserves recognition are not those perceivably negative features; instead the limelight needs to shine on the workers.
They all understand and express the value of education even if they may not have it. They all tightly grasp the value of tough grind and elbow grease even if they dislike their job. Most importantly, despite all else, they persist with their work so that someday the food in front of them may not be their discounted burger and fries, but instead real fruits and veggies like at the farmer’s market.
It’s the employees of the Davis McDonald’s who work tirelessly to give themselves and their families a life that many Davis locals, including myself, were already blessed with.

Grace Calhoun is a sophomore student attending Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. As a Kinesiology major, Grace is in pursuit of a career in public health or corporate wellness. She has worked various jobs and traveled to many countries, which have provided her with a vast amount of life experience to draw upon and write about.

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Special to The Enterprise

Carol L. Walsh

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September 17, 2014 |

March 6, 1925 – Sept. 14, 2014

Carol L. Walsh died Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014, after a long decline following a stroke in March. At the time of her death she was living in Vallejo where she began her life in California more than seven decades earlier. But Davis, and later Woodland, was her chosen home for almost 30 years.

Carol was born in 1925 to Carl and Dorathy Carlson and spent her early years in Hibbing, Minn., where she and her sister Charlotte were raised in a small home that Carol was able to revisit in her 70s with many of the younger generations. When the Great Depression brought work in the mines of the Iron Range of Minnesota to a very low level, the family moved first to Clinton, Ariz., and then to Vallejo, where Carol attended high school and met her future husband, William Walsh. After graduation and during World War II, Carol worked as an administrative assistant at Treasure Island and Hunters Point. Carol and Bill married after the war and were together for 48 years until his death in 1998.

They raised their family of four children in the little towns along the Carquinez Straits, eventually settling in Crockett. When her children were well-launched, Carol returned to work as a secretary in Berkeley. In 1971 Carol and Bill moved to Houston, Texas, for a five-year stint. They returned to California in 1977, settling in Davis, where Bill worked at UCD and Carol became a fixture in the lives of children and grandchildren, all of whom eventually lived in the area.

Carol was predeceased by her husband Bill and her daughter, Barbara (Barby) Schacherbauer. She is survived by daughters Kathleen Walsh (Paul Benson) and Sandra (Bill) Seta, and son Patrick (Kerry) Walsh. She is also survived by 10 grandchildren: Eddie Rieves, Ricky Glover, Doug Seta, Tammy (Seta) Johnsen, Joshua and Matthew Walsh-Benson, Timothy Walsh, Christopher Walsh, Emily Walsh and Andrew Walsh; and 12 great-grandchildren. She left this life awaiting the imminent birth of her 13th great-grandchild.

She also leaves behind a favorite niece, Karen Cover, and many friends including the Wild Bunch of Davis (Mabel Neuman, Shirley Adkins and the late Elaine Gleason) and the wonderful residents and caretakers of Camino Alto Residence Club who befriended her and cared so well for her in her last months.

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Special to The Enterprise

Paso Fino

By
September 17, 2014 |

Dear Editor:

At 7 pm on Wednesday, Sept. 24, the Planning Commission will hold a hearing on a second proposal for the Paso Fino site in Wildhorse from developer Taormino & Associates. This proposal would build eight homes and one accessory dwelling unit on the former Haussler property and about half an acre of adjoining public greenbelt. Everyone who treasures Davis greenbelts and urban forest should save the date!

People who want to learn more about the issues can get information at www.Davisgreenbelts.org. Thoughtful comments from current and former Davis residents are worth reading, too, at https://www.change.org/p/save-davis-greenbelts.

Two of my favorites: “As we densify, greenbelts will be our backyards and front yards. They must be saved” and “Greenbelt/open space is precious. Once it’s gone, it’s gone … ”

Sincerely,

Claudia Morain
Davis

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Letters to the Editor

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September 16, 2014 |

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September 16, 2014 |

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September 16, 2014 |

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BC: Cancer clinical trials: Answering questions, offering hope

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September 04, 2014 |

Clinical trials help cancer researchers understand complex diseases and develop new treatments and medications to help manage them. Trials are designed to offer the best possible care while answering specific medical questions.

A cancer clinical trial offers today’s newest drugs and treatments in an effort to answer scientific questions and find better ways to treat cancer. Trials compare standard treatment with a new treatment doctors hope will be even more effective. New cancer treatments are thoroughly tested in the laboratory, often for many years, before they become available to patients.

For patients, clinical trials can mean an opportunity to access the newest and most advanced treatments before they are widely available. Patients may decide to participate in clinical trials because they hope for a cure, a longer lifespan, an improved quality of life or because they hope their participation will benefit other cancer patients in the future.

Talk with your doctor
The more you know about cancer clinical trials, the easier your choice will be. We encourage you to have conversations with your doctor about all treatment options, including clinical trials. Consider asking questions such as:
* Is there a clinical trial going on right now for my type of cancer?
* Am I eligible for that trial?
* What drug or treatment is being studied?
* What are the potential risks and benefits compared to standard treatment?

Learn more about clinical trials and hope for a cure at the National Cancer Institute website, cancer.gov.

— Courtesy of UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Special to The Enterprise

BC: Mammograms: Questions for the doctor

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August 29, 2014 |

(Hasn’t been edited)

A mammogram is an x-ray of the breast to check for breast cancer. Mammograms can help find breast cancer early. You have a better chance of surviving breast cancer if it’s found and treated early.

If you are age 40 through 49, talk with your doctor about when to start getting mammograms and how often to get them.
If you are age 50 to 74, get mammograms every 2 years. You may also choose to get them more often. Together, you and your doctor can decide what’s best for you.
Mammograms for women over age 40 are covered under the Affordable Care Act. Depending on your insurance plan, you may be able to get mammograms at no cost to you. Talk to your insurance provider.

Like all medical tests, mammograms have pros and cons. These pros and cons change with your age and your risk for breast cancer. Use the questions below to start a conversation with your doctor about mammograms.

What do I ask the doctor?

It helps to have questions for the doctor written down ahead of time. Print this list of questions, and take it to your next appointment. You may want to ask a family member or close friend to come with you to take notes.

Do I have risk factors for breast cancer?
I am under age 50:
Based on my risk factors, what are my chances of getting breast cancer?
Should I start getting regular mammograms? If so, how often?
What are the pros and cons of getting mammograms before age 50?
I am between ages 50 and 74:
Based on my risk factors, what are my chances of getting breast cancer?
How often should I get mammograms?
What are the pros and cons of getting mammograms every 2 years instead of every year?
What happens during an appointment to get mammograms?
How long will it take to get the results of my mammograms?
If I don’t hear back from you about the results of my mammograms, should I assume everything is okay?

— Courtesy of U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, www.healthfinder.gov

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Special to The Enterprise

BC: Though rare, male breast cancer causes concern

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September 17, 2014 |

By John Andrew Prime

“Hey, you’ve got an innie and an outie.”

With those words, Jane Jackson may have saved her husband’s life 15 years ago.

“We were swimming and she looked down at my chest,” said Dr. Robert Jackson, 57, a Shreveport, La., internal medicine specialist. “Inversion of the nipple is a common sign of breast cancer. So I looked down and sure enough, one of my nipples was inverted. That was new. I naturally put my hand up there. It was the first time I felt a lump that was noticeably a lump.”

So began more than five years of treatment for Jackson, who graduated from the medical school in Shreveport in 1982 and joined its faculty in 1986. He had a modified radical mastectomy, six months of chemotherapy and five years of hormonal treatments.

“I did not have to get radiation,” Jackson said.

Now he just sees his primary care doctor annually.

Despite advances in treatment and detection, that doesn’t mean he breathes easy.

“Breast cancer is known for its late recurrences, so that old story about ‘if you’re cancer free for five years it’s OK’ isn’t true.’”

He continued to see his specialist, Dr. Gary Burton, oncologist at Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, for another five years.

Like most men, he hadn’t seen a doctor regularly. Cancer changed that.

“The need for some regular follow-up caused me to get a primary care doctor,” he said. Annual visits for cancer checks are now his norm, but it doesn’t keep him awake nights.

When he was diagnosed, Jackson and and another Shreveporter who has been vocal about his battle with male breast cancer, retired Louisiana State University Shreveport Chancellor Vincent Marsala, were Burton’s only active male patients, but six other men with more advanced cases were being treated symptomatically.

Burton, also a professor at LSU Health Shreveport, said prostate cancer is the most common tumor in men, and lung cancer kills more men and women than any other cancer. “But when you’re talking about breast cancer, it’s a little less than one percent of all the breast cancers we see in a male,” he said. Nationally, he said, fewer than 2,000 a year are diagnosed, with about 450 deaths a year.

Despite advances in its visibility — men now take part in the Susan G. Komen events that have made breast cancer a very high-profile illness — and advances in treatment and research, it remains more deadly for men.

“It’s very treatable,” says Burton. “If a woman has a breast lump, the chance of it being breast cancer is very low, way less than 10 percent. But if a man has a breast lump it is more likely to be cancer than in a woman.” About half of all breast lumps in men are cancerous, he said.

It also may be discovered at a more advanced, and thus deadly stage, than with woman because most men put off treatment.

Burton said that when he was younger, many family doctors didn’t believe men could get breast cancer. “The idea, even in the medical community, was breast cancer is a woman’s disease, prostate cancer is a man’s disease. Well, that’s true and not true. Prostate cancer is a man’s disease — there’s no prostate in a woman to get cancer — but breast cancer is for men and women.”

Risk factors for men and women are the same: Family history of breast cancer, smoking and alcohol consumption. Both Jackson and Burton noted that while there’s no proven link between gynecomastia, or the development of female breasts in men, and breast cancer, that condition — outside its most frequent manifestation in boys just after puberty — warrants medical investigation. Later in life, gynecomastia can be evidence of changes that could affect a man’s health, including the chance of developing breast cancer.

“Men who have breast cancer often have higher estrogen levels than what you would normally see in the male population,” Burton said. “That usually means there something else going on hormonally you wouldn’t be aware of.”

Jackson said, “It’s pure speculation on my part, but chronic marijuana use can cause gynecomastia,” he said. “With the current movement around the country to legalize marijuana I have to wonder.”

Promising research is underway into the genes that trigger the hectic cell growth that can become cancer and genes that apply the brakes to that growth. The genetic abnormality called Klinefelter’s Syndrome increases the risk of breast cancer to one in 30, Burton said.

“Normally a female has two X chromosomes and a male has an X and a Y,” Burton said. “With Klinefelter you have two X chromosomes and a Y chromosome.” That increases estrogen levels, “one of the culprits” in the higher risk, he said.

Some medications, including anabolic steroids, also can cause gynecomastia, Burton said. Studies differ about whether they can lead to male breast cancer, Burton said.

The low incidence makes meaningful studies difficult. Burton estimated in the Shreveport area there are probably 20 to 30 male breast cancer patients, most like Jackson, in remission and monitoring their condition through regular checkups.

“I don’t have anybody right now with male breast cancer who has metastatic disease,” he said. “Most (are) on follow-up.”

There’s not enough data, says Jackson, who despite his own brush with male breast cancer says most men should not live in fear.

“I see so many people that are freaked out about everything with health,” he said. “I don’t think that male breast cancer is something that men need to worry about, but a man well past puberty who notices an unusual appearance or lump that is not symmetrical, needs to go to a physician and have it looked at.”

Or, as in his case, if there’s a sign like a nipple inversion on one side only.

He paid special attention in part because his mother died at the same age he was diagnosed, 42, and he knew the risk factors.

Points to remember, Burton said, are “One, a breast lump in a man is bad. Two, treatment is very effective, just as in women. Stage for stage, there is no difference in outcome. Take men as a group and women as a group, however, and men do a whole lot worse. They don’t get diagnosed early enough.

“If you have gynecomastia, go see your doctor. If it’s asymmetric or there’s a hard lump it ought to be biopsied. (But) the prognosis for breast cancer has improved a lot. The therapies are making a big impact.”

— Courtesy of The Shreveport Times

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The Associated Press

BC: Double mastectomy may not be best choice for survival, study says

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September 17, 2014 |

By Victoria Colliver

Women diagnosed with early-stage cancer in one breast are increasingly choosing to have both breasts removed to reduce their chances of getting cancer again, but they’ll likely have no better chance at long-term survival than those who had a far less invasive lumpectomy followed by radiation, researchers said last month.

Researchers at Stanford University and the Cancer Prevention Institute of California in Fremont reached the conclusion after taking the largest and perhaps most comprehensive look at the survival rates for the most common surgical choices for early-stage breast cancer: double mastectomy, a single mastectomy and lumpectomy followed by radiation.

“We thought we’d maybe see some survival benefit with bilateral mastectomy, particularly in younger women,” said Dr. Allison Kurian, assistant professor of health research and policy at Stanford and lead author of the study. “We looked and looked, and saw no difference there.”

The findings support research dating back to the 1990s even as the rate of bilateral, or double, mastectomies has increased substantially in recent years.

For their study, the researchers relied on data from the California Cancer Registry, which involved nearly 190,000 cases or virtually every woman in California diagnosed with one cancerous tumor in a single breast between 1998 and 2011. More than half were treated with lumpectomies, which involve removing just the tumor and surrounding tissue.

The study showed the rate of bilateral mastectomies rose from 2 percent of all patients in 1998 to 12.3 percent in 2011, an increase most pronounced in younger white women. In that group, the percentage of patients younger than 40 choosing to have both breasts removed skyrocketed from 3.6 percent in 1998 to 33 percent in 2011.

Physicians and researchers aren’t exactly sure why more women are having double mastectomies, but they say that anxiety about getting a second cancer, improvements in reconstruction surgeries and concern about breast symmetry may play a role. Younger women are more likely to have a more aggressive disease, which may also be a factor in a decision.

While the risk of getting a second breast cancer is slightly higher in someone who has already been diagnosed with the disease, Stanford’s Kurian said the risk is still very low. She acknowledged that peace of mind may be a powerful force, but that the potential complications of a more aggressive surgery should be considered.

“On some level, they don’t care how low their risk is, but they want to do whatever is possible to obliterate their possibility of getting another cancer,” she said.

It’s the spread of disease — not a new primary tumor — that causes breast cancer deaths, she noted. “Still, in the back of some people’s minds is the idea that this may help them live longer. We just don’t see evidence of that.”

For Roxanne Sager of Rodeo, the study helped reassure her of her decision to have a lumpectomy when she was diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer in 2006.

“If it were going to make a difference in my outcome, I would have totally had a mastectomy,” said Sager, who was 52 when she was diagnosed and is now cancer-free. “(The study) makes me feel better … but I would have done whatever.”

Sager said she opted for the less invasive surgery because the location of her tumor made it difficult to ensure they removed not only the tumor but the surrounding area with either surgery, so she was advised to have chemotherapy no matter what she decided.

Cheryl Ziperstein of Albany made a different decision eight years ago. While her cancer had spread to at least one lymph node, it was still early stage and confined to one breast. But she opted for a double mastectomy.

“I knew in my core there was not compelling evidence to support the bilateral, but I felt more secure,” said Ziperstein, 63, who directs the patient services program for the American Cancer Society. She said chest radiation for an earlier, unrelated cancer also played a role in her choice.

Ziperstein noted the decision by actress Angelina Jolie to have both breasts removed because of a genetic mutation that greatly increased her chances of getting cancer, helped “normalize” decisions by women to opt for a double mastectomy. “It’s such an emotional decision that even the science, as good as it is and compelling as it is, may not be enough to sway people,” she said.

Despite the September report, Scarlett Lin Gomez, the study’s senior author, said women with a strong family history of breast cancer, or BRCA or other genetic mutations that predispose them to the disease, may make bilateral mastectomy an effective choice for treatment or as a preventive measure.

In a finding surprising to Gomez and other researchers, the study found women who opted to remove one breast — a unilateral mastectomy — had slightly lower survival rates than women who chose the other options. The study does not explain why, but the data show these women are more likely to be a racial or ethnic minority, have lower socioeconomic status and be diagnosed with other health problems.

Gomez, a research scientist at the Cancer Prevention Institute of California, said more research needs to be done to answer that question as well as to look more deeply into the reasons for patients’ decisions.

“The study is not to say don’t have a bilateral mastectomy. This is one piece of evidence to add to the larger discussion,” Gomez said. “It’s important physicians discuss all the pros and cons with their patients. Psychological considerations, whether driven by fear and anxiety, may be just as important as the data we have here.”

(For a fact box)
Key breast cancer study findings
A study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association looked at virtually every California woman diagnosed with one cancerous tumor in a single breast between 1998 and 2011. The study found:

* Of the 189,734 women in the study, 55 percent received a lumpectomy with follow-up radiation, 38.8 percent chose a unilateral mastectomy and 6.2 percent opted for a double mastectomy.

* No difference in long-term survival between those who chose a double mastectomy or lumpectomy followed by radiation. The study did find, however, a slightly higher death rate among women who chose mastectomy in one breast.

* A recent increase in the number of women opting for double mastectomies. Overall, the percentage among all women increased from 2 percent in 1998 to 12.3 percent in 2011, but nearly a third of white women younger than 40 received bilateral mastectomies in 2011.

— By Victoria Colliver, San Francisco Chronicle. Sources: Stanford University School of Medicine and Cancer Prevention Institute of California

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Biberstein grants available 10/14

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September 17, 2014 |

For Immediate Release

Contact: Shoshana Zatz
Cell phone: (530) 219-0862
E-mail: shoshanazatz@sbcglobal.net
Date: September 16, 2014

BIBERSTEIN SOCIAL ACTION FUND GRANTS AVAILABLE
Twelfth Annual Call for Proposals
Proposals due October 14, 2014

DAVIS— Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit applications to the Biberstein Social Action Fund for grants in support of projects addressing poverty, discrimination, abuse and neglect issues in Yolo County.

The fund was established in 2002 by the Board of Directors of Congregation Bet Haverim, Jewish Fellowship of Davis, to honor Ernie and Hannah Biberstein, who are among the founding members of the synagogue and who devoted much of their lives to community service and social justice. Hannah passed away in April 2011.
The goal of the annual awards made from the Biberstein Social Action Fund is to help groups in their efforts to meet unfulfilled needs.
“In light of all the budget cuts in social services, we hope that grants like ours can make a difference,” Hannah Biberstein had said. “It means a lot to us that real individuals benefit from our grants.” Special consideration is given to new and/or innovative projects.
An annual Call for Proposals is released in September of every year. Grants ranging from $500 to $2,000 are awarded each November. A committee of Bet Haverim congregants reviews grant applications.  Current Biberstein Fund committee members are congregants Ernie Biberstein, Anne Gieseke, Amy Abramson, Sandy Jones, Joan Sublett, Shoshana Zatz, and Rabbi Greg Wolfe.
Information about the Biberstein Award is available on the CBH website:

http://bethaverim.wordpress.com/about/cbh-board-committees-and-groups/biberstein-social-action-fund/

The application form is available in the following ways:
Download at:

http://bethaverim.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/biberstein-application-2014.pdf

By mail – contact the CBH office at (530) 758-0842
Visit – Congregation Bet Haverim, 1715 Anderson Road, Davis, CA 95616.

Grant proposals must be submitted no later than October 14, 2014.
Questions may be directed to the Biberstein Social Action Fund at cbhbibersteinfund@gmail.com.
The Bibersteins were among the founders of Davis Community Meals, where they served as board members and officers. They have also been active in a variety of interfaith groups, including Care for God’s Creation, Yolo Interfaith Immigration Network, and Celebration of Abraham, which brings together Jews, Moslems and Christians. In recognition of their services, they received several civic awards.
Ernie Biberstein is a professor emeritus of the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Hannah Biberstein was a mediator in the original city of Davis mediation program, was chair of the city’s Social Services Commission, and served on the Affordable Housing Task Force.
Past grant recipients include: Blacks for Effective Community Action/DHS Youth in Focus Program, Ark Pre-School, Marguerite Montgomery Elementary School Library Rural Innovations in Social Economics (RISE)Citizens Who Care, Inc., Davis Bridge Educational Foundation, Elderly Nutrition Program, Food Bank of Yolo County,  Friends of Esparto Library, Habitat for Humanity, Interfaith Rotating Winter Shelter, Madison Continuation High School, Mercer Veterinary Clinic, NAMI, Short Term Emergency Aid Committee, St. Francis Pet Education and Training Center, Suicide Prevention and Crisis Services, Village Harvest Davis, Yolo Interfaith Immigration Network (YIIN), Yolo Adult Day Health Care, Yolo Community Care Continuum (YCCC), Yolo County Conflict Resolution Service, Yolo County Grandparents Raising Grandchildren, Yolo Literacy Council, and Yolo Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Center.
“We are looking forward to the twelfth annual distribution of these funds for good works in Yolo County,” said Ernie Biberstein. Contributions to the fund may be made through Congregation Bet Haverim, 1715 Anderson Road, Davis, 95616. Please note that the donation is for the Biberstein Social Action Fund.

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Special to The Enterprise

Mylene Fernández-Pintado’s “A Corner of the World” Book Presentation

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September 16, 2014 |

The Hemispheric Institute on the Americas at University of California, Davis is exited to present Mylene Fernández-Pintado and her book “A Corner of the World,” translated by Dick Cluster. This event will be located in 273 Social Science and Humanities on Thursday, October 9th at 12:00 PM.

Mylene’s narrative obsessions revolve around the stories we tell ourselves to justify our actions: infidelity, promises not kept, or why live in a country cold and alienating instead of the homeland that we so painfully miss. Winner of the David Award (1998) from the Union of Writers and Artists of Cuba (UNEAC) for her book Anhedonia. Her novel Otras Plegarias Atendidas won the Italo Calvino Prize in 2002 and the Critics’ Award in 2003. The novel was published by Editorial Marco Tropea in Italy. Her short stories appear in anthologies in Cuba and abroad, and have been translated into English, French, Italian and German. She lives between Havana and Lugano, Switzerland.

Dick Cluster is a translator of Cuban literature and teaches courses on Cuban history, culture, and politics.

“…Her story of lost love and the difficult pursuit of literature is at the same time an X-ray of life in Havana…” -Leonardo Padura, author of The Man Who Loved Dogs and the Mario Conde novels of Havana

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Special to The Enterprise

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September 16, 2014 |

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Connie Valentine oped

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September 17, 2014 |

Dear Debby, Thank you for considering this for an article for the Davis Enterprise. My best, Connie

Connie Valentine, M.S.
950 Pecan Place, Davis, CA 95616
530-753-0806

I read with horror the slowly unfolding story of Daniel William Marsh, a teenager who testified he wanted to commit homicide since he was ten years old, who told counselors about specific tortures he dreamed of inflicting, and who finally acted on those urges on April 14, 2013. He admitted he ended the lives of an elderly couple in a particularly sadistic manner. And said he enjoyed it.

What are we to make of this crime in our highly educated, liberal town of 65,000 people nestled in a bucolic agricultural setting? Are we to say that such admission of a Hannibal Lector type double murder is an anomaly? Or that Davis is different from other rural towns where people are not murdered in their sleep by a neighbor’s kid? Or is this the unique crime of the century?

What could have prevented this and other tragic deaths in Davis?
The Dec. 20, 1980 kidnap-murders of UC Davis sweethearts John Riggins and Sabrina Gonsalves haunted our community until November 2012 when Richard Joseph Hirschfield was found guilty of the crime.
April 24, 1992, Holmes Junior High student Andrew Mockus was beaten and pushed into a moving train by three Davis teens, Michael Johnson, Andrew Childs and Joshua Bettencourt.
In late 1997, three Davis teenagers committed suicide: Qasim Shah, Robert Schulze and Evan Rippee.
On January 4, 2001, UC Davis student Andrew Wieman was found in bed covered with a blanket, with 29 stab wounds to his neck and chest, three of which were fatal. His death was ruled suicide, although the practical impossibility of stabbing oneself fatally three times, then tucking oneself into bed has troubled community members for the past 14 years.
On January 22, 2007, UC Davis student Jennifer Tse took her life at her Davis apartment.
· October 1, 2011, Kevin Gerard Seery was found strangled to death in his residence. It was the first homicide to occur in Davis in almost 7 years, since the rest of the deaths were ruled suicides.

* On Sept. 26 2013, Aquelin Talamantes was found guilty of murdering her 5 year old daughter.

These and other deaths http://daviswiki.org/tragic_events are in addition to local child sex abuse scandals: psychiatrist Michael Hirsch was arrested in November 2000 in an online sex sting operation;
a rape camp posing as a group home was exposed and closed in 2013 (although it took 500 calls to Davis police to get any action); and
priest Hector Coria pled guilty to sex acts with a 16 year old girl in July 2014 and will hopefully be removed from the priesthood.

To say this is all troubling is the understatement of the decade.

Davis is no longer an innocent village, even though it continues to look like Dick-and-Jane land. We now lock our doors and windows tight before going to bed. Alarm companies will profit from our fears. Our town made amusing international headlines in 1994 by giving a citation to a snoring woman, but now we’ve moved into an entirely different league. The international press already has Davis in its headlights after the vicious pepper spraying of peacefully protesting students last year, and the arrival of our newest toy, the hot-potato tank that we have to return to sender. There will be more questions and more focus now, of a much darker nature.

What is going on around here? Do local counselors routinely ignore evidence of markedly abnormal thoughts and emotional disturbance just days before they are acted upon, instead of asking key questions and delving deeper into a child’s psyche and experiences? Do local doctors recklessly prescribe drugs instead of looking for origins of symptoms? Do local bystander children keep silent for months about a hideous crime revealed to them, thereby become accessories after the fact?

There is a missing piece.

With all the scrutiny of this teen who is barely old enough to drive, too young to drink, and can’t yet vote, has anyone thought to ask him if he was physically, sexually, emotionally or ritually abused when he was young? Has he been examined for dissociation or asked about amnesia?

We know from the Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Kaiser Permanente San Diego, along with common sense, that children who are wounded grow to have troubles. The injuries can be emotional, physical, sexual abuse or neglect, and encompass household dysfunctions such as a mother who is beaten, and a parent who is mentally ill, incarcerated, alcoholic or lost to the child. http://acestoohigh.com/

The research project started when Kaiser Permanente physician Vincent Felitti noticed that women in his obesity clinic in San Diego who successfully lost weight often left the program and regained the weight. He asked them why. It turned out they were overwhelmingly victims of childhood sex abuse. Most began their weight gain within a year of being molested or raped. They ate to soothe themselves. Obesity became a protection from unwanted attention.

“Being subjected to abuse during childhood entails a markedly increased risk of developing obesity as an adult. This is the conclusion of a meta-analysis carried out on previous studies, which included a total of 112,000 participants.” http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/281905.php

In July, Yolo County residents were told that obesity (along with sexually transmitted diseases, teen smoking, suicides and attempted suicides) is on the rise in our county. The ACE research documents each of these health risk outcomes as completely predictable results of childhood adversity. It is not a big leap to deduce that children may be increasingly maltreated in Yolo County. This is not rocket science.

Research tells us that the category of parental bullying called corporal punishment can lead to mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety. A police officer confirmed that being hit with a belt is considered “assault with a weapon”. This is done to little children with impunity but if the assailant did it to another adult, he or she would be arrested. A better title for mental illness would be ‘mental injury’. As psychologist John Briere once famously said, “If child abuse and neglect were to stop today, in two generations the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) would shrink to the size of a pamphlet and the prisons would stand empty.”

Daniel Marsh has had a host of symptoms of mental injuries, including anorexia and depression. Yes, he took psychotropic medication. But so do one in five Americans, and they do not commit mayhem. His parents were divorced. But half the population has divorced parents and do not contemplate beating a raccoon to death in the backyard with a bat, or butchering birds, much less admitting to committing torture and double homicide for the thrill of it. That is psychopathy in its purest form.

So, we ask, what might produce such a chilling character defect?

Well, according to the literature, ritual abuse and mind control could do exactly that.

· Randy Noblitt, PhD wrote that ritual abuse consists of universal heinous acts. His book Ritual Abuse in the Twenty-first Century addresses evidence, consequences of these acts to the individual and society, validity of survivors’ stories, and why these allegations are ignored or discredited whenever they surface. We can accept that Aztecs and Mayans sacrificed human beings to ancient gods, but our minds stall trying to imagine it is happening right here, right now. Nonetheless, reports of ritual abuse and mind control in the USA keep surfacing on a regular basis, as hard as the perpetrators try to keep a lid on their activities.

http://www.amazon.com/Ritual-Abuse-Twenty-First-Century-Considerations/dp/1934759120

· Colin Ross, MD, author of Bluebird, blew the whistle on the extensive political abuse of psychiatry in North America in the second half of the 20th century. He based his research on documents of unethical mind control experiments by leading psychiatrists and medical schools who created new identities through torture. The CIA used our taxpayer dollars to create Manchurian Candidates, and carefully documented this extension of the Nazi concentration camp experiments. http://www.wanttoknow.info/bluebird10pg

· Today, these crimes are found worldwide. In the Extreme Abuse Survey by Rutz, Becker, Overkamp, and Karriker (2008), witnessing murder and being forced to participate in animal mutilation and murder by perpetrators were reported by nearly half of the 1471 survivors of childhood torture-based, government-sponsored mind control experimentation from 31 countries. I would urge you to read the survey results for yourselves, unless you have a weak stomach and don’t want to know what is happening in the real world. http://extreme-abuse-survey.net/survey.php?en=b

· The UK and the US, along with many other countries, have successfully prosecuted numerous ritual abuse and torture crimes. http://ukpaedos-exposed.com/uk-child-abusers-named-and-shamed/childhood-abuses/child-abuse-or-tradition/ritualistic-abuse-in-the-uk/ http://endritualabuse.org/evidence/satanism-and-ritual-abuse-archive/

· In his book The Franklin Coverup, former Nebraska state Senator John deCamp described a ritual abuse pedophile ring centered in Omaha, Nebraska, with connections to Sacramento and Washington DC. It consisted of Boys Town, the local news media, law enforcement officials and a man named Larry King from Omaha’s Franklin Savings and Loan. Reporter Nick Bryant covered this story also in his book The Franklin Conspiracy.

· Professionals and local survivors have spoken about ritual abuse and mind control at the Child Sexual Abuse Awareness Conference in Davis for many years. http://www.issb.us/pastevents.html Some survivors reported ritual abuse crimes that occurred in Davis and other parts of Yolo County, but no investigation resulted and reports tended to disappear.

Ritual abuse and torture could certainly make a child feel homicidal and suicidal, become anorexic and depressed, and find a fascination in animal killing and torture. Just like Daniel William Marsh.

Has a ritual abuse and mind control expert been called in to examine him for dissociation or amnesia to see if there might be an origin of his many symptoms? He may very well spend the rest of his life in a facility, whether prison or state hospital for the criminally insane, but unless we ask the question ‘why’ and probe a little deeper, he is likely to be a danger even to staff in the facility. If he is a torture victim, his symptoms might be ameliorated with good trauma therapy while he is contained. He has received only palliative treatment until now; perhaps curative treatment would be beneficial.

This article will no doubt cause some consternation and debunking. This is not a popular topic and perpetrators want to make sure ritual crimes and torture are not taken seriously. It will be interesting to see who writes in opposition. However, despite the anticipated comments on ‘moral panic’ and ‘witch hunt’, it is crucial to ask the right questions.

If Daniel William Marsh was a victim of ritual abuse and mind control training, we can start to understand what happened to him, and maybe figure out how to stop it from happening to other Davis children.

Of course, we could tuck our heads firmly in the sand and ignore it, hoping it will go away. That’s exactly what the good Germans did.

Connie Valentine, M.S.

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Special to The Enterprise

Agruss letter

By
September 17, 2014 |

Dear Editor:

It might seem unthinkable that Davis would sell a greenbelt, but on September 24th the Planning Commission will consider a proposal submitted by Taormino & Associates that would involve just such a sale. This is the second greenbelt-acquisition proposal from this developer to be heard by the Planning Commission.

Their first, in May, asked for 0.75 acres of public greenbelt, and the Planning Commission approved this plan. The resulting public opposition prompted the City Council to ask Taormino & Associates to return to the drawing board. They did, and they’re back.
Their new proposal would destroy about 0.52 acres of the greenbelt. The proposal concerns a piece of private property, and much of the surrounding greenbelt, between Covell and Moore Boulevards and Sargent and Whistler Courts in Wildhorse.

At the May 28th Planning Commission hearing, approximately 20 thoughtful, articulate people made compelling arguments against the first Taormino & Associates proposal. It wasn’t enough. If you treasure Davis greenbelts, please attend the September 24th hearing.

The developers need to go back to the drawing board and come up with a proposal that honors a 2009 plan approved by both the City Council and Planning Commission. That compromise swaps some greenbelt for private land which contains a grove of irreplaceable 60-foot-tall pines, and doubles the zoned density of the private property from two to four homes. As published in recent editorials, the Sierra Club Yolano Group has praised the 2009 plan as considerably less objectionable than the current proposal.

More information, including a list of individuals and groups who want to save the greenbelt and the pines, can be found at davisgreenbelts.org.

Christopher Agruss
South Davis resident

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Letters to the Editor

Affordable housing affects health

By
September 17, 2014 |

Debbie,

Sorry it’s taken me so long to get this to you, but it turned out to be longer and more complicated than I expected. But, here it is, below and attached.

Please note that there is another regional communities summit on September 29th in Sacramento. If there is any way to run it before that date, it would be wonderful.

If you have questions or need more info, just let me know.

Thanks again!
Dell

DELL RICHARDS PUBLICITY
916.455.4790
www.dellrichards.com

Affordable housing affects health 765 words
By Dell Richards Exclusive to The Davis Enterprise

Retail clerks, university employees and receptionists aren’t usually thought of as needing affordable housing, but people such as these who work in low-wage jobs usually spend 30 to 50 percent of their income on housing, especially if they are single parents with children.

Unless they live in affordable housing like that of Mutual Housing California.

Without affordable housing, if single parents have a minimum wage job, they have to work 2.6 full-time jobs to rent a two-bedroom apartment in Yolo County for themselves and their children, according to the 2014 Out of Reach report from the National Low-Income Housing Coalition.

When they spend too much on housing, they have less to spend on necessities such as food, transportation and healthcare.

Recent research by the Chicago-based nonprofit Feeding America shows one in six people in Yolo County get less food than they need on a regular basis. That includes nearly 11,000 children going to bed hungry.

For children, that means they tend to have lower weight than they should, poorer health and developmental risks.

“Affordable housing can function as a vaccine,” said William Ho, Northern California program director at Enterprise Community Partners, Inc. “If you have affordable housing, it frees up money for food and health expenditures.”

Researchers use the term bandwidth to describe the capacity the brain has to process information.

If children are worried about where they will sleep that night, where they will go to school next week or where their next meal is coming from, it affects their ability to process other less pressing concerns such as homework.

It also affects attention span, resilience to change and the ability to form attachments to people, places and things.

“Those of us who work in the fields of health and housing have long known of their important link,” said Rachel Iskow, chief executive officer of Mutual Housing California, which operates healthy, sustainable and affordable housing.

The link between affordable housing and health is so strong that people such as Leilani Barnett, regional manager of community development at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, can cite statistic after statistic about the effect.

“We have a research division that has studied the relationship between social equity—racial inclusion, economic equality, employment, productivity and per capita income—and the economic health economy of regions,” said Barnett, emphasizing that she spoke only as a private individual, and not on behalf of the Federal Reserve.

“There are numerous studies that show a strong linkage with greater equity and stronger economies.”

As a result of these relationships, local banks are taking a more holistic approach to investment and working with the Center for Regional Change (CRC) at the University of California, Davis, to develop an interactive data mapping tool for the factors that impact social equity.

“Banks and other organizations want to have a bigger picture of conditions on the ground and the assets that are going to need to be invested to create thriving communities,” said Jonathan London, Ph. D., director of the CRC.

Although they don’t give percentages, CRC interactive maps show that housing costs are very high in Davis given the number of low-wage jobs.

“When the job-housing fit analysis shows an imbalance of low-wage jobs and affordable housing, this forces people to commute longer distances to work, which also has economic implications, especially for people who contribute to the service, retail, hospitality and other sectors of the local economy,” said London.

This is one reason why the nonprofit developer Mutual Housing continues to build affordable housing in the area.

New Harmony Mutual Housing in Davis opened in 2013; Mutual Housing at Spring Lake in Woodland is scheduled to open next year. Mutual Housing operates an additional four multifamily housing communities in Davis.

This also is why organizations such as Mutual Housing and the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, among others, recently held a Wells Fargo Bank-sponsored regional affordable housing forum in Davis.

Another one—the Greater Sacramento Healthy Communities Summit—in Sacramento on September 29 has just been expanded to accommodate more people.

“By being part of the discussion of those links, we hope to create partnerships and community support for building and maintaining housing that creates healthier children, parents and families,” said Mutual Housing’s Iskow.

Sadly, poverty and lack of affordable housing not only affect long-term health, but life expectancy.

“Only 30% of life expectancy is related to your genetic predisposition, and only 10% is related to healthcare,” said Barnett.

“Forty percent is determined by your behavioral patterns, such as how much exercise you get, what you eat, whether or not you smoke. Fifteen percent is determined by social circumstances such as whether you’re employed or not, whether you go to college or not.

“Having safe, affordable housing may impact one’s behavioral patterns, and one’s social circumstances, impacting one’s health.”

–30—

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Special to The Enterprise

Walk to defeat ALS 10/4

By
September 17, 2014 |

The Sacramento Area Walk to Defeat ALS Saturday | October 04, 2014
WALK CHECK-IN: 9:00 AM
WALK STARTS: 11:00 AM
LOCATION: Raley Field
DISTANCE: 5K and 1 mileEvent/Fundraiser Coordinator
Rene Hamlin
Rhamlin@alssac.org
916-979-9265

Cathy Speck, Davis’ own Amazon ALS Advocate, and her team The SPECKtaculars, invite all to join them for some very meaningful fun.

So much more than just a “Walk” ( and roll) the Walk to Defeat ALS® is an opportunity to bring hope to people living with ALS, to raise money for a cure, and to come together for something you care about. The Walk to Defeat ALS® is The ALS Association’s biggest annual event, which raises funds that allow our local chapters to sustain care services and support research for much of the next year.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Eventually, people with ALS lose the ability to initiate and control muscle movement, which includes muscles of the respiratory system. Over 90% of deaths come from respiratory failure.

Rarely ALS is caused be a genetic mutation- this 1993 discovery is to date most significant finding in ALS research, there is still no cure or treatment for families with ALS – fALS.

Explains Cathy, who speaks at schools, colleges and churches about ALS, “This disease has already killed four family members. Some members of our family inherited the genetic mutation from our mom’s lineage that leads to ALS. Our mom died when she was 52, and I had just turned 13. Our brother Larry died in 2008, and brother Paul died in 2011. I ain’t dead yet. Our SOD1 genetic mutation of fALS happens in only 2% of all ALS cases. This is the truth of ALS and who it hurts, and it’s why I’m asking you to donate to the Walk to Defeat ALS as soon as possible – it’s easy to forget. I do it all the time.”

Every 90 minutes a person in this country is diagnosed with ALS and every 90 minutes another person will lose their battle against this disease. ALS occurs throughout the world with no racial, ethnic, or socioeconomic boundaries. Although the life expectancy of an ALS patient averages about two to five years from the time of diagnosis, this disease is variable and many people live with quality for five years and more. More than half of all patients live more than three years after diagnosis. About twenty percent of people with ALS live five years or more and up to ten percent will survive more than ten years .ALS occurs throughout the world with no racial, ethnic or socioeconomic boundaries.

This cruel, devastating disease can strike anyone. Presently there is no known cause of the disease yet it still costs loved ones an average of $200,000 a year to provide the care ALS patients need. Help make a difference and donate or join a walk today. Cathy believes the Walk to Defeat ALS is the perfect avenue to channel the love and energies of family, friends and colleagues who are determined to help us find a cure. The Walk is once a year that many have scheduled as an annual fun, meaningful family and friends event.

Cathy reminds friends to “remember, your contribution makes a big difference as we continue our quest to end ALS and offer care to people suffering from this horrible disease. Your support is needed now more than ever before, even though the ICE BUCKET CHALLENGE ( IBC) got so much publicity. I could try to explain all the intricacies about financing research, but I have a feeling it would be long , boring and confusing. I fully believe the IBC brought ALS out of the closet and we MUST keep it out – no more hiding the cruel, ugly disease in the shadows. How do we do this ? I’m open to ideas and I’m hoping for benefactors: I am designing t-shirts that are red with white print. The front has a stop sign shape over the heart and says” STOP ALS.” And the back says:” KEEP ALS OUT of the closet.”

The actual Walk begins at 11am but the event starts at 9am with registration, free coffee, fruit and pastries, entertainment, face painting, live music, and games to win prizes.

Says Cathy: “We love having lots of people walking with our team–it feels like a parade full of people celebrating living with gusto, and loving unconditionally.And you can make new friends- friends that might change the way you look at life.Feel free to join in when I start to cheer, chant and join me to make up walkin’ songs, and play the percussion toys provided by The Specktaculars. I will hand out bubbles, Hawaiian leis, and team members can pick up their T-shirts from me before the actual Walk starts.”

She continues:” I have been and continue to be so grateful for your support. In addition to funding research, each donation also goes to support The ALS Association chapter in our local community (ALSSAC ) which covers 24 counties. ALSSAC makes a huge difference in the lives of folks with ALS and their families, friends, caregivers and co-workers. The list goes on exponentially as you realize how just one person with ALS can intensely affect the lives of so many people. The Davis/Sacramento Valley/ Bay Area communities create the generous, loving, supportive embracing arms that I feel wherever I go. And now those arms stretch throughout the US and into Canada.”

Cathy got a late start on her “ALS Walk-a-Thong campaign” this year. In May she was diagnosed with metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. Because ALS has compromised her respiratory system, She new surgery would be risky indeed. But she wanted to ” make my decision about quality of life. In late July I had surgery to remove a tumor that was basically suffocating my small intestine, along with my gall bladder and appendix which also were cancerous. They also tested 24 lymph nodes and 15 were cancerous. My surgeon is brilliant and incredibly skilled . Now I know more than ever that each moment is precious even if it’s painful. Everyday I feel the prayers and healing thoughts that ‘held me up’ as I approached the operating room. I am blessed and filled with gratitude.”

The ALS Association is the only non-profit organization fighting Lou Gehrig’s Disease on every front. By leading the way in global research, providing assistance for people with ALS through a nationwide network of chapters, coordinating multidisciplinary care through certified clinical care centers, and fostering government partnerships, The ALS Association builds hope and enhances quality of life while aggressively searching for new treatments and a cure.

To donate by check,or money order please make checks payable to “ALSSAC” and write “Specktaculars” in the memo, address is below:

ALSSAC: 2717 Cottage Way suite 17 Sacramento, Ca. 95825

Donations are tax deducatble: Tax ID 68–159292.

To donate online, see:Cathy’s Personal Page URL: http://web.alsa.org/site/TR/Walks/Sacramento?px=3149044&pg=personal&fr_id=10154

Or follow Walk to Defeat ALS prompts at : www.alssac.org. If that doesn’t work, you may register and learn more at : www.WalkToDefeat ALS.org

To donate and join The SPECKtculars go to:Team Page URL: http://web.alsa.org/site/TR/Walks/Sacramento?team_id=308013&pg=team&fr_id=10154

For more information about how to buy The Specktaculars’ team T- shirt, please email Cathy Speck at speckduval@gmail.com or text/call 310-508-7401

Questions about the Greater Sacramento Area ALS Chapter is at: www.alssac.org

For more information about Cathy and her journey as she embraces ALS and all the love & compassion that comes with it, check out: Cathy’s “blong” (a combination of “blog” and song”): www.cathydyingasliving.com

The Sacramento Area Walk to Defeat ALS
Saturday | October 04, 2014

WALK CHECK-IN: 9:00 AM
WALK STARTS: 11:00 AM
LOCATION: Raley Field
DISTANCE: 5K and 1 mileEvent/Fundraiser Coordinator
Rene Hamlin
Rhamlin@alssac.org
916-979-9265

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Special to The Enterprise

History oped

By
September 17, 2014 |

By Daniel Burnett
The memory is all but lost, even though the legacy is all around us. You meet it every time you set foot in a National Park, pay social security, or thank a World War II veteran; every time you spend a dime or see Mount Rushmore. The legacy of the Roosevelt family is an essential part of America’s story.

Before the names Kennedy and Bush were synonymous with American political dynasties, there were the Roosevelts. Theodore Roosevelt and Franklin Roosevelt steered our nation through some of the most difficult times in our history. Eleanor Roosevelt became a figure of international prominence and public affection.

As Americans prepare to watch filmmaker Ken Burns’ latest documentary, “The Roosevelts: An Intimate History,” airing this week, a new study suggests that, despite the family’s importance in our history, their legacies are being forgotten.

According to the study, only 60 percent of Americans surveyed know FDR was president during World War II, and less than half knew he was the president responsible for the New Deal.

The situation is similar for Theodore: just two in five Americans associated him with the Panama Canal. Only about a quarter could identify him with the Bull Moose Party—an especially lackluster result considering the survey was plain old multiple choice.

The results are disappointing, but they’re not new. Previous studies on historical amnesia from the American Council of Trustees and Alumni have revealed that a quarter of Americans don’t know that D-Day occurred during World War II. Among Americans 18 to 34, that number grows to a chilling one-third.

Americans are suffering from historical amnesia – and we should be concerned.

Part of the blame lies squarely on the shoulders of our colleges and universities. Nationwide, just 18 percent of colleges require students to take a course in American history or government, according to the What Will They Learn? study (www.whatwilltheylearn.com).

U.S. News and World Report recently released another rating system that uses measures such as student selectivity and alumni donations to determine which colleges are “best.” Unfortunately, those measures have very little to do with whether a student will graduate prepared for the challenges of career and citizenship.

It’s critical that students and parents peel away reputation to focus on results; too many colleges graduate students with no more knowledge of foundational subjects than a 12th grader.

We cannot afford to let the wonder of our nation’s history fade.

At a wedding almost 110 years ago in New York City, President Teddy Roosevelt walked his favorite niece down the aisle. Amidst friends and family, he gave the bride’s hand to his soon-to-be son-in-law.

His niece was named Eleanor, and her groom would also become president—President Franklin Roosevelt.

We have a rich and vibrant history, as well as an obligation to remember our past. It may not be critical to memorize every line of the Declaration of Independence or list the dates of every battle during World War II, but if we forget the underlying significance of these events, we will neither understand the present nor be ready for the future.

Take the time to enjoy history again. Watch Ken Burns’ documentary. And demand that colleges and universities stop shirking their responsibility to parents, taxpayers, students—and most importantly—our future.

–Daniel Burnett is the director of communications for the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, a higher education nonprofit that fights for historical literacy on college campuses.———————————————————————–
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Special to The Enterprise

Tech Crunch

By
September 17, 2014 |

business news….

caption
James K. Garvey

UC Davis Grad, Former Vacaville Resident, Receives Recognition at TechCrunch

Self Lender, LLC, a consumer financial start-up company launched by chief executive officer James K. Garvey, a University of California, Davis graduate and former Vacaville resident, received recognition at the TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2014 conference in San Francisco.

Self Lender was one of the 26 teams chosen to compete in the Start-up Battlefield contest. It was named runner-up for Accenture’s Open Innovation Enterprise Disrupter Award.

“We are honored to have been considered for this prestigious award from Accenture at TechCrunch Disrupt,” Garvey said. “It’s really an amazing feeling that such large market forces already see our potential at this stage.”

Garvey delivered a six-minute presentation on Self Lender (www.SelfLender.com), followed by a question-and-answer session. The presentation is online at http://tcrn.ch/1qQxZYG

The company helps U.S. consumers build credit, save money, and gain access to affordable, financial products. Some 70 to 90 million Americans have subprime credit scores due to insufficient payment history data on their credit report, Garvey said. Self Lender helps its users build payment history, the most important factor in calculating a credit score.

The company’s vision is to help people gain access to tools for active, do-it-yourself, financial improvement, Garvey said.

Self Lender users can create a small, interest-free, zero cost, installment-based debt obligation that goes on their credit report. A user can select a monthly payment amount of $25 to $250, and a term of either 3, 6, 9 or 12 months. After making all scheduled payments, the users receive their entire loan amount back, and months of payment history applied on their credit report. It costs $3 per month to join Self Lender.

Self Lender, based in Denver, was founded in May 2014 by James Garvey and co-founder William Butler, a Vanderbilt University graduate. The company drew widespread attention at the San Francisco.

In elaborating on plans for expanding marketing and software engineering operations in Denver, Garvey said: “Additionally, we are looking to partner with non-profit organizations that need our credit building platform to jumpstart communities.”

Garvey is a 2000 graduate of Vacaville High School. He received his bachelor’s degree in mathematics in the spring of 2014 from UC Davis. He minored in computer science.

More information is available on the website www.SelfLender.com or by emailing james@selflender.com. The company also has Facebook page, http://facebook.com/SelfLender.

Kathy Keatley Garvey
UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology
kegarvey@ucdavis.edu
Or
kathykeatleygarvey@gmail.com
Website: http://entomology.ucdavis.edu/
Department News: http://ucanr.edu/blogs/entomology/
Bug Squad blog: http://ucanr.edu/blogs/bugsquad/index.cfm
Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pho-tog/

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Special to The Enterprise

Sherry Bernard

By
September 17, 2014 |

Aug. 27, 1942 – Sept. 12, 2014

Sherry Bernard, a 35-year resident of Davis, died Sept. 12, 2014, in Davis.

Sherry was born in Philadelphia in 1942; and, as part of military families both growing up and married, she lived all over the world.

Sherry was a lifelong self-described “dog person” and was known internationally as one of the top breeders and authorities on miniature poodles, and in later years, miniature pinschers. Her dogs set the standard, and won top honors all over the United States.

When Sherry moved to Davis, she completed her studies in psychology at UC Davis. She then entered the real estate profession, achieving top producer honors at several local firms. After she left her real estate career, she started a new chapter as a motivational speaker and traveled extensively in that role.

Faced with declining health, she retired and spent her remaining years as an active member of First Baptist Church in Davis and Church on the Rock in Woodland.

Her faith sustained her through the end stage of cancer, and she passed peacefully at home.

Sherry is survived by her husband John; her daughter Christi Nelson of Glendale; her son Randolph Kret of West Hollywood; and son Tim Kret of Sunnyvale. She also leaves three grandchildren, Kayla, Ridge and Rachel.

To be true to her wishes, there will not be any services or other remembrances. Many of you knew her, so carry those fond memories forward. Those who did not know her can be assured that she was a wonderful, complex, loving and passionate person who made an impact on her world — and she will be missed.

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Special to The Enterprise

Consider Greenbelt Diversity – Save the “Pinecone Place”

By
September 17, 2014 |

I’m becoming increasingly concerned about the proposed Paso Fino development on E. Covell Blvd. We first visited the greenbelt surrounding the Haussler property when my daughter was learning how to ride her tricycle, and she happily dubbed it “the pinecone place.” As she has grown, the pinecones, pine needles, and climbable walnut trees have remained a draw, so it remains a stop on evening walks as her little brother takes his turn in learning how to ride a bike with training wheels.

The thought of greenbelts being sold to developers is distressing. I’ve heard it argued that this is not a traditional greenbelt (e.g., another swath of water-hungry grass), and hence not useful. I disagree. Just as in other things, I think that diversity is of value in greenbelts; kids won’t be playing soccer in this area, but it remains an interesting area to explore while also offering adults a peaceful, shady place to enjoy a breeze running through pine needles… We all benefit from having a range of parks and greenbelts to enjoy.

I agree with the principle of infill, but we face a slippery slope in establishing precedent – once a city with budget shortfalls begins selling greenbelts to facilitate profit making for developers, where does the process stop? Once one such parcel has been sold, will we categorize other greenbelts as useful or not, and start selling them off to reduce upkeep costs and offset budget deficits? Why has the developer not put forth a single design proposal that works within their actual parcel instead of spilling over into the greenbelt?

As proposed in John Mott-Smith’s column on Sun 9/14, I think we need to rightfully ask our planning commission and city council hold the developers to establish a positive precedent for all of Davis and not accept anything less than an innovative proposal that benefits everyone – I hope that we as residents can make sure this happens. Please take a moment to write to the planning commission (and city council) before the planning commission meets to discuss this on Sept 24.

Mark Spiller

Davis

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Letters to the Editor

The Right Vote for Education

By
September 17, 2014 |

Dear Editor,

Every election is important; this November is no exception. I am supporting Congressman John Garamendi and I hope you will, too.
I am a teacher in Winters and Garamendi has my vote because of his stance on education. He believes in public school education; he supports proper funding for schools, fair wages for teachers, and he sees the value of art and music in schools.
He also supports early childhood education and after school programs that focus on disadvantaged children to help them keep on level with their more affluent peers.
If educating children is important to you, I suggest you look at the record of Garamendi and that of his opponent. You will see that Garamendi is the one we want in office as our champion for education. Vote for Congressman John Garamendi on November 4th.

Rebecca Fridae

Winters

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Letters to the Editor

The Danger of the Twin Tunnels

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September 17, 2014 |

Dear Editor,

The proposed Twin Tunnel scheme in the Bay Delta Conservation Plan will cost taxpayers $25 billion, send local water elsewhere, and devastate fishing, delta farms, and recreational businesses while threatening animal habitat.

A better approach is Congressman John Garamendi’s plan to create more water storage, desalinate water, promote water conservation and recycling.

Water is one of our most important resources. That’s why I’m voting for Garamendi for Congress.

Woody Fridae

Winters

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Letters to the Editor

Auto Draft

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September 15, 2014 |

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September 15, 2014 |

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September 15, 2014 |

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Evan Ream

Evan Ream graduated with a B.A. in journalism from Southern Oregon in Ashland, Ore. He loves soccer more than any person rationally should. "Some people think football is a matter of life and death. I am very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure them it is much more serious than that." - Bill Shankly

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September 15, 2014 |

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September 15, 2014 |

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September 15, 2014 |

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September 15, 2014 |

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17 Tart photo

By
September 16, 2014 |

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

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Auto Draft

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September 15, 2014 |

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Learn more about 4-H

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September 16, 2014 |

Interested in archery? How about arts and crafts? Or cooking, photography, robotics or animals?

Come to a 4-H Information Night on Tuesday, Sept. 30, at 7 p.m. at the Stephens Branch Library, 315 E 14th St., to learn about these and many more things you can do in 4-H, a nonprofit organization open to all children, ages 5–19.

Davis has three 4-H clubs: Golden Valley, Norwood and West Plainfield, and interested children are welcome to join any of them. All three clubs will have representatives at the information night to answer questions.

The Golden Valley 4-H Club holds its community meetings on the first Tuesday of each month, with the first one on Tuesday, Oct. 7, at 7 p.m. in the Birch Lane Elementary School multipurpose room, 1600 Birch Lane. For more information, contact Claire Phillips at (530) 219-5019 or goldenvalley4h@gmail.com or visit goldenvalley4h.blogspot.com.

Golden Valley projects this year include archery, arts and crafts, beekeeping, chemistry, cooking, community service and dance.

The Norwood 4-H Club holds its community meetings on the first Wednesday of each month, with the first meeting this year taking place on Wednesday, Oct. 1, at 7 p.m. in the Holmes Junior High School multipurpose room, 1220 Drexel Dr. For more information, contact Scott Wetzlich at (530) 902-8605 or sewetzlich@gmail.com or visit norwood4h.blogspot.com.
This year’s projects include dog care and training, hiking, knitting, leadership, movie criticism, photography and poultry.

The West Plainfield 4-H Club holds its community meetings on the second Tuesday of each month, with the first meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 14, at 7 p.m. in Lillard Hall on Road 95. For more information, contact Kris Lomas at (530) 902-3341 or wp4h@att.net.
West Plainfield projects include presentations, public speaking, quilting, robotics, small and large animals, sports and vet science.

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Anne Ternus-Bellamy

New Hotel in Winters, CA

By
September 16, 2014 |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: (9/15/2014)

Ryan Ranchhod
Diede Construction
RRanchhod@diedeconstruction.com

Winters Warms Up with New Best Western Plus
Diede Construction Sets to Diversify into the Hospitality Development Industry

Winters, CA: Family owned Diede Construction, Inc., is expanding their expertise into the hospitality sector. Established in 1978, Diede Construction has proven that no job is too big for the thriving Lodi, CA based construction company.

DDC will head a development team poised to construct a 70-room Best Western Plus complete with meeting space and other much needed business amenities in Winters, California. The site is opposite to the proposed $75 million PG&E training facility, from which the development team expects to receive a fraction of its repeat business.

“It’s an exciting time for us,” said Ryan Ranchhod of Diede Construction Inc. “The hotel industry is beginning to thrive once again and we at Diede Companies aim to establish ourselves within the foundation of the resurgence.” When asked about the potential of the Winters site, Ryan said “The hotel will be developed in a way that permits us to construct additional rooms in a future phase once demand warrants – which we expect to happen in the not so distant future.”

With ample land reserved for this vision, the developers will either add rooms to the Best Western Plus or build another complimentary brand adjacent to the hotel. No matter the decision, the group looks to add at least 70 additional rooms to the site. Complete with freeway visibility from both the 505 and 128 highways, the accessible location stands to become a self-sustaining destination, as the existing gas stations and restaurants will provide a one-stop shop for travelers. The developers have also committed to assist local businesses in the renovation of the existing Chevron pole sign in order to further increase the visibility of all business owners. Financing is in process and the group hopes to break ground within the next 6 -8 months.

When asked about the proposed downtown hotel development and other future competition, “We simply have the most convenient location in respect to area demand,” Ryan concluded. “In today’s secondary and tertiary markets, it is critical to have as many value-adding attributes as you can. Freeway visibility, site access and traffic is paramount; close proximity to existing businesses and convenient amenities such as gas and food make this development viable, as we expect to attract both business and leisure guests. Our turnkey construction, development and hospitality management teams are confident that we will provide the best and most consistent Midscale destination within the region, able to cater to all clients and events.”

About Diede Construction Inc.: Diede Construction Inc. is a comprehensive construction company based in Lodi, California. Diede Construction is licensed in California, Nevada, Washington, Idaho and Hawaii, and has designed, built and managed over 500 million square feet of industrial, office, residential and commercial space. Diede Construction has earned a reputation for honesty, loyalty and hard work, always placing clients and quality first. To see what Diede Construction can do for you, please contact 1(209)369-8255.

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Enterprise staff

Paso Fino development

By
September 16, 2014 |

The proposed Paso Fino “infill” project is so flawed it could serve as an illustration of poor planning in a textbook. I don’t live in the neighborhood, but I am deeply disturbed that the city is giving serious consideration to a project that would create so many problems:

Density. The developer wants to jam several large houses onto small lots served by a narrow driveway. The plan provides inadequate space for driving, parking, walking, and cycling. The miniscule landscapes won’t accommodate trees large enough to provide significant benefits. Tree-infrastructure conflicts are a serious problem in other dense developments in Davis. It’s time to require developers to provide adequate open space around houses.

Safety. A 14-foot-wide lane cannot serve traffic, parking, and garbage pickup without endangering pedestrians and cyclists who will use it for access to Covell. Entering fire trucks, garbage trucks, and delivery trucks must back out. Planning that doesn’t address safe transportation isn’t worthy of the name.

Trees. Why would a city that recognizes the value of urban forests consider removing a grove of trees that provides habitat for Swainson’s hawks, a threatened species? The argument that hawks can find other suitable nesting sites is weak; it has been applied repeatedly to development affecting burrowing owl habitat, but the birds haven’t fared as well as the land developers. The high density in Paso Fino would create another desert for wildlife.

Open space. The greenbelts around the property provide vegetation, open space, a buffer between land uses, and a corridor for pedestrians and cyclists. Sacrificing these by selling city land to a developer is foolish.

Five years ago the city approved a plan for the Paso Fino property that balanced the interests of the city, the neighborhood, and the developer. The current plan allows the developer to make more money, but is a big step backward for the city. I urge the Planning Commission to reject it.

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Letters to the Editor

Thank you for Explorit event

By
September 16, 2014 |

Editor, Davis Enterprise:

A big Explorit Thanks!

On Sunday September 7, Explorit Science Center hosted its second annual “End of Summer Final Blast” family event that drew an enthusiastic crowd of over 300. This year we featured a fantastic show from the UC Davis Department of Chemistry thanks to Professors Kirill Kovnir and Frank Osterloh with their able assistants. Peter Wagner brought his incredible Whymcycles and helped us with a “Good Day Sacramento” promotional spot as well! The local award-winning team from Citrus Circuits put their robot through its tasks, tossing and retrieving a large inflatable ball to the delight of kids and adults! The Davis Makerspace folks wowed everyone with a 3-D printer demonstration in our East Wing. Chelsea Lee provided her brand of object-based, hands-on math in our West Wing. Thanks to the Davis Astronomy Club, our “Blast” audience got some amazing views of sunspots, and prominences through their array of safe-viewing (filtered) telescopes. Down to earth, participants also got a chance to see how water pollutants such as oil can be mopped up using – yes- dog hair. Thanks to the UC Davis Superfund Research Program for this unique hands-on activity!

New to the Blast this year, Explorit reprised its latest Summer Science Camp rubber bands-on “Watermelon Explosion”. A special thanks goes to Harris Moran-Clause Seed Company for supplying those big and juicy watermelons that kept on “giving” tasty treats even after their rubber band ruptures!

The Avid Reader of Davis and Outdoor Davis provided lucky winners with fun science games and some great outdoor gear. Explorit is especially appreciative of vendors and sponsors who provided great food and cool refreshments for this family fun and fundraising event. Roo’s Café brought some delicious wraps, salads and desserts and Jamba Juice kept a lot of thirsty people cool and quenched. In addition, they both contributed part of their sales to Explorit. Other sponsors included Nugget Market and Apex Cycles and Services.

And to those who joined us- Thanks for making this year’s Blast a huge success!

Lars Anderson

Interim Executive Director

Jonathan Feagle
Associate Executive Director

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Letters to the Editor

Find the perfect club or organization to join

By
September 30, 2014 |

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

Being a Davis resident means being involved. For newcomers or longtime locals looking for ways to become proactive, there are a number of organizations and clubs as well as political causes to choose from.

The activities of many of the following organizations are announced in the Events or Briefly columns, or elsewhere in the pages of The Enterprise. Keep reading the paper, check the Internet, call information numbers and come to feel at home in the Davis community.Editor’s note: If you know of a group that was overlooked, or know of a new organization just starting up, send a news release to The Enterprise at newsroom@davisenterprise.net. We’ll include the information in one of our regular editions.

* American Association of University Women, Davis Branch, is committed to promoting education and equity for girls and women, self-development and positive social change. All college graduates are eligible for membership. For more information, visit http://www.aauwdavis.org

* American Civil Liberties Union has as its mission the conservation of the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights. The ACLU of Yolo County works on the front line of regional civil liberties and civil rights battles. For information, call 530-756-1900 or visit www.aclunc.org/action/chapters/yolo_county_chapter.shtml.

* Amnesty International is a Nobel Peace Prize-winning human rights movement that works on behalf of prisoners of conscience in all nations regardless of ideology. For more information, visit www2.dcn.org/orgs/davisamnesty.

* Blacks for Effective Community Action is a community group that advocates for improved relations among racial and ethnic groups. The group provides educational and cultural events and works closely with the school district to enhance the health and well-being of all children and families in Davis, especially those of African descent. The group is not just open to African-Americans, but to the entire community. For information, call Jann Murray-García at 530-753-7443, or visit www.journalism.berkeley.edu/projects/beca.

* CA House, also known as the Cal Aggie Christian Association, through action on issues of peace and justice, aims to support individuals in discovering and fulfilling their human and spiritual vocations. A diverse, open community, they seek to follow the example of Jesus in the midst of the university. Call (530) 753-2000, drop by 433 Russell Boulevard in Davis or visit http://cahouse.org.

* The California Raptor Center treats sick and wounded raptors and, where practical, returns them to the wild. The center, on the UC Davis campus, hosts periodic open houses for the public. For more information, visit www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/calraptor/index.cfm.

* Citizens for Inter-American Cooperation provides technical assistance and funds to promote self-help programs, sustainable agriculture and preventive health programs for citizens of Nicaragua. CIAC also offers educational programs in sustainable agriculture and funds teacher trainings in Nicaragua. Student internships are also available. For more information or to make a donation, call Kevin Wolf at 530-758-4211, send an e-mail to kjwolf@dcn.org or write to CIAC at P.O. Box 2231, Davis, 95617.

* The Cool Davis Initiative is working toward realizing the city of Davis’ Climate Action Plan, which commits Davis to reducing its carbon footprint by 15 percent below 1990 levels by 2015. Davis also is the first city in California to commit to achieving carbon neutrality by 2050. More than 60 community organizations have joined its coalition and 1,500-plus residents have signed pledges to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. For more information, visit www.cooldavis.org.

* Community Alliance With Family Farmers is building a movement of rural and urban people to foster family-scale agriculture that cares for the land, sustains local economics and promotes social justice. The group provides internship and volunteer opportunities for students and community members. For more information, visit www.caff.org.

* Davis Bicycles! is a nonprofit citizen group whose goal is to promote cycling through “advocacy, education, encouragement and design.” The group hosts bike rodeos at schools to teach safety to children and host the annual Loopalooza fun ride to encourage the city to get out and ride. For information on how to join, volunteer or donate visit www.davisbicycles.org or email info@davisbicycles.org.

* Offering food, shelter and hope, Davis Community Meals is a nonprofit organization whose goal is to provide support to low-income and homeless individuals and families. The organization serves more than 700 meals a month. Volunteers are needed for Tuesday evening meals and Saturday lunches. Possible shifts include 9 to 11:30 a.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and 9 a.m to 1 p.m. Saturdays. For more information, visit daviscommunity.org or call 530-756-4008.

* The Davis Democratic Club is a group of community members active in supporting Democratic candidates and policies locally as well as nationally. Monthly meetings are a variety of fundraisers and social get-togethers. For more information, visit www.davisdemocraticclub.org.

* Since 2000, Davis Farm to School has been helping the Davis school district by providing garden-based education, farm fresh foods and increasing recycling and composting programs. The organization is sponsored by Yolo Farm to Fork, a nonprofit previously known as the Davis Farmers Market Foundation. For more information, visit yolofarmtofork.org or www.davisfarmtoschool.org or call 530-219-5859.

* The Davis High Blue & White Foundation organizes and maintains a directory of more then 20,000 DHS alumni. The nonprofit, formed in 2002, created the DHS Hall of Fame, which recognizes alumni, faulty, staff and benefactors who have impacted DHS. The group’s first major fundraising project was for the Ron and Mary Brown Stadium. In addition, they raise funds for various scholarships. For more information, visit dhsblueandwhite.org.

* Davis Media Access, 1623 Fifth St., Suite A, is a nonprofit, membership-based public access television center offering community members the tools and training to produce their own programs for local cable Channel 15. DMA’s mission is to use television to stimulate community dialogue, enhance understanding of all segments of the community and encourage civic participation. The organization offers training, equipment and facilities, production assistance, cablecasting, satellite downlinks and dubs. DMA also conducts extensive outreach and education. Call 530-757-2419 or visit www.davismedia.org

* The Davis Odd Fellows is part of an ancient fraternal order that focuses on community support, social activities and traditions. The Davis Lodge No. 169 was founded April 12, 1870, and is the oldest organization in the city of Davis. The Lodge raises money for several scholarships and hosts various fundraising events. Meetings are held at the Odd Fellows Hall, 415 Second St., Davis. For more information, call 530-758-4940 or visit davislodge.org.

* Since 1981, the Davis School Arts Foundation has helped support arts education in the Davis public schools. The nonprofit organization fundraises to provide grants for art and music projects, along with supplies and materials for various dramatic performances. For more information visit www.dcn.davis.ca.us or email dsaf@dcn.davis.ca.us.

* The Davis Schools Foundation began in 2004 and is a nonprofit foundation whose sole purpose is fundraising to improve educational excellence for each student in the Davis Joint Unified School District. The long-term goal is to develop an endowment fund to serve as a safety net during times of state funding cutbacks. For more information, visit davisschoolsfoundation.org or email infor@davisschoolsfoundation.org.

* Empower Yolo, formerly the Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Center, is a primary victim service provider and works to prevent violence. The nonprofit is “dedicated to the intervention, prevention and elimination of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, human trafficking and child abuse in Yolo County. For more information, visit empoweryolo.org, call 530-661-6336 or email info@empoweryolo.org. If you or someone you know is in need of immediate help call the crisis line at 530-662-1133 or 916-371-1907.

* At Explorit Science Center, people of all ages become active explorers by touching, testing, experimenting and questioning through unique hands-on experiences. You can play a pivotal part in helping people explore science. Share any level of time, skills, energy or a willingness to learn by volunteering at Explorit Science Center. A science background is not necessary; training is provided. Explorit is at 3141 Fifth St. Call 530-756-0191 or visit www.explorit.org

* Habitat for Humanity is an ecumenical international organization whose objective is to eliminate poverty housing from the world and to make decent shelter a matter of conscience and action. The first project of Habitat for Humanity, Yolo County was completed in 1999. To learn more about Habitat for Humanity, Yolo County, or to get involved as a donor or volunteer, visit their website at www.habitatyolo.org or call 530-668-4301.

* Hattie Weber Museum, 445 C St. in Davis, features exhibits of the history and heritage of Davis and surrounding areas. The museum is named for Hattie (Harriet Elisha) Weber who was the first paid librarian in Davisville, serving in that capacity for 35 years. The museum is operated by the Yolo County Historical Society for the city of Davis. Call 530-758-5637, or visit www.dcn.davis.ca.us/go/hattie for more information.

* Wanting to explore global cultures, the International House, Davis, 10 College Park, probably has just what you’re looking for. The goal of the nonprofit is to “foster respect and appreciation for people of all cultures and to encourage a global community for cross-cultural exchange.” I-House plays host to concerts, speakers and cooking demos. Visit www.internationalhousedavis.org for events and times.

* KDRT radio is located at 95.7 on the FM dial and broadcasts at just under 100 watts, powerful enough to cover our city yet small enough to be truly local. KDRT is licensed to Davis Media Access, our local public access television station. The station launched on Sept. 24, 2004 and today has 50 local programmers and a diversity of underwriting from local businesses. KDRT provides compelling and locally relevant programming not usually found on other radio outlets. KDRT’s mission is “to inspire, enrich and entertain listeners through an eclectic mix of musical, cultural, educational, and public affairs programs and services. The  station builds community by promoting dialogue, encouraging artistic expression, and acting as a forum for people who typically lack media access.” For a schedule and description of shows, or for more information about volunteering, go to www.kdrt.org or call 530-757-2419.

* The Crab and Pasta Feed, Golf for Kids Tournament and the downtown U.S. Flag Project highlight the work effort by the Kiwanis Club of Davis. The group — which is a merging of two charters, the Kiwanis Club of Davis (1958) and the Kiwanis Club of Greater Davis (1966) — support a myriad local charities with their fundraising. Weekly meetings are at noon Thursday at Symposium Restaurant, 1620 E. Eighth St. For more information, visit davis.kiwanisone.org or club president Sue Huscroft, suehuscroft@yahoo.com.

* Marriage Equality, Yolo County Chapter is a nonprofit, grassroots organization whose goal is to secure civil marriage for same-sex couples by educating fair-minded people, usually through actions and rallies. Meetings are irregular and times are sent through e-mail to members. Contact co-chairs Shelly Bailes and Ellen Pontac at ca-yolo@marriageequality.org.

* The grassroots nonprofit group NAMI-Yolo provides for education, advocacy and support to help improve lives of people with psychiatric brain disorders. The National Alliance on Mental Illness looks to help families as a whole unit. The Yolo chapter includes Davis, Woodland, Winters, West Sacramento, Clarksburg, Esparto, Knight’s Landing and communities in the Capay Valley. For more information, visit www.namiyolo.org or email friends@namiyolo.org.

* The Putah Creek Council is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the protection and enhancement of lower Putah Creek through advocacy, education and community-based stewardship. The council is made up of area residents, riparian landowners, fishermen, farmers, natural resource professionals and others concerned about the future of this special resource. The council has been active protecting Putah Creek since 1988, and has conducted numerous cleanups, restoration projects and education programs. Putah Creek Council runs an outreach program that connects local residents with the creek. Volunteers give lectures, lead field trips and participate in clean-up and restoration activities. For more information, visit www.putahcreekcouncil.org or call 530-795-3006.

* Quail Ridge Wilderness Conservancy is dedicated to preserving the disappearing oak trees and California bunch grasses on the Quail Ridge Reserve and to protecting all of the reserve’s wildlife. It also is committed to the more general goal of preserving the biological diversity of the planet. Guided walks through the reserve and boat ecotours around the reserve are given monthly. Call for details. The group also participates in the ongoing adopt-a-highway program, and discusses California’s weed and water problems, grazing management and human and natural history. A visitors’ center museum is on the reserve. For more information, visit www.quailridge.org, or email quailrid@quailridge.org.

* Davis has three Rotary Clubs, an organization of business and professional leaders who provide service and encourage others to do the same. The focus of Rotary is to service in community, the workplace and the world. They work to help eliminate hunger, poverty, illiteracy, violence and polio. Local chapters include The Rotary Club of Davis, Davis Sunrise and Davis Sunset. The Rotary Club of Davis meets weekly at noon on Mondays at Davis Community Church, Fellowship Hall, 421 D St. Davis Sunrise meets at 6:50 a.m. Fridays at the Odd Fellows Hall, 415 Second St. Davis Sunset meets at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Our House Restaurant, 808 Second St.

* Senior Citizens of Davis Inc. is an all-volunteer nonprofit public benefit corporation. Its mission is to support the Davis Senior Center and its participants. SCD, which started in 1972, partners with the city of Davis to identify those projects that will benefit the Davis Senior Center. SCD advocates on behalf of the Senior Center as well. The organization holds 90-minute meetings quarterly, with special meetings called only when necessary. For more information. email scofdav@gmail.com.

* Sierra Club, Yolano Group, is an active environmental-issue group that holds monthly meetings open to the public, puts on environmental programs, alerts people about environmental issues and supports numerous environmental causes. Throughout the year, Sierra Club organizes weekly outdoor trips, hiking, including backpacking, snowshoe and climbing excursions. The local group is also active in local, regional, state and national environmental actions. For more information, visit www.motherlode.sierraclub.org/yolano or call Alan Pryor at 530-758-5173.

* There are two Soroptimist International groups in Davis. The nonprofit organization of women fundraises for various organizations from family services to conservation efforts. Soroptimist International of Davis fundraisers include an annual Texas Hold ‘em Night, the beer booth at Picnic in the Park and other events. The group meets at noon on Wednesdays at Davis Odd Fellows., 415 Second St. For more information, visit sidavis.org. Soroptimist International of Greater Davis holds fundraisers to benefit education scholarships and grants and to better women’s health. They meet at 7 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays on the third floor of the Carlton Plaza, 27272 Fifth St.

* STEAC‘s goal is to “provide short-term assistance with basic necessities to Yolo County families and individuals below the poverty level.” The nonprofit began in 1967 with a group of volunteers meeting in a home to help migrant workers following heavy rains. Today a nine-member board meets bi-monthly and oversees the operation that has served about 35,000 people in the past five years. Also in the past five years, they paid out nearly $600,000 in emergency assistance and served more than 280,00 meals. For more information or to volunteer, visit www.steac.org or call 530-758-8435. If you or someone you know is in need of assistance, call 530-7588435. Note, STEAC serves only residents of Yolo County,

* Suicide Prevention and Crisis Services offers 24-hour crisis lines, which are available for any Yolo County residents. Suicide Prevention and Crisis Services of Yolo County is a non-profit organization with the mission of providing crisis prevention and intervention, education and community outreach services to the residents of Yolo County. To find out more, call 530-756-7542 or visit www.suicidepreventionyolocounty.org.

* Tree Davis, your local tree foundation, focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Volunteers are always welcome to participate in special projects, educational outreach and community workshops. For more information, visit http://www.treedavis.org

* The United Nations Association of the United States is the largest grass roots foreign policy organization in the country. Its purpose is to educate, inspire and mobilize individuals to support the principles of the United Nations, strengthen the United Nations system to achieve the goals of the UN Charter and to promote constructive United States leadership in that system. Membership in UNA-USA is open to any citizen or resident of the U.S. At the local level, this is accomplished through education of community members to the vital and necessary role the United Nations plays in our daily lives, through advocacy to build local, congressional and presidential support of the programs and needs of the United Nations and through co-sponsorship of internationally oriented events with other community groups. For further information on programs and membership, contact Verena Borton at rvborton@comcast.net.

* University Farm Circle is the oldest support group on the UC Davis campus, established 101 years ago. It has grown from a small group of about 25 women to more than 500 members today. Members do not need to be associated with the university. The group provides educational and social programs and awards scholarships to UCD students. Annual events include the Holiday Home Tour and Boutique, Newcomers Welcome, Fall Tea, Candlelight Dinner and Spring Luncheon. For more information, contact 2014-15 President Mary Fish at 530-757-7939 or email info@ufcdavis.org. Visit www.ufcdavis.org.

* Yolo Audubon Society is a conservation education organization that holds monthly meetings and sponsors regular field trips throughout Northern California to study birds and other wildlife. For information, visit www.yoloaudubon.org.

* The Yolo Basin Foundation was founded in 1990 as a nonprofit community-based organization to assist in the establishment of the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area, which now has grown to 16,000 acres and is managed by the California Department of Fish and Game. The foundation is dedicated to the appreciation and stewardship of wetlands and wildlife through education and innovative partnerships. The board of directors represents a diverse group of interests, from agriculture and waterfowl conservation to local government and the business community. Yolo Basin Foundation always is in need of volunteers for their education program, Discover the Flyway. For more information on the foundation’s activities see the website at www.yolobasin.org or for volunteer opportunities, call 530-757-4828.

* Yolo County Democratic Central Committee provides information on candidates, campaigns and/or issues and voter registration. For more information, visit www.yolodems.org, or contact the county chair, Bob Schelen, at bob.schelen@yolodems.org.

* Yolo County National Organization for Women is a women’s group active in the Davis area, involved in national, state and local elections and legislation. Visit www.now.org/chapters/ca.html. The university has its own campus chapter.

* Yolo County Republican Party is the principal umbrella group for GOP organizations and activities in Davis. For more information, visit www.yologop.org.

* The Yolo Food Bank “distributes nearly 3 million pounds of food and grocery items annually to children, seniors, families and individuals in need of food assistance.” The Food Bank uses a multitude of distribution programs in partnership with local growers to get food to more than 35,000 food-insecure individuals in Yolo County. To help the Food Bank, individuals may donate food, money or time. For more information, visit www.yolofoodbank.org or call 530-668-0690.

* The Yolo Interfaith Immigration Network is a nonprofit group whose mission is to serve and advocate for immigrants in Yolo County. It offers a variety of programs and services, including youth activities and English as a Second Language classes at Yolo County migrant housing centers for farm-worker families, a visitation program for the youth in detention at Juvenile Hall, and an emergency fund for immigrants who are not able to pay the fees in connection with their immigration applications. To find out more, email YIIN president Alison Pease at alisonmp@gmail.com.

* In 2004, Cindy Schulze started Yolo Military Families and for the last decade the organization has packed up care boxes to be sent to those stationed overseas. Yolo Military Families relies on monetary and gift donations, which is receives from countless locals and organizations. For more information, email yolomilitaryfamilies@gmail.com.

*The Yolo Land Trust works to secure farm land and habitat for future generations. The Trust conserves farm and ranch land by giving land owners an option to selling their land. It supports maintaining natural habitat for plants and animals that depend on farmland and nearby sloughs, creeks and rivers.

The nonprofit plays host to various fundraisers, including “A Day in the Country,” to raise money and awareness about the plight of land. For more information, visit www.yololandtrust.org or call 530-662-1110.

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Enterprise staff

Auto Draft

By
September 15, 2014 |

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Auto Draft

By
September 15, 2014 |

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Anne Ternus-Bellamy

Getting from here to there by buses, planes and trains

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

By
October 02, 2014 |

We like to think you can ride your bike everywhere, but sometimes you need other means of transportation.

In the heart of the Sacramento Valley, Davis is 15 minutes from the state Capitol, museums and other metropolitan attractions. Being on Interstate 80 running east to Sacramento and west to San Francisco makes Davis easily accessible by car with an approximate travel time of an hour and a half from either the Bay Area or the Sierra.

Airports
* University Airport, UC Davis
530-752-8277, general information; http://www.taps.ucdavis.edu/airport
University Airport operates as a utility airport. Air shuttle service is available March through October by private chartering; however space is available for use by private aircraft, such as hangar rentals to overnight tie downs.

* Sacramento International Airport
6900 Airport Blvd., Sacramento; 916-929-5411; http://www.sacairports.org
Sacramento International Airport is the gateway to major cities across the U.S. and around the world. Service is available from 10 major carriers and one commuter airline.

* Yolo County Airport
County Roads 95 and 29, Woodland
530-666-8022, general; 530-662-9631, charter
Yolo County Airport is a general aviation airport for public use. Facilities include: a 6,000-foot runway, fueling, hangars and tie downs. Woodland Aviation occupies most of the airports hangars with a nationwide charter service. The charter service also arranges ground transportation to and from the airport. Open seven days a week.

Ground transportation to Davis
* Yolobus
Daily public bus service; 530-666-2877

* Davis Airporter
Door-to-door shuttle service;
530-756-6715

* SuperShuttle
Door-to-door shuttle service;
800-258-3826

Rail
* Amtrak
840 Second St.; 530-758-4220 direct;
800-872-7245 reservations/schedule http://www.amtrak.com
Amtrak operates along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville, making daily stops, eastbound and westbound, in Davis.

Bus
* Unitrans
530-752-2877; http://unitrans.ucdavis.edu
Unitrans is the public transit system serving the entire city of Davis and the UC campus, providing service six days a week.

Unitrans is run by UC Davis students and used by students, residents, and visitors (fare is $1). It is the only transit system in the United States to operate vintage British double-decker buses in daily
service. While the double-decker buses remain an icon for the service, 90 percent of Unitrans service is provided by a more modern fleet of buses powered by clean burning compressed natural gas.

* Yolobus
916-371-2877; 800-371-2877

http://www.yolobus.com

Yolobus is the public transportation system for Yolo County. It provides service to Woodland, Davis, UC Davis, West Sacramento, downtown Sacramento, Winters, Esparto, the Cache Creek Casino Resort, the Capay Valley, Madison, Dunnigan and the Sacramento International Airport.

Taxi
* A Taxi: 530-297-1111
* Checker Cab: 530-750-7979
* College Cab: 530-756-4444
* Davis Cab: 530-756-5555
* Friendly Cab: 530-750-1111
* Village Cab: 530-753-8294

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Special to The Enterprise

Raphael Moore on sick leave

By
September 16, 2014 |

New Sick Leave Law – don’t worry… you’ll feel better
By Raphael S. Moore, JD, LL.M.
Earlier this month California became the second state in the nation to require most employers to provide their employees with paid sick leave. The Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act goes into effect July 1, 2015, and essentially requires employers to provide 3 days of sick leave per employee. The basic terms of the new law are:
Employees must work at least 30 days before they qualify for the leave, and can use the time off starting with their 90th day on the job.
Employee will get 1 hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked, up to 24 hours (or 3 days) per year.
The time off can be used to take care of themselves or a family member.
There are some exceptions to the law. It doesn’t apply to in-home care workers, for instance, or to employees who are covered by collective bargaining agreements. Still, it will cover some 6.5 million workers in California. A similar law enacted in San Francisco has shown that the benefit is not only for employees, but for many small and medium size employers who have seen a marked reduction in absences in their workforce: sick employees are now able to stay home and not infect co-workers. Before, they had to choose between a day’s pay and working while ill.
What does this mean to you?
If you are an employer, make sure you review any employment agreements and offer letters you use, and ensure that your employee handbook complies with the new law. If you already provide a paid leave policy or paid time off policy, where leave may be used for the same purpose and you meet the minimum requirements, you do not have provide additional paid sick days.
If you are an employee, and your job provides more generous leave, you will see no change. If you were not afforded sick leave, you will now be better able to take care of yourself and your family.
The law has a number of other elements, including limits on how many unused sick days can be carried year to year, rules on how to calculate the pay of rate during the leave, notice requirements, etc. If you need specific advice as to your own circumstances, research the law or speak with a trusted attorney.
— Raphael Moore practices law in downtown Davis. He can be reached at thelaw@mytrustedlawyer.com or at 758-8317.

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Special to The Enterprise

Arboretum activities 10/8

By
September 16, 2014 |

UC DAVIS ARBORETUM AND PUBLIC GARDEN
Fall Event Schedule (October-December 2014)
________________________________________

Wednesday, October 8, November 12 & December 10

Walk with Warren: West-end Gardens
12-1 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis campus

Join Warren Roberts, the Superintendent Emeritus of the Arboretum and famous storyteller and punster for an always-engaging noontime exploration of spring at the UC Davis Arboretum’s west-end gardens. The event is free; limited, free one-hour parking is available along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55 where parking can be paid by meter or by purchase of a $9 daily pass. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

PHOTOS:

Past Walks with Warren

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.

_________________________________________

Thursday, October 9
Opening Night: Readings by the Creative Writing Faculty
7 p.m., Wyatt Deck (Rain location: 126 Voorhies Hall)

Award-winning fiction writers and poets from the UC Davis Creative Writing Program read from their work: Joshua Clover, Lucy Corin, Yiyun Li, Katie Peterson, Margaret Ronda, and Joe Wenderoth. Co-sponsored by the English Department. The event is free; parking is available for $9 in Visitor Lot 5, at Old Davis Road and Arboretum Drive. Click here for a map of the location. For more information, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

_______________________________________

Fridays, October 10 & 24; November 7 & 21; December 5 & 19

Folk Music Jam Session

12–1 p.m., Wyatt Deck, Arboretum Drive, UC Davis campus

Folk musicians are invited to play together informally during this acoustic jam session at the Wyatt Deck, located on Arboretum Drive (formerly Old Davis Road) next to the redwood grove in the UC Davis Arboretum. Pull out your fiddles, guitars, mandolins, penny whistles, pipes, flutes, squeezeboxes (you name it) and join your fellow musicians for a little bluegrass, old-time, blues, Celtic, klezmer, and world music over the lunch hour. All skill levels welcome. Listeners welcome! The event is free; parking is available for $9 in Visitor Lot 5, at Old Davis Road and Arboretum Drive. Click here for a map of the location. For more information, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

PHOTOS

Past Folk Music Jam Sessions

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.

________________________________________

Saturday, October 11

PLANT SALE
to Support the Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden
UC Davis Arboretum Teaching Nursery
(Garrod Drive near La Rue Road, across from Vet Med), UC Davis campus

9 -11 a.m.: MEMBERS ONLY
11 a.m. – 1 p.m.: OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

NEW FRONT YARD: We know that many homeowners out there are in the process of developing their “New Front Yard” by replacing high-water use plants with low-water alternatives. That’s why this October you are going to find just what you need at our fall plant sales. We are going to have the area’s largest selection of attractive, drought-tolerant, easy-care, region-appropriate plants including lots of California natives and Arboretum All-Stars.

Plus, for sale for the first time ever in the United States, customers can purchase a newly-developed, low-water use, rapid-establishment groundcover called Kurapia® (Lippia nodiflora ‘Campagne Verde’). Developed in Japan and tested at UC Davis and UC Riverside, the potential use for this groundcover as a lawn replacement is huge!

Not a member? Call ahead or join at the door! All members receive 10% off their purchases; new members also receive an additional $10 off as a thank you for joining. The benefits of membership far outweigh your cost! For more information on the benefits of membership visit: http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/join_the_friends.aspx.

The event is free; parking is free and available in nearby. For more information and directions, visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx or call (530) 752-4880.

PHOTOS:

Plant Sales

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.

Sunday, October 12
The Art of Science*
1-3 p.m., Wyatt Deck (Rain location: 126 Voorhies Hall)
Join us and experience science in a whole new way! Enjoy UC Davis graduate student scientists presenting their research through song, dance, photography and other media. Participate in hands-on arts and crafts activities and engaging live demonstrations. This event is free and all ages are welcome! Co-sponsored by UC Davis scientists and the Powerhouse Science Center.
*This event is also part of a larger event called Harvest: A Gathering of Food, Wine, Beer, and the Arts (see below).

Sunday, October 12
Harvest: A Gathering of Food, Wine, Beer, and the Arts
1-10 p.m., UC Davis Gateways District
This all-day event, part of the Mondavi Center’s “Performance Enhancement” series includes our above-referenced “Art of Science” event (free) as well as a mix of free and ticketed programming like a family-friendly zone on Vanderhoef Quad, the debut of a new exhibit at the Nelson Gallery, interactive displays, food, wine, beer, pumpkin carving, live music, and more. For more information visit: http://mondavi.ucdavis.edu/harvest

Saturday, October 18
Nature Discovery Drop-in Day
1-3 p.m., Trellis in the California Native Plant GATEway Garden (behind the Davis Commons Shopping Center)

Join us for a free, fun-filled family afternoon exploring our local wildlife. All-ages are welcome. Walking or biking to the event is encouraged. Please note that the Davis Commons Shopping Center parking lot is limited to two-hour parking. Other parking is available in nearby public parking lots. Click here for a map of the location. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

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Sunday, October 19
Among the Oaks
11 a.m., Arboretum Gazebo
Explore an amazing variety of oaks from around the world in the Peter J. Shields Oak Grove. Learn about the life cycle of oaks and see why autumn is acorn time in the grove. The event is free; free weekend parking is available in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55 or on the street. Click here for a map of the location. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

Saturday, October 25
PLANT SALE
to Support the Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden
9 a.m. – 1 p.m., Open to the Public
Members save 10%. Become a new member and receive 10% off and an additional coupon for $10 off. LEARN MORE

NEW FRONT YARD: We know that many homeowners out there are in the process of developing their “New Front Yard” by replacing high-water use plants with low-water alternatives. That’s why this October you are going to find just what you need at our fall plant sales. We are going to have the area’s largest selection of attractive, drought-tolerant, easy-care, region-appropriate plants including lots of California natives and Arboretum All-Stars.

Plus, for sale for the first time ever in the United States, customers can purchase a newly-developed, low-water use, rapid-establishment groundcover called Kurapia® (Lippia nodiflora ‘Campagne Verde’). Developed in Japan and tested at UC Davis and UC Riverside, the potential use for this groundcover as a lawn replacement is huge!

Not a member? Call ahead or join at the door! All members receive 10% off their purchases; new members also receive an additional $10 off as a thank you for joining. The benefits of membership far outweigh your cost! For more information on the benefits of membership visit: http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/join_the_friends.aspx.

The event is free; parking is free and available in nearby. For more information and directions, visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx or call (530) 752-4880.

PHOTOS:

Plant Sales

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.

Sunday, November 2
Native American Uses of California Plants
2 p.m., UC Davis Welcome Center
Enjoy an engaging, family-friendly tour of the Native American Contemplative Garden and discover traditional uses for a variety of California plants. Click here for a map of the location. The event is free; free parking is available in nearby Gateway District Parking Lot. For more information, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

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Sunday, November 9
Storytime Through the Seasons: Under the Redwood Tree
1-3 p.m., Wyatt Deck (Rain location: 146 Environmental Horticulture)
Join the Arboretum Ambassadors for a free, outdoor reading program exploring the cultural and natural world of Native Californians. Enjoy traditional stories, games, and arts. All ages are welcome! The event is free; free parking is available in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 5. Click here for a map of the location. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

PHOTOS:

Storytime Through the Seasons

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.

Sunday, November 16
Go Green Drop-in Day
1-3 p.m., Trellis in the California Native Plant GATEway Garden (behind the Davis Commons Shopping Center)
Want to be more sustainable? Have fun learning about conserving resources through hands-on activities. All-ages are welcome. Walking or biking to the event is encouraged. Please note that the Davis Commons Shopping Center parking lot is limited to two-hour parking. Other parking is available in nearby public parking lots. Click here for a map of the location. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

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Enterprise staff

Westrup letter

By
September 16, 2014 |

Hi Debbie, I would like to submit this letter to the Editor. Thank you very much for your consideration.

All my best,
Laura

This upcoming Wednesday, Sept. 24, the City Planning Commission will consider a new proposal from developer Taormino & Associates for the Paso Fino project located between Moore Boulevard and Covell Boulevard. The new plan was drafted at the request of the City Council, in response to widespread community opposition to the developer’s previous plan, which sought to annex 0.75 acres of public greenbelt.

Unfortunately, the new plan does not got far enough to address community concerns. It still seeks to annex 0.52 acres of public greenbelt. It doesn’t adequately protect a grove of 60-year-old Canary Island pines that provide habitat for Swainson’s hawks and other wildlife – as well as shade, beauty and carbon sequestration for our community. And in my opinion, it doesn’t address neighborhood traffic safety and parking issues.

The Planning Commission must insist that Taormino & Associates confine their project to land they actually own, or to the footprint negotiated with the previous owner of the land in a 2009 compromise that was approved by both the Planning Commission and City Council at the time. That compromise would have swapped some public greenbelt for the private land that contains most of the Canary Island pines.

I urge everyone in Davis who values our parks and greenbelts to attend the Planning Commission hearing at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 24. Please tell City officials that it would be a terrible precedent to cede any greenbelt to a developer without a clear, compelling benefit to the community.

Smart growth is growth that stays true to our values. Both of the plans submitted so far by Taormino & Associates fail to meet that test.

Sincerely,

Warren and Laura Westrup

Davis

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Mural depicting story of two families offers insights into Davis history — with added video available online

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

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Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

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Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

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noise ordinanceW

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Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

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Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

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Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

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Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

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The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

By
September 28, 2014 |

By David Hosley

Special to the Enterprise

As the 2014-15 academic year gets underway, K-8 teachers (as well as newcomers to Yolo County) have a new educational resource at Fourth and D streets in the heart of downtown Davis.

A tile mosaic mural created recently by artist Mark Rivera shows the story of two pioneer families whose descendants lived on the site for more than a century. Particularly relevant to fourth and eight grades, the mural illustrates how the Peña and Vaca families came to the area, what kind of animals they brought, and the variety of food they grew. Their journey was an important part of California history, but also touches on water, agriculture and Latino history.

Augmenting the Peña mural at 444 Fourth St., is an RFID computer chip that’s smaller than a dime, located at a corner of the mosaic. By downloading an application for their smart phones, tablets or laptops, teachers will be able to show students a video about Rivera’s creative process produced by Monto Kumagai.

A reminder of the region’s history

“The mural will continue to remind visitors about the contributions of the family to the region and the Davis community,” says Don Morrill, one of the partners in the new three-story building adjacent to the mural, who coordinated background information for the art project about Narcissa Peña and her forebearers.

“We’ve undertaken these efforts with great respect for the family who long ago helped build our city,” Morrill adds. “We produced a CD for the City of Davis archives and Hattie Weber Museum with pictures of the house, and a narrative of the known history of the family members who lived at Fourth and D streets, including the last resident, Narcissa Peña.”

Mural shows a family’s journey

Rivera immersed himself in the story of the Peña and Vaca families as he was conceiving the design for the mural, which is 13 feet long. It starts chronologically with the journey from Spain, Argentina and Mexico to Alta California, where a land grant was secured in 1841 nearly the size of today’s Solano County.

“I had to connect with the history to get the spirit of the family,” Rivera says. “It’s a different process to create a piece of art than I usually take, trying to take modern viewers into the world of the past.”

Family brands used on the Peña and Vaca rancheros to identify their cattle are depicted, along with crops grown initially on the granted lands west of today’s Vacaville. The Davis history in the mural includes the water wagon that Jesus Peña drove to control dust on the town’s streets with some of the Peña children on top, and the Peña’s little white house at 337 D St.

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Special to The Enterprise

elias 10/3 Dems will have a lock on California

By
September 16, 2014 |

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2014, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“WHY DEMS WILL HAVE A LOCK ON CALIFORNIA FOR AWHILE”

It was lawbreaking, both proven and alleged, that ended the Democrats’ supermajority in the state Senate. Republicans and their efforts had nothing to do with it. Until state Sens. Roderick Wright of Los Angeles, Ron Calderon of Montebello and Leland Yee of San Francisco encountered serious legal problems, Democrats had more than two-thirds of the seats in both houses of the Legislature for almost the first time ever.

The party also holds all statewide offices today, from governor and U.S. senator down through the treasurer’s slot, and the mayor’s office in all but one of the state’s four largest cities. That’s more of a stranglehold on California politics than any party has ever enjoyed.

And it appears that almost no matter what Democrats do, they will continue to enjoy such dominance for years to come.

This seems assured not just by voter registration figures, which grow worse and worse for Republicans. It’s also due to demographic trends than can be seen on the national level.

Sure, the registration figures look plenty bad for the GOP as it strives to break the Democratic lock on California public life.

Between the beginning of 2010 and mid-2014, as population grew by an estimated 2 million, Republican voter registration actually dropped by 121,000. The percentage drop seemed a tad more significant, falling from 30.75 percent of all voters to 28.73 percent before rebounding to just over 30 percent again. During the same time span, Democratic registration increased by more than 150,000 persons, even as the party’s percentage of registrants fell by about 1 percent, from 44.62 percent to 43.58 percent.

Where did the missing Republicans go, along with many new voters who in previous decades might have signed up as either Democrats or Republicans? It appears most joined the growing ranks of independents, choosing not to affiliate with either party, and even more joined small splinter parties. Registration figures for people with no party preference grew by 286,000 during those four-plus years, the percentage of voters opting not to declare party loyalty rising about 1 percent. Another 303,000 signed up with miscellaneous smaller parties.

This trend portends no good for Republicans, who did not even enter significant candidates in several legislative and congressional primary election races.

But the GOP’s problems go even deeper. As California’s population becomes ever more urban, centering in the metropolitan areas around Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego and Orange County, Democrats keep gaining ground.

One study of voter registration in America’s 3,144 counties indicated what California analysts already knew: Democrats are from cities, Republicans from the ex-urbs – suburban or rural areas. This was already true in 1988, starting date for that study, but it’s even truer today.

Los Angeles led the 25 top counties for Democratic voter pickups, gaining 1.2 million Democratic voters in the last 25 years. Orange and San Diego counties are also among the top ten counties for Democratic voter growth, one reason politics has become more competitive over the last 10 years or so in those reputed Republican bastions.

Meanwhile, there were no California counties among the top 25 for Republican voter gains during the last quarter century. So as California and the nation become more urban and less countrified and suburban, Democratic margins tend to go up.

Add this trend to the well-documented increases in Latino voters (which account for much of the Democratic increases in Los Angeles, Orange and San Diego counties) and you get a bleak picture for Republicans.

Is the California GOP completely without hope? Chances are, not even corruption will reduce the Democratic legislative majorities by much. But Republicans still do have a shot at statewide offices, if they run appealing candidates, as demonstrated by Arnold Schwarzenegger in 2003 and 2006.

Even much more conservative candidates than he can win if some ethnic groups should become turned off to Democratic candidates and attracted to GOP ones, or just lose their motivation to vote, while mostly-white GOP voters turn out in big numbers.

Which makes California the Democrats’ to lose, for the foreseeable future.

-30-
Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” now available in an updated third edition. His email address is tdelias@aol.com

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elias 9/30: Tesla ‘loss’

By
September 16, 2014 |

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2014, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“TESLA ‘LOSS:’ CALIFORNIA EVADES A MASSIVE GIVEAWAY”

There are very few Americans who need welfare and government support less than Elon Musk, the hyper-creative head of the Tesla Motors electric car company, the Space X rocketry and satellite hoisting firm and Solar City, a leader in renewable energy.

And yet…almost no one gets more government benefits and business. The principle client of Space X, of course, is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, better known as NASA, which depends on private enterprise – and Russian spacecraft – now that it has retired America’s space shuttle fleet.

Solar City thrives because homeowners are subsidized when they put photovoltaic panels on their roofs.

And then there’s Tesla, lately the orchestrator of a five-state battle over who could be exploited the most. Some states – notably Texas – call the handouts they give entrepreneurs like Musk “incentives” and governors like Brian Sandoval of Nevada and Rick Perry of Texas pride themselves on attracting additional jobs to their states this way.

But the questions remain whether corporate welfare is right, whether its costs outweigh benefits and whether companies getting it could survive without.

Would Tesla’s Model S be as popular as it is without the huge panoply of benefits it comes with? From the start, buyers of these toys for the wealthy (there’s plenty of room to question whether well-heeled buyers deserve welfare) got $7,500 credits on their federal tax returns. California has chipped in an additional $2,500 state rebate. That knocks $10,000 off the price tag.

Owners also can use carpool lanes on freeways when alone for years to come, and in California can compel their condominium or homeowners associations to allow them to install electric charging stations even if they don’t fit the aesthetics of the development.

Anyone who thinks those incentives don’t boost sales is simply naïve. The company also got a sweetheart deal when it took over the abandoned General Motors/Toyota factory in the East San Francisco Bay city of Fremont.

All that didn’t stir any loyalty in Tesla when it sought a location for a planned 6,500-job lithium ion battery factory. It landed just outside Reno after California didn’t match Nevada’s 20-year abatement of all sales tax linked to the plant, a property tax exemption for the next 10 years, reduced business and corporate taxes – and up to $150 million in cash from the state if the company eventually invests an expected $5 billion in the factory.

That adds up to $1.3 billion in cash and tax credits for a plant expected to hire 6,500 persons and create about 10,000 other permanent jobs. So for the privilege of hosting Tesla, the state of Nevada will pay well over $78,000 per job created. How long will it take to recoup that expense? And what about jobs lost when Nevada reduces its film production tax credits to help pay for Tesla’s welfare?

Nevada has never paid anything like that to casinos or other big employers. Nor has California ever paid a company so much. Plus, if Tesla doesn’t pay local property taxes, who will build schools and hire teachers for children of the new workers. Who will maintain the roads they’ll use, or their water and sewer systems? No one knows.

The larger question, of course, is whether any government should make such corporate handouts. Whenever American companies encounter similar subsidies of goods from other countries like China, Russia and Sweden, they gripe about unfair competition.

In fact, the subsidies to Tesla might be seen as unfair competition for other automakers – except that outfits like Nissan, Toyota, Volkswagen and Mercedes Benz have gotten similar but smaller welfare packages from Tennessee, Alabama and Mississippi. Why do you suppose Toyota is moving its national headquarters from Torrance to a suburb of Dallas? You can be sure it’s not because Japanese executives like the ultra-humid Texas weather or the frequent hurricanes.

The real question, of course, is whether any state or national government should allow itself to be extorted like this by any company. For sure, the way it affects fair competition among cars and other products is a perversion of the capitalist system.

But don’t expect Musk or any other corporate kingpin to stop seeking big government bucks in exchange for moving jobs around. As long as politicians vie for the privilege of handing out taxpayer money, this slimy practice will continue.

-30-
Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” now available in an updated third edition. His email address is tdelias@aol.com

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Paso Fino Safety Risk

By
September 16, 2014 |

Many aspects of the proposed “Paso Fino” in-fill project in Wildhorse are concerning and have received justified public attention. These include the potential precedent that would be set if City-owned greenbelt for the first time is sold to a private developer and the loss of historic trees which harbor the threatened Swainson Hawk.

As an emergency physician, and father of three young children, another aspect of this flawed project also concerns me – and it has not received the attention it deserves. The proposal currently before the planning commission would build eight large suburban houses and four small accessory dwelling units on property zoned for two houses. Currently, the developer proposes only a narrow driveway into the project, with no sidewalks or bike lanes. This “street” would be a connector between Covell and Moore Boulevards for pedestrians and cyclists, including children headed to and from Birch Lane Elementary School and Harper Junior High. Cars could enter and exit only through Moore, and would not be able to turn around except by executing three-point turns in private driveways. During times when residents all have cars in their driveways, vehicles (including large delivery vehicles) would have to back out of the street onto Moore.

This development will place people in the community at needless risk. I have seen many preventable and tragic traumas to pedestrians in the Emergency Department. Why place undue safety risks for this project? To my knowledge, there are no other streets with similar dimensions in Wildhorse.

Because of deep concerns by citizens throughout Davis and a growing opposition to the proposals (and not the concept of in-fill) by the developer, the city council has sent his project back to the planning commission. Both the planning commission and the city council must say no to a project that asks cars, bikes and pedestrians to share a too-narrow street connecting two major arterials.

Instead, the City should revive the plan that was approved by the City Council and Planning Commission in 2009 and was supported by the community. This plan would preserve greenbelt so that pedestrians and cyclists could continue to pass between Covell and Moore under a canopy of shade trees, with no competition from cars. It would also provide an entry road into the project with sidewalks and enough room for cars to park and turn around. It will also promote safe in-fill for our citizens.

Kapil Dhingra, MD
Davis

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Letters to the Editor

“Islamist”

By
September 16, 2014 |

I would be grateful if you would discontinue using the term “Islamist” to refer to people who commit acts of terrorism in the Middle East. I feel strongly that those who commit those acts do not represent the true tenets if Islam. I can think of nations, governments and others representing various religious groups who don’t hesitate to commit acts of terrorism.

Michael Gass

Davis

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Letters to the Editor

Agressive dogs in the downtown area

By
September 16, 2014 |

Thank you Mike and Gena May for bringing up the subject of aggressive dogs in the downtown area and in Community Park. I agree with you on the danger these dogs present. As a professional dog trainer of over 18 years in Davis I often will work with clients and their dogs downtown and we too encounter this behavior. It’s scary and I can’t imagine what it must be like with limited sight. There does seems to be a group of homeless people and their dogs that spend the day and evening sitting on the sidewalk on E Street and they spend the night in Community Park. Their dogs are often times off leash and not under voice control. I would hope that animal control will have read your letter and would start to patrol downtown and Community Park and at the very least check to make sure these dogs are vaccinated and licensed and that their owners are reminded that there is a leash law. I would also like to suggest that perhaps the VMTH could do a community outreach and offer free classes to the homeless and their dogs.

Dolores Blake

Davis

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Letters to the Editor

Dog Aggression

By
September 16, 2014 |

I found the article on dog aggression (Sept. 7) very touching, especially because I also experience dog-related issues regularly on my walks around Mace Ranch and in the bike path near Target.

Often, owners seem overconfident that their dogs are friendly. An example that I encountered: “He is a good dog. He does not bite.” Seconds later, the dog started to growl and charge menacingly toward me! I saw a surprised look on the owner’s face before he attempted to control the dog. Public sidewalks should not be the place that dog-owners discover the aggressive behaviors of their dogs. I have also seen some owners with very long leashes on their dogs, allowing dogs to approach pedestrians without concern of their personal space or comfort level. Dog owners should responsibly keep a normal distance from pedestrians and not allow their dogs to be off-leash, as is mandated by the city.

After a few similar incidents over the last few years, I began to change my walking routes near the greenbelt and took to street sidewalks where fewer people seem to walk their dogs. I rather tolerated the downside of street noise and car lights than walk in the pleasant, green space.

I hope that dog owners will be more conscientious and that the City will find creative ways of enforcing the dog-leash law so that people can walk in public areas without the fear of off-leash dogs.

Hari Rajbhandari

Davis

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Letters to the Editor

Can’t Drink Bullets

By
September 16, 2014 |

House chair for the subcommittee on counterterrorism and intelligence, Peter King (R N.Y.) says “this (war on ISIL) is a war that could go on for another 10 or 15 years.” (Sac Bee).
Our military expenditure by household has steadily increased 450% in 40 years. Household income in those same 40 years has grown by next to nothing. Vet these US numbers for yourself – but the story is bleak.

(table could be reformatted to suit your press)
Years 1967-74 2004-14
Average Household Income $46,134 $47,907
Military Spending by Total Households $1,417 $6,389
Military Spending as a % of HH Income 3% 13%
Ratio of Increase of Military Spending 4.5
40 Year Increase in Household Income Almost None
* Nominal Dollars

I’m not arguing that ISIL is not atrocious, but the circumstances around its formation are a reflection of contradictions that we have tolerated for far too long in our own country. We cannot simultaneously be a leader of world peace, the largest consumer of oil and the largest producer of arms.

Correcting this contradiction should transcend our differences. Our beliefs in global climate change, gay marriage or a women’s right to choose should not stand in the way – our government must stand for something other than a perpetual war.

In the place of a war posture, we can build a culture whose policies are built on studied and dignified understanding of the world. We can and should divest our support from countries and industries that perpetuate social and environmental violence.

This will not happen overnight, so we need a symbol of disaffection from our current situation – a visual reminder that inspires consistent incremental action and unifies us with a world of peace loving people. Something that is neither liberal or conservative, democrat or republican, or denominational. Something that can be an accessory of executive and service worker alike. Something to show our unity toward building a future than can replace our current winner take all culture.

How about a crowd funding event promoting this symbol of global unified effort? Is it so difficult to treat each other as we would treat ourselves? The way we are treating each other now is not working.

Scott Ragsdale

Davis

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Letters to the Editor

Auto Draft

By
September 15, 2014 |

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Q and A with Chancellor Linda Katehi (Oct. 2, 11 a.m. to noon)

By
September 03, 2014 |

Questions I said I wanted to ask:

— What have you learned during your five year tenure here at UC Davis?

— What challenges have you faced while here?

— What obstacles do you foresee in the near future?

— And what opportunities do you foresee?

— Explain

Suggestion from Cory
Katehi set as her goal being a top five public research university nationally, as I recall (you can look back to her first big campus speech, but I’m pretty sure it was top five). My question for her would be, in what ways are you closing the gap (cause it ain’t in the rankinggggssss) and what else do you need / need to do in order to climb higher? Also: What are you not willing to sacrifice in order to be ranked higher?

Athletics:
Get stats about how schools are more popular as student choices, even the brainiacs, when teams are big-time and successful. Find background on going D-1 and timing of Katehi’s arrival. What is her hope for sports at UCD?

Note to Luanne Lawrence:

Hello Luanne. I have taken over covering UC Davis for The Davis Enterprise since Cory Golden has moved on to another career path.

Although I am new to the UCD beat, I am not new to Davis or The Enterprise…I’ve been an associate editor at the newspaper for 12 years. I am a huge fan of the university (my husband went to graduate school here, and we both are UC graduates) and jumped at the chance to move into that job when Cory announced he was leaving.

As Cory left, he handed over a nine-page(!) list of story ideas that he recommended I consider, which I did with my editor, Debbie Davis.

One of the first I would like to do is a question and answer session with Chancellor Katehi on her first five years at UCD. Questions like what she has learned during her tenure; challenges she’s faced while here; obstacles and opportunities in the near future, etc.

Cory suggested that I request time with the chancellor through you. Is it possible to meet with her some time in August? I’d like to sit down with her before the breakfast meeting on Oct. 2.

Thank you, Luanne, and have a nice weekend. Tanya
=========
Note from Luanne:
Tanya thank you for the note. I am sorry I missed you when you visited campus with Cory. I am not surprised he had a huge story list – he was so invested in the university and we are grateful for his time and talent devoted to UC Davis stories. I have heard fantastic things about you and am a bit familiar with your work. You may know I arrived a year and a half and am slowly meeting more of the press. I will look forward to meeting you in person.

I know Linda would want to do this, but she is actually leaving on her annual August vacation in Greece. I suspect the best I can do is September. Debbie probably shared that we set up a breakfast for the Enterprise at her home, but I believe that is in October.

Let me contact her office right now and see what I can manage. I apologize if August does not work – I do not know exactly when she leaves, but it is soon. I will get back to you….

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Korematsu does ALS challenge

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September 15, 2014 |

I teach science at Korematsu Elementary. Last week the students at Patwin sent us a video challenging us to the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. This week I’ll be teaching my students about the science behind ALS and the story behind the challenge. We will be doing the challenge at 12:15 on our campus this Friday (Sept. 19)

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Special to The Enterprise

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September 13, 2014 |

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September 13, 2014 |

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September 13, 2014 |

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September 13, 2014 |

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First-year students can claim a free ticket to a Mondavi Center event

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October 01, 2014 |

New students at UC Davis — meaning incoming freshmen, as well as newly enrolled transfer students at the undergraduate level, and new graduate students — are entitled to a special introductory offer at the Mondavi Center: one free ticket each, to the event of his or her choosing.

You can pick a touring classical ensemble — the London Symphony Orchestra, for instance, or a recital by pianist Jeremy Denk, in the grand setting of Jackson Hall. Or a ticket to one of the popular Studio Jazz concerts, performed in a cabaret-style setting in the Vanderhoef Studio Theater. Or an elegant musical trip into 1930s Berlin with Max Raabe and the Palast Orchester. Or a spectacular performance event by the Akram Khan Company, from England.

New students should visit the Mondavi Center box office (open Tuesdays through Saturdays, noon to 6 p.m.) to claim a free ticket. Details also are available online at www.mondaviarts.org or by calling (530) 754-2787.

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September 13, 2014 |

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Bruce Gallaudet

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September 13, 2014 |

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Elizabeth Case

Despite FBS foes behind, schedule doesn’t lighten up

By
September 14, 2014 |

UC Davis — thanks to a strong finish last year — shoe-horned itself into a fourth-place tie in the Big Sky Conference, going 5-3 in league after that forgettable 0-4 start.

The Aggie reward? It’s toughest schedule in school history.

Now that the two games with Football Bowl Subdivision foes are behind them, Davis gets a week “off” in preparation for the Sept. 27 visit from No. 2 Eastern Washington.

Stanford and Colorado State were supposed to be the speed bumps, but Big Sky doesn’t get any easier.

KHTK radio personality Doug Kelly — a member of the Aggie trio calling Davis action this year — believes the locals drew the scheduler’s short straw.

“I look at conference having three levels: Eastern Washington, the Montanas and Northern Arizona are up here,” Kelly motions, creating an upper echelon with his hand above his head. “Teams like us, Cal Poly, Portland State, Southern Utah and Sacramento State are in the middle. Then there’s Weber State, Northern Colorado, North Dakota and Idaho (State).

“Have you seen our schedule?” asks Kelly, half laughing, scratching his head.

That top tier Kelly alluded to? UCD gets ‘em all. After EWU comes calling, Montana State (No. 20) visits for Homecoming on Oct. 11. Then it’s off to Mizzoula for No. 4 Montana before traveling on Nov. 8 to Northern Arizona (No. 25).

Cal Poly, who Davis meets in San Luis Obispo on Nov. 15, received votes in the Sports Network Football Championship Subdivision poll, as did Sacramento State (the Aggies’ regular-season final at home on Nov. 22).

“Did you see what some of the other powers have (on their slate)?” added Kelly. “I don’t know who scheduled these…”

The EW Eagles get North Dakota, Northern Colorado and Idaho State in conference. Northern Colorado and North Dakota are in Montana’s future after a nonleague slate that featured South Dakota and Central Washington. Idaho State, Weber State and North Dakota entertain MSU after the Grizzlies warm up with the likes of Black Hills State and Central Arkansas.

Northern Colorado, Weber and North Dakota lowlight the Lumberjacks’ Big West experience.

The Davis cream puffs? Just North Dakota (1-2 and 3-8 last season) and D-II Fort Lewis, a nice confidence-builder on Sept. 6.

So, batten down the hatches. Here comes the serious part of 2014.

Oh, the good news?

UC Davis gets a bye next week: a perfect chance to regroup, get healthy and await Eastern Washington.

The Aggies won’t have to deal with the riggers of a whirlwind road trip and they will have — it hopes — at healthy home crowd behind it.

Calisthenics: It looked great from the stands as UCD players formed a block Aggie C in doing stretching exercises before Saturday’s game. With starters OT Parker Smith (leg) and S Charles Boyett (ankle) watching, the all-white-clad locals looked like they meant business early.

Old friends in a thriller: Two ex-Aggie assistant head coaches — Keith Buckley and Mike Moroski hooked up in classic small-school season opener last weekend.

Pacific University (Forest Grove, Ore.) hosted Idaho in Moroski’s head-coaching debut. The Coyotes made Moroski’s coming out party a winning one, 35-34.

Moroski, the 1979 UCD grad who went on to play QB in the NFL for Atlanta, San Francisco and Houston, was retired coach Bob Biggs’ right-hand man until Bigg’s retired two years ago.

Buckley was Biggs’ assistant before Big Mike. He went to Pacific in 2010, resurrecting a football program that had been dormant for 19 years. Last year’s 7-3 campaign was a watershed season for the Boxers.

On Saturtday, Buckley’s Boys got a bye, while the ‘Yotes (as they’re called in the north) beat Montana Western, XX-X. Ah, that Aggie coaching tree…

 

 

 

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Bruce Gallaudet

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September 13, 2014 |

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Marjorie Ann Liebert

By
September 06, 2014 |

Nov. 2, 1930 — Sept. 2, 2014

Marjorie Liebert, beloved wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, mother-in-law, foster mom and any role that allowed her to be a mom, passed away peacefully in the wee hours of Tuesday morning, Sept.2, 2014, surrounded by her loving family.

Marjorie was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y. She moved away at 19 upon finding the love of her life, Burt Liebert, while visiting her sister in Tucson and attending a dance. Wed after six weeks of courtship, Margie and Burt were set to celebrate their 64th wedding anniversary next week.

Marjorie and Burt returned to New York to be wed in 1950. That was the beginning of another of their passions, traveling the world. They started as adventurous campers with their family of six, and eventually explored South America, Venezuela, Europe, Russia, Isreal, China, Japan, New Zealand and Australia.

Marjorie’s passion, beyond mothering, was art, beginning her studies at Brooklyn Museum Art School and Art Students League in New York. Margie was a successful professional artist practicing in oil and multi-media works for decades. She also drew book covers and illustrations for several books that she and Burt wrote and published together.

Additionally she studied theatre design at The Art Institute of Chicago’s Goodman Theatre. This later part of her education set her up to be Burt’s teammate as an accomplished set and costume designer, working at high school theaters, the Redwood City Junior Players, and Pied Piper Theatre, where Burt directed children’s plays.

Marjorie received her master’s degree in special education from Sacramento State University and her teaching credentials from UC Davis. She then spent 15 years teaching special education and advocating for special-needs children, many from the families of farm workers.

Marjorie is survived by her loving husband Burt; children Mark, Nina, Scott and Judy; five grandchildren; two great grandchildren; two foster sons; and six foster grandchildren.

A celebration of her life will begin at XX:XX on Saturday, Sept. 6, at the Palo Alto Unitarian Universalist Church, 505 East Charleston Road in Palo Alto. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in her name to Palo Alto Unitarian Universalist Church, the Humanist Community in Silicon valley, or your favorite charity.

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Special to The Enterprise

(OP-ED) Choose to Wipe Out Hunger

By
September 13, 2014 |

CHOOSE TO WIPE OUT HUNGER!

Yolo County Supervisors encouraged more support for Yolo Food Bank’s food aid work by declaring September as Hunger Action Month in Yolo County. The supervisors passed a resolution recognizing Hunger Action Month (Feeding America’s month-long campaign to help end hunger in our country) and the urgent state of food insecurity affecting more than 20 percent of Yolo County residents, while calling every citizen across the county to raise their awareness and level of action to fight hunger in our community.

Yolo Food Bank provides food assistance to almost 24,000 Yolo County residents monthly through our 10 programs, including partnership with 63 agencies. Hunger is, more often than not, a chronic problem for so many of our neighbors. So, it is important to remember that these individuals and their households represent a cross section of our community. They are people like:
• Josefina, who works only part time because of having to care for a disabled, home bound husband.
• Russell who is an unemployed Desert Storm veteran recovering from addiction and PTSD.
• Alice and Roy, who are homeless.
• Oscar, a farm worker and his wife, Rose, a tomato processor who have only seasonal employment to support a family of five.
• Pasha, a single father, who has only been able to find temporary construction work during the past four years.
• Li Jing, who is a university student with no income for food.
• Arnold, who is retired with a monthly pension too small to cover his rent, utilities, medical care, and food.
• Amelia and Thomas, formerly a duel income couple, who now, because of Amelia’s unemployment, rely on one inadequate income to support their family of four.
• Teresa, who is raising grandchildren, has no car and lives on a very low income in an old mobile home in rural Yolo County.
• Gerald, an elementary school student who qualifies for free lunches, and lives with his family in a house without indoor food storage or cooking facilities.

There are several reasons that result in food insecurity, including little or no income, unemployment and underemployment, the rising costs of shelter and food, medical care and utility expenses, lack of transportation, and food deserts.

As a society we need to address these issues. But as a community we can’t singlehandedly take on solving them.

What we can do, however, is make a choice about hunger here at home in Yolo County. Do we do more or maintain the status-quo and ignore the struggle of so many community members?

Yolo Food Bank joins you in calling for action:
• We’re calling everyone to ask the question “How can we have hundreds of farms in our county and still have people going hungry?”
• We’re calling everyone to make a choice that no one in Yolo County should not have enough food, particularly the almost 1 in 4 children who don’t know if they’ll have enough to eat during the day.
• We’re calling everyone to recognize that it’s in all of our interests to pay forward life’s blessings because, in the words of one of our donor/volunteers:

“The Food Bank is providing the basic necessities that allow people to be productive and think about other things…When you’re supporting Yolo Food Bank you’re energizing people to help them go out and make a better life for themselves.”

We’re challenging you to work towards wiping out hunger in Yolo County by following our “30 Ways in 30 Days Calendar,” or getting involved in other opportunities found on our website, or donating, advocating or participating.

Calendar tasks include everything from participating in a SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) challenge to volunteer opportunities and a food packing event Saturday, September 27th at Yolo Food Bank. Download our “30 Ways in 30 Days Calendar” and sign up for the food packing event at: http://www.yolofoodbank.org/events

Give funds, give time, or give food. Every contribution, big or small, makes a difference in the life of a hungry person. Visit our website to learn how you can get involved (www.yolofoodbank.org/get_involved).

As individuals, charities, businesses and government entities, we all have a role to play in getting food to our struggling neighbors in need: What is your choice?

XXX

Linda Zablotny-Hurst
Yolo Food Bank
Director of Development
(530) 668-0690
Linda@yolofoodbank.org

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Special to The Enterprise

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September 12, 2014 |

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Snapshot: Wheel on over to the U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

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Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

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Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

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Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

By
October 02, 2014 |

The U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame has one of the most extensive bicycle collections in the world and is home to all the athletes inducted to the Hall of Fame throughout its 25-year history. Inductees include Olympians and championship cyclists such as Greg LeMond, Eric Heiden, Major Taylor and the founding inductee, Fred “Pop” Kugler.

The Hall of Fame gives visitors the opportunity to view the UC Davis Pierce-Miller Collection of antique bicycles, the extensive catalog of memorabilia from the Hall of Fame, Hall of Fame inductees and many more key cycling artifacts.

It is housed in the former teen center at 303 Third St., downtown, and features changing exhibits honoring Hall of Fame inductees and bicycling history. Hours are 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays; and other days and times by appointment.

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Enterprise staff

Snapshot: Live theater abounds in Yolo

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

By
October 02, 2014 |

With a vast array of local live theaters — focusing on musicals to dramas — Davis residents have plenty to see all year.
* Acme Theatre Company is an entirely youth-run, award-winning theater company that has produced high-quality dramatic performances for nearly three decades. For more information, visit http://www.acmetheatre.net.
* Art Theater of Davis, the newest company in town, is dedicated to modern classics. They perform at the Third Space Art Collective, 946 Olive Drive. For more information, visit ArtTheater.org.
* Barnyard Theatre was founded in 2004 and performs in the historic Schmeiser Barn, 35125 County Road 31. The troupe performs a variety of original works. For more information, call 530-794-8540 or visit www.barnyardtheatre.org.
* Davis Shakespeare Ensemble produces Shakespeare’s works, modern classics, new works inspired by the classics and educational programs. They produce the annual Shakespeare Festival. For more information, call 530-802-0998 or email davis.shakespeare@gmail.com.
* DMTC, founded in 1984 by Jan and Steve Isaacson, produces 10 musicals each year. Performances are held in the DMTC Performing Arts Center, 607 Peña Drive. The nonprofit is an all-volunteer organization from the board of directors on down. For more information, e-mail info@dmtc.org or call 530-756-3682.
* The Woodland Opera House produces five Mainstage productions from September to June, a summer melodrama, a youth theater camp in August, and the Young Peoples Theatre program throughout the year. The nonprofit company performs in the state historical building at 340 Second St. For more information, visit www.woodlandoperahouse.org or call 530-666-9617.

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Enterprise staff

Snapshot: Get close to nature at Yolo Basin Wildlife areas

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

By
October 02, 2014 |

The city of Davis and Yolo Basin Foundation invite community members to join docents at the Davis wetlands on Saturday, for a free guided tour from 3 to 5 p.m. Tours are offered the first Saturday of the month all year-round.

The Pacific Flyway stretches from Alaska to Central and South America. It is the collection of routes taken by birds on their annual migration to and from their breeding grounds. The city of Davis wetlands provides a favorable habitat to many of the more than 350 migratory bird species that help define the Pacific Flyway.
All those wishing to join the tour should meet a few minutes before 3 p.m. at the gate in front of the Davis wastewater treatment plant, east of the Yolo County Landfill on County Road 28H. Participants should bring their own binoculars, water (there is no potable water on site), and field guide. Docents will have spotting scopes to enhance wildlife viewing.

Most of the tour is by car on firm gravel roads, with a couple of optional short walks in the wetlands. A portable toilet is available on the route.

To reach the plant, head north from Davis on Pole Line Road, turn right on Road 28H and go 3 miles east, just past County Road 105. The group meets at the front gate.

This is a free tour; no reservations are required. For more information, call Michael Herrera at 530-758-1018 before the day of the tour, or visit the Yolo Basin Foundation website at www.yolobasin.org.

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Enterprise staff

Snapshot: Fixit stations help cyclists

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

By
October 02, 2014 |

The Davis Bike Club and the city worked together to bring do-it-yourself bicycle maintenance stands to Davis.

Bicyclists in need of a tune-up can now find blue Dero Fixit stations around town, including in front of the Southern Pacific Train Depot, Second and H streets, on the south side of the U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame, Third and B streets, and at the Stephens Branch Library, 315 E. 14th St.

The stations are equipped with tools, which are tethered to the stands by wire rope, that make it easy for anyone to inflate a flat tire, tighten some handle bars or even adjust their brakes.

For more information on the Davis fix-it stations, including quick tutorials on basic repairs that can be made using the stations, visit the Davis Bike Club website at www.davisbikeclub.org/fixit.

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Enterprise staff

Snapshot: No wheels, no worries

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

By
October 02, 2014 |

There are nearly as many registered vehicles in California as there are people in all of Canada.
The latest population figures have Canada at 34.88 million, while the Dec. 31, 2013, DMV records show 32.9 million vehicles legally rolling in the Golden State.

One way to keep the number of vehicles from growing is Zipcars (www.zipcar.com). The hourly/daily rental program is available around the United States, including eight locations in Davis. With cars parked and waiting from the Avis lot on Olive Drive to West Village Square, Davisites have fast, easy access to wheels.
A Honda Fit EV now is available at UC Davis in West Village Square, across the street from West Village’s other Zipcar, a Honda Insight, in front of “The Hub Market.” Both vehicles are available to all Zipcar members, ages 18 and older, for hourly reservations, starting at $8.50 per hour.

The system is as easy as 1) join, 2) reserve, 3) unlock, 4) drive. It includes gas and insurance and features a varying rate scale.

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Enterprise staff

Refsland letter

By
September 13, 2014 |

YOLO COUNTY PEACE OFFICERS MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT
The Fourth Annual Peace Officers Memorial Golf Classic was held on Friday, September 5, at the Wild Wings Club Golf Course.
Several Players enjoyed a hot but fun day of golf while netting about $4,000 from the event. The tournament was hosted by the Yolo County Retired Peace Officers Association, a non-profit organization. The proceeds from the event will be used towards providing a scholarship fund for local students, as well as maintaining the Yolo County Peace Officers Memorial monument.
Hoblit Motors of Woodland had again donated a 2014 Jeep Cherokee if any player could make a Hole in one on the #9 hole. Unfortunately, none were able to do so.
Jim Bonilla, Ted McDonald, Jeff Weatherbee and Scott Smith took first place in the scramble format with a 58. Second place was won by Ron Moore, Stacy La fave, Steve Marquez and Mathew Marquez with a score of 63. The longest drive went to Sean Obyran, while closest to the pin was won by Kevin McKnight.
The event was sponsored by donations from the following; Hoblit Chrysler-Dodge-Ram Motors, Wilkerson International, Yolo County Federal Credit Union, Main Street Motors, Les Schwab Tire Center, Home Improvements Group, Faris Farms, Yocha Dehe Fire Department, Pedroia Family, Costco, Davis Golf Course, Hanlees Chevrolet-Geo-Toyota, Code 3 Wines, Cross Courts, Rocky’s Barber Shop, Sears of Woodland, Frenchy’s Liquor, Yolo Veterans Coalition, Blue Max Kart Club, Precision Auto Care, Mountain Valley Golf, CL Smith Trucking, Colombara’s Cabinet & Millwork Inc., PG Painting, Sheffield Real Estate, County Line Warehouse, Ludy’s BBQ, Woodland Opera House, Wildhorse Golf, Continental Barber, John Dixon Massage, Schmauderer Bros., Woodland Elks 1299, American Legion Post 77, Hayes Feed & Supply, Betty Eredia, Diamond E Western Wear, Steave Thorpe, Treamont Group Inc., Big O Tire, Napa Auto Parts, Sterling May, True Value, Elm Ford, Debi Holmqvist, SWEMEC.
The awards dinner was hosted by the Nest Restaurant following the tournament were a host of prizes were displayed for the silent auction and raffle. They were generously donated by many of the above listed companies.
The Golf Classic committee and members of the Yolo County Retired Peace Officers Association, want to thank all of the sponsors, players, donors and volunteers for making the tournament a success.
Lee Refsland
Woodland

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Letters to the Editor

DMTC makes musical theater accessible to everyone

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

By
September 30, 2014 |

The Davis Musical Theater Company (DMTC), now in its 30th year, is the longest-running, year-round, non-professional musical theater company in California. It’s mission is “to produce quality, affordable, family-oriented theatrical musicals open to all people. DMTC will provide a proving and training ground for amateur theatrical performers, directors, choreographers, musicians and technicians. DMTC will strive to involve a multitude of people and families seeking to make a contribution toward the preservation of the musical theater art form.”

DMTC was founded in 1984 by Steve and Jan Isaacson, who had been involved in local theater groups for a few years, but believed that Davis really needed a musical theater group that produced large-scale, family entertainment. And they felt that ticket prices should be low enough to be affordable to families.. “Why have ticket prices so high that nobody comes?”

After moving around Davis for many years, from the Veterans Memorial Theater to a small warehouse near Sudwerks, to the Varsity Theater downtown, DMTC now has a permanent home at the Jean Henderson Performing Arts Center, 607 Pena Drive, in East Davis.

Davis Musical Theater Company produces six Main Stage musicals and five Young Performers Theater musicals annually, more than 100 performances each year.

The Main Stage shows are generally chosen from among the most popular American musicals. The 1914-15 season will include “Shrek,”“My Fair Lady,” “Anything Goes,”“Sweeney Todd,” “The Wizard of Oz,” and “Evita.” DMTC productions, actors, and technicians have won several Elly awards (awards from the Sacramento Area Regional Theater Alliance) over the years.

Open auditions are held for all shows the weekend following the opening performance for the current show. Actors are asked to prepare a song (not from the show for which they are auditioning) and dress to dance or move. There is a seven-week rehearsal period, Sunday through Thursday, and Steve points out that wife Jan is so precise that rehearsal rarely goes long and not everyone is called every night.

The Young Performers Theater season runs from September to May, during which time the participants (groups generally number 20-40 young people, ages 7-18) will put on four plays. Summer musicals are double-cast, giving more kids an opportunity to do lead roles.

What sets the Davis Musical Theater Company apart from many community theaters is its inclusivity and the family feeling that has been developed over the years. Many performers have been with the company for more than 10 years. Costumer Jean Henderson, who has costumed all the shows for more than 20 years, was given a surprise 70th birthday party recently, and told that the theater had been re-named in her honor.

Actress Mary Young, who has been with DMTC since its second show, has performed with her daughter and with her grandchildren on the stage. Ana Chan, who recently won the Elly for best performance by a young actress, was bounced on Steve Isaacson’s knee as a baby, while her father played in the DMTC orchestra. (Chan is college-bound and plans to major in theater, which she said would never have happened without her years with DMTC.)

Another thing which sets DMTC apart from many other community theaters is that everyone involved is a volunteer. In many theaters, the actors are not paid, but the orchestra is. At DMTC, even the orchestra members (26 musicians for last season’s “Les Miserables”) volunteer and are “paid” a cookie delivered to the orchestra pit at intermission. “We have the best volunteers around. People love it here. They’re here because they want to be here. It’s not a paid job,” Jan says.

Along with the set crew, the actors help build the sets and the cast does all the set changes. “They know when they audition here that we don’t have a separate crew that does it,” she adds.

The Young Performers Theater members work backstage and often run the lights for Main Stage productions. “They’re focused, they’re mature, they know what they’re doing. The kids who run the light board are phenomenal,” Steve says.

DMTC also gives two $500 scholarships for graduating high school seniors. The teens put on a cabaret each year to raise money for the scholarships. “Steve and I can’t do it by ourselves. It’s everybody’s theater,” Jan says.

Some DMTC actors have used the company as a stepping stone to professional theater, like Jenifer Foote, who was in South Pacific at age 6 and has now been performing on Broadway for many years, and Mara Davi, who did several shows with DMTC and also went on to Broadway. She was also in the hit TV drama, “Smash.”

For information about tickets, or auditioning for an upcoming show, call (530) 756-3682 or e-mail info@dmtc.org.

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UCD athletics have break-from-work entertainment for everyone

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

By
October 01, 2014 |

“All work and no play makes…”

Well, you know the saying.

For brainiacs and avid sports fans alike, UC Davis athletics provide a welcome diversion from the classroom or 9-to-5 responsibilities.

With 23 programs competing in Division I leagues ranging from Big Sky football to Big West basketball, UCD has something for every sports taste.

As a D-II school more than a decade ago, Davis earned six Director’s Cups as the country’s most accomplished athletic program at its level.

Since 2007, all Aggies teams have gone D-I and many have seen instant success.

Even before school began earlier this week, UCD has tried to put its best foot forward with early starts to soccer, field hockey, volleyball, men’s golf and football campaigns.

Care to get away on an inexpensive, exciting sports mini-vacation?

Stop by the Student Store — or the UC Davis Store Downtown — and get your Aggie Pride pumped up with dozens of new-season apparel choices, and then head out to one of literally hundreds of hometown game days.

Of particular note this fall? Nine-time NCAA women’s basketball champion Connecticut meets the Aggies at The Pavilion on Nov. 14 (7 p.m.). What a way to kick off a basketball season.

Here’s a quick look at each UCD sport:

Football — Already with games versus Stanford, Colorado State and Eastern Washington under its belt, the Aggies (X-X RECORD HERE) will celebrate Homecoming versus Montana State on Oct. 11.

On Nov. 1, Northern Colorado visits before arch-rival Sacramento State comes a-callin’ Nov. 22 in the regular-season finale.

UCD plays its home games at Aggie Stadium at La Rue and Hutchison roads on west campus.

Soccer — Big West schools are among the elite on the nation’s pitches, and both Aggie women and men have some monster home dates ahead.

For the men, Cal State Fullerton opens league play Thursday with a night game at Aggie (football) Stadium. Game time is 7 p.m.

UC Santa Barbara comes to Davis on Oct. 18 and the locals have another night game at Aggie (football) Stadium versus Cal Poly come Nov. 5.

For the distaff, UC Riverside (Thursday, 4 p.m. at Aggie Soccer Field) opens BWC play. Only three more home games follow: Cal State Fullerton (Sunday, noon); Long Beach State (Oct. 19, 1 p.m.); and UC Irvine (nov. 2, 2 p.m.).

Field hockey — Under first-year coach Tiffany Huisman, the UCD women inaugurated play at the new $3.2 million Aggie Field Hockey Facility on La Rue Road.

Stanford comes to town Sunday (1 p.m.) and Cal is in Davis (Oct. 10). Both are NorPac Conference games.

Volleyball — Former UCLA and Illinois assistant Dan Conners has taken the helm of the Aggie women as he tries to shepherd his charges through a difficult Big West campaign.

Just back off a tough league opener with Hawaii (UCD XXXX, XX-X), the Aggies are next home in The Pavilion for a showdown with UC Riverside on Oct. 11.

Other do-or-die home encounters include a Halloween date with UC Santa Barbara, a Nov. 1 date with Cal Poly and late-Big West rumbles with Cal State Fullerton (Nov. 13), UC Irvine (Nov. 15), Long Beach State (Nov. 20) and Cal State Northridge (Nov. 22).

Men’s water polo — The schedule this far has been wicked for UC Davis (X-X), but students are just in time to cheer on their Aggies when nationally-ranked Stanford plays at the Schaal Aquatics Center (just southeast of Aggie Stadium) Sunday at noon.

Concordia (Oct. 19) and Air Force (Oct. 23) are in town later before UC San Diego (Oct. 31), Loyola Marymount (Nov. 2) and UCLA (Nov. 9) are at Schaal.

Men’s basketball — The season in which Davis suffered through season-ending early injuries to frontline standouts J.T. Adenrele and Josh Ritchart, the Aggies are at full strength and look to literally rebound as their slate begins Nov. 16 versus Holy Names at The Pavilion.

Other marquee contests on the home schedule include San Jose State (Dec. 3), Cal State Northridge (Jan. 1) and UC Santa Barbara (Dec. 29) before the nation’s tallest collegiate team — UC Irvine — comes to town, ending the Big West campaign on March 7.

Look for swingman Corey Hawkins to be an All-American candidate.

Women’s basketball — They went to Connecticut last season and saw what the greatest women’s team in college history could do. Davis lost 97-37 in Hartford, Conn., as the Huskies went on to a 40-0 record and their ninth national crown.

This fall, UC Davis opens at home with UConn (Nov. 14 at 7 p.m.).

Another 13 home games will feature nonconference opponents like St. Mary’s (Nov. 22), Pacific (Nov. 29) and San Francisco (Dec. 2).

Big West play again figures to be contentious. The Aggies, led by senior forward Sydnee Fipps who is closing in on the school’s all-time scoring mark, meet Hawaii (Jan. 22), Long Beach State (Feb. 19), Cal State Northridge (Feb. 5) and Cal Poly (Feb. 26) in Big West crucials.

Like head coach Jennifer Gross says: “We are inspired by fan support … and the schedule we have in 2014-15 should bring new folks to The Pavilion.”

Especially the season-opener with No. 1 Connecticut.

Other sports — Although schedules haven’t been released for most spring sports, UC Davis will be chock-a-block with fun-in-the-sun options for Aggie fans.

The baseball squad plays at Dobbins Stadium (east of The Pavilion) and track-and-field happens at old-time-feel Toomey Field (A Street and Russell Boulevard). Golf — both men and women — have big tournaments at El Macero Country Club and Aggie softball will say goodbye to LaRue Field as the announcement has been made that the whole facility will get a facelift in the near future.

Fan Zone: Students can get involved with the Aggie Pack, buy gear, get insight into scoring bling, get complete schedules or follow UCD athletic social media by visiting www.ucdavisaggies.com.

Daily coverage: The Davis Enterprise — the newspaper you’re reading — has in-depth, five-days-a-week coverage of the Aggies. From on-line alerts to features to columns and analysis, The Davis Enterprise has the Aggies covered.

Go to www.davisenterprise.com/subscribe/ to get your home delivery started — or call (530) 756-0803.

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Bruce Gallaudet

Sunday best: Older dog care

By
August 30, 2014 |

Might want Shawn to make a chart of:
Compare Plans and Coverage for Pet Insurance
from an attachment in Julie Meadows’ note dated Sept. 10

Pet insurance sidebar

Start with Heidi Timberlake’s story about Clyde.
Then Julie Meadows
Then Melissa Bain
————
Melissa Bain, DVM, behaviorist
Associate professor of clinical animal behavior

1993 for specialization
Dr. Ben Hart, specialty college

What are some of the challenges people face with dogs living longer?

“Chronic medical conditions, that could be anything from arthritis, kidney disease, liver disease,…and then you get cancers.”

Dogs and cats can get cognitive dysfunction

Canine cognitive dysfunction

Pretty prevalent
Did a study, probably 15 percent of 11 to 12 year old dogs have at least one sign

70 percent of older dogs have signs

Signs include:
house soiling
Go outside, come back in and pee
Getting lost the same way people do

Change in sleep/wake cycle, sleep all day, awake all night

Exercise gives better flow to the brain so your cells don’t die as quickly

mental exercise very good for older dogs
Training exercises, food puzzle
Like humans play mind games

“more connections you make when they do start breaking down, you have more connections”

Separation anxiety can develop at age 10 and up. Dogs might not be remembering things and can’t remember that mom is leaving and that she will return

prevention, just like in humans, the earlier you catch it, the better to help slow down the progression

Diets
Hills BD (brain diet)
antioxidants, vitamen e, things shown in humans to help help with dogs

“It does help, it’s not perfect”

Bain noted a study (looked this up…appears to be a UC Irvine/Uni of Tornto:

http://www.workingdogweb.com/Older-Dogs-Can-Learn.htm

When looking at diet, they had four groups of beagles, one group regular diet, no training
one had BD, and training
one had training
one had diet

Groups who had both had cognitive decline progress slower

training or the food statistically equal

Start a diet like this at 9-10 years old

Other diets are coming that will be OTC (Hills is a prescription)
Supplements can be bought now.

Antioxidants being added to food.

Generally see young dogs for behavior

We do have to get involved in vets

“Always look at the whole family”

Dogs with pain might start biting

Any time anybody doesn’t feel good, they might be grouchy

Making end of life decisions…How do you advise?
(Tell story of put 5 things on a list that your dog enjoys, and when your dog can no longer do three of them, time to consider putting dog down)

Alice Villalobos vet oncologist in Southern Cal (trained at UCD)
Human animal bond

HHHHHMM scale
Hurt
Hunger
Hydration
Hygiene
Happiness
More good days than bad

Point isabel Near Richmond 40 acres
Near Costco

Hotline for people grieving over loss of pet – funding for person was cut…closed in 2009

http://www.theaggie.org/2009/11/12/pet-loss-support-hotline-closes-after-20-years-of-service/

From Julie Meadows:
Ryen Morey would be delighted to speak with you re: his group’s attempt to
get a bereavement counselor here.
Ryan’s info: Class of 2016 President
Students for One Health President
Pet Loss Support Club Vice President and CE Coordinator
VMTH Tour Guide ramorey@ucdavis.edu

Ben Hart, mentor for Melissa

Lynette Hart
Bigger breed study on spay/neuter and cancer

Chihuahua

When to get the next dog? “There’s no right or wrong.”
Whatever’s right for you is right for you.

=========
For other vet: Julie Meadows
(Bio Julie sent):
Julie Meadows, DVM, is an associate health sciences professor for community medicine at the University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, where she lectures on primary care, communication and preventive healthcare topics. Dr. Meadows has played an integral role in growing the community medicine service in order to enhance primary care training for veterinary students. Her professional speaking focuses on the concepts of relationship-centered care and family practice as well as pediatric wellness. Dr. Meadows received her DVM from UC Davis and practiced small animal general medicine for 20 years, owning a practice for 10 of those years, prior to her current position.

Age and disease are breed specific

When is your dog old? Considered a senior

Giant breeds, mastiffs
Age 8

Most other breeds get label of old at 10 years
“Where they’ll get their discounts at restaurants”

Senior screening lab work

Tells clients for what to be on the look out for in the next year

Major warning signs in change of drinking, specifically drinking more (could be a marker for kidney probe or diabetes), or starting to urinate in the house, or urinating in larger volume
Nocturia, needing to urinate at night

Bladder infections often go along with that

Often feeds into canine dementia

A lot of overlap between mental and physical in older dogs

Try to sort out if there are physical reasons for changes, or is it mental

The other thing to look out for is a sudden change in weight, give that most american pets are overweight, the appearance of a waistline is troubling

Treatments: Chemo, radiation, etc take a toll on a dog.

How do you handle hearing loss?
we don’t know if it’s a common thing, it’s not a common complaint for clients

it’s hardly ever

Many people will say he doesn’t come when I call him

Is that a physical hearing loss, or is that a lack of recognition in somebody calling you, or a lack of desire, or is it “selective hearing.”

Arthritis is huge, and it directly correlates to the fact that so many are overweight

Overweight human goes out and walks a pet, helps both

enhances human animal bond

osteoarthritis in smaller breeds too, specifically in their knees, many toy breeds have kneecaps that get out of place

see it in a gait…medial patellar lunation steps along and lifts back knee and keep it bent for a few steps

Bad eyesight?
General dog population
if you feel like the dogs eyes and they look gray or cloudy
can be an aging change that does not effect vision

Training vet students to use a special lens to see if there is an obstruction
nuclear sclerosis v

vast majority of dogs whose eyes seem gray or cloudy do not represent vision troubles

Huge believer in the idea of the annual exam

Save up some questions for that visit
expect your vet to actually look

Most adult dogs have cataracts because they have diabetes

Difference between easy and expensive

A board-certified ophthalmologist can remove cataracts

starts at $2500

Take a dog who can’t see makes him see

One of the things about cataracts is once you resolve the cataract, it’s fixed

When you’re in your decision making about whether the financial decision
you know this will solve cataracts, not chemo

So many pieces of the puzzle for chemo

do you have room in your life to deliver your pet to chemo for eight weeks

expected outcome

Lymphoma $3k to $5K one year

The idea of being in a relationship with your primary care provider helps you navigate that process

There will always be the statistics
Specialists can give you the stats
and can help you navigate what might come

but having primary care vet to bounce that info of helps make decisions

Nothing is as hard as being in a crisis with your pet, and not knowing the facility, not knowing the people you’re dealing with, not knowing the financial options

If you can move into planning, staying ahead of the trouble can help lessen future problems

Huge evidence base in humans and animals in prevention and monitoring

Crisis always costs more and is always emotionally harder.

Gerontology

automatically switch to a senior diet?

As a GP, I’d say not automatically. They might have a slightly lower calorie count, but there’s no evidence that taking in a lower amount of protein will stave off kidney disease

Overweight should have light food or restricting amount

One of the gimmicks that might be out there is glucosamine and chon
but the amount that is in the senior diets is not significant to make a difference in long term joint health

Vets perspectives is shifting in health supplements

traditionally in favor of glucose cont

moving away toward omega 3 fatty acids

Jamie Peyton – integrative medicine chief

Enhances quality of life…that aspect of care is booming

Yes, pet health insurance will expand options

Major medical rather than wellness rider (or preventative)

What we want to do as vets these days is tailor your dogs health plan to whom you live with

not every dog needs to be on the same parasite plan, doesn’t need teeth cleaned every year, doesn’t need an EKG every year after 10

handouts on insurance

Arthritic dog, Clyde, large breed, lab cross

Liver numbers were high, concerned he couldn’t use non-steroidal

coming tomorrow for abdominal ultrasound

I’m a believer in “age is not a disease”

came in for walking family in the middle of the night

Three possibilities

belly hurts and he wakes
or alzheimers
or joint shifts

You can feel the joint

diminished range of motion in arthritic muscle

Muscles over his arms are atrophying

Send email – about insurance info

CDS in dogs.com

Checklist for dogs

In human medicine
home nursing
hospice societies
physician’s assistants
nurse assistants
social workers
whole network of people to help
respite care
morphine pumps for pain

none of that exists for vets

respite care is starting to exist, vets

if you have an animal in chronic kidney disease, doesn’t eat but does seem to be happy…

14 year old lab who raises her head and wags when you arrive, won’t get up and come to you, won’t eat, you know she has a liver tumor

but other than not eating, she seems OK

sleeping a lot, doesn’t eat

Traditionally vets will use that as a time to look at euthanasia

If you don’t, dog will become dehydrated, probably in some degree of pain
Might start vomiting from dehydration

Humans you can give ice chips, anti-nausea drugs, he;p you as you die

Vets can now come to the house and give patches for anti-nausea, or patches, help you and your dog transition to death at home or keep going on longer until you feel it’s time for both you and your dog

traditional vet medicine is stuck

not eating or Urinating in bed is often a stop pint

There might be welfare issue if they’re in pain

Going from pint a to point b, navigating less directly

Palliative care not better in a different country

Not in north america for sure

end of life discussions in a component of primary

Email for bio

orthopedic component

morbidity is what problems strike

osteoarthritis

degenerative joint disease

So much more to do now, outcomes are so much

integrative medicine, carts for dogs, talk to jamie peyton

Vet students ready to
Ryan Morey
did a big push to get bereavement services reestablished
with a part time social worker

contact ryan morey
or cheryl cobs at school of vet med development office

========
During office visit on Thursday, Sept. 11
Dr. Justin Bonetto, fourth year/senior student

Heidi Timberlake, Clyde’s owner, a 14-year-old golden retriever mix coming for an abdominal ultrasound.

A quick check up before he goes.

Timberlake reports to Bonetto, “He’s been really good — hasn’t been panting as much.”

Dr. Bonetto says it’s probably the tramadol that Clyde is now taking for pain.

Clyde’s liver numbers were high.

Timberlake said Clyde’s problems started when she and husband, Kris, noticed a “hitch in his giddyup.” Although it was slight at first, they put him on an anti-inflammatory medicine to see if it could be corrected.

Before that anti-inflammatory was prescribed, though, a blood panel was done on Clyde which showed he had elevated liver values. When Clyde was in a few months later for a teeth-cleaning, blood work before that procedure showed the liver numbers had doubled.

Hence the ultrasound appointment.

Other symptoms the Timberlakes have seen include Clyde panting at night, limping more and deciding not to bound up the stairs to be with the family. He will just wait at the bottom for someone to come back down.

“It’s taken me a while to accept his limitations,” Heidi said. “He’s a Tahoe dog,” and she has had him as a hiking companion for years (they got him when he was about a year and a half). Now that Clyde just stops walking after a short hike — previously Heidi couldn’t keep up with him — she has had to adjust her expectations.

Heidi assumed Clyde had arthritis, but once the blood tests showed another issue, they needed to look further. Heidi said they are willing to figure out what the problem is and what the vets recommend, but they are not willing to be aggressive in treatment if something serious is discovered.

Something that has definitely influenced her willingness to subject Clyde to aggressive treatment has been her mother-in-law’s death from colon cancer in March. Chemotherapy was very hard on her — “it made her miserable” — so Heidi readily dismisses any notion of “awful treatments.”

She points to Clyde’s advanced age, 14, which is quite old for the big breed he is (a golden retriever crossed with something else sizable).

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Auto Draft

By
September 12, 2014 |

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Mondavi Center hosts all-star lineup of classical, jazz, dance and more

By
October 01, 2014 |

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

It’s doubtless you’ve seen the “big beige box” while cruising past the UC Davis campus on the freeway — the Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, often referred to as “the Mondavi Center.”

But have you been inside? Jackson Hall — with 1,600 to 1,800 seats (depending on configuration) — is a wonderful setting for classical concerts. Musicians like Itzhak Perlman and Yo-Yo Ma love the hall’s sound, and return again and again.

Smaller concerts take place in the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, which can be configured for anywhere from 125 seats around cabaret-style round tables for jazz events, to roughly 250 seats, for the popular concert series by the Alexander String Quartet.

The Mondavi Center also hosts prominent dance companies, international performers known for world music, family-oriented shows, theatrical plays, popular speakers (including NPR personalities), charming “oddball” acts (like the Ukelele Orchestra of Great Britain) and more.

Here’s a thumnail listing of the upcoming Mondavi season:

Sept. 18: Caetano Veloso, Brazilian guitarist

Sept. 19: Ellis Marsalis, Jr. and Delfeayo Marsalis, jazz

Oct. 4:    Nick Offerman, comedy

Oct. 10: Rising Stars of Opera with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra

Oct. 12: Ray LaMontagne, folks/roots rock

Oct. 8-11: Cyrille Aimée, jazz

Oct. 15-18: The Hot Sardines, jazz

Oct. 16: Experience Hendrix, with Zakk Wylde, Jonny Lang, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Eric Johnson

Oct. 18-19: Mummenschanz, dance theater

Oct. 24: Akram Khan Company, dance theater

Oct. 25: San Francisco Symphony

Oct. 26: The Very Hungry Caterpillar, children’s show

Nov. 1: Regina Carter, jazz

Nov. 2: Alexander String Quartet

Nov. 5: Jeremy Denk, piano

Nov. 8: Czech Philharmonic Orchestra

Nov. 13: Academy of Ancient Music

Nov. 14: The Gloaming, Celtic music

Nov. 16: David Sedaris, speaker/comedy

Nov. 18: Irvin Mayfield and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra

Dec. 3: Dr. John & The Nite Trippers

Dec. 4: Brad Mehldau Trio, jazz

Dec. 5: Cantus, vocal ensemble

Dec. 7: Mariachi Sol de Mexico

Dec. 10: Mike Birbiglia, speaker/comedy

Dec. 12–13: Lara Downes, piano and Zuill Bailey, cello

Dec. 14: American Bach Soloists

Jan. 11: Alexander String Quartet

Jan. 17: Itzhak Perlman, violin, Rohan De Silva, piano

Jan. 19: Gregory Porter, jazz

Jan. 21: Nada Bakos, speaker

Jan. 24: Wendy Whelan, dance

Jan. 25: Dr. Professor Tomáš Kubínek, theater

Jan. 28: The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain

Jan. 29 – 31: Words and Music Festival consist of performances by UC Davis’ new music group Empyrean Ensemble, San Francisco sound artist Bob Ostertag, So Percussion and UC Davis Symphony Orchestra featuring many new works including festival composer-in-residence Melinda Wagner’s Pulitzer-Prize winning Concerto for Flute, Strings and Percussion.

Feb. 4–7: Billy Childs Quartet, jazz

Feb. 8: Les 7 Doigts de la Main, physical theater

Feb. 10: Temple Grandin, speaker

Feb. 13: Orchestre de la Suisse Romande

Feb. 18: Brian Jagde, tenor

Feb. 21: Ballet BC

Feb. 23: The Servant, film

Feb. 27: Young Artists All-Stars, classical

Feb. 28: Young Artists Competition Finals

March 1: Young Artists Competition Winners Concert

March 4: Intergalactic Nemesis Part 2, theater

March 6: Anonymous 4, vocal

March 10: Hugh Masekela and Vusi Mahlasela

March 13: Curtis Chamber Orchestra

March 13–14: Tanya Tagaq, Inuit performer/film

March 14–15: Julian Sands, theater

March 15: Alexander String Quartet

March 17: Danú, Irish music

March 19–21: EarFilms, sound performance/theatre/film

March 21: London Symphony Orchestra

March 25: Lang Lang, piano

March 25–28: Donny McCaslin Group

March 28: Three Acts, Two Dancers, One Radio Host/Ira Glass

April 2: Max Raabe and Palast Orchester, jazz

April 8: Buddy Guy, blues

April 12: Quixotic, theatre/dance/tech performance

April 16: Arlo Guthrie

April 17: Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra

April 19: Lemony Snicket’s The Composer Is Dead, classical music murder mystery

May 6: Dan Savage, speaker

May 8: Academy of St. Martin in the Fields Chamber Ensemble

May 16–17: Philippe Sly, bass-baritone and John Charles Britton, guitar

Single ticket prices range from $11 to $130 — UC Davis students pay half the regular ticket price. Season subscriptions are available. For more information, go to http://www.mondaviarts.org/ or call (530) 754-2787.

 

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Enterprise staff

Sutter market

By
September 13, 2014 |

Joseph Giottnini of Squashed Olives in Vacaville sells all natural olive oil-based products–extra virgin olive oil and handmade soaps, lotions and chapsticks–at Sutter Davis Hospital Farmers Market, Thursdays, 10 am to 1 pm, year-round at the hospital’s entrance.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Local farm products are the stars at Sutter Davis Hospital Farmers Market on September 18th

Contact: Randii MacNear, executive director, Davis Farmers Market, 530.756.1695 or email: rmacnear@dcn.org

Local food products–produce, honey, eggs, baked goods, extra virgin olive oil and olive oil beauty products–are the stars at Sutter Davis Hospital Farmers Market next Thursday, September 18th from 10 am to 1 pm. The market is located at the hospital’s shade-covered entrance at 2000 Sutter Place with plenty of free parking.

Current market items and producers include: extra virgin olive oil and handmade olive oil-based products from Squashed Olives in Vacaville; grapes, peaches and nectarines from Neufeld Farms in Kingsburg; local eggs and assorted summer produce from Chavez Farms in Esparto; vine-ripened tomatoes, squashes, potatoes, onions, garlic, greens and other produce from Toledo Farms in Lodi; organic honey from Sola Bee Farms; lus whole grain breads, cookies and apple tarts from Upper Crust Bakery in Davis.

The hospital’s Market accepts EBT cards, WIC and Senior coupons. Shoppers with no cash in hand, can also purchase market scrip using debit or credit cards.

Sutter Davis Hospital Farmers Market is now open year-round, rain or shine, and offers plenty of free parking.

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Enterprise staff

MBI patent

By
September 13, 2014 |

Marrone Bio Innovations Receives Patent for Use of
Chromobacterium to Control Corn Rootworm Larvae Infestation

DAVIS, Calif., Sept. 11, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Marrone Bio
Innovations, Inc. (MBI), (Nasdaq:MBII), a leading provider of bio-based
pest management and plant health products for the agriculture, turf and
ornamental and water treatment markets, today announced that it has
received a patent for the use of Chromobacterium, a naturally occurring
bacterium with demonstrated insecticidal and miticidal capabilities.
The patent protects the uses of Chromobacterium formulations,
compositions and compounds to control corn rootworm larvae infestation.

“This patent is an important first step in developing a commercially
viable product to inhibit infestations of corn rootworm larvae across
America and other regions where they continue to spread such as Latin
America and Europe,” said Pam Marrone, MBI’s CEO. “Our research shows
Chromobacterium to be effective at containing the larvae and we are
developing product applications that offer growers an additional
resource to combat this pest.”

One of the most devastating pests in the United States is the corn
rootworm, which does its damage as larvae feeding on the roots of young
corn plants in farmers’ fields. The United States Department of
Agriculture estimates that corn rootworms can cause $1 billion in lost
revenue each year, which includes $800 million in yield loss and $200
million in cost of treatment for corn growers. There are reports from
experts in the field that rootworms in some regions in the Midwest have
developed resistance to biotechnology and chemical solutions.

Alison Stewart, Ph.D., Sr. VP R&D and Chief Technology Officer at
Marrone Bio Innovations added, “This patent award demonstrates our
world class R&D effort to find, protect and develop products that can
work compatibly with traditional pesticides to protect plants in an
effective, efficient, and environmentally responsible way.”

A strain of Chromobacterium is the active ingredient in MBI’s
Grandevo(R) Bioinsecticide, currently selling to growers of fruit,
vegetable, vine and nut crops to control a wide range of chewing and
sucking insects and mites. Grandevo strengthens growers’ integrated
pest and resistance management programs, with no adverse effects on
honeybees and other non-target organisms.

About Marrone Bio Innovations

Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc. (Nasdaq:MBII) is a leading provider of
bio-based pest management and plant health products for the
agriculture, turf and ornamental and water treatment markets. Our
effective and environmentally responsible solutions help customers
operate more sustainably while controlling pests, improving plant
health, and increasing crop yields. We have a proprietary discovery
process, a rapid development platform, and a robust pipeline of pest
management and plant health product candidates. At Marrone Bio
Innovations we are dedicated to pioneering better biopesticides that
support a better tomorrow for users around the globe. For more
information, please visit www.marronebio.com.

The statements contained in this press release that are not purely
historical are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section
21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Forward-looking
statements in this press release include statements regarding our
expectations, beliefs, hopes, goals, intentions, initiatives or
strategies, including statements relating to market size and the
results from the field trials. Because these forward-looking statements
involve risks and uncertainties, there are important factors that could
cause actual results to differ materially from those in the

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Special to The Enterprise

Downtown walking tour 10/11

By
September 13, 2014 |

Davis History Walking Tour

Ever wondered why Davis is here? What it was like in its early days? Why the town name was changed from Davisville ? What happened to the original town hall? Why the Hattie Weber Museum has “Library” written on the front? How Central Park was created? Where the Weber, Brinley, Hamel and other early families lived? Why some families wouldn’t bring their children to town in the late 19th and early 20th centuries?
The answers to these and many more questions on Davis history will be answered on Saturday, October 11, beginning at 2 pm at the Hattie Weber Museum, 445 C Street in Central Park when Gerri Adler begins her walking tour of historic downtown Davis. Adler, a Davis businesswoman and local historian, grew up in Davis in the 1950’s and has many tales to tell about the town before the post WWII growth surge.
The tour winds through downtown Davis while Adler explains what was here, how it came to be and what it was like to grow up in tiny Davis. An illustrated brochure shows historic Davis buildings in context.
Reservations for the tour may be made by contacting Adler at Lasting Impressions (756-2122). The cost is $10; all proceeds benefit the Museum’s fund to restore and repurpose the 1937 WPA building in the park.

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Enterprise staff

Restoring freedom to information in the Freedom of Information Act

By
September 13, 2014 |

Enclosed is an op-ed on FOIA reform by Amy Bennett, Assistant Director of OpenTheGovernment.org. Please let me know if you are interested in using the piece. A photo of the author is available and credit to American Forum is appreciated.

Thanks!
Denice Zeck
American Forum
202-355-8875

——————————

Restoring Freedom to Information in the Freedom of Information Act

By Amy Bennett

Over time federal agencies have flipped the Freedom of Information Act (ACT) on its head. Congress clearly intended the FOIA to be a tool for the public to pry information out of federal agencies. In recent years, however, agencies have blatantly abused opaque language in the law to keep records that might be embarrassing out of the public’s hands forever.

One of the clearest examples of this problem has been playing itself out in court rooms over the last few years as the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has successfully argued against the release of a 30 year old “draft” volume of the official history of the 1961 Bay of Pigs Disaster. There are few records in the federal government that are seen to merit such secrecy. This draft CIA history is afforded stronger protections than the President’s records, or even classified national security information. Members of the public are able to access similar records generated by the White House as early as twelve years after the President leaves office. Even most classified national security information is automatically declassified after 25 years. Yet, the CIA continues to insist that releasing a draft volume of a history of events that occurred more than 50 years ago, and are already generally understood by the public, must be kept secret.

How is this possible? The record can continue to be withheld because it fits under the rubric of the FOIA’s exemption for “inter- and intra-agency records.” While this exemption was originally intended in part in allow agency officials to give candid advice before an agency has made an official decision, agencies have stretched its use to cover practically anything that is not a “final” version of a document. As long as a record meets the technical definition of an “inter- or intra-agency record,” there is nothing the public – or courts—can do to make an agency release it.

Thankfully, Congress has recognized this black hole in the public’s right to know, and has stepped in with a bill that promises to close the loophole and make other changes that would improve the FOIA process. Longtime FOIA champions Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Senator John Cornyn (R-TX) have reached across the aisle to develop and introduce S. 2520, the FOIA Improvement Act. The bill takes the common sense step of requiring agencies to weigh the public interest in the release of an inter- or intra- agency record when considering whether to withhold it, and also puts a time limit of 25 years on the use of the exemption. Far from radically changing how requests are currently processed, this narrowly tailored change to the law would help make sure historical records are available on a timely basis and stem the worst abuses by allowing a court to weigh-in where necessary to make sure records that would show waste, fraud, abuse, or illegality are released.

With trust in government at an all-time low, the public clearly has an appetite for laws that would make it easier to understand what the government is doing and why, and to hold government officials accountable for their actions. The public would also benefit from seeing that Congress can still work in a bipartisan fashion to address issues. Time is running out to make S. 2520 the law during this session of Congress, though.

While the House unanimously passed a bill that included many reforms that are similar to S. 2520 earlier this year, the House bill does not address the problem with inter- and intra-agency records. Once Congress comes back in September, members will have to work across the aisle and across the Capitol Dome to make sure they reach a compromise that can be put on the President’s desk before the session ends on January 3, 2015. This is work Congress can, and must, do to help restore freedom to information in the FOIA.

————————————————–

Bennett is Assistant Director of OpenTheGovernment.org.

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Special to The Enterprise

Proposed nondiscrimination policy for Davis Boy Scout Troop 139

By
September 13, 2014 |

By Torgny Nilsson

As you may know, it has long concerned me that our Troop has not taken any public, or even private, position against the national policy of discrimination that remains to this day in scouting. I think our adult leadership is, by its silence, teaching our scouts that discrimination is either acceptable, or at least nothing to be fought. And I think this goes against the lesson we, and scouting, purport to teach our scouts: to stand up against injustice and to speak up for what they believe to be right, even if the wrong at issue does not impact them personally and even if speaking up puts them at risk.

I have raised this issue with our troop’s leadership repeatedly since Adin and I came to Troop 139. Even before that, in fact. Yet every time I have raised it, our leaders have avoided doing anything, seeming to do what they can to table or delay any action, even a discussion, on this issue.

I finally last April presented our leadership committee with a proposal that we state our objection to the national policy of scouting using the following statement, essentially the same statement already adopted by a fairly large number of troops and even entire districts across the US:

The mission of Troop 139 of the Boy Scouts of America is to provide character development, citizenship training, growth in physical and mental fitness, and leadership opportunities for the young people of the Davis area. We pride ourselves on the diversity of our members and we are committed to providing young people with an educational and stimulating environment in which to learn and grow. Through the Scout Oath and Law, we pledge to respect all people and to defend the rights of others. Bias, intolerance, and unlawful discrimination are unacceptable within the ranks of Troop 139.

My proposal was supported by a memo detailing the discrimination policies of national scouting, the Girl Scouts (which does not discriminate), Rotary (our chartering organization which also does not discriminate), and the Boy Scout troops and districts across the nation that have adopted non-discrimination language without any retaliation from nationals.

Though approximately 140 days have passed since I presented my proposal and supporting memo, our leadership appears to have taken no action on this issue, As the majority of our leadership committee appeared to me to be supportive of a non-discrimination statement, I have the disappointing sense that this proposal is being blocked by a very few individuals in our top leadership.

I have the sense that you share my disgust of discriminatory policies and am thus sending you this in the hope that you will help me get this to a vote of our members, preferably the scouts as we keep telling them that this is a boy-led organization, but at the very least a vote of the parents. Even if you disagree with my position on discrimination, I hope you will still support putting this proposal to a discussion and a vote.

I am having a crisis of conscience, so to speak, in participating in, and in allowing my son to participate in a group that appears to be supportive of discrimination. I’ve lost count of the number of families who have told me that they have avoided scouting in Davis because none of our troops have spoken up against discrimination and give the impression that they agree with the national policy. And I’ve seen that many of our scouts, and many of their parents, are also uncomfortable with our Troop’s silence.

If you feel strongly enough about this issue to do so, I urge you to join me in calling on our Troop’s committee (headed by Rich Bailey, I don’t know the other voting members on the committee, though Rod is a non-voting member) to put this issue up for a vote, and to do so now without more delay. And I urge you to speak with the other parents in our group and to urge them to do the same. And please speak with Rod (rodnishikawa@gmail.com) and Rich (rbailey2@pacbell.net) urging them to act. I believe our Troop’s inaction and silence has gone on long enough.

My goal is not to challenge nationals. Or even the district. I just wish to set a better, more honorable and just, example of what scouting can be here in Davis, or at least in our troop. Scouting is an amazing program; I got more out of scouting as a child than I can possibly relate in one email. Oddly, some of the things scouting taught me are to fight for what is just and honorable and not to discriminate. Those are things I’d like our scouts to take with them from scouting as well, in addition to the camping and leadership skills.

Best regards and thanks for your time,

Torgny Nilsson

P.S. In case you are interested, I’ve attached the memo I presented to our committee.

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September 12, 2014 |

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September 12, 2014 |

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September 11, 2014 |

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Wendy Weitzel

Wendy Weitzel

Wendy Weitzel is a longtime journalist and Davis resident. She is a former managing editor of The Davis Enterprise, working there from 1998-2008. She has written her Comings & Goings business column since 2001. Today, she does freelance writing, editing, marketing and design.

Snapshot: Forget the basement, bargains are in the barn

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

By
October 02, 2014 |

So you’ve searched every place in town and just can’t seem to find that right chair, cabinet, printer or microscope.
Well head out of town to UC Davis and check out the Bargain Barn, on the south side of LaRue Road between Garrod Drive and Putah Creek Lodge. The store is open from 4 to 7 p.m. the first Thursday of the month.
The Bargain Barn features previously owned items. It has sold everything from VCRs to fire engines.
Individuals may shop online at bargainbarn.ucdavis.edu/4sale/, in the store or at departments.
For more information, call 530-752-2145.

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Enterprise staff

Davis Media Access brings community TV, radio

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

By
September 28, 2014 |

By Autumn Labbe-Renault

Special to The Enterprise

Every week at Davis Media Access is different. As I write, we’re expecting a visit from singer-songwriter Colin Gilmore. Gilmore grew up in Lubbock, Texas, spending many nights as a child in nightclubs like Stubbs, where he witnessed songwriters like Joe Ely, Terry Allen, and his own father, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, bring the stage to life.
Gilmore’s performance is part of “Live in the Loam” at KDRT 95.7 FM, a grassroots community radio station and a project of DMA.

Launched this August, Live in the Loam is a series of “pop-up” performances scheduled as notable performers pass through town or play nearby. Often scheduled on short notice, Live in the Loam is an evolving gift to the community from the dedicated volunteer programmers at KDRT. For the complete archive so far, please visit http://bit.ly/1rYvxTK.

Another Live in the Loam performance is Hawaii’s Masters of the Slack Key Guitar, recorded with KDRT programmer Beth Post on Friday, Sept. 12. These three masters — George Kahumoku, Jr. (Uncle George), Led Ka’apana and Uncle Richard Ho’opi’i— featured regularly at the renowned “Slack Key Show” on Maui, bring Hawaii’s unique folk styles, with origins in the early 19th-century Hawaiian paniolo (cowboy) culture, to 21st-century stages. These men are truly legends of Hawaiian music and culture, and it was an honor to have them grace our media center. Post’s show, Ne Mele O Hawai’i, airs live Wednesdays from 3-4 p.m.

———

DMA recently purchased three Canon XA-25 cameras.  These “camcorder” type cameras are meant to replace the aging GL-2 and Canon Vixia cameras in our field checkout inventory, although all cameras will still be available.  Workshops in camera usage are offered to existing producers. If you’d like to get access to DMA’s equipment and services, or just learn more, you’ll need to attend a general orientation — http://davismedia.org/content/get-involved

———

Fall 2014 internships are now available at Davis Media Access; available to Davis Joint Unified School District students, DMA’s internship provides hands-on experience and exposure to many aspects of community television production.  The internship focuses on coverage of DJSUD sporting and performing arts events, as a component of DMA’s partnership with DJUSD Educational Access Television Channel 17. Please visit http://davismedia.org/content/fall-2014-internships-now-available-davis-media-access for more information.

About Davis Media Access:
DMA is the non-profit, community media center serving Davis, CA and surrounding areas. Our mission is to enrich and strengthen the community by providing alternatives to commercial media for local voices, opinions and creative endeavors.
DMA maintains and operates Davis’ public access television station DCTV Channel 15. Through a partnership with the City of Davis, DMA provides the public with access to video and television equipment, training and unique programming.
Through a partnership with DJUSD, DMA operates Educational Access Channel 17. This channel provides programming such a DHS football games and other sports, school music programming, and all DJUSD graduation ceremonies.
DMA owns and operates KDRT-LP, 95.7 FM low-power community radio for Davis and beyond.
We round out our offerings with digital equipment and social media, topical workshops, local programming archives, participation in open-source projects, low-power FM radio advocacy, youth media projects, local studio productions, event coverage, and advocacy and information for broader media issues. DMA is committed to strengthening localism through media and is proud to support platforms for free, local expression.
— Autumn Labbe-Renault is executive director for Davis Media Access, an organization providing access to, and advocacy for, local media. She writes this column monthly. Find out more about DMA at http://davismedia.org, like the organization on Facebook, or follow her tweets @dmafeed.

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Autumn Labbe-Renault

Snapshot: Take a walk along the UCD Arboretum

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

ArboretumA2W

By
October 01, 2014 |

The UC Davis Arboretum is a living museum with more than 4,000 kinds of trees, plants and shrubs. Established in 1936, the Arboretum stretches along the old north channel of Putah Creek, covering about 100 acres. Students and teachers use the plant collections for research and study.

Visitors come to attend classes, gather ideas for their own gardens and enjoy guided tours. The plants in the Arboretum are arranged in a series of gardens that represent different geographic areas, plant groups, horticultural themes or historical periods.

Arboretum paths are popular with walkers, joggers and bicyclists. The main path is a 3.5-mile loop. The lawns at the west end near Peter J. Shields Grove are perfect for informal games and picnics. Picnic tables are located behind Putah Creek Lodge and in the Redwood Grove.

Gardens include: the Mary Wattis Brown Garden of California Native Plants; the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden of perennials and small shrubs; the Carolee Shields White Flower Garden; Peter J. Shields Oak Grove including conifers and acacias; the Mediterranean Section; the Weier Redwood Grove with North Coast Area and California Foothill Section; and the Desert Section.

* Location: Along the banks of Putah Creek, Davis
* More information: 530-752-4880; http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu

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Enterprise staff

Auto Draft

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September 11, 2014 |

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September 11, 2014 |

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September 11, 2014 |

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Snapshot: Inspect insects at Bohart Museum

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

ArboretumA2W

BohartW

By
October 01, 2014 |

The R.M. Bohart Museum of Entomology, founded in 1946 at UC Davis, is dedicated to teaching, research and service. It has the seventh largest insect collection in North America, totaling more than 7 million specimens. The museum also is home of the California Insect Survey, a storehouse of the insect bio-diversity of California’s deserts, mountains, coast and Central Valley. The public is welcome to the museum/lab for no charge. Hours are 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The museum is closed Fridays and all major holidays. Visit 1124 Academic Surge, UCD; 530-752-0493; http://bohart.ucdavis.edu.

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Enterprise staff

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September 11, 2014 |

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September 11, 2014 |

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September 11, 2014 |

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Kia goes upmarket in a big way

By
From page A16 | September 12, 2014 |

The Associated Press

The 2015 K900, the new flagship at Kia, is an attractive, large, luxury sedan with a quiet, comfortable ride, a boatload of standard features and a value price compared with luxury-brand competitors.

Starting manufacturer’s suggested retail price, including destination charge, of $60,400 makes the sizable K900 Kia’s most expensive model by far.

But the story is what these dollars buy.

2015 Kia K900

Base price: $59,500 with V-8

Price as tested: $66,400

Type: Front-engine, rear-wheel drive, five-passenger, large luxury sedan

Engine: 5-liter, double overhead cam, Tau direct injection V-8

Mileage: 15 mpg (city), 23 mpg (highway)

Length: 200.6 inches

Wheelbase: 119.9 inches

Curb weight: 4,643 pounds

Built at: South Korea

Options: VIP package (includes advanced smart cruise control, power door latches, power reclining and ventilated rear seats, power front-seat head restraints, rear seat lumbar support, surround view monitor, head-up display, 12.3-inch instrument cluster) $6,000.

Destination charge: $900

 

Standard features on the lone K900 model that’s now on sale in the include a 420-horsepower V-8 that’s more powerful than the V-8 in the Lexus LS 460.

There’s also a modern, eight-speed automatic transmission, three drive modes, 19-inch wheels, soft, Nappa leather seat trim, three-zone, automatic climate control, navigation system and a 900-watt Lexicon Logic 7 surround sound audio with 17 speakers.

That’s not all. There are standard front and rear cameras, front and rear parking sensors, panorama sunroof, genuine wood interior accents, leather-wrapped dashboard and door panels and power opening and closing trunk.

Plus, among other things, the K900 has standard heated and ventilated front seats and heated rear seats, heated steering wheel, power rear window sunshade, rain-sensing wipers, light-emitting diode (LED) headlights and fog lights, lane departure warning system, blind spot detection system, rear cross traffic alert and eight air bags.

And, the K900 comes with three years/37,500 miles of free, scheduled maintenance as well as Kia’s industry-leading warranty coverage good for 10 years/100,000 miles on the powertrain and five years/60,000 miles limited vehicle coverage.

As hard as it may be to believe, Kia’s K900 is a nearly 17-foot-long, rear-wheel drive four door meant to compete with the big, rear-drive sedans from Lexus, Mercedes and Audi.

Savvy shoppers who aren’t wedded to a Lexus badge or Mercedes star on their car can quickly calculate how much money they can save — and how many amenities they get — by opting for the K900 instead of the usual luxury cars.

For example, the 2014 Lexus LS 460 with 368-horsepower V-8 has a starting retail price of $73,065. But heated and cooled front seats, power opening and close trunk, LED headlights, heated steering wheel, blind spot monitor and 19-inch wheels are options.

Meantime, the 2014 Mercedes-Benz S550 with 449-horsepower, bi-turbo V-8 has a starting retail price of $95,325, and the 2014 Audi A8 with 333-horsepower, supercharged six cylinder starts at $77,400.

Of course, because the K900 is new this calendar year, there are no reliability ratings yet.

But Lexus has racked up years of top reliability ratings for its flagship LS sedan. And there are a few features, such as all-wheel drive and rear-seat entertainment, that aren’t offered in the K900.

Then again, the K900 can include nice, reclining rear seats — a feature not always found on other luxury sedans sold in the States.

Truth is, the K900, sold under other names, has been a limousine-like car in Kia’s native and in other countries for a few years.

Owned by Hyundai, Kia based the K900 on the platform of the previous-generation Hyundai Genesis rear-drive sedan and uses the same engine and transmission that’s in Hyundai’s flagship sedan, the 2015 Equus. The Equus has a starting MSRP, including destination charge, of $62,450.

But the Equus suspension, amenities and some materials are different from that in the K900. As an example, the Equus has an air suspension, while the K900 does not.

Kia officials are conservative in their expectations for the K900. In part, this is because not all Kia dealers have the car to sell.

So far in calendar 2014, the company reports 1,050 sales. This accounts for less than 1 percent of Kia’s vehicle sales.

The K900 has a sleek side profile that belies the car’s length. Jazzy wheels accented the test car nicely, and the front had a similarity to Kia’s second-priciest car, the Cadenza sedan. About the only criticism is for the LED headlights that have an odd, four-cube light arrangement inside their housings.

Inside, the K900 feels spacious, particularly for its 45.9 inches of front seat legroom. In the back seat, legroom is measured at 38.2 inches, which is less than the 38.8 inches in the Equus and the 43 inches in the rear seat of the S550. But the K900′s 40.2 inches of front-seat headroom is more than that in the A8.

The leather seat covering in the test K900 was soft to the touch, but the mashup of seams on the seats didn’t convey the same richness that an Audi seat has.

The K900 large-sized display screen near the top of the dashboard was nicely integrated, however, and didn’t look like an afterthought, the way these display screens do in some other luxury cars.

Redundant controls for ventilation and audio in the center of the dashboard ensured that even drivers unfamiliar with the K900 menu-controlled display screen could quickly operate the radio and air conditioning.

The 5-liter, double overhead cam V-8 has a larger displacement than the Lexus LS and Mercedes S-Class V-8s and delivered smooth power.

In leisurely driving, power came on steadily. For strong acceleration, a driver needed to jab the gas pedal to get the transmission to downshift a gear or two.

Torque peaks at 376 foot-pounds at 5,000 rpm, which is more than the 367 foot-pounds of the LS 260.

The K900′s ride is on the soft side, so the car was a great highway cruiser, cushioning most road bumps.

The test car averaged 20 miles per gallon in combined city/highway travel, much of it in Eco mode.

The large, 19.8-gallon fuel tank cost just over $75 to fill at today’s prices for premium gasoline.

Kia plans to add a V-6-powered K900 in the 2015 model year.

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Hashtag info 1

By
September 12, 2014 |

1) Q: word assoc Davis: “Parks”; Margaret Womble, Homemaker, Davis resident 32 years
2) Q: freshman need: “Bicycle”; James Lehman, Chef, Davis
3) Q: How many bikes: “9″; Ava Giovannettone, age 7; John Giovannettone, age 4; Davis
4) Q: freshman need: “Jump rope”; Semaj Harris, age 7, Davis
5) Q: word assoc Davis: “Woodland”; Charlene Brigham, Singer, Woodland
6) Q: word assoc Davis: “Farmers Market”; Val Garcia, Dad, Woodland
7) Q: fav place to take people: “Co-Op”; Koyuki Nakano; Studies at UCD, Davis
8) Q: word assoc Davis: “Home”; Katie Kelsch, Public Health Nurse, Davis
9) Q: freshman needs: “Shower Caddy”; Thao Nguyen, UCD Student, Davis
10) Q: freshman needs: “Flip Flops”; Amit Chu, Accountant, Davis
11) Q: word assoc Davis: “Bike”; Marisol Yandel, Student, Davis
12) Q: freshman needs: “eye mask”; Louise Head, Electrical Sales Associate, Davis
13) Q: word assoc Davis: “Cows”; Mandy Li, UCD 5th year Biochem, Davis
14) Q: Where you’d take a visitor: “Davis Farmers Market”; Spencer Tumbale, UCD Biomedical Eng, 4th year, Davis
15) Q: word assoc Davis: “fruit”; Xinyun Li (male); Huazhen Liu (female); Qian Xun Li (daughter); Xinyun is a visiting scholar to UCD, Davis
16) Q: word assoc Davis: “Hippies”; Maribel Martinez, Document Control Specialist, Norcal Beverage & Eric M., Norwich University, Masters, English; Camden, 18 mos., all of Davis

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September 11, 2014 |

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September 10, 2014 |

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September 10, 2014 |

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Activities photo for Welcome

By
September 11, 2014 |

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

ArboretumA2W

BohartW

ClockTowerW

The “Clepsydra” clock and water feature on the E Street Plaza is both a fun piece of public art and a frequent gathering place. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise file photo

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Enterprise photojournalists

Snapshot: Kick garbage to the curb

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

ArboretumA2W

BohartW

ClockTowerW

The “Clepsydra” clock and water feature on the E Street Plaza is both a fun piece of public art and a frequent gathering place. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise file photo

TrashCansW

By
September 30, 2014 |

No matter how much you compost and reuse, you may still have some items that fall into the garbage and recycling category.
The city of Davis allows for three different sized garbage carts: 35, 65 or 95 gallons. There also are carts for paper and container recycling. They are supplied by Davis Waste Removal, 530-756-4646, which also picks up the carts once a week.
DWR’s website, http://www.dwrco.com/, contains rules and regulations to insure proper pick up.
Billing questions go to the city at 530-757-5651.

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Enterprise staff

Snapshot: Sounds like a party

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

ArboretumA2W

BohartW

ClockTowerW

The “Clepsydra” clock and water feature on the E Street Plaza is both a fun piece of public art and a frequent gathering place. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise file photo

TrashCansW

LiveMusicW

By
September 30, 2014 |

In addition to public art work, Davis is overflowing with live music year round.
There are major events like the Davis Music Festival, sponsored by Music Only Makes Sense, along with smaller performances put on by the Davis Live Music Collective, Thursday Live!, Village Homes Productions and TimnaTal.
In addition, bands can be found at home concerts, Picnic in the Park, E Street Plaza, Sophia’s Thai Kitchen, The Odd Fellows Hall, Monticello Seasonal Cuisine and more.
The musical stylings are as varied as the venues.

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Enterprise staff

Snapshot: Plenty of places to park it

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

ArboretumA2W

BohartW

ClockTowerW

The “Clepsydra” clock and water feature on the E Street Plaza is both a fun piece of public art and a frequent gathering place. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise file photo

TrashCansW

LiveMusicW

park new1W

By
September 30, 2014 |

The city of Davis Parks and Community Services Department maintains a total of 48 acres of parks, which include play areas, sport facilities, picnic areas and open areas. Bike paths connect parks and greenbelts to each other, great for jogging, biking or walking.
A few notable parks include:
* Rainbow City: The park includes a huge play structure including a pirate ship, a giant sand box, swings, slides, and other fun climbing structures.
* Central Park: The park features two playgrounds — including a newly renovated all-access structure — the pedal-powered Flying Carousel of the Delta Breeze, several gardens, a horseshoe pit and plenty of shady grass.
* Mace Ranch Community Park: This 23-acre area has baseball fields, a soccer field and a burrowing owl habitat.
* Toad Hollow Dog Park: Dogs are thrilled to have their own place to play in Davis, at 1919 Second St.
For a complete listing of facilities, parks and services, visit Davis City Hall, 23 Russell Blvd., call 530-757-5626, or check the city’s website at http://archive.cityofdavis.org/pgs/.

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Enterprise staff

Snapshot: A night out with the neighbors

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

ArboretumA2W

BohartW

ClockTowerW

The “Clepsydra” clock and water feature on the E Street Plaza is both a fun piece of public art and a frequent gathering place. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise file photo

TrashCansW

LiveMusicW

park new1W

NeighborsNightOutW

By
September 30, 2014 |

Are you new to Davis, have new neighbors or just looking for an excuse to party? Then the ninth annual Davis Neighbors’ Night Out on Sunday, Oct. 12, is just what you’ve been waiting for.
The community celebration is a get-to-know-you event that builds a sense of connection and safety among residents.
Neighborhoods are encouraged to have parties between noon and 7 p.m, noting it will start getting dark at about 6 p.m. Keys to a successful party include inviting everyone in the neighborhood, with a personal invitation to new neighbors. Blocks should pick a Party Sponsor, who can pick up a party packet from the Davis Police Department. For assistance with invitations or have questions, please contact: Stacey Winton, 757-5661, swinton@cityofdavis.org; Kellie Vitaich, Police Department, 747-5400, kvitaich@cityofdavis.org; Gary Sandy, 754-2187, gasandy@ucdavis.edu

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Enterprise staff

Snapshot: Dive into Davis fun

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

ArboretumA2W

BohartW

ClockTowerW

The “Clepsydra” clock and water feature on the E Street Plaza is both a fun piece of public art and a frequent gathering place. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise file photo

TrashCansW

LiveMusicW

park new1W

NeighborsNightOutW

PoolW

By
September 30, 2014 |

Bust out the sunscreen and floppy hat when the city pools are in full swing for the summer. Both Arroyo and Manor pools have lap swimming, diving, water slides and play areas.

Cool off with “Family Fun Nights” — on Mondays and Wednesdays at Manor Pool, and on Tuesdays and Thursdays at Arroyo Pool — from 7:15 to 9 p.m. when aquatics staff will host family events and play music and trivia.

UC Davis Recreation Pool’s unique configuration offers a wide variety of fun water activities. With lap lanes, a sun warming island, a large shallow area with graduated water depth and the wading pool, there is something for everyone. During the summer the Rec Pool offers adult swim lessons, aqua aerobics, junior lifeguarding and youth swim lessons.

* For more information, call 530-752-2695, or on the web at http://campusrecreation.ucdavis.edu/.

* Location: Manor Pool, 1525 Tulip Lane; Arroyo Pool, 2000 Shasta Drive
* More information: 530-757-5626; community-services.cityofdavis.org/aquatics-program

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Enterprise staff

20 years later, remembering the Rwandan Genocide

By
August 16, 2014 |

Twenty years ago one of the world’s most devastating events blazed in Africa, leaving tragedy in its wake. The Rwandan Genocide is infamous for its systematic destruction of the Tutsi people, one of three ethnic groups in Rwanda, by the Hutu people, the majority ethnic group. The genocide killed as many as one million people, including 20 percent of Rwanda’s total population and 70 percent of Tutsi peoples. The 100 days of violence are still vividly remembered today.

Local man Faustin Rusanganwa, whose roots draw him back to Rwanda, mourns the genocide as the 20th anniversary passed this year. Rusanganwa was born in Kigali, Rwanda in 1954. With the exception of his brother, Rusanganwa’s entire family resided in Rwanda until the genocide – his sister and her children still live there today.

Rusanganwa was born a Tutsi. Memories of his childhood are sprinkled with discrimination and violence based on his ethnicity.

“If you were Tutsi it was very difficult to get an education,” Rusanganwa said. He recalled times when teachers would ask all of the Tutsi children to raise their hands so they knew who they did not have to educate as thoroughly.

“I was branded,” he said.

Hutu and Tutsi people lived and ate together as neighbors, but violence was still prevalent, recalled Rusanganwa. One night when Rusanganwa was a child, a group of youth slashed open the roof of his family’s home. He and his siblings laughed when they awoke to see stars overhead. “We never realized what it was when we were kids,” he said, “but I will never forget that.”

Years before the Rwandan genocide, “hit-and-run” robberies and vandalism where commonplace to the Tutsi people.

In 1973, a coup d’etat placed Juvenal Habyarimana into power in Rwanda. The onslaught of further civil unrest pushed Rusanganwa and his brother to leave the country. After years of trying to get on his feet in bordering country Burundi, Rusanganwa enrolled in Duke University program and made his way to the United States in 1985. After two years in North Carolina, Rusanganwa moved to Davis to be closer to the multicultural community he discovered in California.

On April 6th, 1994, Habyarimana’s airplane was shot down. This occurred amidst the Rwandan Civil War which began in 1990. The civil war was largely a conflict between Hutu and Tutsi groups. Though the facts still remain blurred to this day, Habyarimana’s Hutu-led government traced the attack on the Habyarimana’s plane to Tutsi groups, instigating the Rwandan genocide.

“As soon as we saw the president’s plane crash, we said ‘That’s it,’” said Rusanganwa. Watching the events unfold from his American television was a nightmare. “You see these things happen in another country on the news all the time, very rarely is it your own country,” he said.

As he stood by watching his television 9,000 miles away, all Rusanganwa could do was hope that his family was still alive.

Through these times, Rusanganwa mentioned that his community gave him consistent support, never forgetting to ask him how he and his family were doing.

The genocide ended on July 15 when anti-Hutu forces took the capital. Rusanganwa returned to Rwanda in December to search for his family. He brought with him a sliver of hope that his family survived. What he found, however, was what Rusanganwa described as a “warzone” – streets littered with debris, broken windows, shoeless civilians, and overflowing orphanages. “When I went back my house was gone,” he said, “everything was gone … they took everything.”

After speaking with his family’s neighbors, Rusanganwa discovered that only his sister was still alive. She had run away to a neighboring country with her children. After endless searching and speaking with locals, “Miraculously, I found my sister,” said Rusanganwa. “Finding her was a very powerful moment.”

Today, Rwanda has recovered from the genocide. Adoption programs that placed many of the orphans left behind from the genocide into any homes that had space, Rusanganwa said.

Since the genocide, the region has continued to go through periodic war and unrest. Political changes such as putting an end to discriminatory policies against Tutsi people have helped the country to recover from the horrors of the genocide, according to Rusanganwa. After his visit in 2010, he observed that Rwanda was more developed that he had ever seen it before.

What is left behind, however, are the tragic memories and relatives lost. “My kids will never meet grandma, or their uncle,” said Rusanganwa, somberly.

Remembering the Rwandan genocide should be “educational,” commented Rusanganwa. “We see it in Israel and Sudan today. All of these are the same,” Rusanganwa said. “No one wins a war.”

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Felicia Alvarez

Snapshot: Check out local scene at ArtAbout

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

ArboretumA2W

BohartW

ClockTowerW

The “Clepsydra” clock and water feature on the E Street Plaza is both a fun piece of public art and a frequent gathering place. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise file photo

TrashCansW

LiveMusicW

park new1W

NeighborsNightOutW

PoolW

art aboutW

By
September 30, 2014 |

Second Friday ArtAbout, a monthly self-guided artwalk, allows for exploration of art installations at venues around Davis. Community members, visitors, art lovers, students, and families alike are welcome to explore downtown Davis and its arts and entertainment community. This free event offers art, activities, live music, complimentary wine and refreshments, and opportunities to converse with featured artists.

Discover local and regional talent, new artistic styles, and unique creations while experiencing downtown.

For more information about Davis Downtown and ArtAbout and to find a copy of the Second Friday ArtAbout Guide, visit DavisDowntown.com or email ArtAbout@DavisDowntown.com.

 

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Enterprise staff

Snapshot: The Varsity Theater: See a new classic at an old one

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

ArboretumA2W

BohartW

ClockTowerW

The “Clepsydra” clock and water feature on the E Street Plaza is both a fun piece of public art and a frequent gathering place. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise file photo

TrashCansW

LiveMusicW

park new1W

NeighborsNightOutW

PoolW

art aboutW

VarsityW

By
September 30, 2014 |

There have been numerous variations of the Varsity Theater, 616 Second St. in Davis, and its classic architecture styling and neon marquee make it easy to find downtown. The theater shows independent films. A second screen in a 97-seat stadium auditorium was added to the Varsity on Feb. 5, 2010.
For recorded showtimes that are updated every Thursday evening, call 530-758-5284. To read the complete history, visit http://www.davisvarsity.net/history/

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Enterprise staff

Snapshot: The art of the matter

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

ArboretumA2W

BohartW

ClockTowerW

The “Clepsydra” clock and water feature on the E Street Plaza is both a fun piece of public art and a frequent gathering place. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise file photo

TrashCansW

LiveMusicW

park new1W

NeighborsNightOutW

PoolW

art aboutW

VarsityW

ArtW

By
September 28, 2014 |

Meandering through downtown Davis, you may run across a life-size giraffe; or while strolling along a bike path, you may find bigger-than-life dominoes.

Davis likes to liven up its landscapes and neighborhoods is through public art.

A stroll through downtown might take you past “The Joggers” at Third and F streets, “Solar Intersections” at the train depot, “Clepsydra” clock and water feature on the E Street Plaza, the pieces in Central Park, or one of a couple of murals on downtown buildings.

In North Davis, a walk or bike ride would take you by several pieces on greenbelts — curious dogs or tumbling dominoes. In West Davis, a flying saucer crash-landed not long ago. At The Marketplace shopping center, ceramic pigs dance.

In South Davis, artist Troy Corliss built a rammed-earth wall titled “Alluvium” that varies in height and meanders in Walnut Park. Artist David Middlebrook’s “Ancient Shadows” adorn the Playfields Park bicycle tunnel.

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Enterprise staff

Snapshot: Science is fun at Explorit

By
September 28, 2014 |

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

ArboretumA2W

BohartW

ClockTowerW

The “Clepsydra” clock and water feature on the E Street Plaza is both a fun piece of public art and a frequent gathering place. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise file photo

TrashCansW

LiveMusicW

park new1W

NeighborsNightOutW

PoolW

art aboutW

VarsityW

ArtW

Explorit2W

Build a tornado in a bottle or learn how to launch a rocket.

The Explorit Science Center allows people of all ages to become active explorers by touching, testing, experimenting and questioning through unique hands-on experiences.

You can play a pivotal part in helping people explore science. Share any level of time, skills, energy or a willingness to learn by volunteering at Explorit Science Center.

A science background is not necessary; training is provided.

Explorit is at 3141 5th Street. For more information, call 530-756-0191 or visit www.explorit.org

Comments

comments

Enterprise staff

Snapshot: Check out this museum

GetFit1w

Instructor Thomas Gojkovich of Get Fit Davis leads an interval-training class on Sept. 17. Interval training classes are becoming popular at local fitness clubs since they work out the entire body. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

RealEstate1W

Realtor Julie Partain hands out a flyer to neighbors Yadong Liu and his daughter Riley Liu during a recent open house. The housing market is picking up in Davis as people decide now is a good time to buy. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Causeway BikeW

Biking along the causeway offers beautiful views any time of day, and, at dusk, possibly even a glimpse of the Mexican freetail bat colony leaving from under the causeway for their evening feeding. Enterprise file photo

community gardenW

BobDunningPicksW

noise ordinanceW

PicnicDayW

NguyenW

Thao Nguyen, UCD student, Davis

StoimerW

Kiril Stoimer, third-year biology studentat UCD, Davis

KelschW

Katie Kelsch, public health nurse, Davis

RobWhiteInnovateDavisW

17tartsW

TreePlanting54W

Pioneer Elementary School students plant some trees at their campus in May, with help from Tree Davis, a local tree foundation. It focuses on community education and outreach and coordinates several tree-planting projects each year. Fred Gladdis/Enterprise file photo

trainstationW

The train station in Davis is along the Capitol Corridor between San Jose and Roseville. Enterprise file photo

Pena Mural with artist Mark Rivera (1)

Artist Mark Rivera shows off his newly completed Peña family ceramic mural at Parkview Place, Fourth and D streets. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

Bike MuseumW

BarnyardW

YoloBasinW

Bike fixit2W

Zipcar01W

Steve and Jan Isaacson have been running Davis Musical Theatre Company since the couple founded the community theater company in 1984. Many local children and adults have experienced live theater through DMTC, as actors, volunteers and audience members.
Fred Gladdis/Enterprise photo

Aggie football is in full swing at UC Davis.
Enterprise file photo

MondaviSkedW

Racheal Prince, and the rest of the dancers from Ballet BC, are part of the 2014-15 lineup at the Mondavi Center. Michael Slobodian/Courtesy photo

bargain barnW

Bill Buchanan, Jim Buchanan and Don Shor in March have a DJ meeting at KDRT radio in Davis, part of Davis Media Access.
Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise file photo

ArboretumA2W

BohartW

ClockTowerW

The “Clepsydra” clock and water feature on the E Street Plaza is both a fun piece of public art and a frequent gathering place. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise file photo

TrashCansW

LiveMusicW

park new1W

NeighborsNightOutW

PoolW

art aboutW

VarsityW

ArtW

Explorit2W

HattieWeber3W

By
September 28, 2014 |

What better way to celebrate a historical library building than to turn it into a museum.

That’s exactly what the city of Davis did with the first branch of the Yolo County Free Library. The 1911 building, originally at 117 F St., was moved to its current home at the corner of Fifth and C streets, 445 C St., where it became the Hattie Weber Museum, named after the first paid librarian in Davisville.

The free museum features exhibits on the history of Davis and Yolo County along with hands-on exhibits for kids: ring a bell, use an antique typewriter, play with antique reproduction toys or a piano.

It is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesdays and Saturdays year round. Donations are accepted.