Tuesday, April 21, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

BIKE TAB: Bike Polo

By
May 01, 2015 |

The modded bikes sit at rest on opposite sides of the tennis-court sized playing surface, split three on each side, their riders staring down the center of the court.

A woman dressed in clip-in bike shoes, knee-high shin guards, jean shorts, a purple tank and a florescent blue flat-billed hat walks over to the beer cooler, pulls out a fresh roller hockey ball and places it in the center of the court.

She steps outside and behind the chain-linked fence, the sun beating down on the scorching West Manor park on a hot spring Sunday afternoon. Shaggy’s “It Wasn’t Me” comes on the boom box that seems to exclusively play hits from the 1990s and early 2000s.

The woman raises her voice, “Three, two, one … POLO!”

Immediately one rider from each side cycles at breakneck pace towards the ball while their two teammates flank them.

The two riders going for the ball are given 20 yards to accelerate near full speed and reach their mallets out at the ball, seemingly about to create a disaster of a crash dead center in the playing surface.

But no crash occurs as one rider arrives a fraction of a second before his opponent, controls the ball with his mallet, and deftly maneuvers out of the way of the onrusher and passes to an open teammate.

The controlling team breaks sprint and moves into a series of intricate motions designed to constantly move and create space, like a motion offense in basketball.

After 12 minutes – or rather some amount of time close to 12 minutes, as everyone forgot to set a clock – the six athletes get off their bikes and exit the court, dripping in sweat and surprisingly unscathed despite the fact that each one of them had just sprinted around in a small space with five other bikers at full speed — holding onto the handlebars with one hand and what could be designated as a weapon with the other.

This is bicycle polo, an up-and-coming sport played as a three-on-three version of the “regular” game, only on bikes instead of horses.

In accordance with its quirky nature and self-proclaimed moniker of the “bike capital of the world,” Davis naturally has its own bike polo club, who can be seen playing, drinking and grilling on Sundays at West Manor.

Though bicycling is as popular as ever in the town where the United States Bicycling Hall of Fame resides, the sport of bike polo has yet to fully break through in the way it has in other communities such as San Jose, where the city constructed bike polo-specific courts to foster the community’s deep interest in the sport.

“We’re a growing sport and there are a ton of clubs, but a lot of people still don’t know about bike polo,” says Jennifer Kutzleb, the woman who called the first game and a member of the club. “Davis doesn’t even have (bike polo specific courts) and we’re the bike capital of the world.”

“Sometimes I feel like we’re a weird religious cult because when we see people, we ask, ‘want to play?’ … and they slowly walk away,” Kutzleb says.

Kutzleb began playing 18 months ago after she was introduced to the sport by her husband Abe.

Ever since then, the couple has been completely obsessed with the sport, even making a trip to Spain to visit a former member of the club and play bike polo in another country.

“Our anniversary, we went back to the house, drank champagne and talked bike polo strategy,” Kutzleb said.

Last summer, Kutzleb fundraised to send her team of female polo players named “The Trixies” to Toronto to compete in Ladies Army, the women’s world championship of hardcourt bike polo.
With the tournament in San Francisco this year, Kutzleb won’t need to fundraise to send her team, but the Davis Bicycle Polo Club will still host a tournament in order to fundraise to help with the costs of hosting the tournament.

On May 16 and 17 at West Manor Park, the club will host the Davis 2015 Co-ed Mini-Bench Bike Polo Tournament to raise funds for the cause.

“Hosting a tournament like this is a lot of hard work but also a lot of fun,” Kutzleb says, “It’s a chance for experienced players to practice competitively, as many of us are getting ready for our region’s qualifying tournament, but it’s also a chance to introduce newer players to the sport.”

“We also hope this tournament encourages the Davis community’s awareness and interest in bike polo and that they come cheer on their Davis teams.”

In addition to the fundraising done at the tournament, Sudwerk’s Dock Store will donate a percentage of its proceeds to the tournament for business done on Friday May 15.

Back on the courts, it’s Kutzleb’s turn to play, so she straps into her helmet and gets on her bike. Abe begins the game and pretends to keep time.

Abe began playing the sport four years ago after ordering a bike part online that said it was good for bike polo.

Curious, he looked up videos of the sport and was immediately hooked, quickly gravitating towards the competitive side of the game.

Luckily, he lived about a block away from West Manor and helped set up shop there, starting with chalk drawings for goals before graduating to cones, and then finally actual goals.

As the music switches to the epic “What is Love” by Haddaway, Abe talks about his aspirations to compete in the national championships this year, even going as far to compete with players he knows from Wisconsin and New York to get the best shot possible.

Looking decidedly punk with his lip ring, above-the-knee shorts and tight-fitting shirt with a heart that’s bisected with a polo mallet like an arrow, he fits in perfectly with the diverse crowd.
Through the unique community of bicycle polo, he has been there before, and met most of the top performers in the world.

“I’ve played with most of the top players in the world even though I’m not big time,” he says with a smile. “It’s not like you go to the park to play basketball and get to play with whoever the top star is now.”

The game on the court ends after a club member randomly decides that 10 seconds are left in the game and then takes 30 seconds to count down from 10 while one team nears the other team’s goal.

“I hate everyone around here,” jokes a member as he exits the court. “Bike polo ruined my life.”

The players all convene around the cooler. The hot dogs are finally ready, and the beer is still cold.

It’s Sunday in West Davis, and the polo players are relaxing.

— Reach Evan Ream at [email protected] or follow him on Twitter @EvanReam

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Evan Ream

Evan Ream graduated with a B.A. in journalism from Southern Oregon in Ashland, Ore. He loves soccer more than any person rationally should. "Some people think football is a matter of life and death. I am very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure them it is much more serious than that." - Bill Shankly

BIKE TAB: Bike Lanes/Maynard Skinner

By
May 01, 2015 |

Bicycle lanes — more than 150 miles of which wend through the UC Davis campus and the city of Davis — are synonymous with Davis.

A given in the quality of life of the community, bike routes encourage physical fitness, take automobiles off the street, save energy and play defense in the battle to protect our environment.

But how did the city and UCD become so at one with the bicycling? It’s been a marriage that hundreds of other towns and campuses have looked to for inspiration.

Maynard Skinner — former mayor of Davis who served the City Council in four different decades — recalls the early campaign to make his community the Bicycle Capital of the United States.
Skinner says he was recruited to first run for the council in 1966.

“I didn’t know why they picked me, but we brainstormed and came up with a platform which contained safety issues,” said Skinner, now 87. “The Richards Boulevard undercrossing, child care services, public smoking, bicycle safety…”

It was Emil Mrak — the first chancellor of UCD when it became a full-fledged University of California campus — who got the ball, er, bike rolling.

Mrak loved cycling. He was charged with growing the Davis campus and encouraged students to “bring their bikes to school.” Mrak instructed campus planners to make UCD bike-friendly. He eventually closed the campus to public vehicle traffic.

As bike riders proliferated, their safety when coexisting with vehicles became a concern around town.

Donna and Dale Lott, UCD professor Bob Sommer and Eve and Frank Child were early advocates for following the lead of the Dutch. In Holland, bike lanes were everywhere, and after the Lotts and Childs returned from a sabbatical to Europe, they began a full-court press to make Davis bicycle-friendly.

Their champion was Skinner.

“Although the council turned mostly a deaf ear to the cause, the call for bike lanes grew in the community,” wrote The Davis Enterprise in 2007. “In 1996, with the endorsement of bike-lane advocates, Maynard Skinner and Norm Woodbury were swept into city office.”

Bike lanes soon would become reality.

After the Lotts and Childs served as catalysts, Skinner issued a 1967 ultimatum to colleagues: “We’re going to stay here until midnight if it takes that long to get these bike lanes approved.”

But what would those dynamics be? Seems simple enough: a painted line 6 feet off the curb plus instruction for cyclists and motorists via well-placed signage and street symbols.

Not so fast, remembers Skinner…

“We didn’t know. We were the first in the nation wrestling with the idea. At first we thought ‘Bike lane, parking, traffic flow from the curb out.’ Then we had an idea to divide the bike lanes from parking with (cement buffers).”

Those cement dividers were installed along Sycamore Lane. Other routes — Eighth Street, Anderson Road and B and Third streets among them — were taking shape. Quickly, city engineers saw that the Sycamore design wasn’t working and the concrete blocks were removed.

Eventually — with city engineers Duane Copley. Dave Pelz, Fred Kendall and Art Eichorn reinventing town-and-gown transportation routes — the council’s vision began to take shape.

UCD professor Mel Ramey’s design became a world standard for bike lanes. Former Mayor Ralph Aronson began to push for a Third Street Parade (a main thoroughfare that to this day is a main artery from campus to downtown). City Attorney James Callaway — who drafted state bicycling legislation for traffic signals, taking bikes off sidewalks and making lanes legal — led the statutory charge.

Mark Francis — the cutting-edge UCD faculty member in environmental design — devised the first Davis greenbelt. Caltrans’ first bicycle program director, Rick Blunden, embraced Davis’ lead. Kent Gill, in 1965 the Sierra Club chairman and the only bike-riding City Council member, was lauded by Skinner for his relentless support of the new-look Davis.

In 2017, Davis will mark the 50th anniversary of the city’s first official bike lane — along B Street, right in front of what is now the U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame.

City Public Relations Manager Bob Bowen says dedication of a permanent marker at that corner will be part of many bicycle-related celebrations in 2017.

“We’re all proud of what the legacy has became,” Skinner recently told The Enterprise. “Now, bicycle lanes are established as an element of planning efforts, included in the General Plan and other development review processes.”

And to this day, Davis has remained a mentor to other cities — and some countries — in their work to make this planet a more bicycle-friendly environment.

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Bruce Gallaudet

BIKE TAB: Meet the Pepper Peddler

By
April 18, 2015 |

Pepper Peddler Coffee combines two things that the people of Davis love: bicycling and coffee.

Alex Roth is the Pepper Peddler of Davis, running a coffee-roasting and delivery company that does it all by bike. The company roasts small batches of coffee beans using a stationary bike roasting mechanism and delivers the beans door-to-door via bike.

Eight years ago, Roth started Pepper Peddler Coffee Roasting with a stainless steel drum and a pair of propane tanks. The original idea behind the Pepper Peddler, however, was to roast peppers.

One of Roth’s not-so-secret skills is his ability to grill up a mean green chile pepper. After moving on from a lab position he held for 10 years, he made jokes to his peers about starting a pepper roasting company.

“The health department couldn’t wrap their head around the concept and there wasn’t a market for peppers though,” Roth explained.

After a job out on an oil rig, one of his coworkers suggested coffee roasting. And in a college town where the coffee is always pouring, it seemed like a perfect fit.

Pepper Peddler’s roasting station is far from average. Beneath the roof of an open-air shed, a stationary bike and a hooded steel drum churn out roasted beans. The stationary bike is connected to the steel drum through a series of gears and chains. While he originally tried to work the system with a recycled motor, the manual power of the bike allows Roth to rotate the beans at the perfect rate.

Two propane tanks ignite a flame that cook the coffee beans from below as Roth works the rest of the roasting apparatus from the stationary bike. Inside Pepper Peddler’s warehouse on Olive Drive, a more conventional operation packages and labels each batch. Coffee is roasted weekly in 25- pound batches with varying darkness, including light, dark, and “Special Dark” blends.

During the early days of the business, Roth recruited a fleet of high school students looking for extra cash to help deliver the coffee around town.

“It was always their first job … I saw myself as a sort of mentor to them,” Roth recalled with nostalgia.

Like the high school teachers who turned a teary eye with the approach of Spring, Roth described how he too missed his high school delivery squad as they grew up and left for college.

Today, three bikers and Roth are in charge of delivering coffee to about one hundred customers in Davis and Sacramento. Seven different routes take the riders anywhere from a loop around downtown to a ride on Amtrak to deliver to customers in Sacramento. Roth estimated that a typical route goes 15 to 20 miles.

Tuesday night is roast night, where Pepper Peddler opens up to volunteers that help with the roasting process. Volunteers take 20 minute turns on the stationary bike, surrounded by friends and supporters that come to the Pepper Peddler roasting station to help with each week’s batch.

“It’s a nice decompression after work,” Roth said. Peddling away and with the company of good friends and, at times, live music, the volunteers typically churn out eight batches of coffee in a night — approximately 200 pounds of coffee beans.

For their hard work, Roth treats the volunteers to a “post-roast toast” where pizza and beer is on him, and they each get to bring home a bit of coffee.

Roth described that having only volunteer roasting provides a unique atmosphere. “Having only volunteers takes away the fear of getting fired,” Roth explained.

When the roasting is done, the whole beans go out for packaging. Pepper Peddler’s operations have a sustainable focus, reusing the mason jars and invoices given to each customer. The coffee is delivered in sliding boxes recycled from old redwood fence boards, Roth said.

The beans also have a green focus. Roth explained that he only buys single-source, fair-trade organic beans. The current beans he’s roasting are from Peru.

Pepper Peddler Coffee can be seen around town; local restaurants including Delta of Venus, Monticello Bistro, and Our House all brew the peddler’s coffee. Whole Foods and the Davis Food Co-op also sell his beans.

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Felicia Alvarez

Crary, Evans and Spurgin bring bluegrass and more to The Palms

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Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

By
April 21, 2015 |

Dan Crary, Bill Evans, and Steve Spurgin, all of whom have deep roots in American music, are a new acoustic trio playing a combination of cutting edge bluegrass, folk and Americana music. They will perform at The Palms on Saturday, April 25.
Dan Crary is a pioneer of flatpicking guitar solos in a bluegrass band. A founding member of the Bluegrass Alliance, and the “newgrass” approach, his 20+ year collaboration with Byron Berline and John Hickman (as BCH, Sundance, California) earned him numerous awards and accolades. A veteran of tours in more than thirty countries, Crary is a stylist with an international reputation for taste and brilliance. His “racing licks sounded like the fretboard equivalent of Fred Astaire dancing up, then down a staircase” (LA Times).
Bill Evans is an internationally-respected five-string banjo life force. Whether it’s his one-man history performance, “The Banjo In America,” the annual “California Banjo Extravaganza”, the monthly Bangers & Grass shows, extensive teaching and music camp presence, authorship of Banjo For Dummies, or guest appearances from the San Francisco Symphony to A Prairie Home Companion, Evans’ deep knowledge, intense virtuosity and contagious passion for all things banjo is undeniable.
Texan Steve Spurgin is a former Nashville staff writer providing hits for the publishing companies of Gene Watson and Reba McEntire. His song, “A Walk In the Irish Rain,” has been recorded by a dozen artists, including Country Current (the US Navy Band) and Lily of the West. After performing with everyone from Byron Berline & Sundance to Freddy Fender, Spurgin won the “New Folk” award at the prestigious Kerrville Folk Festival, and has been an in-demand singer-songwriter ever since.
A Crary, Evans & Spurgin show includes new songs and old stories, blazing instrumental artistry, and deep-down, powerfully-felt musical moments. It’s whistling winds in the pines, rambling boys and tragic girls, joys and laughter from old times, furious and foot-tapping instrumental tunes, and a little touch of glory-to-God. And it’s the hovering ghosts of Jimmie Rogers and The Carter Family and Bill and Lester and Earl and Woody and all the greats who showed the way.
Crary, Evans & Spurgin’s Saturday, April 25 show at The Palms Playhouse (13 Main St. in Winters) will start at 8 p.m. Tickets, $20, are available at Pacific Ace Hardware in Winters, Armadillo Music in Davis, Davids’ Broken Note in Woodland and out the door if not sold out.
More information is available at palmsplayhouse.com, dancrary.com, billevansbanjo.com and spurginmusic.com.

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Special to The Enterprise

Chatham County Line brings bluegrass- and rock-tinged Americana to The Palms

By
April 21, 2015 |

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

Chatham County Line is a young and extraordinarily talented bluegrass quartet known for its left-of-center approach, bringing passion and excitement to their music, and adding a bit of a rock ‘n’ roll sensibility to bluegrass and other roots forms of music. Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms Playhouse on Wednesday, April 29.
Chatham County Line formed in 1999 in Raleigh, North Carolina has released seven recordings, five of them on influential Yep Roc Records.
What makes this “sing-around-one-microphone” bluegrass band unique is their varied and mature repertoire that reaches beyond traditional bluegrass topics without losing focus, innovative arrangements, fantastic vocals (both harmonies as well as Dave Wilson’s standout lead) and the sheer energy and joy they bring to their music.
Chatham County Line is Dave Wilson on guitar, harmonica, and lead vocals; John Teer on mandolin, fiddle and harmony vocals; Chandler Holt on banjo and harmony vocals; and Greg Readling on bass and harmony vocals.
Chatham County Line’s Wednesday, April 29 show at The Palms Playhouse (13 Main Street) will start at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 and are available at Pacific Ace Hardware in Winters, Armadillo Music in Davis, Davids’ Broken Note in Woodland and at the door if not sold out.
For more information, visit palmsplayhouse.com or chathamcountyline.com.

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Special to The Enterprise

Vocal Art Ensemble to sing “Mostly Madrigals” in Davis and Sacramento

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

By
April 21, 2015 |

ENTERPRISE STAFF

What exactly is a madrigal, and what makes it so? Where did it come from, and where did it go? During the first three days of May, the twenty-five singers of the Vocal Art Ensemble (VAE) aim to answer these questions with their spring concert program entitled “Mostly Madrigals — An Age of Refined Musical Pleasures.

“The idea sparked when one of my singers asked me to define just what a madrigal was,” explains VAE director Tracia Barbieri. “I realized there were probably many music lovers who don’t really know the answer either, and that I could create a whole program to show them.”

So Barbieri set out to craft an educational as well as entertaining choral program, in which VAE could trace the heritage of the genre by musically illustrating several of the madrigal’s compositional characteristics.

For example, showcasing the fondness for “word-painting” in this tradition will be the two-part madrigal “Thule: The Period of Cosmography,” composed by Thomas Weelkes in 1600 when he was just twenty-four years old. “Weelkes was playing around with the imagery of an erupting volcano,” says Barbieri. “Through overlapping scales he paints the picture of billowing ‘sulphurious fire’, and with scattered entrances of the voices he imagines flying fishes leaping away from the lava as it flows into the ocean. It’s so much fun to sing, I’m not at all surprised it was all the rage with both peasants and aristocracy back in Weelkes’ day.”

The selections in the “Mostly Madrigals concert program will range from three to six vocal parts; VAE will utilize as few as one or two singers on a part, to as many as six.

“To me the most challenging and interesting aspect of this music is how to embody both the lightness and delicacy of the lyrics and notation, and at the same time convey the powerful emotions underneath,” says VAE soprano Jeri Ohmart. “This music often carries us along like bubbles on a stream, but that stream runs deep and the currents underneath are strong.”

“It is fun to sing pop music from 500 years ago,” adds tenor Rob Woodman. “It is playful, inventive, and shatters convention and decorum just like pop music of today.  It not only gives us full permission to be creative, but begs us to go beyond simply beautiful singing into a full bodied, lusty, grab-you-by-the-ears tug into an experience of the musical relationship.”

Why is the program entitled “Mostly” MadrigalsBecause, says Barbieri, the concerts also include examples of other types of compositions she views as related. “I want to give a taste of the madrigal’s influences both across the globe and through the generations,” she says, “so we’ll also perform sacred music from the same period that perhaps inspired or was inspired by this genre, as well as a little ethnic music that embraces some of the same compositional techniques.” The program will conclude with several selections from two Madrigal song cycles by contemporary composer Morten Lauridsen.

VAE will be joined by the Baroque & Beyond recorder ensemble, a group of Sacramento-based historic enthusiasts who play on Baroque and Renaissance-style wooden instruments. Soprano Laura Sandage will act as narrator and educator, introducing concepts listeners will hear.

Mostly Madrigals will premiere on Friday, May 1, 2015 at 7:30 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Sacramento (2620 Capitol Avenue). Additional performances will be Saturday May 2 at 7:30.p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Davis (27074 Patwin Road) and Sunday May 3 at 4 p.m. at the Davis United Methodist Church (1620 Anderson Road). The suggested donation, gratefully accepted at the door, is $10-25. For more information visit www.vae.trug.com or call 530-757-2396.

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UC Davis Symphony to perform classic Beethoven concerto, and unusual forward-thinking works by Varese, Scriabin

By
April 21, 2015 |

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Three big, big works — each unlike the other two… and one of them includes a siren! That’s the program for concert by the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday (May 2) at 7 p.m. in the Mondavi Center.

“We are playing two pieces from the early 20th century which are scored for a giant orchestra,” said conductor Christian Baldini, adding “They are both completely different.”

One of the big pieces on the program is the “Poem of Ecstasy” by Russian composer Alexander Scriabin, which premiered in New York in 1908. This 20 minute piece is usually described as a symphonic poem on lofty cosmic themes, though some think of it as a symphony in one movement. 1n 1909, Scriabin approved a program note that described the music in expansive terms as “the Joy of Liberated Action. The Cosmos, i.e. Spirit, the Universe at Play, is not conscious of the Absoluteness of its creativeness, having subordinated itself to a Finality and made creativity a means toward an end…”

Baldini said that “In Scriabin, a constant inner search for clarity is done through returns to ideas. This piece is full of luscious harmonies, evocative lines and in a sense, at times it turns into a ‘trumpet concerto,’ simply because the trumpet plays an extremely crucial role at those big climaxes. It is hyper romantic music.”

The other big piece on the program is “Amériques,” composed between 1918 and 1921 by Edgard Varèse. The composer left his native France during the devastation of World War I, and started over in New York — a city teeming at the time with street noise from trains and newfangled subways, police cars, fire trucks, and skyscraper construction. Baldini said “Varèse was mesmerized and stunned by the very active urban life in the big metropolis. All of the sounds he heard from his apartment’s window, and by walking around the Big Apple, became part of this massive piece.”

The music starts in a gentle mode, but escalates over the course of 20 minutes. Baldini said “It is scored for an extremely unusual orchestra: quintuple woodwinds (including a heckelphone, similar to a bass oboe), 8 horns, 6 trumpets, 5 trombones (including a contrabass trombone, that we are borrowing from the San Francisco Symphony), 2 tubas, celesta, 2 harps, and 14 percussionists –including a siren — plus orchestral strings.” Baldini will be bringing in some musicians from his other local orchestra (the Camellia Symphony Orchestra in Sacramento) to complete the gargantuan ensemble needed to perform this piece.

Baldini added that conductor Leopold Stokowski premiered “Amériques” in 1926 with the Philadelphia Orchestra, using 16 full rehearsals to prepare the piece. “A member of the audience sent a letter to Stokowski complaining that the piece was better suited for the Philadelphia fire department,” Baldini quipped. But during the past 30 years, “Amériques” has caught on as a forward-thinking modernist showpiece that was written ahead of its time.

Alongside these two large early 20th Century pieces will be the Beethoven Violin Concerto, dating from 1806. It is one of the composer’s landmark works, and one of the most popular violin concertos ever composed. Baldini said we are doing it with the wonderful Alina Kobialka, who won the Mondavi Center’s Young Artists Competition four years ago. I first heard her play then at age 14, and she has already become a very impressive artist, with great maturity.” Alina Kobialka has recently turned 18, and she has performed with a number of California orchestras, including Symphony Parnassus in San Francisco. She comes from a musical family — her father, violinist Daniel Kobialka, was a member of the San Francisco Symphony from 1975 through 2008, and he served as principal second violin for many years.

Tickets are $12-$17 general, $8 students, www.mondaviarts.org or (530) 754-2878.

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Michael Musial is featured artist at next Sunday at I-House

By
April 21, 2015 |

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Michael MusialW

Musician and and singer Michael Musial is the featured artist at next Sunday at I-House, set for Sunday, April 26. Courtesy photo

The fourth season of Sunday(s) at I-House cross-cultural open-mic’ hour plus a featured performer continues, hosted by James Williams, from 7 to 9 p.m. Sunday, April 26, at International House, 10 College Park, Davis. The first hour is the open mic portion, welcoming a broad array of entertainers from the community. The doors open and sign-ups begin at 6:45 p.m.
The featured performer for the second hour is guitarist Michael Musial. Although a classically trained pianist and piano technician by trade, his primary musical interest is playing guitar. His style is American Primitive, a genre pioneered by the guitarist John Fahey. He can be heard playing covers, original arrangements of cover songs and a few original instrumentals. Originally from Pennsylvania, Musial moved to California in 2003 and currently lives in Vacaville.
This event is an on-going fundraiser for I-House. Admission is free, but any size donation is appreciated. Hot and cold beverages as well as snacks will be available to purchase. It will continue on the first and last Sundays through May.
For more information, call James Williams at 916-541-8980; or email him at [email protected]

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Special to The Enterprise

‘Little Shop of Horrors’ fun for all ages

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Michael MusialW

Musician and and singer Michael Musial is the featured artist at next Sunday at I-House, set for Sunday, April 26. Courtesy photo

www.facebook.com/amyshumanphoto

The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn (Spencer Alexander) has a conversation with a plant he names "Audrey II" in the Woodland Opera House production of “Little Shop of Horrors.” The plant turns out to be much more than he expected. Courtesy photo

By
April 19, 2015 |

If you go

What: “Little Shop of Horrors”

When: April 17-May 10, at 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays

Where: Woodland Opera House, 340 Second St., Woodland

Tickets: $25 for adults, $23 for seniors and $12 for children 17 and under on the main floor; $15 for adults and $7 for children in the balcony. Call 666-9617 or visit www.woodlandoperahouse.org.

It’s always interesting when a director takes a new approach to a familiar show. Sometimes it works, sometimes not so much.

Based on the Roger Corman 1960 film of the same name, the musical, with book and lyrics by the late Howard Ashman and music by Alan Menken, had its world premiere off Broadway in 1982, where it ran for more than 2200 performances. The musical music version, starring Rick Moranis and Steve Martin was produced in 1986 and in 2003, “Little Shop of Horrors” hit the big time with a real on-Broadway production.

A new production, directed by Jason Hammond, opened last weekend at the Woodland Opera House.

“Little Shop” is the story of Seymour Krelborn (Spencer Alexander) a nerdy employee at Mushnik’s Florist shop, a failing business on skid row. Seymour is somewhat of an experimental botanist bought an odd plant from a Chinese flower shop during a solar eclipse. He named the plant “Audrey II” to honor his colleague, Audrey (Christianne Klein), for whom he has tender feelings.

Audrey, however, is in an abusive relationship with the dentist Orin Scrivello (Dan Sattel), whose mother encouraged him to go into dentistry because of his love of inflicting pain.

Audrey convinces Mr. Mushnik (Gil Sebastian) to display Audrey II in he window of his shop and it begins to attract customers to the shop. But the plant soon starts dying because Seymour can’t figure out what to feed it. Accidentally pricking his finger, he then discovers Audrey II needs human blood to thrive. Seymour is in the position of having to find more and more blood to feed his plant, while the plant grows to eventually practically take over the flower shop and Seymour is forced to find humans to feed to Audrey II, until he finally learns the terrible truth about her.

Traditionally, Audrey II is a large blob of fabric which has an opening through which food can be tossed. An unseen puppeteer manipulates the plant while its voice, sounding like the voice of Satan, booms out ominously from a speaker somewhere.

In this production, Audrey II looks more like – sorry I have to say it – a giant vagina, with a gaping opening through which the indomitable Deborah Hammond stands and sings as the voice of the plant. Though Hammond is definitely menacing, it just doesn’t give the same degree of horror as the original staging.

The actors, however, are excellent. Spencer Alexander is a wonderful nerd, uneasy, especially around Audrey. He’s uncomfortable in his new role as celebrity as the fame of Audrey II spreads. And he is both horrified and repulsed by the things he is willing to do to keep Audrey alive.

Christianne Klein is sweet as the ditsy Audrey who feels she is unworthy of anyone but an abusive male because she is a woman with “a past.” Yet she fails to recognize that Seymour is in love with her. Actually, anyone would fall in love with her as she sings “Somewhere That’s Green,” her wistful wish for her perfect dream life. I liked that Klein used a Bronx accent, but didn’t go overboard with it, as some actresses do.

When Audrey and Seymour finally confess their feelings for each other, their duet “Suddenly Seymour” is a lovely break from all the horror going on in their lives.

Gil Sebastian was an appropriately grouchy and blustery Mr. Mushnik, who rescued Seymour from a skid row orphanage and gave him a bed under the shop counter and allows him one Sunday off every two weeks. He is not above offering to adopt Seymour if it will ensure that he will keep Audrey II at the flower shop.

Doing his best to steal the show in the small, but important role of the nitrous oxide-sniffing dentist Orin Scrivello, Dan Sattel is deliciously unlikeable. A Michael Imperioli look-alike, Sattel is also able to transform himself rapidly into several other small roles, with several looks, including that of a woman.

The trio of do-wop singers who act as a quasi Greek chorus throughout the show are Emily Jo Semioff, Julia Spangler and Erin Bruni. They each get a moment to shine and each display strong voices.

Also, Lenore Sebastian appears in the small role of a skid row homeless woman. A consummate actress, Sesbastian makes the most of her character, though she has no lines to speak.

Jason Hammond and Denise Miles are credited with costume design. Those for Audrey are particularly appropriate while the red gown for Deborah Hammond is stunning, and the transformation of the girls’ trio from drab skid row clothes to sequined dresses was fun.

Special mention should be made of the small orchestra – Jia-Min Rosendale, Dale Proctor, Scott Plamondon, Alex Rieff and DaveGill who provided the perfect accompaniment.

There is no great message in this show, unless it’s “if you find a strange plant which appears suddenly following a total eclipse of the sun, walk by and leave it alone.” But this musical is fun for the whole family.

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Party Differences in 2016

By
April 20, 2015 |

It is very early, but the candidate field for the 2016 Presidential race is firming up with some notable differences between Democrats and Republicans.

The GOP ticket includes three confirmed, and another nine likely, candidates. The Democrat’s ticket includes one confirmed, and another four likely.

The average age of all twelve Republican candidates is about 54 years old. The average age of all five Democrat candidates is about 65 years old.

In terms of diversity, the GOP field includes two Hispanic Americans, one Indian American, one African American and one female candidate… or 41.7% diverse. The Democrats have one female candidate. The rest are white males. The Democrats provide us a 20% diversity offer.

The Democrat field is dominated by Washington insiders, primarily Senators, with only one outsider, a former governor and mayor.

Conversely, the GOP field includes four current or previous Senators (equaling the Democrat offering), but also six governors and two candidates with business backgrounds.

Compared to this current field of the Party that dominated the last two Presidential elections on a wave of youthful exuberance and a message of hope and change, the GOP field is younger by almost a generation, more diverse and with a much smaller percentage of Washington insiders.

This is an encouraging flip if you favor balance in American politics as a tonic to the corruptive consequences of groupthink and absolute party power.

But of course we must listen to what all these candidates have to say. In the end, the job of the American voter is to be the hiring manager selecting the candidate that will lead our great country to continued greatness.

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Letters to the Editor

Annual tribute promotes engaging, empowering crime victims

By
April 21, 2015 |

WOODLAND — Monday’s tribute to Yolo County crime victims held a double meaning for Davis residents Gloria and Lawrence “Mikey” Partida.
On one hand there was triumph, acknowledgment of the challenges Mikey Partida overcame following a March 2013 hate-crime beating in downtown Davis that left him hospitalized for two weeks. Partida was one of five crime survivors honored at the Woodland Opera House event.
But the mother and son also were mourning another loss — that of 17-year-old Charlie Moore Jr., Gloria Partida’s nephew and Mikey Partida’s cousin, who was fatally shot in a Dixon park Friday night.
Gloria Partida said the teen initially survived surgery for his chest wound but died while en route to the hospital’s recovery area.
“He was a very sweet boy — a goofy, funny kid,” one who celebrated his 17th birthday two weeks ago by flying a kite, Gloria Partida said. “He was very kind and had a lot of energy.”
She said her nephew had been with some friends who got into an argument with another group of teens, one of whom brandished a gun and began shooting when people began to run. Dixon police announced the arrest of a 16-year-old boy in connection with the crime.
“I know (Charlie) and his friends were not expecting this to be the outcome,” Gloria Partida said. “It’s tragic, because it’s two lives that are affected and changed negatively.”
She noted the same was true in her son’s case, a brutal assault that left Mikey Partida with extensive injuries requiring months of recovery, and which resulted in jail time for his assailant.
Mikey Partida, 34, said he appreciated the recognition from the Yolo County District Attorney’s Office, which for nine years has held a victim tribute in conjunction with National Crime Victims’ Rights Week. This year’s theme is “Engaging Communities — Empowering Victims.”
He said the DA’s victim advocates were invaluable in helping his family navigate the lengthy court process, staying by their sides at the defendant’s hearings and explaining legal terminology, among other services.
“It was like we were going into their house, and they wanted us to feel comfortable,” Mikey Partida said. The acknowledgment “reminded me of who I am as a person, and what to do with my days to live a better life.”
The keynote speaker for Monday’s event was Victoria Hurd, the eldest daughter of Claudia Maupin, who along with her husband Oliver “Chip” Northup were slain in their South Davis home on April 14, 2013.
Hurd recalled the horror of that day, as well as the efforts of the District Attorney’s Office in “the remaking and rebuilding my life.”
Though debilitated by grief, “I sensed my mom’s spirit, her voice as powerful in death as it had been in life, say to me, ‘You can do this — I’ve left you with all the tools you need. It’s your journey. You have to own it, darling,’ ” Hurd said.
Days later, Hurd was awaiting her appointment in a trauma counselor’s office when she noticed a sign that read: “The human spirit is stronger than anything that can be done to it.”
Hurd said her mother taught her early on that there are two choices when it comes to facing life’s challenges — faith or fear.
“Faith heals, and fear cripples,” Maupin would say. “I hope you choose faith, my darling. It’s a much happier life.”
Hurd noted that everybody faces tragedy at some point in their lives, and must choose their own path for coping with the pain — by going through it, around it, above it, or by crawling below it.
“No matter how you choose to go, there is always a light. The light is always there, and it’s yours to seek and to find,” Hurd said. In her case, at the counselor’s office, “I saw the light glimmer in that sign. …I chose to walk through the door and begin the healing.”
But Hurd said she was not alone in her choice to heal. In addition to her family, Hurd received the support of Yolo County Victim Services following the arrest of Maupin and Northup’s killer.
“Victoria, I will help you,” advocate Laura Valdes told Hurd during their initial phone contact, she recalled. “This is what victims’ assistance is all about — guiding the victim from the point of trauma to the point of recovery with compassion and dignity.
“Beginning with that phone call, I have been treated with both,” Hurd said. Valdes “did everything she could possibly do to make my experience as equipped and as empowered as possible.”
— Reach Lauren Keene at [email protected] or 530-747-8048. Follow her on Twitter at @laurenkeene
Sidebar:
Other survivors of Yolo County crimes honored at Monday’s crime victim tribute included:
* Sarah Cassidy, whose home was struck by a reckless driver, the resulting damage narrowly missing Cassidy and her newborn baby. Cassidy was recovering from a C-section at the time and suffered complications that required surgery and a lengthy recovery.
* Felicia Leivo, hailed for breaking the cycle of violence and testifying in court against her abusive boyfriend, despite his efforts to pressure her into refusing to cooperate in the case.
* Olga Sanchez, whose report to police of an indecent-exposure suspect led to the man’s arrest and conviction, as well as the requirement that he register as a sex offender.
* John Laben, recipient of the 2015 Hero of the Year award, for his efforts to assist an intoxicated woman who arrived on his doorstep in Davis last fall. Concerned she would fall victim to a sexual assault, Laben reported the woman to police, and the pair later resolved the matter through the District Attorney’s Neighborhood Court restorative justice program.

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Bike Tab – City Bike

By
April 21, 2015 |

They met one another with an affinity for skateboarding, going to frat parties, and “doing all the stuff that freshman kids do,” Ashoor recalled.

Ashoor and Vu lived on the same floor of Kearny Hall, one of the Tercero dorms, their freshman year at Davis in 2008 and they’ve been friends and business partners ever since.

Their partnership transformed a Craiglist bike parts venture into an international bike company. Ary Ashoor and Vince Vu are the founders of City Bicycle Company, a Sacramento-based bike company with a focus on sleek design and city life.

City Bicycle Company manufactures fixed-gear bicycles with a ____ frame. The wide frame allows the rider a larger canvas to put stickers on to customize the bike. The _____ makes the frame nimble yet light at the same time. They manufacture two different types of bikes, the Type One and the Type Two, all with a city name to accompany it. The Type Ones are a steel-framed, more affordable introductory bike, while the Type Twos kick it up a notch with an aluminum frame, which can be used on racing circuits.

Vu shaped the marketing image behind the company, incorporating in the color palette of different cities into the bikes to capture the culture of American and International cities. It’s a casual yet sexy bike, that captures the youth of today’s city cyclists.

The original inspiration behind the business however wasn’t to make sleek fixies however, it was two college kids looking to make an easy buck inside a Taco Truck.

Taco truck dreams and freighters from China

It was they’re sophomore year and Ashoor and Vu were two broke college students always looking for a way to make a little money on the side. They were both trying to put themselves through college and had a tendency to pick up odd jobs on Craigslist; gigs for yardwork, loading, or painting.

The two quickly became masters of Craigslist, digging out odd jobs and buying and re-selling bike parts on the Web. As the sales and demand kicked up, Ashoor recalled thinking, “Hey, I can do this for fun.” And thus a the business started budding to life.

Sales were gaining momentum when one day Ashoor saw an inspiring advertisement on Craigslist: a taco truck selling for $7,000. The two budding businessmen began putting their profits from the bike part sales into savings and asked friends and family for donations to purchase the druck.

“Davis didn’t have a lot of food options at that time and we thought we could make some cash by opening up a truck by frat row,” Ashoor said.

But a quick look into the logistics quickly sent their dreams crashing to ground. Legally, the business would require a brick-and-mortar storefront before they could take off into a food truck venture. The costs of a storefront in or near downtown Davis were even less inspiring.

Setting the taco truck idea to the side, Ashoor and Vu set back on their bike part sales, which were growing into custom bike sales.

It wasn’t long before their next big idea came along. Vu made a new connection with another student who knew a bike parts manufacturer in China.

Using their capital to front enough money for $10,000 worth of bike parts, Vu and Ashoor made their first bulk bicycle order. When the shipping container finally arrived from China, it was as if a Pandora’s box of young business problems was unleashed.

“It was the week before finals week and it was raining,” Ashoor recalled when the container finally arrived. Ashoor and Vu had used their savings from the taco truck and a handful of credit cards to get the job done.

 

 

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Felicia Alvarez

College corner: How are AP credits counted in college?

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Michael MusialW

Musician and and singer Michael Musial is the featured artist at next Sunday at I-House, set for Sunday, April 26. Courtesy photo

www.facebook.com/amyshumanphoto

The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn (Spencer Alexander) has a conversation with a plant he names "Audrey II" in the Woodland Opera House production of “Little Shop of Horrors.” The plant turns out to be much more than he expected. Courtesy photo

JenniferBorensteinW

By
April 30, 2015 |

Fun facts about 2014 AP exams
* There are 38 different AP exams
* Overall average score of 2.89
* 4.176 million exams were taken
* 2.34 million students took AP exams
* 6 percent increase over previous year in number of exams
* English Language & Composition AP exam is taken the most
Source: http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/research/2014/Prog-Summary-Report-2014.pdf

Baseball season is upon us so I feel inspired to use some baseball analogies. Here goes: Right about now high school juniors and seniors are rounding third and heading toward home plate. Several issues are weighing on their minds — college, finals, the nuclear deal with Iran, summer plans.

Although juniors and seniors are navigating different stages of the college admission process, surprisingly, many are asking me the same question. “How will my AP scores be counted for college credit and/or placement?” To understand this issue better, we first must understand the rules of the game.

“Placement” means a student may skip into a higher-level college course but does not earn units toward graduation for that skipped course. “Credit” means a student does earn units toward a college degree. Basically, college credits for AP exam scores allow a student to progress to graduation sooner or take a lighter load along the way.

Okay, back to the question on deck. Even though there are similarities in the assessment of AP scores for college credit and placement, each college — and sometimes each department within a college — sets its own policy so there is variation across colleges. Indeed, colleges may offer both credit and placement, or either one.

In general, there is a level playing field and most colleges do give college credit for an AP exam minimum score of 3 or higher. Some colleges, however, only give credit for scores of 4 or 5. Recall that AP exams are graded on a scale of 1 to 5.

So how do colleges “keep score” of the credits/placement earned in this context? Well, the UCs grant AP credit for scores of 3 or higher; but the number of credits granted depends on the exam subject. For example, a score of 3 or higher on the AP chemistry and AP statistics exams, a student would earn 8 units and 4 units, respectively, on the quarter system. The California State Universities follow a similar protocol but may award different amounts of credit.

Where the game plan is more convoluted is with some of the highly selective, private schools. Many will provide different amounts of credits for different scores — not just different subjects. Yale, for example only provides 1 college credit for an AP chemistry score of 5 but it will provide college credits for either a score of 4 (1 credit) or a score of 5 (2 credits) on the AP calculus BC exam. Then there are some colleges which do not provide credit toward graduation at all such as Brown and the Cal Tech.

Bottom line is that the answer to how will AP scores count for credit and placement is “it depends.”

Thus, it is worthwhile to cover one’s bases and do your research to understand the AP credit and placement policy of the college you will, or you want, to attend. A good place to go is the College Board’s AP Credit Policy website https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. What you will find for each college is a list of AP exams and the scores required to earn credits for those exams, how many credits are awarded for that score, and the equivalent course that would be skipped.

Oh, and remember that in order to receive credit/placement you need to be a closer by ordering the College Board to send your official AP scores to the college of your choice. The 2015 AP exams will be available online in early July. Usually, colleges will notify you after receiving your scores about what you have qualified for in terms of credit, placement and/or course exemptions. Contact your college of choice if you have any more questions.

Until next time… Regardless of the credit policy of the college though, taking APs helps make a student a heavy hitter when it comes to the admissions process so my suggestion is to take AP courses in your areas of strength and sit for the AP exam when possible. Once you receive your scores it is whole new ball game and you can start to piece together the credits and/or placement you may receive.

— Jennifer Borenstein is an independent college adviser in Davis and owner of The Right College For You. Her column is published on the fourth Tuesday of the month. She lives in Davis with her family. Reach her at [email protected], or visit www.therightcollegeforyou.org.

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Jennifer Borenstein

Davis Arts Center: Ceramics Exhibit; Doo Wop, Donate and Dessert; Holiday Sale

By
April 21, 2015 |

By Erie Vitiello
Next week the annual juried show by members of the Association of Clay and Glass Artists of Northern California, held each year in conjunction with the California Conference for the Advancement of Ceramic Art, returns to the Tsao Gallery. “ACGA: Ceramics in Focus,” featuring artists Caroline Blackburn, Craig Easter, Jane Grimm, Bill Heiderich and Jo Killen, will run April 30 – May 27.
Arts Center instructor Linda S. Fitz Gibbon, whose ceramic work has been widely exhibited both regionally and nationally, juried this year’s show. Linda said she looked for artists with diverse vocabularies and interpretations of the ceramic medium whose work would create an interesting dialogue but still show cohesively in one space. The juxtaposition of Blackburn’s high-fire encrusted glazed stoneware, Easter’s wood ash-glazed thrown plates and vessels, Grimm’s low-fire monolithic and monochromatic modernist sculptures, Heiderich’s humorous geometric plays on form and Killen’s raku and saggar-fired vessels creates a unique “cacophony of voices,” she said, “that is unified by a common paring down of non-essential elements and mastery of form and glaze.”
Two receptions open to the public will be held for the show: an artists’ reception on May 1 from 5 – 7 pm, and a Second Friday ArtAbout reception on May 8 from 7 – 9 pm. I encourage community members to join us and experience these diverse creative voices for themselves.
***
This year’s Big Day of Giving, the 24-hour online giving challenge to support regional non-profits, takes place on Tuesday, May 5. If you value the Arts Center’s unique role as a place where artists and students of all disciplines can learn, share and develop their art together, please lend your support by donating to Davis Arts Center at bigdayofgiving.org on May 5.

Donations start at $25, and each donation on May 5 is even more significant due to incentive funds contributed by local businesses and foundations. Participating non-profits share the incentive funds on a pro-rated basis, so the more support we receive, the larger our share of the incentive funds will be!
To celebrate the Big Day of Giving, we’re throwing a free Doo Wop, Donate and Dessert party in partnership with Davis Schools Orchestral Music Association. On May 5, starting at 5 pm, music ensembles from Davis schools will perform in the Atrium, and at 7:30 pm Davis Arts Center’s Doo Wop class, taught by Frank Fox, will present its fabulous end-of-class concert. After the concert there will be an open mic, hosted by our own Heidi Bekebrede, and all donors get to sing! Throughout the evening, we’ll partake of delicious desserts donated by local companies, so come on down and join us for food, fun, song and some friendly rivalry between DAC and DSOMA!
***
Artisan-Vendor applications are now being accepted for entry into the 25th Annual Holiday Sale, December 4 – 6, 2015. Known for its friendly, family-oriented atmosphere, with patrons who return year after year to do their holiday shopping, the Holiday Sale features unique handmade products by over 65 artisans who generously donate fifteen percent of their sales back to the Arts Center to support our programs.
Artisan-vendors are selected by a committee comprised of Davis Arts Center board members, staff and local artists. The committee seeks a wide variety of exceptional functional and artistic items in a range of prices, from clothing and jewelry to soaps, housewares, edible goods and more.
All applicants must submit an online application by Monday, June 1, 2015. Applicants will be notified of their acceptance status by June 22, 2015. Details can be found at davisartscenter.org/events/annual-holiday-sale.

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Davis Cheer is loud and proud

By
April 21, 2015 |

The Davis Cheer team found success early and often, placing in the top three at their first competition last year, followed by a second place, and since then, nothing but first-place finishes.

Not bad for a program that only recently took root in Davis.

But a step back would certainly have been understandable during their most recent competition in Hayward — after all, their coach had to abruptly leave the team due to a family emergency.

Their parents and new coach Katelin Kennedy weren’t sure what to expect when the two teams of girls — ages 4-8 and 9-15 — took to the floor in Hayward to perform the routines their previous coach had taught them, though Kennedy likely had a good idea.

“Before they even started, they were saying, ‘We’re already winners,'” Kennedy said. “It was so cute. They had amazing attitudes.”

And it paid off, with both teams winning first place in the regional competition.

Davis Cheer is a program of Champion Youth, a nationwide non-profit in multiple cities offering multiple sports.

Denicia Morris, a 10-year-old North Davis Elementary School student, has been participating in Davis Cheer for over a year and now serves as a team captain.

“It’s a lot of fun,” she said. “The girls are all really sweet.”

What she likes most of all are those competitions, she said, before proudly showing off her recently won medals.

Davis Cheer is all about competitions, with each seven-to-10-week session followed by a competition against other cheer teams in Northern California featuring dance moves, cheers and stunts, including impressive lifts for such tiny girls.

The cheerleaders practice weekly in the multi-purpose room at Willett Elementary School and the program is open to any interested youths — including those outside of Davis. Last Wednesday, Kennedy was leading about a dozen of the younger girls through a 45-minute class before the older girls — more than 20 of them — had their turn.

It was the first class of the current session and many cheer parents were on hand as well to sign up new participants. They are always on hand to help out and, of course, to cheer for their cheerleaders during competitions.

Though the current Spring session has already started, those interested are still welcome to sign up any time and can do so by simply showing up at the regular Wednesday classes. Students ages 4-8 meet from 6:15 to 6:55 p.m. and those ages 9-15 meet from 7 to 7:40 p.m. at Willett Elementary School, 1207 Sycamore Lane.

The cost is $7 per lesson per session if paid in advance, $8 if paid a week at a time, and scholarships are available for both class fees and uniforms.

For more information, visit http://www.championyouth.org or call 800-956-6956.

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Anne Ternus-Bellamy

School of Population and Global Health

By
April 17, 2015 |

Clarifying points from Kathleen MacColl (not to be quoted: Just wanted to make sure I was clear on the below – it was informational only and I wasn’t intending it to be referenced or quoted. Thanks Tanya. )

Hi Tanya,

So glad you made it to the talk! Thanks for coming. I will forward the questions below to Ken, but, in short, to the first concerning location, no determination has been made on location. Regarding the second, yes, the other campuses could expand their scope, but what makes the idea of a school of population and global health at UC Davis so appealing is the unique combination of disciplines that would be required for a robust population and global health program that the other campuses do not currently have. For example, there are only a very few number of universities nationwide (they number in the single digits) that offer veterinary medicine, agriculture and environmental science, and human health. Our schools of veterinary medicine and agriculture are both ranked number 1 in the world and our human health sciences are some of the best in the nation.

That’s the short of it, but please do allow Ken to respond if you don’t mind!

Thanks again Tanya. Enjoy your weekend.
————-

Recognizing that trans-disciplinary approaches are needed to address the growing health challenges resulting from changing demographics, greater global connectivity, climate and other environmental changes, new technologies, and modern society itself, Chancellor Linda Katehi recently charged Dr. Kenneth W. Kizer to lead an eff ort to create a new School of Population and Global Health at UC Davis. The proposed School of Population and Global Health envisions aligning education and training in human and animal health sciences, agriculture, environmental and life sciences, and the social sciences to better prepare leaders, scholars and practitioners to address the many health challenges of our increasingly crowded and connected planet. UC Davis is uniquely positioned to pioneer the forwardlooking trans-disciplinary educational and research programs that will be needed to address the human, animal and environmental health challenges of the Anthropocene Era. Please join us on March 18th for a discussion about this new UCD initiative. Dr. Kenneth W. Kizer is a Distinguished Professor in the UC Davis School of Medicine and the Bett y Irene Moore School of Nursing and is the Director of the Institute for Population Health Improvement.

=====
SACRAMENTO —
Kenneth Kizer
Several months ago (memo dated July 30, 2014) chancellor asked if I would develop a plan to … develop a
School of Population and Global Health at UCD

second of town hall meetings,

Say a few things about population health and global health…inextricably linked

Why UCD is uniquely positioned to do something in this regard
evolving strategy

Things will change as we move forward

Why a school of population and golbal health?
conceptual underpinnings

human activities are fundamentally changing the earth’s geography, climate, biome and consequent medical and health issues

impact of human activities on earth’s ecomsystems portend a new era in medicien and health that will be drivenby multiple anthropogenic health challenges

Should UCD have a school of publichealth

1968, dept of comm health established in the SOM
late 1980s discussion among SOM Dean Williams, Chancellor Huller and CDH services directory Kizer re: establishing a school of publich health

1991 kizer takes on chair of dept of comm health…renames it department of comm and international health

early 1990s discussions continue for SPH

(Too boring to list)

2009 uc global health institute launched with two centers at UCD, other centers/ograms at UCLA, UCSD, UCSF

2011 institute for population health established at UCDHS…SOM Dean Pomeroy’s requested IPHI

2014 katehi reopened discussion of a ucd sph/spgh

Population health causes confusion, some dismay in public health community

how are they dif/same
Population health definition is evolving…refers to overall or aggregate health status or health outcomes, of a defined group of people resulting from the many determinants of health, including health care, public health interventions, and social and environmental factors

Pop health mgmt refers to purposeful actions or intervents taken to influence health status or outcomes o f… slide went away

single most important thing we can do to help the health of california…is to increase the number of college graduates

link between education and determinant of health is great

dif between public health and pop health

pub health typically deals with those things that govts do within their political jurisdiction…infection disease control, insurance, ensuring safe good and clean water
environmental hazards, tracking diseases, encouraging healthy behaviors

Pop health is traditional public health with more emphasis on
disease prevention efforts with individual-level healthcare

slide went away

Cost of caring will be an increasingly challenging societal burden as population grows

21st C pop health imperatives

1. demographics and conditions of senescence
2. controlling cost of health care
3. food security and diet-related diseases
4. climate and environment-related conditions
5. resurgence of infectious diseases
6. cancer
7. mental health, neruodegenerative conditions and other disorders of brain function
8. violence and trauma
9. genomic and medical technology

most antibiotics are used in agriculture and food production, not in medicine

need to address antibiotic use in industrial food production

i.e. china requires more protein now, more cattle, poultry, etc, means more antibiotics for increased livestock production

interconnections for these things is profound, but we’re not approaching them with an eye to that

cancer is a disease of old age…as we get older as a society,

public health is currently not addressing this kind of issue

Said Arab Spring had much more to do with basic conditions of living (lack of food, gas, jobs, etc) than religious ideology

Why a SPGH at UCD

current health sci prof training is not aligned to address 21st century health challenges

critical pop and global health issues are major cali issues

ucd’s combo of animal, human, plan and environmental expertise

In US, philly has Jefferson…School of Population Health

one in BC…school of Population and Global Health

What’s been done to date?

after letter from Katehi
core planning committee convened and some key issues clarified
support personnel (manager and analyst)
subcommittees being planned

2. Inventory of existing programs, centers and departments related to PGH

3. Communications/meetings with stakeholders
(website under construction sites.google.com/site/spghsampleemb.home
4. Researched and started work on proposal for regents, ucd academic senate, etc.

“People most interested in this are also very busy”

Funding identified to move it forward is necessary
Funding development and trying to get seed money is plan for next few months.

Questions from crowd
a few people in lab coats
no one I recognize

of 10 most air-polluted communities in nation, 5 or in Cal, 3 or in valley
related to ag, climate, among population

“science is demonstrating that drought in cal is due to climate change”
Implications not just for Cal, and cal’s economy and role of ag, are profound

If we take Medi-Cal (a dirty word to some people), largest insurance program in Cal and the nation, now at $95B program, rapidly growing, 1/3 of cals have that has primary insurance, 1/2 of kids

High utilizers in medi-cal, quite clear that if we don’t address mental health issues of people in top 5 percent, we won’t improve their outcomes

we can do lots but if we don’t deal with
basic housing, food security, transportation, there won’t be progress
directly effects all of us because taxes pay for medi-cal

Thoughts about structural or systems issues that have interfered? since it didn’t come to fruition in the past…

Kizer: Proposal for new school has to go through regents, UC acadeic senate, two schools of pub health didn’t see need for more
why not increase student numbers at other two schools

Has that changed?
Kizer: No

Point that it would be more economical/better use of public funds to use other two schools, is pretty hard to argue
unless you don’t do something different than they do, hard to justify cost of starting up a new one

schools of pub health have a stylized process of how they become accredited/established
we’d be writing book on how it works at a school of pop and global health

pragmatic reasons why this might make sense…easier to become this new kind of school.

Degrees…how would existing depts that are relevant be organizationally structured, which degree progs would be included?
Kizer: no one loses in the process, no one is going to be forced into something else, how can we augment programs we have

should it be undegrad and grad degrees? Or just one or the other?
Planners think it should be both
brand new major interdisciplinary major…plant sci, vet med that is very popular although young…I imagine we could have popular majors like that

“Schools” generally deal with grad programs
Colleges deal with undergrad programs

Need to figure out what an undergrad major would look like
what would grad degree programs look like

Recent survey done of health sys CEOS, hardest expertise to get is in population health management. Most major health sys know pop health mgmt is key function

Top 5 percent consume 50-60 percent of expenditures of health related svcs

Question…What? other countries?

Kizer…how do we establish linkages with other universities/entities around the globe

World Food Center is working on potential connections with universities in china

we’d also want to look at brazil, india, russia

Antimicrobial resistance, as medical tourism grows, and people are going to india, Thailand to get surgical interventions because they are too expensive to get in US
employers pay for those

But those people come back with bacteria resistant to US drugs, they introduce to our biome…
we live in a very global community, but we aren’t trained to recognize all of this…

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April 20, 2015 |

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Talking or texting while driving

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April 21, 2015 |

Rarely a day goes by that I don’t see someone in Davis driving while either talking on a cell phone or texting. Often the driver is not hiding the fact that they are doing these things which always surprises me since they are both illegal. It especially bothers me as I know someone (not in Davis) who lost her 2-year-old daughter in a car accident because the driver who hit them was distracted by talking on a cell phone and ran a stop sign.

Please don’t talk or text when you drive. You may think you are the one person who can use your phone when you drive without any repercussions, but you are wrong. It’s not worth it. Whatever it is can wait until you can safely use your phone.
Melanie Bowden
Davis

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Letters to the Editor

dog leash letter Hing

By
April 21, 2015 |

Kudos to Mike Clegg for his rebuttal to Mark Rollins’ belief that dogs in Davis would be better behaved off -leash. My dog is a timid, sometimes anxious, little rescue who is undergoing daily training. I specifically take him to Chestnut Park where leash laws apply. When loose dogs come bounding up to him, he gets frightened, backs out of his harness (and consequently his collar) then runs away. Although he knows his way home, I am distressed for the rest of the day worrying about him getting hit by a car. So I have undertaken the tedious task of educating owners individually of my situation. Most people are sympathetic and respectful, but there are others who think that they are above the leash law, even though their dog is not under voice command. Davis has some wonderful dog parks where leashes are not required. Won’t you please take your dog there to roam freely so we can all enjoy our dogs free of hassle?
Jenny
[email protected]
Sure, I’m Jenny Hing at 1209 Chestnut Lane, Davis 95616
530 753-8751

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April 20, 2015 |

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Travel training 4/25

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April 21, 2015 |

Transit, Bicycling, and Paratransit Travel Training Workshop on Saturday April 25

Experience the joy of active transportation! There is so much to discover in Davis, so many possibilities, that accessing your favorite local destinations without a car is easier than you thought. Whatever your age or ability, you can live an active, healthy, independent life with the many transportation options available in Davis.

The City of Davis and transportation partners are hosting a travel training workshop to provide better access to local transportation options and services. Focused on seniors and those with disabilities, but open to the public, the travel training event will be held on Saturday, April 25, 2015 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at the Davis Senior Center, 646 A Street (corner of A & 7th Sts.). Through this program, you can learn to travel to destinations like the movies, a favorite restaurant, or shopping excursions.

At the event, participants will select from one of three training sessions: Transit (facilitated by Unitrans and Yolobus), Paratransit (City of Davis Community Transit and Yolobus Express), and Bicycling (City of Davis Active Transportation Program). Following the training sessions will be short supervised group activities intended to break the “fear barrier” in using these services alone.

The travel training program aims to improve awareness, understanding, usage, and confidence in using local transportation options; forge new social connections; and more importantly, increase independence. The travel training workshop is held annually each Spring.

For more information, please visit http://community-development.cityofdavis.org/travel-training-program or contact Brian Abbanat at [email protected] or (530) 757-5610 x7301.

Download a copy of the Travel Training Workshop Flyer.

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Special to The Enterprise

Gen Events MASTER

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August 16, 2012 |

Saturday, April 25

The Davis Schools Foundation invites the community to “Meet Me at the Carousel,” a fun-filled event for families celebrating the foundation’s 10th anniversary. The event, from 9 a.m. to noon during the Farmers Market in Central Park, will include free carousel rides; musical performances from the North Davis, Montgomery and Korematsu elementary school choirs and the Davis High School Advanced Treble Choir; and fun activities from the UC Davis Veterinary Student Outreach Club.

Sunday, April 26

The “Sound of Music” is the theme of this year’s Davis Madrigals’ Choral Workshop for children in grades K-6. The workshop takes place from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., with a performance in the Brunelle Performance Hall, 315 W. 14th St., beginning at 4 p.m. The cost is $30 per student and registration may be submitted electronically by visiting http://www.davismadrigals.com/2015-madrigal-singers-spring-choral-workshop.html. For more information, contact Julie Cross at [email protected]

Wednesday, April 29

Davis Parent University presents Jennifer Senior, author of “All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood,” from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Brunelle Performance Hall at Davis High School, 315 W. 14th St. Free tickets may be reserved at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/1423775.

Friday, May 8

Youths ages 1-17 are invited to Friday Night Live!, an hour of tumbling and gymnastics at the Civic Center Gym, 23 Russell Blvd, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Whether they want to work on gymnastics skills or just jump on the trampoline, children will be supervised and coached by gymnastics and dance staff, though children ages 1-4 must have a parent or guardian supervising them on the gym floor. The cost is $5 at the door.

Friday, May 29

Youths ages 1-17 are invited to Friday Night Live!, an hour of tumbling and gymnastics at the Civic Center Gym, 23 Russell Blvd, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Whether they want to work on gymnastics skills or just jump on the trampoline, children will be supervised and coached by gymnastics and dance staff, though children ages 1-4 must have a parent or guardian supervising them on the gym floor. The cost is $5 at the door.

Friday, June 5

Youths ages 1-17 are invited to Friday Night Live!, an hour of tumbling and gymnastics at the Civic Center Gym, 23 Russell Blvd, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Whether they want to work on gymnastics skills or just jump on the trampoline, children will be supervised and coached by gymnastics and dance staff, though children ages 1-4 must have a parent or guardian supervising them on the gym floor. The cost is $5 at the door.

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Anne Ternus-Bellamy

By
April 20, 2015 |

Davis Community Television (Channel 15) will air a debate sponsored last year by the Davis Peace Coalition from 8 to 10 p.m. Sunday, May 1.

“A Community Debate — Achieving a Just Peace in Israel/Palestine: Is the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions Campaign a Help or Hindrance?” (Episode #312) was recorded by video magazine series Media Edge.

The debate features Omar Barghouti, an independent Palestinian researcher, commentator and human rights activist, and Zeev Maoz, a UC Davis professor of political science and director of the International Relations Program.

Barghouti is a founding member of the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel and of the Palestinian Civil Society Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions campaign against Israel. Maoz is a scholar of Middle East politics and an expert on the Israeli security establishment. He serves as a distinguished fellow at the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya, Israel, and is a past director of academic programs at Tel Aviv University, the University of Haifa and the Israeli Defense Forces’ National Defense College.

Episodes of Media Edge are available online at http://www.WeTheMedia.tv.

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elias 5/8: automatic registration voter turnout

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April 21, 2015 |

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2015, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“CAN AUTOMATIC REGISTRATION INCREASE VOTER TURNOUT?”

No sooner had Oregon’s Democratic Gov. Kate Brown signed a new law automatically making a registered voter of every person who applies for or renews a drivers license in her state than California’s top elections official jumped on the idea.

Alex Padilla, the MIT engineering graduate who once was the Los Angeles city council’s youngest president ever, was up-front about copying Oregon. “While many states are making it more difficult for citizens to vote, our neighbor to the north offers a better path,” Padilla, the California secretary of state, said in a press release days after the Oregon law was signed. “I believe the Oregon model makes sense for California.”

The Oregon law is a significant new twist on the federal “Motor Voter” law in use since 1993. The national law requires all states to offer voter registration opportunities at all Department of Motor Vehicles offices, plus every welfare office and those that deal with the disabled.

But the law is not usually enforced. Example: Most California DMV offices may offer voter registration on request, but they don’t normally inform everyone they serve of this, nor are voter registration materials included in most DMV renewal mailings.

This would be rectified in a California version of the Oregon law, which now takes the form of a bill by Democratic Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez of San Diego.

The Oregon measure will not merely consider every U.S. citizen over 18 who contacts that state’s DMV a registered voter, but will automatically send ballots to all of them in every election.

That’s not precisely the model to be followed here. For one thing, Oregon in recent years has conducted many of its elections purely by mail, while only about half California’s voters participate by mail.

So all the California law would do is add eligible new voters to the rolls. This would see them receiving by mail all voter guides on initiatives and candidates, but no absentee ballots unless they’re requested.

The motives for this change are clear, as are some problems. The California move is spurred in part by pathetic turnouts in municipal elections across the state early this spring. In Los Angeles, for example, less than 10 percent of eligible voters participated. Some city council members, then, were elected by just 4 percent or 5 percent of eligible voters in their districts. So increased voter participation is one motive for this change.

There’s also the fact that everyone involved with this proposed change is a Democrat, and increased turnout historically tends to favor Democrats. New voters, minority group members and youths tend to turn out less than Anglos over 50, who historically are more likely to support Republicans. So there’s a political motive in addition to the good-government one.

Then there are the potential problems: It’s still illegal for non-citizens to vote in California elections, whether they involve local, state or federal offices and issues. Yes, there have been proposals to allow non-citizens to participate in local elections affecting their interests. But that idea has never taken hold, and there’s little likelihood it will anytime soon.

Another potential problem is how the DMV can know whether a drivers license applicant is a citizen. Critics of Motor Voter have long complained that it can let non-citizens onto the voters’ rolls. But the agency will take only birth certificates, passports, drivers licenses from other states and similar official documents as its required proof of identity. So unless an applicant obtains a highly credible forgery, the DMV will be able to screen non-citizens out of voter registration.

Another problem is that some eligible voters never register because they don’t want their addresses, birth dates or party affiliations made available to the public. Others don’t want to be called for jury duty, for which voter registration records are used.

That’s a tougher problem, yet could be resolved by changing some rules about disclosure of personal information on registered voters.

But the bottom line will likely be that this bill, or a modified version, will pass because something has to be done to increase voter turnouts. If this can’t do that, it’s hard to see what might.

-30-
Email Thomas Elias at [email protected] His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, go to www.californiafocus.net

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Whitney Joy Engler

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April 21, 2015 |

Sept. 4, 1987 – March 27, 2015

Whitney Joy Engler died on March 27, 2015, in Davis. Born in San Diego on Sept. 4, 1987, Whitney grew up in the Scripps Ranch community, graduating from Scripps Ranch High School in 2005. In 2010, she earned a bachelor’s degree in brain behavior and cognitive science with a minor in biology from the University of Michigan, where she rode on the equestrian team.

She was a member of the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Class of 2015 at UC Davis and will be awarded a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree posthumously in May. While at the University of Michigan and at UC Davis, Whitney received more than a dozen awards and scholarships, including those from the Westminster Kennel Foundation, American Humane Association and, in March, the Floyd Tuition Support Scholarship.

Whitney was an incredible individual in both her personal and professional life. She was fiery, caring, had a laugh full of joy, and could see the light in almost any situation. She was always aware of how ridiculous life could be and reveled in it, but she was also able to make the best of things when life got hard.

Most of all, Whitney was an incredible friend who was always there for anyone, in good times and bad. She especially excelled in animal behavior, training and shelter animals. She would have been an amazing veterinarian. Her hobbies included biking, dog agility, horseback riding, gardening and surfing.

Whitney is survived by her brother Wes, her father Dennis, her mother Virginia, and her loved pets, including Australian shepherd Rose; cats Zayne, Indiana and Chique; and Eos, a red-crowned Amazon parrot.

Commemorative services were held at veterinary colleges all across the country on April 2, and a celebration of life at UC Davis on April 3. A memorial Mass will be celebrated at St. Gregory the Great Catholic Church in Scripps Ranch at 1 p.m. Monday, April 27. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the Whitney J. Engler Memorial Scholarship Fund, UC Davis Foundation, P.O. Box 1167, Davis, CA 95617.

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Special to The Enterprise

A convention far, far away

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From page A19 | April 18, 2015 |

Day one

You could smell the Force at the Anaheim Convention Center. Oh, there were other aromas emanating from the crowd at Star Wars Celebration, but the palpable sense of anticipation managed to overwhelm the senses.

From the lucky few who camped overnight to score tickets to be in the room with JJ Abrams, to the less dedicated who only managed to get into a room with a big screen, to the unlucky peons in line who were reduced to watching on their cell phones, this motley army of cospalayers, burned-out fossils and wide-eyed kids waited in unison for the greatest perk the not-at-all annual gathering of all things “Star Wars” had … The trailer for the latest movie.

After the crowd(s) roared approval, the gates opened and the great mass of nerddom flooded into the convention hall, where a myriad delights awaited them in the cavernous space. Want a picture of you son (dressed as Boba Fett, of course) about to be eaten by a rancor? Star Wars Celebration can oblige.

How about vintage memorabilia (Darth Vader soap from 1980?) … Or maybe the latest artwork from the hottest artists inspired by the films? Help build a replica of cloud city, hear a lecture from one of the film technicians, or get an autograph from one of your heroes.

Hours after the premiere, the crowd was still buzzing about the trailers. “Were you in the room?” Asked one twenty-something girl between bites of a veggie patty at a shared table in the eating area.

No, some of us couldn’t get here the night before.

“Oh … It was pretty epic.”

But the real soul of the event is in the vendor booths. If nothing else, it’s a case in point of assets appreciating over time. And over distance, too … an Anakin Skywalker action figure that once sold for 1 pound, 59 pence, in England is now going for $45 in California. Good thing I unloaded mine for a buck at a garage sale in 1987.

there are bargains to be had, if you willing to compromise – if you take the toy lightsaber that’s missing a tip, you’ll save a fiver. Some wanted more. “Please, let me give you my money,” said one haggler, pushing for a discount.I

He must have used a Jedi mind trick, because it worked.

————

Day two

Friday’s crowd was even bigger than Thursday’s, and without the distraction of the trailer there was more grumbling in the queue to get in.

The early excitement centered on a preview for the new “Battlefront” video game. I got a sneak peek on Thursday and it was spectacular. But the panels began in earnest a today, and it was a day for long lines.

I had the choice between walking right in to see Ray Park (the spectacularly sinister Darth Maul in “Phantom Menace”) or waiting two hours for Carrie Fisher. For this fossil, it was no choice. I broke my usual practiced and joined the early birds for a “Date with a Princess.” (Yes, the cheesy title is typical.)

Carrie Fisher

The world’s nerdiest DJ tried to keep everyone interested with some retro tunes, along with a squad of storm troopers warmed up the crowd with some armor-challenged dance moves. Then came 80s video game music.

Of course, the late arrival is taller than me.

Mark Daniel led a puzzle challenge. and there’s still 15 minutes to go.

Princess Leia fashion show … the bearded guys got the biggest applause.

Two minutes over with T-shirt cannon, which can’t hit the back row.

Host: James Arnold Taylor. Voice of Obi-Wan and Minions.

Glass of wine and her dog Gary.

Hopes fans will explain trailer to her. “What does it all mean.”

“I don’t know what is a spoiler and what isn’t.”

Safe questions.

“I always think, no matter what it is, that i’m always doing it wrong.”

Raised in a showbiz family. “It became my ‘ordinary.’ ”

Debbie Reynolds : “Be careful of any weird hairdos”

Underage in “Shampoo”

“Early I the morning is too early” to deal with droids and sci-fi junk. Slept through hair – two hours. Used wig on SNL.

Peter Cushing “smelled of lavender.”

“When you make a movie, you don’t know if it’s going to do well.” “For the second movie, you know you’re working on a hit.”

She lived up to her reputation for irreverence. After showing barefoot and with her dog, she suggested “force” as an alternate curse word, wrestled with the host and kissed a fan like he was her brother or something.

So what was her favorite scene? “Probably one of the ones where I said something awful to Harrison. You know, he’s a scruffy-looking nerf herder.”

——

Day three

Saturday’s crowd was the biggest yet. I skipped the morning fun, hanging out with the family at Disneyland before the biggest remaining event, the panel with Mark Hamill (that’s Luke Skywalker, non-nerds).

Learning from the previous day’s success, I arrived two-and-a-half hours early, before my plans were thrown into confusion by a knot of people blocking the queuing area. An unspecified “medical emergency” had thrown a monkey wrench into proceedings, and the early birds were piling up, bereft of the structure provided by an orderly queue.

In any case, my early-birding wasn’t early a enough, and I ended up In the fourth section to be let in.

Finally, whatever it was was resolved and the mob was able to stop waiting to wait. Or waiting to wait to wait; there were two more rooms to stand in before the show started.

It was a more diverse crowd an the day before, including a 4-month-old baby and some women who were probably devoted Mark Hamill fans back in 1977. “Well preserved” doesn’t begin to describe it.

It’s a strange camaraderie in line, where people holding spots for a half-dozen friends will look in askance at anyone encroaching too far into their space, but who are nonetheless united in a vague us-against-them mentality against the convention organizers who are packing them in like cattle.

They are simultaneously upset at the conditions they are enduring and proud that here, in the longest lines, they get to be the ones who endure them the longest.

Hamill’s talk was preceded by an hour with James Arnold Taylor. He’s an engaging performer and quite the vocal mimic, but he wasn’t the man everyone came to see. sixty minutes was a bit much.

“This hardly seems real.”

“The new cast members are just unbelievable.”

“I heard about it on the Internet just like you did.” On the title, “The Force Awakens.”

Recorded new lines for teaser, mixed with “Jedi” dialogue.

“There’s so much there for you to speculate on.”

“They don’t call it a teaser for nothing.”

Kingsmen and the Flash kept him busy.

“It was all so new to me.” On “Star Wars.”

Sir Alec liked mosque joke.

Cushing wore glove to keep nicotine smell off his hand

On “Empire”: “One word; Yoda.”

“When Frank put that puppet on his hand … I was just transfixed.”

Yoda radio cut to the Stones.

On “Jedi”: Didn’t know what Ian MacDiarmid looked like – had to have him over for dinner.

talked to extras to earn their respect.

TFA:

“They try to trick you.”

Lucas invited him to lunch “Something big is going on.” Laughed at idea of new trilogy.

“It’s not like it was a choice, it’s like I was drafted.”

“Never taken fans for granted.”

Most awkward: “I invited you to my 11th birthday party and you never wrote back.”

Guy in Darth mask surprised him in Tahiti.

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Master Gardeners 5/2

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April 21, 2015 |

NEWS RELEASE
Yolo County Master Gardeners
530-666-8143
University of California
Cooperative Extension – Yolo County

May 2015

Here are the events for May:

Want to learn about gardening with containers? A free workshop will be held on May 2, 2015, 9-10:00 am at the Davis United Methodist Church in the Grace Garden area behind the church located at 1620 Anderson, Davis. Learn about the secrets of successful small space gardening for growing tasty vegetables, herbs and flowers.

Two free helpful workshop events for gardeners will be presented at Woodland Community College on May 9, 2015. The times are 9-10:00 am – Managing Pests in Your Garden, and 10-11:00 am – Attracting Pollinators to Your Garden. Learn how to identify pests and control them, and how to attract pollinators to your garden. Location is 2300 E. Gibson Road, Woodland.

A free summer tree workshop will be held on May 16, 2015, from 2-4:00 pm at the Turner Library located as 1212 Merkley Avenue, West Sacramento. Learn the what, where and when of young tree pruning and shaping. For more information contact UC Cooperative Extention 530-666-8143.

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Forbes letter

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April 21, 2015 |

I want to thank the Nugget Market in Woodland publicly for pulling the energy drink “51 Fifty” from the shelves.

The energy drink “51 Fifty” has appeared at retailers all over California. Urging people to “live the madness”, 51 Fifty is a tasteless insult to many who live with the feelings of elation and risk-craving some mental illnesses inspire. The drink refers to Section 5150 of the California Welfare and Institutions Code. The code says when a person, as a result of a mental health disorder, is a danger to others, or to himself or herself, or gravely disabled, a peace officer may take the person into custody. The loss of freedom, employment and social standing a real 5150 often leads to isn’t funny, hip or cute. Neither is profiting off of it.

June Forbes
1611 El Capitan St.
Davis, Ca 95616
530-756-5501

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Letters to the Editor

Bonner letter

By
April 21, 2015 |

Hi Letter to the Editor Folks,

Would you please post this Letter to the Editor when possible? Also, would you please add the appropriate accent marks on Cesar Chavez before printing?

Thank you!!

Jill Bonner
530-330-4315

Cesar Chavez Bike Swap Another Success!!

A big, big thanks to all the families who participated in the Cesar Chavez Elementary 3rd Annual Citywide Bike Swap Event which took place on Sunday, April 12th. It was a win-win situation for those who consigned their bikes, donated their bikes or bought bikes at the swap.

More than 225 bikes were consigned or donated, the majority of which sold – all for great prices! The Bike Swap was a true community service effort with support from many sources. Business and local organizational support came from Ink Monkey who helped us get the word with colorful, catchy banners that were hung around town. Then we had Apex Bikes, B & L Bike Shop, Blisworks and Davis Freewheeler all offering bike tuneup discounts to folks that bought bikes at the Swap. Green Bike Depot consigned several bikes, bike lights and bike locks for us to sell (which the school got a percentage of), UCD TAPS sold quite a few bike licenses at the Bike Swap and many UCD Iota Phi Theta Fraternity student volunteers came to help out. As for handling the bike intake, bike clean up and bikes sales throughout the Bike Swap, a thank you to Davis Bicycles School Committee volunteers in addition to the many Cesar Chavez families plus several independent bike-knowledgeable volunteers and community helpers.

Lastly, a huge Thank You once again to Debbie Davis with the Davis Enterprise for helping to promote the Bike Swap Event. Since this was a citywide event – we could not have gotten the word out without your publicity assistance.

All profits from this annual event support Cesar Chavez Elementary Spanish Immersion Parent and Teachers (SIPAT). Thank you again to all who made this continuing event so successful and so fun. It’s a great way to ReCycle your BiCycle!! Hope to see you again next year!

Jill Bonner
Cesar Chavez SIPAT Bike Swap Coordinator
www.davisbikeswap.org

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April 18, 2015 |

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April 18, 2015 |

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Evan Ream

Evan Ream graduated with a B.A. in journalism from Southern Oregon in Ashland, Ore. He loves soccer more than any person rationally should. "Some people think football is a matter of life and death. I am very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure them it is much more serious than that." - Bill Shankly

Charlie and Pickles photo

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April 18, 2015 |

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Vet end of life

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April 19, 2015 |

End of life doesn’t mean life must end.

Dr Lynn Hendrix
Beloved Pet Mobile Vet
530-383-2543
www.belovedpetmobilevet.com
Storm was aptly named, she had been a force of nature her entire life. However, the first time I met her she was a simmering Storm, laid low by the bleeding mass in her spleen. The second time I met her, she greeted me at the door, hackles raised, barking, charging me a bit, a wild Storm! A completely different dog from the first time I met her. She was in animal hospice and we were controlling her pain and gave her a great quality of life until her cancer had metastasized to her brain and her bone and we helped her with a gentle euthanasia. She lived 9 months past the initial diagnosis, far past when she was “supposed” to die.

People who have been given a terminal diagnosis do not stop living at the moment of diagnosis. They have several choices to deal with their disease to fulfill their life for as long as they are able. This can include life prolonging care, limited care and comfort care, more commonly known as hospice care. People often spend this last part of life, termed end of life stage, or the stage of end of life, doing things they wanted to do, a bucket list for example. They may also be past the point in their disease process where they are able to go out and do a bucket list but they still are often engaged in life activities around their home and with their family.

As a hospice and palliative medicine veterinarian, I most often encounter animals who have been given a terminal diagnosis. I help those animals live as full and happy a life as they can with their terminal disease. This can mean that there is a cessation in curative medicine, no more tests, no more trips to the veterinarian’s office, often bringing in a house call veterinarian to help the family through comfort care. It can also mean for some, the same as for people, life prolonging care, such as palliative radiation, or limited care, such as giving fluids, or treating an abscess. It does not necessarily mean that the animal has to be euthanized at that time, there is often more a hospice veterinarian can do to help keep the animal comfortable. Euthanasia is still an option and most hospice veterinarians will perform euthanasia when it is time and is deemed appropriate by the team taking care of the pet.

The concerns that I often see or hear about is that the animal is in pain, or that the owners or the veterinarian has not perceived pain in the animal but thinks they are suffering in some other way. Most often it is pain and because chronic pain is much more difficult to assess in animals, no one has seen it. However, if you ask human beings in the same condition, cancer for example, as they get farther into their disease process, they will report pain. With chronic pain in humans, the way you know about it, is the person who has chronic pain will tell you. With chronic pain in animals, since they can’t tell you directly, they show you in other ways. So many animals I see, have gotten off their nice cushioned beds and are now laying on the hard floor. They do this because pressure can help relieve pain, think of a person with back pain, they get the firmest mattress they can find, because it helps relieve pain. Animals who pace at night, who stop eating, who get grumpy or have change in their behavior, all could have chronic pain. (If you are reading this and notice any of these things, bring them to the attention of your veterinarian.)

There are many things a hospice and palliative medicine doctor can do for your animal at the stage of end of life. End of life does not mean life has to end. If we can make them comfortable, they can go on living, and be engaged in life. If not, we can always help them have a gentle death. Consider hospice before you make the next step as your elderly animal approaches the end.

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Thomas Oide

Thomas Oide is a senior at Davis High School, the editor-in-chief of the DHS student-run newspaper, The HUB, and a staff writer at 12thmanrising.com.

DMA Big Day of Giving 5/5

By
April 19, 2015 |

DMA, The Wardrobe to host Big Day of Giving event
Davis Media Access (DMA), Yolo County’s only non-profit community media center, and The Wardrobe, an Art Couture salon located in downtown Davis, are pairing up to present a unique and interactive event on 5/5/15, the Big Day of Giving.

Numerous non-profits are planning events in Davis and Woodland. Titled “5/5 – Help the Grassroots Thrive!” the DMA event takes place from 5-7 p.m. at The Wardrobe, located at 206 E Street. The event came about largely because Caswell has served as a board member for DMA the past two years. “I wish to introduce our downtown, especially the business community, to the value of supporting Davis’ local TV and radio station. DMA is a powerful resource,” Caswell said, “and being involved there has reminded me it was while doing radio that I found my creative voice.”

The Big Day of Giving—dubbed BigDOG—is a regional effort aimed at stimulating charitable giving to our region’s non-profits. By giving a tax-deductible donation of $25 or more online that day, you can help the non-profits of your choice win prizes and incentives. From 12:01 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. on 5/5/15, log on to www.bigdayofgiving.org, type in your non-profit’s name, and donate safely.

A BigDOG donation to Davis Media Access helps support KDRT, and its efforts to inspire, enrich, and entertain listeners through an eclectic mix of music, cultural, educational, and public affairs programs and services.

During the event, KDRT will be live on the air, with local DJs Sara Eley, Pieter Pastoor and Danny Tomasello at the mic. They’ll spin tunes, record station IDs, with music projected outside The Wardrobe. Businesses who drop a business card off during the event will be eligible to win one month of underwriting on KDRT 95.7 FM, the non-commercial radio station DMA operates ($125 value). Everyone can enter to win a $50 gift card to The Wardrobe. Several tablets will be available to facilitate participation in the BigDOG, and light refreshments will be available.

For more information, contact DMA at http://davismedia.org, [email protected] or (530) 757-2419.

###

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Ride of silence 5/20

By
April 19, 2015 |

Good afternoon,

Will you please publish the following information in your publication–running it twice if possible.

Thank you!

Ellen Winder
2015 Davis Ride of Silence

Date: Wednesday, May 20, 2015
Time: gather at 6:30 p.m., roll out at 7 p.m.
Place: Veterans Memorial Center parking lot, 203 E 14th St, Davis

The purpose of the ride is to honor and to remember all those who have been injured or killed while riding on the public roadways, and to remind motorists of the vulnerability of those with whom they share the roads. The first Ride of Silence occurred in 2003 in Dallas, Texas, and has since spread across the globe. Last year 10,600 riders participated in 315 Rides of Silence in 49 states and 22 countries.

Our 8-mile route through Davis will begin at the Veterans Memorial Center and end at the Bicycling Hall of Fame, where we will have the opportunity to socialize and share memories and stories. Everyone is welcome to join the ride, which will proceed in silence no faster than 12 mph. Helmets are mandatory and lights are recommended. More information about the event is available at www.rideofsilence.org.

For more information please contact Ellen Winder at [email protected]

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Enterprise staff

Comcast upgrade

By
April 19, 2015 |

A copy of this press release will be available at: http://comcastcalifornia.mediaroom.com/index.php?s=43

COMCAST ANNOUNCES 2 GIGABIT RESIDENTIAL SERVICE AND
NEW EXTREME 250 MBPS TIER IN CALIFORNIA

COMPANY ALSO INCREASES SPEEDS FOR EXISTING INTERNET CUSTOMERS
AT NO ADDITIONAL COST

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – April 17, 2015 – Comcast today announced it will launch Extreme 250, a new 250 Mbps Internet speed tier for California customers. The company also will increase its Performance tier from 50 Mbps to 75 Mbps and its Blast tier from 105 Mbps to 150 Mbps, both at no additional cost to customers. These changes will go into effect starting in May and continue throughout the year.

In addition, Comcast will roll out its residential multi-gigabit broadband service to nearly three million California homes starting in June. Gigabit Pro is a symmetrical, 2 Gigabit-per-second service that will be delivered via a fiber-to-the-home solution and offered to customers in the Chico, Fresno, Marysville/Yuba City, Merced, Modesto, Monterey, Sacramento, Salinas, San Francisco Bay Area, Santa Barbara County, Stockton and Visalia metro areas*.

“This is Comcast’s 15th speed increase in 13 years. We are proud to boost our existing speeds and most importantly introduce new Internet tiers like the Extreme 250 and Gigabit Pro that will allow our California customers to do more online, across multiple devices,” said Hank Fore, Regional Senior Vice President of Comcast Cable’s California Region. “We will continue to look for opportunities to increase speeds to not only stay ahead of customer demands, but also to provide a wide range of options that meet customer needs.”

Gigabit Pro will be available to homes within close proximity of Comcast’s fiber network and will require installation of professional-grade equipment. The company has fiber at the core of its network and, for the past decade, it has invested billions of dollars to extend that fiber deeper into neighborhoods and closer to homes. To date, Comcast has built out more than 145,000 route miles of fiber across its service area, including throughout California, to serve residential communities with a fiber to the home solution.

Comcast has been doubling the capacity of its network every 18 months. Additionally, the company has been delivering multi-gig (up to 10 Gbps) Ethernet service to businesses in California since 2011.

Comcast first announced Gigabit Pro in Atlanta earlier this month.

About Comcast Cable:
Comcast Cable is the nation’s largest video, high-speed Internet and phone provider to residential customers under the XFINITY brand and also provides these services to businesses under the Comcast Business brand. Comcast has invested in technology to build an advanced network that delivers among the fastest broadband speeds, and brings customers personalized video, communications and home management offerings. Comcast Corporation (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK) is a global media and technology company. Visit www.comcastcorporation.com for more information.

* The new Internet speeds mentioned throughout this press release will not launch in the following areas: Arbuckle, Coalinga, Cool, Gustine, Huron, Isleton, Le Grand, Lodi, Maxwell, Planada, Rio Vista, Santa Cruz, Santa Nella, Scotts Valley and Williams.

###

MEDIA CONTACT:
Bryan Byrd
(916) 826-7983
[email protected]

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Whole Foods donation

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April 19, 2015 |

Whole Foods Market Donates Feed 4 More Proceeds to Yolo Food Bank

WOODLAND, CA — Whole Foods Market in Davis presented a check for $8,593.86 to Yolo Food Bank to help stock the pantries of hungry families in Yolo County. Funds were raised during the Feed 4 More campaign held in November and December 2014. Caring Whole Foods shoppers added donations to their bills at the checkout counter.

Because Yolo Food Bank is able to leverage its buying power with food donations and wholesale bulk purchasing, Whole Foods’ donation represents $47,266.23 in wholesale food value (the equivalent of $5.50 for each donated dollar). The donation will make a big difference for the 17,000 local households (approximately 47,000 Yolo County residents) who access Yolo Food Bank each month.

The contribution will support Yolo Food Bank’s nine food distribution programs, including Kids Farmers Market which provides fresh produce for students at four Yolo county elementary schools and one preschool to take home to their families. Seventy-percent or more of the students at all five school qualify for free or reduced price school meals.

Since its partnership began with Yolo Food Bank in 2012, Whole Foods has donated over 231,000 pounds of food. Yolo Food Bank collects food from Whole Foods seven days a week. Executive Director of the Food Bank, Kevin Sanchez stated, “We are fortunate to have the support of Whole Foods Davis and their customers, and appreciate their enthusiasm to give back to our community. Our partnership with Whole Foods allows us to provide healthy choices to Yolo Food Bank clients with limited budgets,” Sanchez expressed, “We’re thrilled that this donation allows us to provide thousands of pounds of fresh local produce to our neighbors in need.”

XXX
The mission of Yolo Food Bank is to alleviate hunger and malnutrition in Yolo County. Through our programs and partnerships with over 60 local non-profit partner agencies, each month we serve 17,000 households

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Bill Leet on organics

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April 19, 2015 |

April 14, 2015

Editor, Davis Enterprise

Over the 76 years of my life I have lived in a half dozen cities. All seem to have in common that the City Council members believe that they are better qualified to guide city programs than the citizens of the city. My first experience with this was in Sandy, Oregon where a school dress code requiring grade-school girls to wear dresses in the winter was on the agenda. The council discussed issues of little concern to anyone there until after mid-night, apparently hoping people would go home. Finally with nothing more to discuss they opened public comment on the dress code. Forty-two people opposed and one supported the proposal. The proposed dress code passed the council anyway in a unanimous vote.

In Bellevue, Idaho the County Council ignored statutes and public commentary by banning the division of a property into 25 acre segments in an area zoned for 20-acre parcels. The council members received a terse reprimand from the Idaho Supreme Court.

Here in Davis, a small committee has devised a foolhardy program to reduce landfill. I expect that by naming it “the organics program” they figured it would sail by the mostly environmentally-conscious Davis population without much incident. To bolster their position they invited comment through the Davis Together::Social Network tool. That maneuver clinched it for me that the Davis Council would implement their plan without attention to any comments received, because only a handful of Davisites have ever heard of the Davis Together:: Social Network, and those that have, don’t represent mainstream opinion in Davis.

Was a study conducted to identify the source of bulk in the landfill and what other technology might be used to reduce it? Styrofoam is used indiscriminately to package everything from toys to appliances and has huge bulk. There are non-toxic ways to reduce plastic foams to one-one-hundredth of their volume. Wood adds bulk and could be easily separated by employees to do such a job. The cost would probably be less than the cost of thousands of 95 gallon bins. Who profits from selling bins to the city? Could we be looking at lobbying from private beneficiaries?

The program that Davis has now should be an example to other communities. The amount of organic material that can be disposed by piling garden cuttings in the street is enormous. Few other cities can come close. I predict that disposal of organics will be reduced under the new program. Moreover, to the detriment of our beautiful treescapes here in Davis, people will postpone pruning jobs that should be done in the winter and summer until fall. Is there a single arborist on the committee that devised this inane program? Davis, recipient of “Tree City USA designation, certainly should at least consult one.

The “organics program” committee should take a tour of the city sometime soon and note the amount of cuttings in the street. It is enormous in mid-spring, because that is when things grow fastest. The decision to conduct street pick-up primarily in the fall is ridiculous. Fall leaves are not the bulk of garden waste over the annual season, and most people prune throughout the year.

I believe it’s appropriate to mention that some five years or so ago I agreed to participate in a random telephone survey. The questions I was asked very clearly and certainly pertained to whether the green waste street disposal program was good, or whether it should be replaced by a program using bins for green waste. Since no change was made at that time, I must assume that public opinion in that survey favored continuing the present program. Are the results of that survey available for public scrutiny? Does the council have the results of that survey, which was designed by a polling business presumably qualified in sample design? It feels to me as if a this program is being pushed to accommodate minority interests and that some very viable alternatives have been over-looked.

Sincerely,

Bill Leet
530-574-4869

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Provenza on child abuse prevention

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April 19, 2015 |

April 17, 2015

Contacts: Lori Aldrete, 916-501-2654
[email protected]

Opinion Editorial
April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

By: Jim Provenza

Child abuse is a national problem.  It plagues every community in every state and crosses income, ethnic, and religious categories.  Our children are society’s greatest assets for the future. All children deserve to be loved, encouraged, and nurtured.

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month.  During this time, we focus on raising awareness about the issues surrounding child abuse and identify the work we are doing here in Yolo County to address the needs of vulnerable children and their families.

Research shows that children in families with social connections, resilience, financial stability, food security, knowledge of parenting and child development, and tools to help children develop social and emotional competence are less likely to be abused and neglected and more likely to have a healthy future.

Tragically, an estimated 3 million children each year are referred to state and local agencies across the United States for instances of maltreatment – nearly 6 referrals per minute.  During 2013, almost 500,00 California children were referred for welfare investigations, including approximately 2,000 reported cases in Yolo County.

Fortunately, a lot of good work to benefit children and families is being done in Yolo County.  In addition to our local government programs, we have several organizations doing outstanding work to help parents and children, including the Yolo County Children’s Alliance, Yolo County Crisis Nursery, Yolo Family Strengthening Network (YFSN), and First 5 Yolo.

As the Child Abuse Prevention Council for Yolo County, the Yolo County Children’s Alliance serves as the coordinator for the YFSN. More than 20 Yolo County agencies and organizations are involved in the Strengthening Families™ initiative; a research based strategy to increase family strengths, enhance child development, and reduce child abuse and neglect. The goal is to bring about fundamental change in how we serve families in Yolo County and to integrate a framework of five protective factors into our service systems countywide.

The five protective factors to promote better outcomes for families are parental resilience, social connections, knowledge of parenting and child development, concrete support in times of need, and building the social and emotional competence of children.

The Children’s Alliance also runs the highly successful Step by Step/Paso a Paso home visiting program which improves the infant-parent relationship by enhancing skills, promoting healthy child development, and encouraging healthy parent-child bonding in a safe home environment. From pregnancy through the child’s fifth birthday, a family support worker meets with and supports the family. Family support workers provide tips for self-care during pregnancy and how to soothe a crying baby, along with information on nutrition and a safe home environment. Together with the parents, they work on child development stages; social, emotional, and cognitive development for the child; parent-defined family goals; coping skills for stressful situations; accessing health services for child and parent; and parent-child bonding and attachment.

This year, the Yolo County Children’s Alliance and Child Abuse Prevention Council, in partnership with the Yolo Family Strengthening Network, has created a toolkit for families for Child Abuse Prevention Month. The theme of the toolkit and the Child Abuse Prevention Month campaign is Talk + Play = Connect, Time with Kids…It Adds Up!

The toolkit contains information for parents about why talking to children is so important, general tips on how to talk to children, book recommendations for parents and children, information on why playing is so important, and tips and activities for parents to do with children at every stage: baby, toddler, preschooler, school-age, and teenager.

For more information about the toolkit and other Yolo County Children’s Alliance programs, call (530) 757-5558 or go to yolokids.org.

Families in Yolo County can also find resources and support through local Family Resource Centers. The centers help families access needed services; provide free fresh produce, parenting, nutrition, and money management education; preschool classes; and, early developmental and mental health screenings for children.  Family Resource Centers are located in Davis, Woodland, West Sacramento, Clarksburg, Esparto, Knights Landing, Yolo, and Winters.

Thanks to the generous support and commitment of our community, another tremendous resource in the prevention of child abuse is the Yolo Crisis Nursery.

The Yolo Crisis Nursery’s overarching goal is to prevent child abuse and neglect by bridging emergency childcare with a support network of resources and services to ensure both parents and children form a healthy family. With their children in the safe hands of trained, committed staff members in a loving home environment, parents receive help from Crisis Nursery staff in resolving their crisis or hardship. Wrap around services and resources are provided to parents to help put the family back on track to a more stable life situation. Families stay whole and become stronger. Children are less likely to become troubled teens. The cycle of abuse is broken.

Our children are our greatest legacy.  During Child Abuse Prevention Month I invite all those with children in their lives to take a moment and reflect on what they can do to support the programs to help families, and ensure each young person in their life and our community is protected and nurtured.

###

Jim Provenza, a parent and grandparent, is the District 4 Yolo County Supervisor; Chair of the Yolo County Children’s Alliance; and Chair of First 5 Yolo.

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April 17, 2015 |

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Bike and Driver protocol story

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April 18, 2015 |

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Leet letter

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April 18, 2015 |

Over the 76 years of my life I have lived in a half dozen cities. All seem to have in common that the City Council members believe that they are better qualified to guide city programs than the citizens of the city. My first experience with this was in Sandy, Oregon where a school dress code requiring grade-school girls to wear dresses in the winter was on the agenda. The council discussed issues of little concern to anyone there until after mid-night, apparently hoping people would go home. Finally with nothing more to discuss they opened public comment on the dress code. Forty-two people opposed and one supported the proposal. The proposed dress code passed the council anyway in an unanimous vote.

In Bellevue, Idaho, the County Council ignored statutes and public commentary by banning the division of a property into 25 acre segments in an area zoned for 20-acre parcels. The council members received a terse reprimand from the Idaho Supreme Court.

Here in Davis, a small committee has devised a foolhardy program to reduce landfill. I expect that by naming it “the organics program” they figured it would sail by mostly environmentally-conscious Davis population without much incident. To bolster their position, the invited comment through the Davis Together::Social Network tool. That maneuver clinched it for me that the Davis Council would implement their plan without attention to any comments received because only a handful of Davisites have ever heard of the Davis Together::Social Network, and those that have, don’t represent mainstream opinion in Davis.

Was a study conducted to identify the source of bulk in the landfill and what other technology might be used to reduce it? Styrofoam is used indiscriminately to package everything from toys to appliances and has huge bulk. There are non-toxic ways to reduce plastic foams to one one-hundreth of their volume. Wood adds bulk and could be easily separated by employees to do such a job. The cost would probably be less than the cost of thousands of 95 gallon bins. Who profits from selling bins to the city? Could we be looking at lobbying from private beneficiaries?

The program that Davis has now should be an example to their communities. The amount of organic material that can be disposed by piling garden cuttings in the street is enormous. Few other cities can come close. I predict that disposal of organics will be reduced under the new program. Moreover, to the detriment of our beautiful trees here in Davis, people will postpone pruning jobs that should be done in the winter and summer until fall. Is there a single arborist on the committee that devised this inane program? Davis, recipient of “Tree City USA” designation, should at least consult one.

The “organics program committee should take a tour of the city sometime soon and note the amount of cuttings in the street. It is enormous in mid-spring because that is when things grow fastest. The decision to conduct street pick-up primarily in the fall is ridiculous. Fall leaves are not the bulk of garden waste over the annual season and most people prune throughout the year.

I believe it’s appropriate to mention that some five years ago or so ago I agreed to participate in a random telephone survey. The questions I was asked very clearly and certainly pertained to whether the green waste street disposal program was good, or whether it should be replaced by a program using bins for green waste. Since no change was made at that time, I must assume that public opinion in that survey favored continuing the present program. Are the results of that survey available for public scrutiny? Does the council have the results of that survey, which was designed by a polling business presumably qualified in sample design? It feels to me as if this program is being pushed to accommodate minority interests and that some very viable alternatives have been over looked.

Bill Leet
Davis

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EARTH DAY: Locals recognized by Council for positive environmental impact

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April 22, 2015 |

The Bike Campaign and Neighborhood Partners LLC were honored Tuesday evening by the Davis City Council when they received the city of Davis Environmental Recognition Awards.

The awards were created in 1995 by the Davis Natural Resources Commission to honor and recognize the environmental accomplishments of individuals, businesses and nonprofit organizations working in and around Davis.

The Bike Campaign was founded by Maria Contreras Tebbutt of Davis, who teaches by example and bikes wherever and whenever she can. The Bike Campaign has presented to thousands of people in the community the importance of reducing car trips to improve local air quality, reduce traffic congestion, reduce carbon emissions and to promote a healthier lifestyle for families.

The Bike Campaign has:

* Developed and sustained a “bike lending library” at the New Harmony apartments in South Davis;

* Presented free cycling clinics for the public, encouraging and educating people to learn about the basics of bike ownership and how to ride bikes in traffic while being safe;

* Brought together community leaders to support the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by reducing car trips;

* Established the Bike Garage, which provides donated bicycles to those who normally would not be able to afford to purchase a new bike. This program has significantly reduced the number of bikes that have to be recycled to metal, thereby reducing energy usage and pollution;

* Given presentations to school and community groups about how to reduce car trips and increase bike riding; and

* Created and implemented the Cycle de Mayo benefit bike ride, which brings riders together from Davis, Woodland and other areas for a country bike ride and to increase awareness for sustainable transportation.

The Bike Campaign nomination was submitted by Henriette Bruun, J. Cortez III, Lally Pia and Philip Summers.

Neighborhood Partners, LLC, was nominated by James Zanetto with letters of support from Unitrans and Brown Construction Inc. The principals are David J. Thompson and Luke Watkins, both longtime Davis residents.

The company has provided environmentally sensitive, permanently affordable housing for low-income families in Davis and Yolo County and has developed, initiated or assisted in creating about 800 units of affordable housing.

The projects feature passive solar, photovoltaic solar electricity, south-facing orientation, through ventilation, high-rating insulation, community gardens and planter boxes.

Neighborhood Partners communities are built with community solar, providing the equivalent power for the community building, parking lots and all general uses, which means residents pay only for their unit uses and do not pay for the property uses.

All of the Neighborhood Partners communities work with Unitrans or Yolobus to ensure a high level of bus service and close proximity to bus stops, as well as ensuring that the buses or Davis Community Transit have easy pick-up and drop-off to all of the Neighborhood Partners communities.

In addition, Neighborhood Partners built the first community in California to generate photovoltaics; the first senior community in Davis to have photovoltaics; the first affordable family community in Davis and in Woodland to have photovoltaics; and the first development in Davis to meet the dark-sky ordinance.

 

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Elly Fairclough photo

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April 18, 2015 |

Elly Fairclough took a retirement trip to the Grand Canyon — her first visit — to celebrate the next chapter of her life.

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College corner: How are AP credits counted in college? (NOT READY)

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April 18, 2015 |

Baseball season is upon us so I feel inspired to use some baseball analogies. Here goes: Right about now high school juniors and seniors are rounding third and heading into the home stretch. Several issues are weighing on their minds — college, finals, the nuclear deal with Iran, summer plans.

Although juniors and seniors are navigating different stages of the college admission process, surprisingly, many are asking me the same question. “How will my AP scores be counted for college credit and/or placement?” To understand this issue better, we first need to differentiate between placement and credit.

Placement means a student may skip into a higher-level college course but does not earn units toward graduation for that skipped course. Credit means a student does earn units toward a college degree. Basically, college credits for AP exam scores allow a student to progress to graduation sooner. So, earning credit leads to a reduction in tuition expenses! Or, it means taking fewer courses each term (maybe to allow for work) while still progressing toward graduation in a timely manner.

So back to the question at hand. Even though there are similarities in the assessment of AP scores for college credit and placement, each college — and sometimes each department within a college — sets its own policy, leading to variation across colleges. Indeed, colleges may offer both, or either, credit and placement.

In general, most colleges do give college credit for an AP exam minimum score of 3 or higher but some colleges only give credit for scores of 4 or 5. Keep in mind that AP exams are graded on a scale of 1 to 5 and the amount of credit a college provides for the same score may vary.

An example of one of the more straightforward AP college credit and placement policies is the UC system. The UCs grant AP credit for scores of 3 or higher, but the number of credits granted depends on the exam subject. For a score of 3 or higher on AP chemistry and AP statistics a student would earn 8 units and 4 units, respectively, on the quarter system. The California State University follows a similar protocol. Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, for instance, provides 9 college credits for each score of 3 or higher on both of these two exams.

Where things get a bit more convoluted is with some of the highly selective private schools. Many will provide different amounts of credits for different scores, not just different subjects. Yale, for example, which is on the semester system, only provides 1 college credit for an AP chemistry score of 5; but it will provide college credits for either a score of 4 (1 credit) or a score of 5 (2 credits) on the AP calculus BC exam. No credit is awarded for AP statistics.

Then there are some colleges which do not provide credit at all such as Brown and Cal Tech, which state on their websites that they do not award credit for AP exam scores.

Bottom line is that the answer to how will AP scores count for credit and placement is “it depends.” Thus, it is worthwhile to invest some time to understand the AP credit and placement policy of the college you will, or you want, to attend. A good place to go is the College Board’s AP Credit Policy website https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies.

What you will find for each college is a list of AP exams and the scores required to earn credits for those exams, how many credits are awarded for that score and the equivalent course that would be skipped.

Regardless of the credit policy of the college though, taking APs helps make a student more competitive in the college application process. My suggestion is to take AP courses in your areas of strength and sit for the AP exam. See my website for my April 2014 column entitled, “How many APs should I take?” for more guidance on this topic. Once you receive your scores you can start to piece together the credits and/or placement you may recieve.

Oh, and remember that in order to receive credit, you need to have the College Board send your official AP scores to the college of your choice. You can send scores to one college for free at testing time or afterward online at the College Board website for $15 dollars per each score report sent. The 2015 AP exams will be available online in early July.

Usually, colleges will notify you after receiving your scores about what you have qualifed for in terms of credit, placement and/or course exemptions. Contact your college of choice if you have any more questions.

Until next time … and my favorite Yogi Berra quote to stay with the baseball theme. “If you see a fork in the road, take it.” So true, so true.

Interesting facts about 2014 AP exams
(http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/research/2014/Prog-Summary-Report-2014.pdf)

38 different AP exams
Overall average score of 2.89
4.176 million exams taken
2.34 million students took AP exams
6% increase over previous year in number of exams
High school seniors take more APs than other high school years
English Language & Composition Ap Exam is taken the most

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BIKE TAB: Bike the Bay this May

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May 01, 2015 |

It almost seems a heresy to say. But it’s true, that right here in the land of the automobile and legendary drives like U.S. Highway 1, where hot rods were born and where driverless cars are being designed, California actually has a car-free side. It’s not so surprising though, one constant you will always find here is that it is a place that is constantly reinventing itself and open to new ideas. Like freeing urban environments from gridlock, minimizing carbon footprints and getting locals and visitors more in touch with their communities by getting them out of cars and into other modes of public transportation, like bicycles. Here’s a Bay Area overview that will put you in touch with many recent developments that are transforming California into a car-free paradise.

Connecting folks to spokes around the Bay Area

LA may be where the car still reigns as king, but only in San Francisco can you ride on a National Historic Landmark. Since 1873, the city has flexed its car-free cred with its storied cable cars, the much-loved antique street trolleys that are the world’s last permanently operating manual cable car system. Three cable lines criss-cross the city taking you to every see-worthy site in S.F. including neighborhoods like Nob Hill and North Beach. More information can be found at the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency website.

But the wheels keep turning here in the Bay Area and the last decade or so has seen another mode of transportation become a local icon as well. San Francisco has wholeheartedly adopted a bicycle culture that thrives in the city’s compact urban environment. Organizations such as the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition connect folks to spokes in myriad ways including adult, youth and family bike lessons, city bike maps and walking guides (including topo maps so you can avoid those legendary hills), mapping tools to create your own routes and insider information on how to combine your bike ride with public transit systems like BART and the Muni bus system.

Other ways to enjoy San Francisco’s bike culture include pedaling the paths of Golden Gate Park to enjoy scenic attractions like the Japanese Tea Garden, especially on Sundays when the park is closed to vehicle traffic. Sundays are also a bike bell-ringer for another reason: the city’s Sunday Streets program, which runs from March until October, closes streets to vehicle traffic for eight Sundays in different neighborhoods such as The Mission and Tenderloin areas, allowing cyclists to share the streets with rollerbladers, pedestrians, open-air yoga classes and kids’ programs. Making it easy to enjoy any of the above, San Francisco has also instituted a new bikeshare program, Bay Area BikeShare, offering annual, monthly, 3-day and daily memberships. Just visit one of the solar-powered kiosks spread around the city, swipe your card and get rolling.

Across the bay in Oakland and Berkeley, Open Streets Sundays are also part of the mix, with both cities asking locals and visitors to leave the car in the garage for a day to enjoy new activities and feel the pulse of the city. In Oakland, Oaklavia is a city-wide celebration that connects community organizations, business owners, entertainers, locals and visitors who can ride, walk, blade and celebrate freely in select neighborhoods including North Oakland and Lake Merritt. Sunday Streets Berkeley turns Shattuck Avenue into a playful venue where you’re encouraged to cycle, stroll, dance and discover this colorful East Bay neighborhood near UC Berkeley.

The East Bay’s thriving bike culture has also spawned some great resources and sub-cultures like Spokeland (classes, clinics, parts, events) and Oakland’s scraper bike culture, where inner city young people take found objects and transform their bikes into highly stylized green machines.

Serving the entire Bay Area, Bay Area Rapid Transit traverses everywhere from points east like Walnut Creek to the heart of San Francisco – even going under the bay for a Chunnel-like experience – to ensure you can cover virtually the entire region without ever getting in a car.

— Courtesy of visitcalifornia.com

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Special to The Enterprise

BIKE TAB: Bike rides, breezeways and beer

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Michael MusialW

Musician and and singer Michael Musial is the featured artist at next Sunday at I-House, set for Sunday, April 26. Courtesy photo

www.facebook.com/amyshumanphoto

The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn (Spencer Alexander) has a conversation with a plant he names "Audrey II" in the Woodland Opera House production of “Little Shop of Horrors.” The plant turns out to be much more than he expected. Courtesy photo

JenniferBorensteinW

Biketrip4 Bike path entranceW

The bike path entrance coming into Davis from the Yolo Causeway is marked with a sign. This part of the path is relatively smooth. Elizabeth Case/ Enterprise photo

By
May 01, 2015 |

As craft beer booms around California, so it does in Yolo County. Now, it’s well know that downtown Davis has an incredible beer selection: the Beer Shoppe, de Vere’s, City Hall, University of Beer, Sudwerk and many more. But if you’re looking for an adventure, consider hopping on your bike and pedaling to a local brewery, like Bike Dog, Jackrabbit Brewing Company and Yolo Brewing Company, all of which found a home across from the Port of Sacramento just over the causeway.

The trip is about 12 miles one way — an hour-plus of riding without stopping.

There are two ways to start from downtown:

1: Head under the Lincoln Highway/E Street underpass and take a left at Olive Drive.
Continue down about three-quarters of a mile, then cross over the street to the bike path that is hidden along the highway. Be careful when crossing the street — the Olive Drive freeway exit drops cars off right where the bike path starts.
Follow the bike path for an easy three miles. It will drop you right past where the tracks cross the Lincoln Highway (Road 32A)

2: Take Third Street east (away from the university), and then take a right when you reach L Street.
Follow L Street as it bends left and merges onto Second Street, and pedal about 2 miles past the dog park, then bear left with the road past Target and continue straight, crossing Mace Boulevard. On your right is Ikeda’s. They’ve got great tamales and top-notch pies, so if you’re in the mood for a picnic, leave a little early and pick up some food for a stop under the highway at the Yolo Bypass.
Keep biking straight, until you have to bear right to cross the train tracks.

Both path options above will lead you right to the intersection of the railroad and Lincoln Highway. Ride straight down Lincoln for another 2 miles, then before the road makes a U-Turn, bear slightly left across the road and up the small hill that separates the road from bypass.

(If you gave yourself an extra hour, follow the U-turn around — there’s a path that will take you into the bypass on your left and it is a gorgeous piece of nature to explore. Note that bikes are not allowed in the bypass area — you can dismount and lock them together, or walk with them.)

The road will take you toward the highway, and then turn left to bike along it. The cars can be pretty noisy, but it’s probably safe to wear ear plugs if it really bothers you. Just make sure to take them out when you hit the end of the bike path.

The bike path offers great views of the north end of the Yolo bypass. If you bike back around sunset, you might see swirls of bats flock out of their roosts under the highway.

At the end of the bike path, veer right at the Roland Hensely Bicycle Pathway sign, onto Enterprise Boulevard, and under the freeway overpass. This is a terrible street for bikes, but you’re only on it for about a quarter of a mile before you turn left onto Industrial Boulevard.

To start your afternoon at Bike Dog, follow Industrial until you reach Harbor Boulevard. I’d recommend taking a left here and an immediate right onto Del Monte, because Industrial loses its bike lane and it’s difficult to turn left into the Bike Dog parking lot, especially during rush hour.

Turn right onto Terminal, then right again onto the Industrial sidewalk. Dismount, and turn into the first parking lot. If you peek into the alleyway just before, you can see the backside of the bar. You can enter here, too, but the bike rack is on the other side.

To reach Yolo Brewing Company and Jackrabbit Brewing Company, exit Bike Dog and walk your bike to the intersection of Industrial and Terminal Street, turning left onto Terminal; both breweries are then just minutes down the road from each other.

Grab a beer, nosh at the food trucks, and while away an afternoon.

Bike safe!

Note: Please, bike and drink responsibly. The Davis Enterprise does not condone or encourage biking and drinking. Know your limits, and please, take a taxi or car share home if you drink one too many beers.

BREAKOUT BOX:

West Sacramento beer houses within biking distance of Davis:

Bike Dog Brewery is located at 2534 Industrial Blvd. #110. Hours: 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 2 to 9 p.m. Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday

Yolo Brewing Company sits just down the street from Bike Dog, at 1520 Terminal St. Hours: 3 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday

And only two blocks further is Jackrabbit Brewing Company at 1323 Terminal St. Hours: 5 to 9 p.m. Friday and noon to 9 p.m. Saturday

Try these other Yolo County options for more beer-cycle adventures:

Find Berryessa Brewing just beyond Winters on Road 128, a 17-mile trip one way. Hours: 3 to 8 p.m. Friday, noon to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

The Black Dragon Brewery & Homebrew Shop lies at the west end of Main Street in Woodland, a 12-13 mile trip one way. Hours: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, 3 to 9:30 p.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, and 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday

**This story originally ran in our Welcome edition October 2, 2014; it has been updated to include new breweries in the area and hours of operation.

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Elizabeth Case

Lutch letter

By
April 17, 2015 |

Ms. Parker is sadly inaccurate when she characterizes Jay Dudley as equating criticism of Israel with anti-Semitism. Mr. Dudley was addressing the fact that Israel is subjected to attacks whose goal is to besmirch and undermine Israel, the only democracy in the Middle East. Apparently Ms. Parker cannot cope with Mr. Dudley’s exercise of free speech and finds it necessary to treat him with ridicule.

According to Ms. Parker, “It seems dictators everywhere are united in believing that patriotism is far too important to be subjected to mere fact.” This is certainly the case in Iran. The day after Iran’s June 12, 2009 election results were announced, hundreds of thousands of people poured onto Tehran’s streets to protest. Thousands of protesters were beaten, hundreds were arrested and dozens were killed by snipers. On June 18, Supreme Leader Khamenei delivered a Friday prayer sermon dismissing the protesters’ complaints that the election was rigged. Clearly the Iranian regime was not going to tolerate the Green Movement. Many of us remember news reports about the tragic death of 26-year-old Neda Soltan, an aspiring musician, shot by a sniper, as she stood at the edge of a Green Movement protest. Based on the actions of the Iranian regime, it would behoove those who are not bothered by Khamenei’s recent “Death to America, of course” to understand that a call for “Death to Israel” really is something to be taken seriously.

No matter how they are disguised, efforts that are accurately labeled as anti-Semitism are present in American society today and identifying them as such does not “undercut American democracy.” Mr. Dudley’s presentation set forth the intellectual underpinnings that eventually lead to genocidal hatred.

Julia Lutch
43577 Almond Lane
Davis
530-902-8449

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Anne Ternus-Bellamy

Students of the Month – April

By
April 17, 2015 |

The Sunrise Rotary Club of Davis recently honored XX Davis, Da Vinci and King high school students as Students of the Month for April. They are:

* Manuel Enriquez, nominated by King High School counselor Uta Russell, who wrote, “We have truly enjoyed having Manuel at King for over one year now and admire so much about him. He has a great presence in our school, every day he comes to school with a smile, he is a very good student, an asset to our community, a good friend and supportive to other students. Manuel Enriquez exhibits several qualities that make him an exemplary student: his attendance is superb, he is focused, reflective and more importantly eager to learn. Simply put, he portrays the qualities that make up a great student. His Economics teacher reports that Manuel is able to make connections with previously taught concepts on both a micro and macroeconomic level. What does that mean? He sees how the big economic picture affects the wallet. He is always a pleasure to have in class and is a model student. Manuel is a senior who is on track to graduate early, maybe even by the end next week because he will have met all of his graduation requirements by then. At this point, he is exploring and pursuing his postsecondary options and has signed up at American River Community College and is also considering the military. Congratulations, Manuel!”

————

There are three Rotary clubs in Davis, which meet at noon Mondays, 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays and 7 a.m. Fridays. Members provide service to their community and internationally. For more information about Rotary, contact Dennis Lindsay of the Sunrise club at [email protected], Samer Alassaad of the noon club at [email protected] or Steve Boschken of the Sunset club at [email protected]

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Enterprise staff

FOIA Act

By
April 17, 2015 |

Hi Debbie,

President Obama has routinely promised greater transparency within the federal government. Now, Congress is making great strides towards actually achieving this critical goal.

Please consider the below op-ed by Caroline Little, President and CEO of the Newspaper Association of America, on the legislation currently under review by both the House and the Senate. The bills have the potential to greatly impact both the work of journalists and the public’s access to key information.

Thanks very much for your time and consideration. I look forward to your thoughts.

Best,
Carly

Carly Buggy
On behalf of the NAA

o: (484) 385-2934
m: (585) 755-8822
[email protected]

Why strengthening the Freedom of Information Act is so important

By Caroline Little, president and CEO, NAA

Word count: 586

President Obama has routinely promised greater transparency within the federal government. Now, Congress is making strides towards achieving this critical goal.

The House of Representatives and Senate are currently considering nearly identical bills to strengthen the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), which provides the general public, including journalists, with access to federal government records.

This legislation has received broad support across media organizations, including the Sunshine in Government Initiative, a coalition of which the Newspaper Association of America is a member. And here’s why:

Openness instead of secrecy would be the “default” key within the government.

The legislation would require agencies to release documents under a “presumption of openness,” reaffirming the principle that information should never be kept confidential to protect government interests at the expense of the public. Agencies would need to prove specific harm that could result from disclosures before withholding documents. While this policy has been in place since 2009, the legislation would ensure future administrations honor this objective for openness.

The process of obtaining FOIA records would be much more efficient.

Citizens and journalists would receive requested information in a more timely fashion and would be updated on the status of their request or reason for denial. Federal agencies would be allowed to withhold information on policy deliberations for only 25 years – currently, there is no limit.

More records would be available.

The legislation would require agencies to post frequently requested information online. This will give citizens and journalists more timely access to key information and a deeper understanding of what the government is doing – or not doing.

Why is this important?

The Freedom of Information Act remains a powerful, though currently inefficient, tool to obtain public information. Last year, several key stories were brought to light as a result of reporters’ FOIA record requests.

The Associated Press was able to show that people accused of Nazi war crimes had continued receiving Social Security payments after leaving our country. In another instance, a reporter reviewing military ballistics tests found that the Marine Corps had issued armored vests that failed to protect against bullets – and 5,277 vests were quickly recalled, perhaps saving lives. Likewise, records obtained through FOIA revealed that some firefighter safety equipment failed to work properly when exposed to heat or moisture, rendering it ineffective in crisis situations.

Without these records and journalists’ diligent research, none of this would have been brought to public attention. Our armed forces and firefighters may have been directly harmed as a result.

The Freedom of Information Act was enacted in 1966. It remains critical for creating and preserving an open and accountable government. However, it must be updated to keep up with changing technology and a persistent mindset within federal agencies that information belongs to the government not the general public.

Congress came very close to passing FOIA reform legislation last year before the end of the 113th Congress. Now, members in both the Senate and House are working in a bi-partisan fashion to move these bills forward in the new Congress. The Senate Judiciary Committee unanimously approved its FOIA reform bill, S. 337, which is sponsored by Senators John Cornyn, Patrick Leahy, and Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley. The House bill (H.R. 653), which is sponsored by Representatives Darrell Issa and Elijah Cummings, was reported out of committee last week. We applaud the bills’ sponsors and the congressional leadership for turning their attention to this good government legislation. We hope that this momentum bodes well for bipartisan, bicameral action early in the new Congress.

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Cycle de Mayo 5/2

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April 17, 2015 |

4/15/15

PRESS RELEASE

TAKE Immediate ACTION

CYCLE DE MAYO benefit bike ride

Enjoy a nice leisurely ride in the country. Join us for the Cycle de Mayo benefit bike ride in Yolo County on Saturday, May 2, starting at 8-9am. (Day-of registration 7:30am)

A great way to kick off National May is Bike Month. Ride 10, 15, or 25 miles between Davis/Woodland or Woodland/Davis with a party stop at Plainfield Station, Yolo County’s most famous ‘biker bar’. Live music, fresh fruit and the amazing Whymcycles will add to the fun. All levels of riders are invited to ride any kind of bike, whatever distance they want. Invite your family and friends to ride and enjoy this celebration.

Advance tickets are $25 for adults, $10 students, kids under 12 are FREE, available on-line at http://cycledemayo15.brownpapertickets.com (Day-of $30/$15). Riders will leave from either Davis High school, 315 W. 14th St., or Woodland High School, 21 N. West St., and meet in the middle for a party at Plainfield Station. Repeat the 25 mile route for more mileage and a longer ride!

The ride will benefit the Center for Families, which guides very low-incolme and poor families to self-sufficiency by providing bikes and training.

For more information contact. Maria Contreras Tebbutt at (530) 753-1125 or [email protected] or visit www.thebikecampaign.com (events).

///

Maria Contreras Tebbutt
Nationally Certified Cycling Instructor
Non-Profit Program of Center for Families
Private Office: (530) 753-1125

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Enterprise staff

Lewlin letter on Roundup

By
April 17, 2015 |

At the risk of being labeled a bully, I would like to point out the flaws in the reasoning of the kids who wrote to you urging people not to use Roundup herbicide. (If anyone expresses an opinion in a public forum they should be prepared to deal with reasonable rebuttal no matter how young they may be.)
The argument is that Roundup kills milkweed, which Monarch Butterflies need to survive. However if you do not apply the Roundup to milkweed it does not get killed.
The confusion stems from the assertion that GMO corn is causing a decline in Monarch populations. The GMO insect resistant corn has pollen that is slightly toxic to the butterflies. However it is not toxic enough to kill them, and in any case the pollen is not present when the larvae come out. Actually the reduction of insecticide use is good for the butterflies. Insecticide kills all butterflies and the larvae.
The Roundup resistant corn is so effective when used with roundup at killing the weeds that the milkweed is indeed not present. This can be a problem. To mitigate this, the Monsanto company gives away packages of milkweed seed to corn farmers and urges them to plant it where it will not be killed by the Roundup. This is an issue in Iowa, not Davis.
Using Roundup to kill crabgrass or something like that, will not do any harm to anyone or to the butterflies.
This crusade is well intended but based on misunderstandings.
Roundup is a low toxicity chemical and breaks down very quickly. It is a way better option than most herbicides out there. Most of the other herbicides available also kill milkweed, if sprayed on milkweed. Why no crusade against them?
There are important environmental issues out there to be concerned about, but this is not one of them.
I have no problem with urging people to plant milkweed. Perhaps I will too. A quick search revealed that one can get free milkweed seed at https://www.livemonarch.com/free-milkweed-seeds.htm. No doubt these kids will avail themselves of this offer and plant a big patch of milkweed!
Gabe Lewin
Davis

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Letters to the Editor

Mete letter

By
April 17, 2015 |

Karahan Mete
635 Adams St # 6
Davis CA, CA 95616-3284

April 15, 2015

The Davis Enterprise
315 G Street
Davis, CA 95616

Dear Davis Enterprise:

Assembly Bill (AB) 1410 seeks to divest public employee and teacher
pension funds from Turkey, urging this nation to change its policy on a
historical dispute.

AB 1410 constitutes ethnic pandering and creates a dangerously slippery
slope. Will every ethnic constituency with a grudge ask the state to
divest from a foreign country? Will Japan be next because Korean Americans
object to Japan’s stance on the “Comfort Women” of WWII? Will England
follow because Irish Californians are uncomfortable with its commemoration
of the Potato Famine? Will Laos and Vietnam be targeted out of respect
for California Hmong? The list could go on until nearly every corner of
the world is off-limits for pension fund investment. And how would PERS
and STRS administrators do their jobs faced with divestment orders every
year?

As a member of the Pax Turcica Institute I sense that California is
preoccupied with one ethnic group’s grudge against Turks and Turkey. It is
patently unfair that our history textbooks, through equally misguided
education bills, fail to acknowledge the enormous massacres and
deportations of millions of Ottoman Muslims during the Balkan Wars of
1912-13 and the subsequent World War I. It is also alarming that AB 1410
is unconstitutional as it would adversely impact the federal government’s
exclusive right to regulate foreign commerce.

AB 1410 claims that divestment from Turkey is similar to the current laws
regarding Sudan and Iran. This is untrue. While divestment from Iran and
Sudan is authorized by federal law, federal government has never
considered sanctions against Turkey over the debated history. Furthermore,
the Iran and Sudan related legislation addressed the ongoing human rights
violations in the states that sponsor terrorism. In contrast, Turkey has
upheld universal human rights and has been a close U.S. and NATO ally for
decades.

If adopted AB 1410 will signal that U.S. foreign policy can be misled by a
vocal constituency that can get its ethnic grudge on legislative agenda.
That would make the already complex administration of the state’s pension
funds impossible. AB 1410 is bad for California, it should not pass.

Sincerely,

Karahan Mete
530 297-1655

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Letters to the Editor

Coal Divestment

By
April 17, 2015 |

Investing in coal and fossil fuel companies financially support corporations which spew tons of pollution into the atmosphere, when there are more environmentally conscious ways to create energy. Dirty energy is not the only way to power America, and it is time for large institutions and entities to divest from coal and fossil fuel companies.

Recently San Francisco’s Retirement Board has divested half a billion dollars in fossil fuel holdings. Divesting from investments in fossil fuels will be a powerful step in combatting climate change, which is why I urge CalPERS to divest from thermal coal companies in the upcoming senate bill. Divestment is a clear and strong message to citizens and companies alike; we do not support your dirty energy.
Caroline Williams
Davis

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Sean Gellen Boys lacrosse vs. Casa Roble photo

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Michael MusialW

Musician and and singer Michael Musial is the featured artist at next Sunday at I-House, set for Sunday, April 26. Courtesy photo

www.facebook.com/amyshumanphoto

The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn (Spencer Alexander) has a conversation with a plant he names "Audrey II" in the Woodland Opera House production of “Little Shop of Horrors.” The plant turns out to be much more than he expected. Courtesy photo

JenniferBorensteinW

Biketrip4 Bike path entranceW

The bike path entrance coming into Davis from the Yolo Causeway is marked with a sign. This part of the path is relatively smooth. Elizabeth Case/ Enterprise photo

12dhs boysLaxW

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April 12, 2015 |

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Felicia Alvarez

Will the drought hit your kitchen?

By
From page A5 | April 15, 2015 |

According to the latest USDA forecast “California Drought 2014-15: Food Prices and Consumers”, food prices aren’t expected to increase more than usual, that is a 2-3 percent increase over last year. (They note, however, that the 2005 drought resulted in a 4-percent increase, and they do update forecasts regularly.)

Even a 2-percent increase can seem like a lot at the checkout, and it’s likely that it won’t be an evenly distributed increase. Fresh produce, meat and dairy will likely go up more than canned beans or potato chips, making family shopping a little more difficult.

What’s a good cook to do? Planning well, shopping smart and avoiding waste are the order of the day. Since I’ve written quite a bit on all those topics (archives of which are nicely available on the Davis Enterprise website) it might be a better use of this space to provide you with some inexpensive and delicious dinner recipes to keep things lively.

All of these recipes are vegetarian, since meat prices are likely to spike higher than zucchini. Any of them would be nice with a bit of shredded cooked chicken added at the end of cooking. On the flip side, they can be made vegan with little trouble – substitute some nice tofu for the egg and replace the cheese with some extra avocado.

— Julie Cross is marketing and education director at the Davis Food Co-op. She writes a monthly food column for The Davis Enterprise.

Taiwan Noodles

Here’s a super quick and tasty supper. If you like spice, add sliced hot peppers or hot sauce to the dish.

Ingredients:
4 oz. Asian wheat noodles
oil
3 scallions
10 mushrooms
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon broth
2 baby bok choy, sliced
2 eggs

Putting it together:

Cook noodles according to package instructions. Cook sliced scallions and mushrooms in a bit of oil until nicely browned. Add garlic. Add bok choy, soy sauce and broth. Cover pan and let cook until bok choy is done. Add cooked noodles and let rest while you cook two eggs – fried or poached as you like. Divide noodles between bowls and top with egg.

Potatoes with Everything

This is an excellent way to use up leftover vegetables.

Ingredients:
half a bell pepper, sliced
oil
8 small cooked potatoes
4 green onions, white and light green part thinly sliced
salt
handful of cooked greens
grated cheese
sour cream
cilantro
(hot sauce or peppers)

Putting it together:

Toss pepper in a hot pan with just a bit of oil. Slice potatoes into bite-sized chunks and add to pan. Salt to taste. Let cook, stirring infrequently, until peppers are tender and potatoes nicely browned, adding green onions for last few minutes of cooking. Add greens and let heat through. Divide between two plates and sprinkle with cheese. Top each serving with sour cream, cilantro and hot stuff if you like it.

Laura’s Tortilla Soup

This is an excellent late spring soup – substitute fresh and frozen vegetables at will based on price and availability.

Ingredients:
3 flour or corn tortillas, cut into strips
1 tablespoon high heat oil
1 1/2 cups chopped onion
1/4 cup chopped red bell peppers
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes
2 cups finely chopped kale
1 cup frozen sweet corn or corn cut from 2 ears
1 small can of black beans, rinsed
5-6 cups vegetable or chicken broth
½  tablespoon chili powder
2 teaspoons cumin
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
1 1/2 teaspoons hot pepper sauce (opt.)
salt and ground black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
1 avocado — peeled, pitted, and sliced
1 cup shredded cheese

Putting it together:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Arrange tortilla strips on a baking sheet and spray lightly with cooking spray.

Bake in the preheated oven until golden and crispy, 8 to 10 minutes.

Over medium-high heat, sauté onion, red bell pepper, cumin, chili powder, garlic, salt, and pepper in oil. Sauté until onion is translucent, 5 to 10 minutes. Then add zucchini and corn. Sauté until zucchini is slightly softened, 3 to 4 minutes.

Add broth, diced tomatoes, black beans, kale and hot sauce to the pot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer soup until vegetables are tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Stir cilantro into soup and serve topped with sliced avocados, tortilla strips, jack cheese and a wedge of lime.

Stovetop Mac and Cheese

This is, oddly, one of the most frequently mentioned recipes at the Co-op. It just goes to show that simple, homemade mac & cheese is much superior to stuff-in-a-box, even organic stuff-in-a-box.

Ingredients:
2 cups uncooked macaroni (or tiny shells)
2 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoon flour
1 cup milk, conventional or unsweetened soy
1/4 teaspoon dry mustard
1 cup grated cheese (jack or cheddar)
Salt and pepper to taste

Putting it together:

Cook macaroni according to package instructions. In a heavy saucepan, melt the butter. Add the flour, mixing well, and cook over low heat for one minute. Pour in the milk in a thin steady stream, stirring the whole time, and mix carefully to get any lumps out. Cook over low heat until thick, stirring occasionally. Be gentle – do not whisk or beat. When thick, stir in mustard. I don’t normally salt food when cooking; if you do, salt according to taste.

Drain macaroni and return to pot. Put grated cheese on top. Pour sauce over. LET STAND FOR 1 MINUTE. Stir gently. Serve at once.

Serves two.

Happy Crispy Cakes with Zippy Sauce

This is a staff favorite at the Co-op, and my house.

Ingredients:
1 carrot, peeled
1 stalk celery, strings removed
1/4 cup chopped yellow onions
1/4 cup chopped red pepper
1/4 cup frozen sweet potato cubes
1 clove of garlic
1 tablespoon finely grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons finely ground nuts
1 egg white
1 tsp. prepared mustard
1/2 tsp. salt
2/3 cup fine fresh bread crumbs or matzo meal
olive oil for frying

Zippy Sauce:
1 teaspoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1 teaspoon oil
1 clove garlic, minced
4 green onions, white & tender green parts chopped
2 tablespoons tamari or teriyaki sauce
2 tablespoons vinegar
1/2 teaspoon brown rice syrup

Putting it together:

Using a food processor, hand grinder or a very sharp knife, very finely chop all the vegetables. Stir in cheese, nuts, white egg and salt. Heat a large skillet and add enough oil to coat the bottom of the pan. Form about 2 teaspoons of the vegetable mixture into a small cake; dip both sides in bread crumbs. Add to hot pan and cook over medium heat without turning until golden brown. Flip and cook until brown on second side. Serve at once, or hold in a single layer on a cookie sheet in a warm oven.

* Slip your knife blade just behind several strings. Use your thumb to hold on to the strings, then peel them down the length of the celery.

Zippy Sauce: Mix vinegar, tamari & rice syrup together. In a non-stick sauté pan, sauté ginger and garlic gently in oil until fragrant, 1-2 minutes. Add green onions and cook another minute. Add vinegar mixture and bring to boil. Cook until slightly reduced, 2-3 minutes.

Serves two as a main dish or four as a side dish.

— Wish you had more recipes like this? Visit http://davisfood.coop/education/recipes and your wish can come true!

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Remembering Steve Marschke

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April 15, 2015 |

By Daryl Fisher
Features Editor
Steve Marschke, the longtime publisher and editor of this paper, has died. I have never liked that word, since it sounds so harsh and final, and when I edit the obituaries here at the News-Ledger, I always use the phrase, “passed away”, which drove Steve absolutely nuts. Unlike me, Steve was a real newspaperman who wanted everything stated clearly and factually, and he was always telling me, “People die, Daryl, they don’t pass away!” So there you go, Steve, you finally got me to do it right.

Steve was diagnosed with esophageal cancer at the beginning of this year. He had started to have some trouble swallowing, but other than that, he was in fine health. But further tests revealed that the cancer was already at stage 3 and he immediately began both chemotherapy and radiation treatments, which ended last month. But while awaiting surgery later this month to remove the rest of the cancer, x-rays discovered that it had spread to his diaphragm and lungs. With his cancer now being both inoperable and aggressive, Steve died last week, surrounded by the family he loved so much.

Steve had a fine education and was an avid reader who was extremely knowledgeable about everything from cooking to politics. He could have done most anything with his life, but by his mid-20s, he was in love with the newspaper business. When he first started working for the News-Ledger almost three decades ago, he once told me he wouldn’t have been surprised if he had found Benjamin Franklin still toiling there because everything in the place was so out-of-date. Slowly and surely, though, Steve started changing things, even if he had to drag people along kicking and screaming.

Over the years, although he was always working on a shoestring budget, Steve managed to modernize most everything about the News-Ledger. Among many other things, he made it possible for us to layout and print the paper with computers instead of by hand, properly track and bill our loyal subscribers and advertisers, and have a front page that was much more about facts than opinions. And when the longtime owner of the News-Ledger died and left the paper to Steve, he quickly went about paying off more than $20,000 of printer’s debt by greatly expanding our legal advertising. For the first time since anyone could remember, the News-Ledger became profitable, and it has stayed that way to this day.

Although Steve was very much a modern man, especially when it came to such things as literature and technology, he was also a throwback in terms of how newspaper men were supposed to act and report. He was maybe the most honest man I have ever met and he wanted any story that found its way into the News-Ledger to be as accurate and fair as humanly possible.

Steve was not into fluff and hyperbole and I often teased him about being like Sergeant Joe Friday, the famous detective on the old 1960’s TV drama, Dragnet, who used to always say, “Just the facts, Ma’am.” He was also always kind, polite, and friendly to a fault, and in all the 25 years I worked with him, I can’t remember us ever having a single argument, or of him ever even raising his voice to anyone. He didn’t like dealing with a bunch of unneeded drama in his life and the News-Ledger office was always a fun and harmonious place to be and work.

Steve was a man of many talents who could sail his own boat, make his own beer, properly train dogs that other people had given up on, and cook a gourmet meal. Most of all, though, he was a family man, and he was rocked to his core by the unexpected death of his beloved wife, Cindy, less than two years ago. He was also very devoted to his two step-daughters, Sarah Jane and Laura, and his parents, Gerald and Joyce Marschke, and he was surrounded by their love when he died.

How does one say goodbye to someone so young and vital and still very much needed by his family and friends? Steve was only 51, and he was full of hopes and dreams and goals, especially when it came to this newspaper. He had been working hard to be able to someday turn it over to the community of West Sacramento, to be ran by a non-profit foundation governed by local citizens who would appreciate as he did the fact that a well-run local newspaper is invaluable to the community it serves.

I usually got to the office most days before Steve did, since he was coming from Davis where he lived. But as soon as he was comfortably seated at his desk, he wanted to know if anything new had happened in West Sacramento, the region, and even the world for that matter. He was inquisitive by nature and his appetite for wanting to know as much as possible about what was going on all around him was insatiable. And because Steve was so knowledgeable about so many things, he was also very well aware of the fact that his chances of beating the kind of cancer he had were not very good. But in these past weeks when hope and his strength began to fade, Steve spent very little time talking about his very serious health issues, preferring to concentrate as best he could on his work and the emotional well-being on those he loved the most.

Finally one day I just blurted out, “Why you, Steve?”, to which he simply replied, “Why not me?”

So here I am Steve, sitting at my desk at the old News-Ledger in the dusty and cluttered office we shared for so many years, knowing that it will never be the same now. Without much of an effort at all, you made it a wonderful place to work, learn and grow, and your tireless efforts on behalf of our little community newspaper has made West Sacramento a much better place to call home. And since I know how much you have missed Cindy, I’m hoping there is some kind of reunion permitted, because I know that would please you a million times more than any words I or anyone else could pen about you.

There is one little story I want to tell, though, since I think it goes to the heart of who Steve really was, and it’s about a little mongrel dog he named Jenny.

One rainy night way back when the News-Ledger was located on West Acres Road across the street from Raley’s, Steve looked out the big picture window and saw a little stray dog as black as the night hobbling along using only three of her four legs. Out of his chair he flew and into the pouring rain he went, following the exhausted and soaking wet animal until it could go no further. He picked her up, took her inside, and started drying her off and warming her up. And to make a long story short, he quickly realized one of her legs had been shattered, and before all was said and done, little Jenny had been given the best doggie medical care Steve could get her, including a complicated operation that was required to save her leg, costing many thousands of dollars that no editor of a small town weekly newspaper has laying around. But Steve always said it had been a wonderful investment, because Steve and Jenny were inseparable for many years, and with his help, she turned into the smartest and most loveable stray dog that God ever created.

You were a truly good and decent man, Steve, in a world where that is getting rarer all the time, and you made a meaningful and lasting difference in the community I love and touched more lives than you’ll ever know. Emily Dickinson once wrote that “Parting is all we know of heaven and all we need of hell”, and you will always be remembered and missed!!

Godspeed, Steve.

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April 14, 2015 |

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elias 5/1: state business climate

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April 14, 2015 |

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: FRIDAY, MAY 1, 2015, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“STATE BUSINESS CLIMATE: MARKET SAYS IT’S PRETTY GOOD”

The drumbeat from Republican politicians, governors of states like Texas and Florida and from independent relocation consultants seems constant: California’s business climate stinks; high taxes and heavy regulation are driving businesses and jobs out of this state.

These folks note that companies big and small, from Toyota and Nissan to Buck Knives, have announced they are moving corporate offices out of California to low-tax, low-regulation, low-wage states.

They also harp on the fact that more Californians move to other states than residents of other states move here, a phenomenon that’s far weaker now than at the height of the recession five years ago.

All this, they say, adds up to a lousy business climate, one which cries out for less regulation, lower corporate and capital gain taxes and a laissez faire attitude toward virtually anything business wants to do, a la Texas. In fact, the business-funded Tax Foundation ranks this state’s tax structure the third worst for business and its regulatory environment eighth worst.

But wait. At the same time that California was allegedly losing jobs, unemployment declined from a peak of 12.4 percent four years ago to 6.8 percent this spring, the biggest reduction of any state. California also produced more new jobs in that time than any other state, by far.

In fact, reports Bloomberg News, one major barometer of business health that is purely market driven and rarely subject to influence peddling says California is far and away the best state for business. Better – and bigger – than almost all countries.

That barometer is the stock market. It turns out that while the folks Gov. Jerry Brown likes to call “declinists” have steadily bemoaned California’s alleged plight, stock traders moved by the profit motive and not by propaganda were saying it’s just not so.

The 63 companies in the Standard & Poors 500 index headquartered in California produced the best returns of the five states with the largest populations. Since the beginning of 2011, those companies produced a 134 percent return on investments, more than doubling in book value. The closest big-state challenger to that remarkable performance was Florida, where S&P companies had an 82 percent return. Texas companies gave investors a mere 52 percent return on investment. Not bad, but not nearly up to California’s performance.

The California companies posting this performance are in fields from health care to biotech, energy to electronics. Companies making consumer staples, including agriculture, were among the healthiest, seeing the value of their stocks triple over the last four years, Bloomberg said.

Their promise for the future is best, too, because California companies spent far more than firms in other places on research and development – betting on their futures. Of the 122 outfits in Bloomberg’s America’s Clean Technology Index, 26 are in California, more than 20 percent. They spent an average of $118 million, or one-fourth of their sales, on R&D, compared with an average of 9.4 percent for companies elsewhere.

While all this was going on, California was climbing back into seventh place among all countries, with only six nations – one of them comprising the rest of America – boasting higher gross national products. That means the state, ranked as high as sixth before the rise of China, has surpassed the huge production of Brazil.

And 33 California companies are among the 500 largest in the world. Meanwhile, of the 123 Americans among the world’s 400 richest people, 28 live in California, meaning high taxes are no deterrent to the super rich – perhaps because many of them manage to evade most of those levies.

And what about the fact that six Californians leave the state for every five who move here? It turns out, reports the real estate website Trulia, that has more to do with housing prices than anything else.

Stock market and job growth has helped drive California prices ever higher, with a family income of about $140,000 needed to support buying the median San Francisco Bay area home, and $89,000 needed in the Los Angeles area. With home prices exponentially lower elsewhere, it’s no wonder some homeowners choose to cash out at the same time California’s wealthy, newcomers and long-timers alike, keep driving prices up in many places.

Put it all together, and things are far from perfect, but the picture is a whole lot brighter than what’s painted by politicians who so often try to win votes by putting California down.

-30-
Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” now available in an updated third edition. His email address is [email protected]

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elias 4/28: drought plans

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April 14, 2015 |

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 2015, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“BOTH LOGIC AND ILLOGIC IN BROWN’S DROUGHT PLANS”

There is both sense and nonsense in the $1 billion drought relief package announced by Gov. Jerry Brown in a parched Sierra Nevada Mountains meadow that usually is covered in deep snow on the date Brown walked through it.

But the rationale behind the single largest part of the package is fundamentally contradictory.

Brown says California must ready for new and lasting, drier realities, then bases the most expensive part of his plan on weather patterns he previously said are most likely things of the past.

Authorized spending on all this now comes to $1.7 billion, including almost $700 million Brown proposed and the Legislature approved last year, most of it not yet spent.

It certainly makes sense to assist the most drought-stricken communities, as the package does with more than $14 million to better purify existing but polluted groundwater supplies and to truck water into those areas. No one complains, also, about more than $40 million for food and other relief for citizens and cities with lost jobs and tax revenues because local farms have fallowed many thousands of their acres.

There’s also no quarrel with the plan’s spending more than $10 million to make some existing irrigation systems more efficient. Nor with putting more than $500 million into improved capture of storm water and expanded use of recycled, purified “gray” water for irrigation and landscaping.

But Brown has taken heat over the fact that his emergency rationing plan does not force farms to cut use of surface water or lower pumping of ground water. Leaving farmers’ ground water out of the order, of course, exposes the weakness of the ballyhooed underground water regulations Brown signed into law last year – a law that will lack teeth for more than 10 years.

This all leaves plenty to question. One big question is why the plan includes only about $270 million – just over 15 percent of the package funding – for helping develop new sources of fresh water, including innovative desalination methods other than the hyper-expensive and power-sucking reverse osmosis technique now in use in a few places. Brown has not yet spoken about that.

But he has talked about why he included $660 million for new flood control projects – essentially building dams and reservoirs and lining some streams with concrete, a la the Los Angeles and Santa Ana rivers, where activists regularly push to remove concrete and return streams to their natural state.

The governor cited the danger of “extreme weather events,” caused by climate change, even though the only changes so far in California’s weather from global warming have been extended dry periods. “All of a sudden, when you’re all focused on drought, you can get massive storms that flood through these channels and overflow and cause havoc,” he said during a news conference.

But the state already has an extensive system of flood control channels and huge reservoirs designed to capture and control flood waters. Existing reservoirs are so low now there is little imminent danger they will overflow in the foreseeable future. So why not spend the money earmarked for flood control on building innovative new desalination plants, a tactic that would leave California far better off in future droughts?

Essentially, Brown and the Legislature are focusing on old technology to solve new problems, a criticism also leveled at them over the high speed rail project, which will use 1970s-era technology rather than exploring newer ideas like magnetic levitation and the “hyperloop” suggested by Tesla Motors founder Elon Musk.

But Brown insists that “History shows us that every time California comes out of one of these droughts, it’s with a boom-and-bust cycle of rain.” This is the same man who likes to preach that times have changed and so has nature. It has been more than 40 years since any part of the state experienced 30 days of steady rains, the sort of phenomenon that might justify massive new reservoirs.

If the current measures are a way to justify shoring up levees in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta area, fine, but say so. Don’t sell them as something quite different.

All of which means that as with most government spending and projects, there’s a lot to like in the governor’s measures – but also a lot that needs a harder, more critical look than the Legislature gave it while rubber-stamping the entire package.

-30-
Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” now available in an updated third edition. His email address is [email protected]

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Zamora 4-H photo

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April 14, 2015 |

Members of the Zamora 4-H container gardening project prepare their group project for the 4-H Spring Show on May 1. From left are Alyvia Lehman, Maddy Akina, Kendall Alexander, Katelyn Castaneda and Sofia Lewis. Courtesy photo

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Special to The Enterprise

Farm Connection Day 5/1

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April 14, 2015 |

On Friday May 1st, more than 2,500 students from all over Yolo County will attend Farm Connection Day at the Yolo County Fairgrounds from 9a.m. until 1pm. The public is invited as well.
The event, which is a partnership between the Yolo County 4H and the Yolo County Farm Bureau, will feature over 100 different agricultural displays and hands on activities for kids of all ages. Students will get to experience a mobile dairy classroom, take their photo with Wally Walnut, and see detection dogs from the Department of Fish and Wildlife, among other displays provided by agricultural leaders.

Farm Connection Day is the kickoff for the Yolo County 4H Spring Show which will run through May 3 and feature the swine show on Friday May 1st, sheep and beef shows on Saturday May 2, as well as many arts and science entries which will be on display in Waite Hall all weekend. For more information contact the Yolo County Farm Bureau at 662-6316 or Yolo County 4H at 666 8703.

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Winters street fest 4/24

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April 14, 2015 |

PRESS RELEASE
WINTERS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
CONTACT: SHERI NEAL, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, (530) 795-2329

The Winters Chamber of Commerce will host the Fourth Friday Feast and Street Fair April 24, located on Historic downtown Winters Main Street. The goal is to encourage community spirit, for guest to discover the Winters charm, and savor the local food, wine, and beer.
Enjoy an electric mix of locally grown products produced in and around Winters such as local honey, olive oil, preserves, reclaimed wood furnishing, and much more. Buckhorn Steak House, Putah Creek Café, and El Pueblo will provide delicious street side dinning for patrons. Putah Creek Café puts on quiet the show with preparing a giant batch of paella, Buckhorn roast a suckling pig, and tasty tacos and home made churros from El Pueblo. Local beer provided by Berryessa Brewery, wine by Berryessa Gap, and Rootstock. It will be a family friendly atmosphere with a face painter and balloon twisting available for children.
The Spanglers will provide live music while patrons dine at the 40-foot long family style table that will stretch down the middle of Winters Historic Main Street. Come out and enjoy a beautiful evening in Winters. Fourth Friday festivities kick off at 6 p.m. and go until 8:30 p.m. March through May. June through October the hours are 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

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Enterprise staff

Winters Agri-Tour 5/6

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April 12, 2015 |

Winters Chamber of Commerce Agri-tour at Four Winds Nursery

PRESS RELEASE
WINTERS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
CONTACT: SHERI NEAL, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, (530) 795-2329

The Winters Chamber of Commerce will hold its second Agri-tour of the year on Wednesday, May 6, at Four Winds Nursery located on Sackett Lane in rural Winters. Four Winds is a third generation family farm. Floyd Dillion created the first commercial dwarf citrus in 1946 and founded Four Winds Nursery. Four Winds has three growing locations, Mission San Jose, Freemont, and Winters. They choose to expand there growing ground to Winters due to the proven micro climate for citrus. Cedar Seegar is now the owner and operator of Four Winds Nursery and began growing and building citrus stock in 1988.
“Now we grow over 60 different types of citrus from all over the world, as well as virtually every edible ornamental fruit tree, shrub and bush,” says Seegar.
Participants will tour the green house, production area, and the mail order packing facility, Putah Creek, and water treatment facility.
The day will begin at Steady Eddy’s Coffee House located at 5 E. Main Street at 9 a.m. Participants will enjoy a beverage and pastry of choice. At 9:30 a.m. the tour will leave for Four Winds Nursery.
The tour will then return to Winters for lunch at the famous Putah Creek Café located at 1 Main Street in historic downtown Winters. After lunch participants will visit Arc Guitar located at 308 Railroad Ave. Arc Guitar is a unique and musical addition to downtown Winters. Al Calderone the owner of Arc Guitar builds, repairs, teaches lessons, and organizes a guitar school and workshops. While there, participants will enjoy listening to students play the guitars they built themselves.
The tour is an all-inclusive price of $50. Wear shoes suitable for walking. For more information or to register for the tour, contact Winters Chamber of Commerce, Executive Director, Sheri Neal at 795-2329.

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Winkler Dinner 5/16

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April 12, 2015 |

On May 16th the Davis Enology & Viticulture Organization we be hosting the 15th annual Winkler Dinner at the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine & Food Science. This event is put on annually by the students of the Viticulture & Enology Department at UC Davis and all proceeds support activities throughout the year including educational wine tastings, immersion trips to various wine regions, and the DEVO International Fellowship which is granted to a student to work a harvest abroad. Previous recipients of this award have worked at wineries in France and Australia.

The dinner consists of five courses; each prepared by individual chefs and paired with wine that is generously donated. The dinner is accompanied by live and silent auctions as well as live music. 

The 15th Annual Winkler Dinner 
May 16th, 2015 @ 6 PM 
Held at the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine & Food Science in the Olive Grove 

Limited tickets are available for $150
Visit devo.ucdavis.edu for tickets and more information.

Please email [email protected] if you have any questions! 

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Stargazing photos

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April 12, 2015 |

Here’s info for the attached photos:
Astronomer Dan Philips looks through his telescope, photo by Luke Petersen
A family learns how to use a telescope and explore the night sky, photo by Charlotte Orr

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Michael May 4/30

By
April 11, 2015 |

There Is Always a Way
Presented by Mike May and Gena Harper
Free and open to the public

Their stories are about challenge and success. This is the first time these two dynamic people have presented together, here at Covell Atria Gardens on April 30 from 6:30 to 7:30 PM.

Mike May was blinded at age 3 from a chemical explosion. Gena Harper was born with Glaucoma, leaving her with partial vision. She ran into a faucet at age 3, which poked out one of her eyes. Mike had a revolutionary stem cell transplant in 2000 and gained some low vision.

However, their stories are not about blindness. They are about triumphing in spite of and perhaps even because of the obstacles. Both have been competitive skiers. Mike holds the downhill speed skiing record for a totally blind person. Gena made the US Paralympic Cycling team at the age of 48.

Mike is CEO of Sendero Group, which makes adaptive technology for the blind. Gena is a Senior VP in financial planning for Morgan Stanley.
Mike and Gena reconnected in 2011, 24 years after they first met. With an assist by Stevie Wonder at a concert in 2012, Mike proposed to Gena. This is typical of the company they keep and the stories you will hear on April 30, inspired by their shared commitment to the concept, “There Is Always a Way.”

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Walt Sadler oped on boys’ toys

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April 11, 2015 |

Boys Toys
A lot has been said about giving Men a toy makes them behave like a Boy. That being said, I have always been intrigued with the fascination that Police Forces have for Military Style weapons; those, that are by design for Killing people. You know those Boy’s Toys like the M16 style weapon that are so prevalent and every Police Force has them for protection from those they are supposed to Police. Is it some form of envy or hormone overload? Maybe some time in a combat zone would curb that desire!
Having been in the Army, Chu Lai, Republic of Vietnam, July 1967 to July 1969, I have a lot of respect and in some ways a fear of Military grade weapons. I was not in a direct combat situation, but I was stationed next to a MASH Hospital; the first step for someone from the field of fire to either rehab or going home in a box. Therefore, I witnessed the impact of those “Boy’s Toys” on the human body, they were designed to Kill. That is the purpose of military weapons! Cut a man in half with one burst.
I have some very strong feelings about the Militarization of Police Departments nationwide, and more particularly Davis Police. Am I now in Ferguson? I remember when Davis Police Office Cantrill was killed at night in 1959; I don’t remember the town shutting down or the Police Chief asking for high capacity weapons. Just grief, bewilderment, and sadness.
The major issue regarding the Davis Police Chief and his executive Management Team acquiring the MRAP, with complacent approval from the City Council, is that they seem to have lost touch with the realities or values associated with living in Davis. Are Woodland and West Sacramento values so much lower? Having lived in Davis since 1950, the City hasn’t changed that much in terms of safety. In Davis, I have never walked down a street at any time of day or night and felt the cold fear or anger that flirted with me during my year and a half in Vietnam, with the exception of one time.
That exception was when my wife and I, stumbled on a Davis Police response to a false domestic violence complaint that involved four police officers, in the midafternoon. Walking around the corner onto a bike path, I came upon a Police Officer standing there with an M16. Was he there for covering fire in the event the gentlemen the police were talking to on his front lawn said something they didn’t like? Why was that degree of response necessary, did he understand the killing power he had in his hand? I think not, by the way he was holding it; it was a toy!
Look at the past event in Stockton, 60 plus bullets into the hostage’s car by the police with Boy’s Toys and no mention of how many bullets went into the Community. They know, called brass inventory, i.e. bullets issued. Think that community is going to say something, bet not, wrong socioeconomic group to question authority. Look at the Pepper Spray fiasco at UCD. Check on the health effects, Agent Orange? Oh, and for those Officers that felt threatened by the Student crowd, must have trouble walking in Union Square; try a new vocation. Give the Boys a Toy and they believe they have to use it, if nothing else to show the politicos that it was a wise decision to acquire them.
The recent tragic murder/suicide shooting in Davis produced a scenario that has further reinforced my belief that “Militarized Police Departments” have lost sight of their mission to “Police.” Events of that day make it appear that the Davis Police took their “eye off the ball”. Did getting their “Boy’s Toys” (2-MRAPs, 2-Robots, M-16s, tear gas, etc.) to the situation, take precedence over determining the status of the individuals involved? Was anyone still alive when the Davis Police arrive, or did they even attempt to find out? Where was the active shooter? Why did it take 7+/- hours for the Police to enter the premise? More importantly, how long would it have taken before the MRAPs? Seven tear gas canisters and two concussion grenades, must need to get rid of dated Military inventory, or was it a training exercise? From my Army experience, I know you can’t be quiet when gassed with even the smallest amount of tear gas. While these are questions the City Council, as the ultimate authority, should have answers for, true to form in the new Davis style, be quiet and it too will pass. Don’t upset a Union.
Here is a solution! Let those politicians, public, and police that think the “boys toys” are needed in Davis, Woodland, or West Sacramento, book a vacation in Bagdad or Kabul. Orbitz must have a special! Bet after six weeks there, where they are required to walk the streets every day, they will more fully appreciate what they have here. I did when I returned from Vietnam.
Walter E. Sadler is a Davis resident that survived Vietnam.

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Special to The Enterprise

Mark Bittman:

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April 11, 2015 |

BC-BITTMAN-COLUMN-NYT/893
McDonald’s Turns ‘Progressive’
By MARK BITTMAN

c.2015 New York Times News Service

You could almost feel sorry for McDonald’s. That’s an odd sentiment when you consider that the company’s revenues in 2014 were $27.4 billion and its stock price makes it worth something like $92 billion. It’s among the world’s most valuable brands and has three times the U.S. market share of Subway, its nearest competitor.

Enviable. Yet for years its new products, business ventures, even social media attempts have gone wrong: It sold a 90 percent share in Chipotle, now one of its strongest competitors; it introduced products like chicken wings, which went nowhere; it created a Twitter hashtag, #McDStories, that turned into a bashing event. And it has spectacularly failed to attract or even hold on to millennial customers, who’ve fled in droves.

Meanwhile, it’s the most visible target of an alliance of workers fighting for $15 an hour (most McDonald’s workers make slightly more than the federal minimum wage, $7.25, but it varies by state), and its food is seen as anything but sustainable, fresh or healthy. A result has been a decline that includes a whopping 15 percent drop in its U.S. operating income in the last quarter of 2014.

The company is losing customers to higher-end burger chains like Shake Shack and Five Guys, to small but intriguing startups that makes locally sourced, slow food appealing, like Dig Inn, to Chick-fil-A (around $5 billion in sales in 2013) and, of course, to Chipotle, which has sales in the $4 billion range.

McDonald’s can’t get a break. In the last two months, the company has made several well-publicized big announcements that were widely greeted with yawns or jeers.

The first was a decision to phase out chickens raised using antibiotics meant to treat humans. The second was to unilaterally raise the salaries of those minimum-wage workers the company directly employs by at least a dollar an hour, granting a small amount of paid vacation time to company employees and financial assistance for education to all workers in its system. And the third was to begin referring to itself as a “modern, progressive burger company.”

Is it too little, too late? Recall Polaroid trying to manage digital photography or BlackBerry struggling to recover after being devastated by the iPhone. Once again, an entrenched company has sat back while nimbler, more with-it others ate its lunch. Many of the new fast-food chains are paying workers better, sourcing sustainable ingredients, creating different forms of fast food and even making better burgers. Now McDonald’s is trying to play catch-up.

But it’s using half measures, and that’s the problem. It’s not like the competition is going to go away, and the brand may be permanently tarnished. Fixing that isn’t going to be easy, and it’s not even clear whether it’s possible.

What McDonald’s should do is go all in and really transform itself, because the effect of positive change would be immeasurable. Instead it tries to play it both ways, controlling what franchisees buy and sell but insisting that it cannot dictate how they treat employees. Thus the wage increase touches only around 11 percent of the chain’s workers, and workers immediately decried it as inadequate. (Even Wal-Mart did better.) No one turns down a raise, but this one virtually guarantees that most of the company’s workers will remain eligible for food stamps, thus perpetuating the public subsidy for McDonald’s labor force.

That the nonantibiotic move has taken this long (Chipotle has tried to be antibiotic-free for more than a decade, as has Panera) and is so incomplete — that is, there’s no word about pork or beef, and the move is being phased in — also seems pathetic. (Even more pathetic is the refusal of the Food and Drug Administration to mandate the removal of nonmedicinal antibiotics from animal production, but that’s another story.)

These moves demonstrate that McDonald’s is hardly a “progressive” company but one that is merely trying in a halfhearted way to catch up with changing market norms and to anticipate inevitable regulation.

If McDonald’s were truly progressive, what would it do? It might revamp the menu in favor of sustainably sourced and fresher food (it’s worth noting that in Britain, McDonald’s uses free-range eggs and organic milk), and might increase its workers’ wages (and hours) to something approaching a living wage.

It may be that the biggest beneficiary of McDonald’s recent moves is the food movement, which, smelling blood, continues to apply pressure. (In response to the raise, some demonstrating workers chanted: “Hey McDonald’s, let’s be blunt/This is just a PR stunt.”) And that movement continues to gain credibility as it attends more to the rights of humans than those of animals — not that animals don’t matter, but it’s all relative.

It’s great that McDonald’s blinked. I’d love to see it become a truly progressive company — I’d even help them if I could — but if that’s not in the cards, it would be fine to see a continuing decline in its business. Either would be a satisfactory ending to the McDonald’s story.

c.2015 New York Times News Service

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New York Times News Service

Gail Collins: Rand Paul, Paul Rand quiz

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April 11, 2015 |

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Commentary: Rand Paul, Paul Rand Quiz
By GAIL COLLINS

c.2015 New York Times News Service

Rand Paul for president! Wow, we’re awash with first-term Republican senators who feel the nation needs their services as leader of the most powerful nation on the planet.

Paul can also perform eye surgery, which is certainly a plus.

What do we know about this man Rand? Well, he’s interesting. Among the throngs of Republicans promising to cut taxes, slash domestic spending and repeal Obamacare, Paul is unusual in that he also wants to stop government surveillance, negotiate a peace treaty with Iran, slash defense spending and eliminate foreign aid.

Except — stop the presses! — Rand Paul is also evolving. The freshman senator who once wanted to eliminate all foreign aid, including to Israel, is now a freshman senator who wants to eliminate some foreign aid while leaving more than enough for a certain “strong ally of ours.” Also, he has learned that Iran probably can’t be trusted. And he now wants to raise defense spending by about $190 billion.

You could argue he was way more interesting before he started to evolve. But onward.

During a postannouncement interview on Fox News, the new presidential contender was asked about an incident when he “took a shot at Dick Cheney.” This would have been a 2009 speech, discovered by Mother Jones, in which Paul basically argued that Cheney had opposed invading Iraq until he went to work for the war contractor Halliburton.

“Before I was involved in politics!” the new candidate retorted. If you agree with his theory that would mean that nothing Rand Paul said before 2010 counts.

It is true that you can’t blame politicians for everything they did when they were young and foolish, but a five-year statute of limitations seems a bit short. I’d accept a rule wiping out anything that happened in college short of a major felony. That would include a former classmate’s claim that when she was at Baylor University, Rand Paul and a friend forced her to bow down and worship the god Aqua Buddha.

That’s way more diverting than the story about Mitt Romney cutting off a classmate’s long hair in high school. But it’s off the record. Do not base your opinion of Rand Paul on the Aqua Buddha incident. Really. Forget I ever mentioned it.

Once Paul began sniffing the presidential air, position changes started coming rapid-fire, and he’s gotten quite touchy when people point that out. “No, no, no, nonononono,” he said, accusing NBC’s Savannah Guthrie of “editorializing” when she listed several of his recent shifts. It was reminiscent of an encounter he had a while back with Kelly Evans of CNBC. (“Shhh. Calm down a bit here, Kelly.”) You might wonder about Rand Paul and TV women, but as we all know it takes three incidents to make a trend. Next time.

The encounter with Evans came after Paul was trying to walk back one of his more interesting policy statements: opposition to mandatory vaccinations. “I guess being for freedom would be really unusual,” he said archly, before claiming that he knew of many “walking, talking, normal children who wound up with profound mental disorders” after being vaccinated. This one has since evolved a lot.

Paul has swung to the left on some issues, like immigration. He acknowledges that there’s global warming, which he believes should be combated in ways that do not inconvenience the coal industry. He has stuck to his guns on opposing government surveillance of American citizens, and you can buy a “Don’t Drone Me, Bro!” shirt on his website. (Also at the website: $20 Rand Paul Flip-Flops, although someone on the team apparently noted the irony and changed their name to Rand Paul Sandals.)

And, of course, Paul is still a libertarian. Because he most definitely believes government should get off your backs and stop messing with your lives. Unless you happen to have an unwanted pregnancy, in which case, rather than allow you access to abortion, he is prepared to tie you to a post until you deliver.

Everything perfectly clear? And, now, a brief Rand Paul Pop Quiz.

1) Paul began his presidential announcement speech by telling the people:

A) “We have come to take our country back.”

B) “We come to take our money back.”

C) “We have come to take our previous statements back.”

———

2) Rand Paul did not get a bachelor’s degree because:

A) He was out partying all the time with the future governor of Wisconsin, Scott Walker.

B) He was so supersmart that Duke University allowed him to skip right over to medical school.

C) He was expelled for the Aqua Buddha affair.

———

3) An avid user of all media social, Paul once twittered that politics doesn’t involve enough:

A) Good ideas for using more coal.

B) People with an IQ above 90.

C) Puppies.

———

4) The Rand Paul presidential campaign slogan is:

A) “Defeat the Washington Machine. Unleash the American Dream.”

B) “Cry havoc and let slip the dogs of war.”

C) “Beat Hillary. Release the Kraken.”

———

Answers: 1-A, 2-B, 3-C, 4-A.

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New York Times News Service

David Brooks: The revolution lives!

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April 11, 2015 |

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Commentary: The Revolution Lives!
By DAVID BROOKS

c.2015 New York Times News Service

Beyond all the talk of centrifuges and enrichment capacities, President Barack Obama’s deal with Iran is really a giant gamble on the nature of the Iranian regime. The core question is: Are the men who control that country more like Lenin or are they more like Gorbachev? Do they still fervently believe in their revolution and would they use their post-sanctions wealth to export it and destabilize their region? Or have they lost faith in their revolution? Will they use a deal as a way to rejoin the community of nations?

We got a big piece of evidence on those questions Thursday. Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, delivered his first big response to the sort-of-agreed-upon nuclear framework. What did we learn?

First, we learned that Iran’s supreme leader still regards the United States as his enemy. The audience chanted “Death to America” during his speech, and Khamenei himself dismissed America’s “devilish” intentions. When a radical religious leader uses words like “devilish,” he’s not using the way it’s used in a chocolate-cake commercial. He means he thinks the United States is the embodiment of evil.

Second, we learned that the West wants a deal more than Khamenei does.

“I was never optimistic about negotiating with America,” he declared.

Throughout the speech, his words dripped with a lack of enthusiasm for the whole enterprise.

Obama is campaigning for a deal, while Khamenei is unmoved. That imbalance explains why Western negotiators had to give away so many of their original demands. The United States had originally insisted upon an end to Iran’s nuclear program, a suspension of its enrichment of uranium, but that was conceded to keep Iran at the table.

Third, we learned that the ayatollah is demanding total trust from us while offering maximum contempt in return. Khamenei communicated a smug and self-righteous sense of superiority toward the West throughout his remarks. He haughtily repeated his demand that the West permanently end all sanctions on the very day the deal is signed. He insisted that no inspectors could visit Iranian military facilities. This would make a hash of verification and enforcement.

Fourth, we learned that Khamenei and the United States see different realities. It’s been pointed out that Iranian and U.S. officials describe the “agreed upon” framework in different ways. That’s because, Khamenei suggested, the Americans are lying.

“I’m really worried as the other side is into lying and breaching promises. An example was the White House fact sheet,” he said. “This came out a few hours after the negotiations, and most of it was against the agreement and was wrong. They are always trying to deceive and break promises.”

Fifth, Khamenei reminded us that, even at the most delicate moment in these talks, he is still intent on putting Iran on a collision course with Sunnis and the West. He attacked the Saudi leaders as “inexperienced youngsters” and criticized efforts to push back on Iranian efforts to destabilize Yemen.

The foreign minister of the United Arab Emirates, Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed al-Nahyan, characterized Iran’s recent bellicosity this way: “It’s about Iran believing in exporting the revolution. It’s part of their regime, a part of their ideology.”

Khamenei’s remarks could be bluster, tactical positioning for some domestic or international audience. But they are entirely consistent with recent Iranian behavior. His speech suggests that Iran still fundamentally sees itself in a holy war with the West, a war that can be managed prudently but that is still a fundamental clash of values and interests. His speech suggests, as Henry Kissinger and George Shultz put it in a brilliant op-ed essay in The Wall Street Journal on Wednesday, that there is no congruence of interests between us and Iran. We envision a region of stable nation-states. They see a revolutionary anti-Western order.

If Iran still has revolutionary intent, then no amount of treaty subtlety will enforce this deal. Iran will begin subtly subverting any agreement. It will continue to work on its advanced nuclear technology even during the agreement. It will inevitably use nuclear weaponry, or even the threat of eventual nuclear weaponry, to advance its apocalyptic interests. Every other regional power will prepare for the worst, and we’ll get a pseudo nuclear arms race in a region of disintegrating nation-states.

If Obama is right and Iran is on the verge of change, the deal is a home run. But we have a terrible record of predicting trends in the Middle East. Republican and Democratic administrations have continually anticipated turning points in the Middle East: Republicans after interventions, Democrats after negotiations. But the dawns never come.

At some point, there has to be a scintilla of evidence that Iran wants to change. Khamenei’s speech offers none. Negotiating an arms treaty with Brezhnev and Gorbachev was one thing. But with this guy? Good luck with that.

c.2015 New York Times News Service

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Paul Krugman: Where government excels

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April 11, 2015 |

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Commentary: Where Government Excels
By PAUL KRUGMAN

c.2015 New York Times News Service

As Republican presidential hopefuls trot out their policy agendas — which always involve cutting taxes on the rich while slashing benefits for the poor and middle class — some real new thinking is happening on the other side of the aisle. Suddenly, it seems, many Democrats have decided to break with Beltway orthodoxy, which always calls for cuts in “entitlements.” Instead, they’re proposing that Social Security benefits actually be expanded.

This is a welcome development in two ways. First, the specific case for expanding Social Security is quite good. Second, and more fundamentally, Democrats finally seem to be standing up to anti-government propaganda and recognizing the reality that there are some things the government does better than the private sector.

Like all advanced nations, America mainly relies on private markets and private initiatives to provide its citizens with the things they want and need, and hardly anyone in our political discourse would propose changing that. The days when it sounded like a good idea to have the government directly run large parts of the economy are long past.

Yet we also know that some things more or less must be done by government. Every economics textbooks talks about “public goods” like national defense and air traffic control that can’t be made available to anyone without being made available to everyone, and which profit-seeking firms, therefore, have no incentive to provide. But are public goods the only area where the government outperforms the private sector? By no means.

One classic example of government doing it better is health insurance. Yes, conservatives constantly agitate for more privatization — in particular, they want to convert Medicare into nothing more than vouchers for the purchase of private insurance — but all the evidence says this would move us in precisely the wrong direction. Medicare and Medicaid are substantially cheaper and more efficient than private insurance; they even involve less bureaucracy. Internationally, the American health system is unique in the extent to which it relies on the private sector, and it’s also unique in its incredible inefficiency and high costs.

And there’s another major example of government superiority: providing retirement security.

Maybe we wouldn’t need Social Security if ordinary people really were the perfectly rational, farsighted agents economists like to assume in their models (and right-wingers like to assume in their propaganda). In an idealized world, 25-year-old workers would base their decisions about how much to save on a realistic assessment of what they will need to live comfortably when they’re in their 70s. They’d also be smart and sophisticated in how they invested those savings, carefully seeking the best trade-offs between risk and return.

In the real world, however, many and arguably most working Americans are saving much too little for their retirement. They’re also investing these savings badly. For example, a recent White House report found that Americans are losing billions each year thanks to investment advisers trying to maximize their own fees rather than their clients’ welfare.

You might be tempted to say that if workers save too little and invest badly, it’s their own fault. But people have jobs and children, and they must cope with all the crises of life. It’s unfair to expect them to be expert investors, too. In any case, the economy is supposed to work for real people leading real lives; it shouldn’t be an obstacle course only a few can navigate.

And in the real world of retirement, Social Security is a shining example of a system that works. It’s simple and clean, with low operating costs and minimal bureaucracy. It provides older Americans who worked hard all their lives with a chance of living decently in retirement, without requiring that they show an inhuman ability to think decades ahead and be investment whizzes as well. The only problem is that the decline of private pensions, and their replacement with inadequate 401(k)-type plans, has left a gap that Social Security isn’t currently big enough to fill. So why not make it bigger?

Needless to say, suggestions along these lines are already provoking near-hysterical reactions, not just from the right, but from self-proclaimed centrists. As I wrote some years ago, calling for cuts to Social Security has long been seen inside the Beltway as a “badge of seriousness, a way of showing how statesmanlike and tough-minded you are.” And it’s only a decade since former President George W. Bush tried to privatize the program, with a lot of centrist support.

But true seriousness means looking at what works and what doesn’t. Privatized retirement schemes work very badly; Social Security works very well. And we should build on that success.

c.2015 New York Times News Service

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April 9, 2015 |

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Upcoming events at Logos Books

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April 05, 2015 |

Award-winning faculty from the UC Davis English department will lead a fun, casual, and interactive discussion of some intriguing medieval poems and the amazing history of the English language at Logos Books, Thursday, May 21, from 6 to 8 p.m. No prior experience or knowledge necessary; just a curiosity about history and poetry. Music and light refreshments will be offered.

* Una Chiacchierata, Italian conversation, meets the first Thursday of every month from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Logos Books, 513 Second St. Next meeting is Thursday, May 7. Check logosbooks.wordpress.com for topic info.

* La Table Française meets the second Wednesday of every month from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Logos Books. Next meeting is Wednesday, May 13. Check logosbooks.wordpress.com for topic info.

* On Thursday, May 14 , 7:30 to 9 p.m., The Quinton Duval Poetry Series at Logos Books will conclude its year of readings with a reading by Davis Poet Laureate Andy Jones. Refreshments follow the reading, all are welcome.

* El Círculo Español meets the third Monday of the month from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Logos Books. Next meeting is Monday, May 18. Check logosbooks.wordpress.com for topic info.

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Enterprise staff

Avid 6/5

By
April 05, 2015 |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
DEBUT MYSTERY AUTHOR TO READ FROM SACRAMENTO-BASED “ONE MURDER MORE” AT THE AVID READER JUNE 5TH
The Avid Reader bookstore in downtown Davis is proud to present debut author and former elected official Kris Calvin’s Sacramento-based mystery novel“One Murder More,” on June 5th at 7:30pm.
In “One Murder More,” a beautiful legislative aide is found stabbed to death in California’s Capitol building. Maren Kane, a lobbyist for a fledgling Sacramento toy company, is in the midst of a legislative fight that could make or break her career. She doesn’t have time for a coffee break let alone involvement in a murder investigation. When police arrest Maren’s colleague for the crime, she’s certain they have the wrong man. The cops suspect a crime of passion—love gone wrong. Maren knows that in the capital, money and power drive all things tragic and scandalous. Sex and love are little more than window-dressing. But will she be able to prove her theory—and free her friend—before she becomes the next victim?
Davis resident and bestselling thriller author John Lescroart says “Crisp and entertaining, ‘One Murder More’ marks a solid debut for Kris Calvin, who sets herself apart as a writer to watch.”
A former local elected official, Kris Calvin, knows politics from the inside out. She lives minutes from Sacramento, capital city of California and has been honored by the State Assembly and the California Governor’s office for her leadership in political advocacy on behalf of children. Educated at Stanford and UC Berkeley in psychology and economics, Kris loves mysteries and thinks there’s no better way to achieve work-life balance than to stumble upon a corpse, unravel the relevant clues and find the killer (so long as all of that happens between the covers of a good book).
The Avid Reader is a local independent bookseller offering new hardbacks and paperbacks, special orders at no charge, and complimentary wrapping. The Avid Reader hours are 10 am to 10pm Monday through Saturday, Sunday from Noon to 8pm. For more information, call (530) 758-4040.
Who: Kris Calvin
What: Author Event “One Murder More” – Reading, Q&A, Discussion, and Signing
Where: The Avid Reader, 617 Second St., Davis, CA 95616
When: June 5, 2015, 7:30pm – 8:30pm
Contact: Meredith Sweet, 530-759-1599, [email protected]

This June, Inkshares is publishing Kris Calvin’s debut mystery, One Murder More (Pub date: 06/01/15). The fast-paced story follows Maren Kane as she endeavors to unravel the truth behind a violent stabbing that ends the life of a young, beautiful aide to the governor. Having spent years on the inside in politics, Calvin draws on her own experiences to give us a front-row seat in California’s capitol.

John Lescroart calls One Murder More “crisp and entertaining,” and that it “marks a solid debut for Kris Calvin, who sets herself apart as a writer to watch.” Robert Dugoni says it’s “an irresistible political thriller that reminds [him] of House of Cards.”

Having spent 13 years living in South Pasadena, Kris moved to Davis five months ago. If you’re interested in reviewing her book, I’d love to send you a pdf advance copy. Kris is also available for interviews.

 

Here’s the Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/367708730087130/

Phone: 530-759-1599
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.avidreaderbooks.com
Address: 617 2nd St. Davis, CA 95616

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Special to The Enterprise

elias 4/21 no embargo: Utilities commission

By
April 07, 2015 |

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2015 OR THEREAFTER

EDITORS: TO ENSURE TIMELINESS, DISREGARD EMBARGO DATE

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“SMELL OF FEAR AS UTILITIES COMMISSION LAWYERS UP”

The strong odor surrounding California’s most powerful regulatory commission this spring stems not only from corrupt-seeming decisions but also from fear. Fear that past and present members or top staffers of the state Public Utilities Commission might do jail time. Fear they could see personal fortunes decimated by legal fees while fending off state and federal criminal investigations.

How bad have things become at the PUC, which sets prices for privately-owned utilities like Pacific Gas & Electric, Southern California Edison and San Diego Gas & Electric?

Even the commission’s new president, Michael Picker, said the other day that when it comes to cleaning up his agency, “I think we have a long way to go.” Of course, over the last 17 months, he backed every questionable decision pushed by disgraced former PUC President Michael Peevey.

Like many outfits overcome by fear, the PUC has lately tried to cover up by claiming internal documents are “privileged” and by hiring top defense attorneys. The commission’s first contract with the SheppardMullin law firm was for $49,000, work to be done at a “discount” rate of $882 per hour. That deal fell just below the $50,000 level where state contracts for outside work must be approved by the Department of General Services.

But the Picker-led PUC has followed up by awarding SheppardMullin a contract for $5.2 million for the rest of this year. Both agreements may be illegal, even if the new one is approved by the DGS.

Still, there is little doubt of that approval. All present PUC members were appointed by Gov. Jerry Brown, who also named all top officials of the DGS, so this is really the right hand approving what the left hand wants. What’s more, Brown’s chief of staff, Nancy McFadden, was PG&E’s chief lobbyist in Sacramento before joining him.

Asked under what authority it hired SheppardMullin, the PUC cited state government code section 995.8. That section says a public entity can only hire criminal lawyers to defend present or former officials if “The public entity determines that such defense would be in the best interests of the public entity…” The PUC would have to hold hearings to make such a circular determination, but it has not.

This makes the big-buck pacts appear illegal, no matter what the DGS might rule.

The obvious question here is why state taxpayers should fund the defense of officials who may have conspired with big utilities to bilk them via decisions like the one forcing consumers to pay most costs for retiring the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station.

Commission spokeswoman Terrie Prosper claims outside lawyers are needed because the PUC “does not have the expertise…or time to handle…the massive amount of work that needs to be done to…manage and cooperate with investigations.”

The SheppardMullin contract suggests that “managing investigations” includes stonewalling requests for documents while “assisting in public relations.” It says attorneys will also “develop and manage litigation strategies” and “assist and attend interviews of commission employees by investigators (including preparing witnesses).”

“This means the $5.2 million is for a cover-up,” says former San Diego City Attorney Michael Aguirre, who has sued to block the contracts. “They will restrain and restrict documents and the testimony of witnesses and use privilege to (try to) conceal crimes.”

Aguirre notes the commission never formally voted to spend the money, but PUC Executive Director Timothy Sullivan simply signed the new contract. Because the PUC itself cannot be indicted, it’s clear the money will be spent to help defend individuals – present or former commission officials.

Neither Sullivan nor any other PUC official responds to repeated inquiries about who SheppardMullin will defend. Nor would the PUC say why those officials should not fund their own defenses.

Aguirre suggests that if Picker really favors transparency, as he often claims, he would waive all privilege and open every commission document to press, public and investigators, saving the $5.2 million in legal fees.

But Picker repeatedly refuses to be interviewed and by the end of March, the commission had spent more than $2 million on outside lawyers to deny document requests during the last six months, all without a hearing.

So the smell of fear is plain at the PUC, and no one can predict the next major errors and cover-up attempts that might produce.

-30-
Email Thomas Elias at [email protected] His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, visit www.californiafocus.net

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elias 4/24: Jessica’s Law

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April 07, 2015 |

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2015 OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“COURT FRUSTRATES VOTERS’ WILL ON ‘JESSICA’S LAW’”

It was no surprise when Proposition 83, the so-called Jessica’s Law, passed in 2006 with better than a 2-1 majority. The issue, as stated in the ballot summary, was where convicted sex offenders should be allowed to live, no matter how long ago their offenses. The plain wish of the vast majority of voters is that these people become pariahs for life, unable to live anywhere near any potential victims.

Nobody likes sexual predators, especially violent ones, nor should they. But lawyers for some of them argue that once they’ve served their time and once corrections authorities rule they’ve been rehabilitated as well as possible, they’ve got to live somewhere. And the reality is that Proposition 83 allows them almost noplace to live in any city or town.

That’s what voters wanted, of course. No one wants a predator living nearby, and many parents have felt more comfortable since Proposition 83 passed.

As written, this law prohibits all registered sex offenders from residing within 2,000 feet of any school or park. The law also mandates far longer prison terms than before and allows the state Department of Mental Health to keep offenders in custody indefinitely after their prison terms are up, if psychiatrists determine they’re still dangerous. After release, the measure puts tracking devices on all of them for life.

No one is seriously challenging many of these provisions, which expand on the severe restrictions previously placed on violent rapists and child molesters. The challenges have come to the residential limits.

On its surface, this proposition was a no-brainer, a gut reaction against a few crimes committed by paroled offenders who were not being thoroughly monitored. Pre-existing rules even contained a tougher residential restriction than the initiative’s 2,000-foot limit for some offenders, not allowing predators judged to be high risks to live within 2,640 feet of parks and schools.

But by voting as they did, Californians said they don’t fully trust the judgment of mental health professionals; they said no one can ever be sure a onetime offender might not again act out an impulse. Previous law took essentially the same point of view, having long required released sex offenders to register with authorities even decades after their crimes.

The legal problem comes in restricting where long-ago offenders can live, even after they are judged no longer a serious risk to anyone. This spring, the state Supreme Court in a ruling on a San Diego case, written by conservative retired justice Marvin Baxter, said the restrictions are too tough. Those rules raised the rate of homelessness among the state’s 8,000-plus registered sex offenders by a factor of 24, also hindering their access to medical care and drug and alcohol dependency programs.

While the beatdown of Proposition 83 residency rules applied at first only to San Diego County, it has already been made general by a state order lifting the distance restriction on offenders whose crimes didn’t involve children.

The state high court’s decision was presaged years earlier by a federal judge in San Francisco, who said the day after the initiative passed that there was “a substantial likelihood” the law is unconstitutional, changing conditions of parole for persons convicted and released long before it passed.

That ruling came in a case where a former offender, identified only as John Doe, claimed Jessica’s Law would force him to leave a community where he lived peacefully for more than 20 years.

That’s just what Republican legislator Susan Runner, from the high desert region of Los Angeles County, wanted to do when she sponsored Proposition 83 and it’s what voters wanted, too. They simply don’t trust prior offenders to remain impulse-resistant forever, and so they want even long-ago sex offenders with solid records since their release far from any proximity to children.

The last time voters felt as strongly about an initiative was in the mid-1990s, when a huge majority passed Proposition 187 in an effort to cut off health, education and all other public services to illegal immigrants. A federal judge struck down most of that one quickly.

No one seriously expects the surveillance and sentencing aspects of Proposition 83 to suffer a similar fate. But voters can be excused if they feel frustrated by a court waiting almost nine years to strike down a much of a law they passed, one that provided peace of mind to many.

-30-
Email Thomas Elias at [email protected] His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, visit www.californiafocus.net

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Avid 5/3

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April 05, 2015 |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
BESTSELLING AUTHOR LALITA TADEMY READS “CITIZENS CREEK” AT THE AVID READER, MAY 3

Bestselling Northern California author Lalita Tademy will read from her newest novel, “Citizens Creek” at The Avid Reader independent bookstore on Sunday, May 3rd from 2:00pm to 3:00pm.

Set against the backdrop of Alabama in 1822, “Citizens Creek” introduces readers to Tom, a young boy abandoned by his mother and sold to work on a plantation for a Creek Indian Chief. Nicknamed “Cow Tom,” by the Chief, for the special skill he has in caring for cattle (and as a way to distinguish him from another “Tom” on the plantation), he also speaks and understands multiple dialects, a valuable asset for Chief Yargee who relies on Tom as both translator and negotiator in business transactions.
Kirkus Reviews says that Tademy “explores a forgotten trail of American history to find an intriguing tale of love, family and perseverance in the struggles of proud African Creeks.”
Lalita Tademy is the author of ”Cane River,” a New York Times bestselling novel and the 2001 Oprah Book Club Summer Selection; and its critically-acclaimed sequel “Red River.” She lives in Menlo Park.
The Avid Reader is offering “Citizens Creek” to book clubs at a 20% discount. The bookstore requests each group purchase of five or more be made by one member of the bookclub.
The Avid Reader is a local independent bookseller offering new hardbacks and paperbacks, special orders at no charge, and complimentary wrapping. The Avid Reader hours are 10 am to 10pm Monday through Saturday, Sunday from Noon to 8pm. For more information, call (530) 758-4040.
Who: Lalita Tademy
What: Author Event – Reading, Q&A, Discussion, and Signing
Where: The Avid Reader, 617 Second St., Davis, CA 95616
When: May 3rd, 2015, 2:00pm – 3:00pm
Contact: Meredith Sweet, 530-759-1599, [email protected]

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Enterprise staff

Avid 5/16

By
April 05, 2015 |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MARIN AUTHOR AND EARTH ADVOCATE MARY REYNOLDS THOMPSON TO PRESENT “RECLAIMING THE WILD SOUL” AT THE AVID READER ON MAY 16
The Avid Reader bookstore in downtown Davis is happy to present Marin writer, poet, and earth advocate Mary Reynolds Thompson and her new book “Reclaiming the Wild Soul: How Earth’s Landscapes Restore Us to Wholeness” on May 16, 2015 at 7:30pm.
In this rich and captivating work, Reynolds Thompson’s magically guides overwhelmed modern souls to reengage their inner lives with the archetypal dimensions of Earth’s five great landscapes—deserts, forests, oceans and rivers, mountains, and grasslands.
Angeles Arrien, author of “The Four Fold Way” and “Living with Gratitude” says that “Reclaiming the Wild Soul leads us on a journey of exploration, through imagery, poetry, story and creative imagination, to connect back to the five archetypal landscapes in Nature, and reconnect to our own inherent Nature.”
Mary Reynolds Thompson is a facilitator of poetry and journal therapy and life coach dedicated to bringing forth the Wild Soul Story. This new story is rooted in our oneness with nature and a vision of a world in which the wild landscapes of both Earth and soul can thrive. Born and raised in London, England, today Mary lives in her beloved landscape of Marin County, California, with her husband, Bruce. She is also author of “Embrace Your Inner Wild: 52 Reflections for an Eco-Centric World” , as well as numerous articles on ecospirituality. In 2008, she became core faculty for the Therapeutic Writing Institute.
The Avid Reader is a local independent bookseller offering new hardbacks and paperbacks, special orders at no charge, and complimentary wrapping. The Avid Reader hours are 10 am to 10pm Monday through Saturday, Sunday from Noon to 8pm. For more information, call (530) 758-4040.
Who: Mary Reynolds Thompson
What: Author Event – Reading, Q&A, Discussion, and Signing
Where: The Avid Reader, 617 Second St., Davis, CA 95616
When: May 16, 2015, 7:30pm – 8:30pm
Contact: Meredith Sweet, 530-759-1599, [email protected]

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PEC photos

By
April 03, 2015 |

microenterprise is Leaves & Grass founded by Jan Lonnerdal and Brian Reioux, two childhood friends who decided to go into the gardening business together. They thoroughly enjoyed working in the yard, from lawn mowing to raking leaves. With Lonnerdal’s busy summers spent in Sweden, a third business partner, Dylan Lefebvre, was brought in permanently. The trio work three to four days a week with big bright smiles because they have a job they love and look forward to.

First picture – Brian Reioux on the left and Dylan Lefebvre on the right cleaning up leaves at Symphony Financial last Fall. They rake up leaves on the tarp and then carry the tarp to the front. They work at Symphony Financial all year once a week on Mondays.

Second picture – Brian Reioux on the left and Jan Lonnerdal on the right, dumping leaves for pickup at Symphony Financial on F street in Downtown Davis. They have been a steady customer for about 4 years.

Third picture – Brian Reioux mowing the lawn over at a customer’s house (Ann Griffith) in West Davis. They do this house every Thursday, they moved a couple years ago and had Leaves and Grass continue to do the house they moved in to as well. They do a lot over there like hedge trimming, weeding, mowing and edging.

They work in the mornings Monday-Thursday from 9-12:30 and then all of them have other jobs. Dylan works at the USDA germplasm repository in the afternoons, Brian works at Hibbert Lumber and Petco, and Jan works at a lab at UCD. They are also involved in sports through Team Davis Special Olympics. Brian Reioux has been in the paper before, you guys did a big spread on him volunteering for the Davis High football team (I think it was a full page article on the front page of the sports section?). I’ll check to see if I can find some better pictures of Amy! I don’t work with her so I’m not the quality of the ones we have, but I will send you the best I can find soon. Feel free to ask any more questions you might have!

Amy Tonai is the sole owner and operator of Amy’s Shredding. She started her business in 2010 with the help of family and friends. Amy has been a Yolo County resident for 35 years and has strong ties to the Davis community. She loves working with local businesses and meeting new people. She’s a strong individual with a great sense of humor.

Amy is great at telling the story of how she started her own business. Here is what she says: I started because another person with a disability no longer wanted to do his shredding business; he wanted to go back to school. I heard about it and was excited about the idea of operating my own shredding business. I was already employed by CES and part of my duties was shredding. I enjoy every moment of it. I was going to get a loan to purchase the shredder but my dad said ”no, I will get the shredder for you.” The big shredder cost $2,000! Friends helped move the big shredder to Woodland where I worked in a shed behind a friend’s house for almost a year. I had to move when my friend needed the space for her office. I was talking to people at CES when another person heard that I needed a new work space. Robin Dewey said that I could work in her shed in her backyard. Now we call it the ”shred shack.”

My business has really grown and one of the highlights was when it was discovered that when you Google ”shredding” and ”Davis,” Amy’s shredding is at the top of the list! It is the only micro-enterprise offering shredding services in the Davis area. My customer needs range from one to 100 boxes. All of the shredded paper is recycled. Every 2 weeks, I take the shredded paper to International Paper to be recycled. I like having my own business and being my own boss. I love shredding and enjoy meeting my customers. I am proud that people in my community trust me to handle their shredding needs!

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Special to The Enterprise

Author at Avid Reader 5/3

By
April 02, 2015 |

2 p.m. May 3 at Avid Reader

CITIZENS CREEK
A Novel

Lalita Tademy

A fascination with her ancestry as the descendant of Creole slave women set Lalita Tademy on a journey to write the critically-acclaimed historical novel Cane River, which went on to become both a New York Times bestseller, and an Oprah Book Club Selection. Her follow-up, Red River, based on real events during Reconstruction after the Civil War, also received its fair share of praise, and solidified Tademy’s role as a master of the genre with USA Today saying that she “shows herself to be a skilled storyteller able to present the past with power and poignancy.” Many have longed for her next book, and the wait is now over. In CITIZENS CREEK: A Novel (Atria Books; On sale: November 4, 2014; 978-1-4767-5303-4; $26.00 U.S./$29.99 Can.), Lalita Tademy continues to shine a spotlight on important moments in American history, and the impact they have all Americans, of color and not.

Set against the backdrop of Alabama in 1822, CITIZENS CREEK introduces readers to Tom, a young boy abandoned by his mother and sold to work on a plantation for a Creek Indian Chief. Nicknamed “Cow Tom,” by the Chief, for the special skill he has in caring for cattle (and as a way to distinguish him from another “Tom” on the plantation), he also speaks and understands multiple dialects, a valuable asset for Chief Yargee who relies on Tom as both translator and negotiator in business transactions.
CITIZENS CREEK follows Cow Tom through the years as he becomes a trusted advisor to the Chief, and becomes the husband of the formidable and strong-willed Amy, a resourceful herbalist who is the heart and soul of her family. While Cow Tom promises to make a good life for Amy, and their subsequent offspring, she promises to bear him sons. Instead, she delivers five daughters, which Amy considered a curse, a belief strengthened when her daughters also go on to bear daughters. However, a male heir is of no significant import to Cow Tom who longs for two things: to buy his family’s freedom from Chief Yargee; and to find the mother who abandoned him. When he is sent to Florida to be a translator for U.S. military generals during the Indian-American war, this bittersweet sacrifice means leaving his family for months; but also that he will earn wages put towards his “free papers.” Florida is also the last place he knew his mother to be, so he is determined to find her while there. Along the way, he witnesses the horrors of war; has to do the unthinkable to survive; is almost killed, more than once; finds favor with high ranking military officials; and meets a fellow linguister who will become a lifelong friend.

The second half of CITIZENS CREEK follows Cow Tom’s beloved first born granddaughter Rose, whom he nicknamed Little Warrior because she survives childbirth, while her twin, a much anticipated male child, does not. Rose is resented by her mother for this, and constantly demeaned and made to feel inferior. However, mirroring her grandfather in both looks and true grit, her grandparents teach her survival skills, and how to celebrate and appreciate who she is, and what she has to offer. Through childhood, Rose helplessly watches as sickness and disease lay claim to close family members; and readers grow up with her as she navigates through marriage and motherhood, each with its own set of devastating challenges. When she consistently turns a blind eye to her husband’s infidelity, she is rocked when that betrayal results in two illegitimate children: sons she decides to raise as her own. When these two children rebel, the sting of betrayal, albeit a different kind, is felt all over again. This, coupled with the fact she has been holding on to family secrets she promised her revered “Grampa Cow Tom” (who went on to become the first Black Creek Indian Chief) she would never reveal, makes her resentful of her family, and hardens her heart. When she realizes resentment and her inability to forgive has cost more than she realizes, she has to make some hard decisions, and possibly commit a betrayal of her own, for the sake of the well-being of her family.

In CITIZENS CREEK, Lalita Tademy masterfully weaves a generational tale of historical fiction inspired by a true story. Through Cow Tom and Rose’s eyes, Tademy shows the strength and determination of not allowing negative circumstances or influences to stand in the way of success, reminding readers that overcoming is always possible.

About the authors:
Lalita Tademy is the author of Cane River, a New York Times bestselling novel and the 2001 Oprah Book Club Summer Selection; and its critically-acclaimed sequel Red River. She lives in California.

CITIZENS CREEK
Lalita Tademy
Atria Books
On sale: November 4, 2014
978-1-4767-5303-4; $26.00 U.S./$29.99 Can.

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Special to The Enterprise

Notes on Warm Remembrance Play Area

By
April 01, 2015 |

Notes from Debbie:
I see that you’re the Saturday shift person this Saturday. Would you please cover this playground dedication ceremony? Dan Wolk will be there, as will some of the Riggins and Gonsalves family members, I believe. Beth Gabor (John Riggins’ cousin) spearheaded this effort and will be a good source. You can find stories Lauren has written about this fundraising effort.

This event probably will close the book on the 30-plus-year sad saga of the Riggins/Gonsalves murders. I have booked photos.
=======

From city of Davis website:
The Warm Remembrance Family Play Area project is a community effort to build a lasting memorial in Redwood Park in remembrance of the lives of John Riggins and Sabrina Gonsalves. Redwood Park was constructed the year Sabrina and John were born – 1962. When John began coming to the park in 1969, as part of the City of Davis summer program, there was a play structure there known as The Egg (picture below). It was the meeting place year round for neighborhood children, and when he attended the adjacent elementary school, The Egg was the first thing he saw as he headed for class each day. John ultimately grew up to become a summer program leader, and that is where he met his sweetheart, Sabrina.

Sabrina, welcomed by her sisters who were students at UC Davis, became a beloved member of the Davis community during the summer of 1978. She also became a leader in the summer program. She warmed the hearts of many children in this very same park with The (original) Egg still a prominent feature.

Sabrina and John are remembered by all who knew them, but especially by the children whose lives they enriched. Sabrina is fondly remembered for her devotion to others and endless compassion. John is lovingly remembered for his affable personality and the fun and games he brought to the playground each day.

This Warm Remembrance Family Play Area is being created to remember the joy and laughter Sabrina and John brought to so many. With generous community donations, the play area will include a number of features in their honor, including a New Egg – a symbol of rebirth and a promising, peaceful future.

The family, friends and the community which stretches far beyond Davis, whose lives were touched by John and Sabrina, and are greater for knowing them, invite you to be part of this effort. Please contribute to the Warm Remembrance Family Play Area project to help recreate for generations to come, the warmth and love that Sabrina and John created for so many.

How to donate and make a difference in our community!

Donate Now ButtonDonate Online: Go to www.sacregcf.org, and follow these steps:

Click on the words “Donate Now” and choose your donation amount.
At the drop-down arrow, click on “Davis Recreation & Community Services Program Fund.”
In the “Additional Comments” box below, please write in “Warm Remembrance Family Play Area.”
Then, complete the billing information and you’re done!
Donate By Mail: Please make checks payable to the “Davis Recreation & Community Services Program Fund”, include the purpose of the donation (Warm Remembrance Project) on the check and mail to either:

Yolo Community Foundation
P.O. Box 1264
Woodland, CA 95776

Sacramento Region Community Foundation
955 University Avenue, Suite A
Sacramento, CA 95825

Note: Contributions of $1,000 or more can be recognized at the site on playground equipment or a bench, for example, or in signage. Contributors at this level will be contacted at a later date to determine their preference.

Contributions to the Recreation & Community Services Fund are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law. The City of Davis encourages donors to consult with their legal or tax advisor before making a gift.

For more information about the Warm Remembrance project, call (530) 756-8119.

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High five

By
March 31, 2015 |

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Enterprise photojournalists

Human trafficking 4/22

By
March 31, 2015 |

WCC FKCE to present community forum on human trafficking April 22 in Woodland
National Center For Youth Law attorneys will discuss efforts to decriminalize child victims of sexual exploitation

WOODLAND, Calif. — Children who have been sexually exploited are not prostitutes — but many are treated that way.

In the United States, more than 100,000 children are exploited through pornography or sold in the sex trade each year. And rather than being considered as the child abuse victims they are, many are arrested; labeled “prostitutes” and criminalized.

“I would like to make one thing clear. There are no child prostitutes,” wrote Alisa Jordheim, author of Made In the USA: The Sex Trafficking of America’s Children. “A prostitute is commonly defined as an adult who consensually exchanges sex for money. Using the term prostitute in connection with a child can bring misunderstanding to the definition of child sex trafficking and implies that the child is making a choice. These children are not making choices. They are being exploited.”

In April, which is National Child Abuse Prevention Awareness Month, the Woodland Community College Foster and Kinship Care Education Program will explore current efforts to decriminalize the victims of the ever-growing trade of child sex trafficking — known as the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (CSEC). A free community forum, “Sex Trafficked Children”, will be conducted from 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday, April 22, at the Department of Employment and Social Services, 25 N. Cottonwood St. in Woodland.

“Thousands of American children are being sold for money, drugs, food and shelter everyday,” said Cherie Schroeder, WCC FKCE director. “Many kids rescued from these horrible conditions find themselves arrested for prostitution. They’re not ‘prostitutes’. They are child abuse victims.”

At the forum, lawyers from the National Center for Youth Law will discuss local, state and national efforts to protect minors from exploitation and prevent child victims from prosecution for solicitation. Attorneys Jesse Hahnell, the director of NCYL’s Foster Youth Education Initiative, and Kate Walker, an Equal Justice Works Fellow in juvenile justice and mental health, will facilitate the forum, which is geared toward child welfare workers, foster parents and professionals — but also open to the public.

“Human trafficking is a major problem internationally, and the United States is far from immune from the epidemic,” Schroeder said. “Fifty-five percent of pornography is produced in the United States — and one in five pornographic images is of a child.”

The April 22 workshop will be conducted in the DESS community room (located just left of the main entrance on Cottonwood Street). Free parking is available in the DESS lot, as well as in designated, on-street areas.

For additional information about the human trafficking forum or any of the WCC Foster and Kinship Care Education Program classes, please contact Cherie Schroeder at (530) 574-1964; or visit www.yolofostercare.com.
Thank you for including in your publication.
Cherie Schroeder
Instructional Specialist/Program Director
Foster & Kinship Care Education
Woodland Community College
2300 East Gibson Road
Woodland, CA 95776
www.yolofostercare.com
(530) 574-1964 Cell

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Enterprise staff

elias 4/17 Disclose Act

By
March 31, 2015 |

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2015, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“‘DISCLOSE ACT’ AS ANTIDOTE TO DISMAL VOTE TURNOUTS?”

Politicians have come up with myriad alleged reasons for the dismal vote turnouts seen across California in this spring’s municipal elections – not even reaching 10 percent of eligible voters in the state’s biggest city, Los Angeles.

Bad timing, some suggest. Too many elections, others say. Another excuse: not enough news coverage.

But these rationalizations ignore a fundamental reality of today’s politics. Voters just don’t trust politicians, believing many have been bought by special interests making unlimited, often anonymous donations under the U.S. Supreme Court’s infamous “Citizens United” decision, which declared that corporations have some of the same rights as people.

Because Supreme Court justices serve for life and several who voted for Citizens United are relatively young, that decision won’t be reversed anytime soon. So anyone believing that openness and transparency can create trust in government must look elsewhere for solutions.

One that many believe can be effective is immediate, prominent disclosure of the biggest funders of political campaigns and advertising both for individual candidates and ballot propositions.

Enter California’s proposed “Disclose Act,” a putative law that’s been on the drawing board in the Legislature for more than five years. It would require the top three funders of ballot measure ads be shown clearly in the ads themselves. And it requires the donors listed in the ad be the original sources of the cash, forbidding the use of committee names often employed to conceal the identities of the original contributors.

While this doesn’t require similar disclosure of donors to so-called independent expenditure committees backing individual candidates, it’s a big step in the right direction. Donors to the candidates themselves are listed on the secretary of state’s website.

Backed by the California Clean Money Campaign and more than 400 other organizations, the Disclose Act reemerged in the Legislature in March, co-sponsored by Democratic Assemblymen Jimmy Gomez of Los Angeles and Marc Levine of Marin County. It’s now also known as AB 700.

“The goal…is to press for greater transparency at who’s trying to hide behind these magnificently titled political committees, expose their true identities and motives,” said Gomez.

It’s anybody’s guess whether voters watching TV and Internet ads would pay attention to this information if offered. But at least this would give them the chance to understand what and who is behind the ads blasted at them.

Would it have worked with something like last fall’s Proposition 45? That measure, aiming to regulate health insurance prices just like car insurance and property coverage premiums already are, led in polls by about 10 percent when the campaign around it began in July of last year.

But a $55 million ad campaign, seemingly ubiquitous for months on both radio and television, reversed that margin and led the initiative to lose by 59-41 percent.

The measure was opposed by the California Medical Assn. doctors’ lobby and the California Hospital Assn., among others. They feared controlling insurance premiums would cut into their members’ income. The endings of their ads also contained fine print and barely audible statements saying they were paid for by the state’s biggest health insurance carriers, Kaiser Permanente, Blue Shield, the parent company of Anthem Blue Cross and HealthNet.

The result made it plain almost no one read the fine print or heeded the sotto voce disclosure statements, let alone checked out the secretary of state website. The ads turned around about 1 million voters, as effective a campaign as the state has seen in years.

Things might have been different had the Disclose Act been around. Would voters who knew the message was sponsored by Big Health Insurance still have changed their minds and chosen today’s unregulated health insurance premiums? It’s speculative to say that disclosure would have prevented the turnaround in voters’ opinion on insurance rate regulation, but the Disclose Act at least would have let them know who was trying to influence them.

All of which means that although the latest version of the Disclose Act would still leave plenty more to be done, it would be a big step toward voters’ understanding the political process and leveling a playing field that now tilts markedly toward large corporations.

-30-
Email Thomas Elias at [email protected] His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, visit www.californiafocus.net

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elias 4/14 desalination

By
March 31, 2015 |

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2015, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“DESALINATION LOOKS BETTER AS WATER PRICES RISE”

“Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink…” Samuel Taylor Coleridge, 1798, in the “Rime of the Ancient Mariner.”

The reality confronting millions of Californians as they cope with yet another lengthy episode in a seemingly endless series of droughts is that – like Coleridge’s mariner – this state has billions of acre feet of water clearly visible every day in the form of the Pacific Ocean and its many bays and estuaries.

But that’s briny salt water, containing an array of minerals that make it almost as inaccessible today as it was to that parched, fictitious sailor of 200 years ago.

But it doesn’t have to stay that way. As the price of water goes up, desalinating Pacific waters becomes ever more enticing and it will become more so if the price of taking salts and other impurities out of salt water falls. In short, if the rising price of fresh water ever comes to match a falling cost for purified sea water, expect desalination to begin on a large scale in California.

It appears things are moving that way now. Over the winter, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California – largest urban water district in the state – paid Sacramento Valley rice farmers an average of $694 per acre foot of water for 115,000 acre feet to be sent south via the state Water Project. For some farmers, selling water is now more profitable than growing crops.

This sounds like a lot to pay for one acre foot, the amount needed to cover an acre one foot deep and about the quantity used by two typical urban families in the course of a year. But at that price, water costs still costs only about one-fifth of a cent per gallon. Well water, by comparison, averages about $293 per acre foot.

Meanwhile, ideas for new methods of desalinating water arrive frequently at the state Department of Water Resources, where analyst Michael Ross checks to see which might have real promise.

“The cost of desalination will come down,” Ross says. “The price of other water is coming up, as we can see from the Met’s purchase. Right now I have a basket-full of proposed processes on my desk.”

Traditional desalination via the process of reverse osmosis (RO) will vastly increase later this year, when Massachusetts-based Poseidon Water opens a $1 billion facility at Carlsbad in northern San Diego County. The plant will make 48,000 acre feet yearly, about 7 percent of San Diego County’s supply, at a cost of about $2,200 per acre foot. A smaller RO plant opened four years ago in Sand City, near Monterey. Santa Barbara plans to reopen a similar plant that was mothballed for years.

But some believe reverse osmosis, which uses a series of membranes to filter sea water, is too expensive.

One idea Ross has reviewed comes from a Texas firm called Salt of the Earth Energy, which would use water from perforated plastic pipes eight to 15 feet beneath the ocean floor, mixing gases and chemicals into sea water from which ocean-bottom silt has filtered almost all marine life. The process would also produce industrial chemicals like phosphates, carbonates and hydroxides, helping bring down the cost of the water produced.

The firm’s consultant, James Torres of Rancho Cucamonga, says the high end of water cost using this process would be $650 per acre foot, less than the Met is now paying for some of its supply.

“This idea is at a proving stage,” said the DWR’s Ross. A test facility is planned along the Gulf Coast of Texas and if it proves promising, the method could solve many current problems with RO, including the fact only half the water RO plants take in eventually becomes potable; the rest is returned to the sea as heavy brine harmful to marine life.

“Our process uses 90 percent of the intake,” said Torres. “And we’ll use only about half the power of an RO plant.”

Another possibly promising technology called “Zero Discharge” is currently being tested in the Panoche Water and Drainage District in Central California, using solar power to evaporate and then collect water from irrigation discharge, with about a 93 percent recovery rate.

Which means drought has not brought despair. Instead, it’s spurring an inventiveness that may soon put the lie to the Rime of the Ancient Mariner.

-30-
Email Thomas Elias at [email protected] His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, visit www.californiafocus.net

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Paso Fino map

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From page A1 | March 27, 2015 |

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Michael MusialW

Musician and and singer Michael Musial is the featured artist at next Sunday at I-House, set for Sunday, April 26. Courtesy photo

www.facebook.com/amyshumanphoto

The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn (Spencer Alexander) has a conversation with a plant he names "Audrey II" in the Woodland Opera House production of “Little Shop of Horrors.” The plant turns out to be much more than he expected. Courtesy photo

JenniferBorensteinW

Biketrip4 Bike path entranceW

The bike path entrance coming into Davis from the Yolo Causeway is marked with a sign. This part of the path is relatively smooth. Elizabeth Case/ Enterprise photo

12dhs boysLaxW

PasoFinoMapW

A map from Taormino and Associates shows the plans for the Paso Fino development, including eight Canary pines to be preserved on the eastern edge of the property. Courtesy graphic

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David Takemoto-Werts for bike tab

By
March 26, 2015 |

Interviewed on March 25
Had a BIKE EPIPHANY

Used his bike to get around at UCSC
Went on a big ride through the Santa Cruz mountains

Didn’t have a car,
hilly school

Second year UCD (grad school)
job at bike barn
opened in 1971, D worked here in 1972

Best job I ever had

Worked on commission basis, work as fast as you could
good training regime
learned a lot about sophisticated repairs

B&L opened in 1965
also Del’s fix it shop (where Davis Ace pet area) with lawn repair

In the 1970s
Some of us had pretty nice bikes

Long before mountain bike area
mix of ten speeds, 3 speeds, and some cruiser
one speed with coaster breaks

internal hubs —

bike census from five years ago
numbers
trips to work
didn’t measure trips to school
City had around 21 percent (dropped from 23 percent)

Closest second is Boulder, Co

Why did it drop?
Davis has become more expensive to live
more and more of our staff and faculty can’t afford to live in Davis, so biking is much too far

Idk if students get polled

If they ask a student in survey, if they bike to work…

compiled stats for bike friendly platinum award

in mid-90s unitrans had referendum…vote for it, additional fee every quarter for Unitrans
as a result, a student could just show a reg card and get on the bus..made it so much easier to ride the bus
observed a dramatic increase in students riding bus.
Long time ago…

international students less likely to purchase a car while here…
maybe it’s seen as lower class

in SC, wear a helmet?
Nobody wore a helmet back in that era
I think I was aware that bike racers wore leather hairnets

College cyclery in Freeport in Sac

cool vintage stuff

Totally legal to ride on the causeway with no bike path
wide enough shoulder
needed to get to the store in Sac that had the weird part he needed for his bike
borrowed his wife’s bike
Got to Broadway, VW bug came out of a side street to make a left onto Broadway
Driver didn’t notice D, he t-boned her side of her door
Feel off seat, straddled top bar

put a dent in her door
Front fork and frame is bent back
woman was a law student at McGeorge
totally apologetic, hadn’t looked to the left,
But the bike in the back of her bug.
She drove him back to Davis
she paid for a new bike for my girlfriend

Result of that was I realized there will be times — dedicated bicyclist — i’m not going to be able to avoid things likes this. So i got a leather hair net

1975 Bell helmets Bell Biker

Skid lid—
had squishy foam and a shell

basic helmet
visor’s typically marketed for mountain biking
Like the visor for attaching helmet mirror
makes his own helmet mirror
Beer view mirror
bike spoke
spoke nipple
beer cap
original design guy bends the spoke
binder clip
little mirro from micahel’s

Dream bike trip
done tours down the cost

Bucket list
Cross-country bike ride
ideally it would be self-supported
independent of a van needing to carry stuff

camp with
two saddle bags/paniers
two small ones in front over wheel
handlebar bag
on top of rear rack
how many lbs … about 40, under 50

wife and I have a nice tandem
envision the trip by myself
third tandem
made by bike friday, in oregon
custom order, give them your measurements
not completely custom
unique about it…not folding but travel bikes,
frame comes apart in pieces

samsonite suitcase (hardshell) modified comes with single bikefriday bike…
whole thing comes apart, fly to europe, bike in hard case
fly to paris, get your bike, assemble it, converts to a trailer
now you put your stuff in it

Tandem is too big for one, but fits in two suitcases, one on top of the other
heard about this 20 or so years ago

Second tandem we had we bought in 1977 before we got married, delivered in 1978 after we got married, santana in So Cal

Knew the guy who started in late 70s, worked for a bike distributor in So Cal (after dropping out of grad school)
Bill McCreedy
had a bike shop in Claremont
Had ordered a jack taylor through Bill

We’re going to start our own lines of tandems, recommend you drop your Jack Taylor
Sixth santana ever built, still have it now

I’m a little bit proud of
2012 I was at a bike conference in Long Beach
conference pro bike pro walk pro place (used to be called pro bike) every two years
switches coasts
I was at a half-day with 50 or 60 people in the profession
as sort of an ice breaker at the start
everyone stand up…
everyone who has been in this line of work for 3 year, sit down,
through the numbers…
more than 25> Me and one other guy were still standing, bike coordinator for city of madison wi

talking about that we both realized we had started in this job in the same year (1987)
in SAME position

TAPS is now Transportation Services

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Davis’ restaurant glut slays Silver Dragon

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Michael MusialW

Musician and and singer Michael Musial is the featured artist at next Sunday at I-House, set for Sunday, April 26. Courtesy photo

www.facebook.com/amyshumanphoto

The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn (Spencer Alexander) has a conversation with a plant he names "Audrey II" in the Woodland Opera House production of “Little Shop of Horrors.” The plant turns out to be much more than he expected. Courtesy photo

JenniferBorensteinW

Biketrip4 Bike path entranceW

The bike path entrance coming into Davis from the Yolo Causeway is marked with a sign. This part of the path is relatively smooth. Elizabeth Case/ Enterprise photo

12dhs boysLaxW

PasoFinoMapW

A map from Taormino and Associates shows the plans for the Paso Fino development, including eight Canary pines to be preserved on the eastern edge of the property. Courtesy graphic

WendyWeitzelW

By
From page A8 | March 22, 2015 |

After more than 25 years, the Chinese restaurant Silver Dragon is closing. The eatery, at 335 F St., is due to change hands on April 1, a family member said.

Jimmy Kieng, brother of owner Nhi Kieng, said another Asian restaurant — possibly specializing in seafood ­— would replace Silver Dragon.

It was 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, and Kieng had time to chat. There weren’t many customers. “In Davis, there are too many restaurants right now,” he said.

He and his family plan to take a break for a couple of months before deciding what to do next.

————

Wheelworks changed hands this month. The bicycle shop, at 247 F St., specializes in performance, road and triathlon bikes. New owner Duke Tuchman purchased it from Joe Santos. Tuchman plans to diversify a bit, while keeping true to its focus, said manager Tim “Sherpa” Maulchin.

Tuchman, a Napa resident, owns Foy’s Bike Shop in Woodland and Napa River Velo in Napa. Maulchin said the shop would expand its inventory ­— including more traditional-style bikes — to round out its selection.

————

Pizza Guys in Davis will have a new owner on April 1. Scott Caster owns two other Pizza Guys ­— in Woodland and Napa (sound familiar?) — and has been in the business for 20 years, he said. The Davis store is at 505 L St., near 7-Eleven.

Caster grew up in Davis and lives in Woodland. He said his grandfather owned a few gas stations in Davis in the 1960s.

————

Shabu Extreme should open soon, an employee said. It fills the former Judy’s Grinders spot at 213 E St.

The employee, who identified himself as only as Kevin, said, “We are currently doing minor touch-ups to the restaurant, and we hope to be ‘soft opening’ in the next week or so. We will keep you posted on our progress.”

Shabu shabu is a Japanese fondue-style dish featuring thinly sliced beef and other dippables.

————

Richard Baciarini, owner of Baciarini Martial Arts in Davis, plans to open a Take it to the MAX fitness center in Woodland in August, and expand the program to Davis in early 2016.

“We are still in negotiations for our (Woodland) location,” he said. “However, I can say it will be extremely close to the Spring Lake home community and the Costco shopping center. I will have more info within the next two weeks, once the lease is signed.”

The MAX location will have the same “customer service and quality instruction” as his martial arts facility at 912 Fifth St., “but with more focus on the adult demographic.” When he brings the program to Davis, it’ll be connected to the martial arts studio.

While martial arts has been his business for years, Baciarini and his wife, Marie, have made extreme positive lifestyle changes in our diet, mind-set and fitness,” in the past year, and attribute it to a 10-week MAX program in Sacramento.

“I lost 33 pounds in just eight weeks. … I loved the program so much, I am opening the first standalone franchise on the West Coast. My wife loved the program so much, she decided to make a massive career change (from marriage and family therapy) and she will now be teaching and managing the Woodland location.”

The program uses nutrition counseling, 45-minute fitness classes, and motivation to “transform your mind and body in 10 short weeks.”

MAX is a growing franchise business, with 40 in New Jersey and New York, and nine in the Sacramento region. Many of them are still in the planning stages. The local ones include Elk Grove, Natomas, Sacramento, Carmichael, Fair Oaks and Granite Bay.

For information, visit http://themaxchallenge.com.

— Wendy Weitzel is a communications consultant in Davis. Her column publishes on Sundays. Throughout the week, watch her Comings & Goings Facebook page. If you know about a business coming or going in the area, contact Wendy at [email protected]

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Kimberly Yarris

David Takemoto-Weerts for bike tab

By
March 20, 2015 |

David Takemoto-Weerts, Bicycle Program coordinator at the University of California, Davis, is a new member of the California Bicycle Advisory Committee. Paul Moore, manager of the California Department of Transportation’s Bicycle Facilities Unit, made the appointment.

Takemoto-Weerts holds the only committee seat reserved specifically for a representative of a youth-oriented organization. UC Davis, of course, has plenty of youths — among our 35,000 students — who ride bicycles, not to mention thousands of bike-riding staff and faculty members.

On peak days, 15,000 to 20,000 bike riders are on the campus, where bicycling amenities include bike lanes and paths, repair stations and loads of bike racks — all of which contribute to UC Davis’ status as a Bicycle-Friendly University and a Bicycle-Friendly Business, both of the highest degree (platinum), as declared by the League of American Bicyclists.

Takemoto-Weerts said he got hooked on cycling his freshman year at UC Santa Cruz. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in anthropology in 1971 and later did graduate work at UC Davis (while also working as a student mechanic at the Bike Barn). He joined the UC Davis staff on a full-time basis in 1983, starting as Bike Barn manager and subsequently moving to the bookstore before becoming the Bicycle Program coordinator in 1987.

The California Bicycle Advisory Committee also includes representatives of state government and local or regional government agencies, bicycle advocacy organizations (statewide and local or regional) and organizations that do not have bicycle advocacy as a main mission.

The California Department of Transportation established the committee in 1992 to provide guidance to the department on bicycle issues. The committee also reviews matters under consideration by the California Traffic Control Devices Committee.
=======
Went to grad school here (anthropology) from fall, 1971, until sometime in the winter of 1973. From fall of ’72 until I left Davis, I was a student mechanic at the Bike Barn. As I often like to tell people: best job (of many good jobs) I ever had.

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Regents CO2 notes

By
March 19, 2015 |

Later this morning, Brown and Napolitano will present their progress

Tuition needs to be kept “as low as possible and predictable as possible”

To make good choices as we contemplate our shared futures

want to do this without sacrificing a single iota of quality

possible Freeze on enrollment at ucb ucla

Difficult decision announced earlier…

Last year CSU turned away 20K qualified applicants

“brings us to the so-called Committee of Two, or CO2″

Meetings have been productive
shared visions
bright future

“Ensuring that this good future comes to pass, and I am confident that it will”
=====
Appalling incidents have taken place on our campuses

bigotry and hate must be condemned wherever and whenever it occurs

will not tolerate any bigotry or hatred
=====
after lunch
two formal meetings
brief
napolitano
conversations have been far-ranging
opps for increasing degree production
how to think about costs … in context of research univ
and how does enrollment factor in

Look forward to continuing to discuss them with Gov Brown
Someone and de leone have been putting together proposals

Looking to find right resolution for the univ and the state
need to include other members of our community
been meeting with undegrads and grad students
they want to be sure that their voices are being heard and I want to commit to them that their voices are being heard

faculty are key, heart and soul of the univ
as are staff, both rep and nonrep

We all want to make sure we do what’s right for higher ed and the university

A fe other items of importance

looking at social and economic mobility it provides cal residents
access to higher ed is a proven path to social mobility

Want to protect and enhance the university as we seek to change

UC outcomes are virtually best in nation

83 percent grad in 6 years

We generate more than $46B in economic activity every year

Narrative to date is very good, but we kow that change is in the air

We will contintue to keep the full board apprised of where we are
hopefully in near future, without concrete date, we will have concrete proposals

Brown concurs
Important inquiry

Group is small, but works very well
no tie votes yet. (joke)

This in some ways is about money
People say don’t you ever talk about anything other than money
Not prime interest
very interested in greatness of the university,
diversity, access, role in our collective life

developing human beings who have a sense of our tradtion, or vaules our past
and develop interpretatiove skilss that are …

challenging world now
as much as we need science, we need people who can understand human nautre and … world conflicts

this is about humanities, history, … as well as stem

but everything has costs
whatever the acitivity that is funded by the state, people who receive fund always want mroe, and legislature is forced to make changes

Iun market system, it provides the

In govt, Brown has to say no, and I will

It’s not just the univ, health care, prisons, roads, water, educa

there’s an argument for more spending, but that won’t be done
have to make choices

shows chart with steep curve

work we are doing now is the flattening of that tuition curve
it’s something that isn’t just UC, this is the whole country

Student debt…talked to pres of Wells Fargo

student at UCLA law school $120K in debt

Tension between UC and finance depart 35 years ago was simliar
univeristy has autonmy and elite character

Govt office has inherenet role to play

If we can go from 1.5 to 5 or 6 years, that would help
maybe more summer school courses, online, getting ap courses oriented better
getting cc students better set to graduate in 2 years

it isn’t just putting everything online
I consult my iphone several times a day to define things

I can usually find it pretty fast,
a lot of knowledge is now available

rambling

pres of Wash Post, he’s the CEO of Amazon

Bezos is hiring lots of s/w enginerrs, not just journalists

What’s happend to UCS and financial insitutions will also impact universities
won’t really know

Impliations for access, more people through UCs by making it more accessioble and by making it

Former stanford prof activity based costing
Only done in a few deptartments at unnamed univ
idea is to get info on how many students take what class from what prof, all dif info and data you have, find a way to undersant how you are really doing

took to make the univ more effective
you can find out does a math course at riverside cost more than a math course at uc berkeley or uc davis

process presented for our consideration

look at all the big data that;s out there in our univ right now.

I’m enjoyhing it, I enjoy the intellectual pleasure of listeingin to all of this.

I think we’re moving in the right direction, we';ll have more to report back very soon.

female regent…latina?
question to Gov
Cal is so remarkable in so many ways, tech, innovation, creative ecomonmy drivers in this state
uc has such an important rtole to play
paired with changing demographic
young population…50 percent of people under five are latino
Access, opportunity

Enrollment…
access is improtant, can guarantee access by innovating, technology
help us better understand your approach to enrollment

Gov
To think about enrollmnet you have to look more broadly at all the segments
community colleges, cal state, and UC
different
different functions
cal state gives a few phds
digital breaks down barriers

used to be called savings and loans and banks

now we have a financial services deparmtnet
info and knowledlge exchange is going to spread beyond fixed walls and boundaries
look at three segments to maek sure we’re appororpate

because prop 98 applies to k-12 and CC, a lot of money is flowing in that directin
most extra money this year will go toward those segments

If you say need another UC campus, look at it…we’re not alone, private campuses, lot s of didfferent things

can only help if we can get the job done at the best cost

There are limits

Cal Grant program barely existed 20 years ago, will continue to grow
there’s a lot of stuff we gotta look at

Napolitano
One of the fundabmental questions what does it mean to be a publich university
Only 7 percent for the budget of our medical schools comes from teh state
undergrads…love to get back to the days where 90 percent comes from the state

How do we maximize the opps of young people in cali to go to research uni.
master plan is to have the segments works together

requires using data to better predict what we need

Regent Keefer
Like the attention that has been drawn to cost saving end of it, as well as the univ

i.e. 50 percent of students don’t pay
kinds of facts are finally coming to the public attentions

Student regent…

Gov
online stuff
pres of az state, using online stuff to help students navigate courses
four year graduation rate has increased
we may need counselors, but s/w is effective as more young people get sophisticated
more kids are adept at that

Design shift that isn’t always imaginable (horse manure to cars_)

Napolitano
interesting add-ons to how online coudl work

we’ve been nailing down 10 clear pathways from CCs to certain majors at UCs

What ASU is doing
but they were pretty low in grad rates
we already have a good grad rate, how do we sustain that
really keep in mind cost, quality, outcomes

ASUA president (from Merced) Jefferson…
invited Napolitano and Brown to a student-led town hall at UCD next month
about tution, etc. look into this.
=======
regent …
when people find out you are a regent, and want to engage you on this topic, it’s to find out why their kid didn’t get into the UC campus of their choice.

Perez
the right mix of students at each campus

perception of campus climate

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Citrus Circuits photos

By
March 17, 2015 |

Mechanical lead Megan Yamoah feeds totes into Citrus Circuits’ robot, Lemon Drop. Courtesy photo

Citrus Circuits’ robot, Lemon Drop, stacks totes in competition. Courtesy photo

Citrus Circuits team members are congratulated for winning the Industrial Design award at the Central Valley Regional competition. Courtesy photo

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Special to The Enterprise

Untitled_4

By
March 14, 2015 |

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UCD California Lighting Technology Center

By
March 14, 2015 |

From Kat Kerlin:
CLTC is doing a lot of interesting things in energy efficiency and lighting tech. In addition to helping you figure out what kind of lightbulb you might want, they are coming up with energy efficient and pleasing-to-the eye solutions for retail spaces, hospitals (link to story: http://news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=11018), K-12 schools, and the UC Davis campus, and their work has helped set building codes and standards for the state.

They led our Smart Lighting Initiative (link to story: http://news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=10249) that retrofitted indoor and outdoor spaces on campus, including our parking lots (energy-saving sensors, etc) and street lighting. When the sensor lights come on as you walk by the refrigerated cases at Target, you have CLTC to thank. They also consulted on lighting for the Honda Smart Home and West Village, among many other things.

When you get a chance to take a tour, be sure to check out their “lightbulb room,” retail demo space, and kitchen demo space.
=========
Kelly Cunningham
—————————-
Outreach Director
California Lighting Technology Center, UC Davis
633 Peña Drive / Davis, CA 95618
530-747-3824 desk
916-202-2499 mobile
cltc.ucdavis.edu

Said she could give a tour, offer ideas for a top tips for readers on buying lighting for their homes, etc.

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Kosher kitchen gives students a special opportunity

By
March 13, 2015 |

Inside the UC Davis branch of Hillel House is a room with red-tiled floors and stainless steel counters. Ladles hang in front of crowded spice racks. Well-stocked refrigerators hum contentedly in one corner.
It may look like just another kitchen, but this one is special: it’s the only commercial kitchen in Yolo County that is kept according to kashrut, the way of kosher eating.
Hillel House combines faith and community to serve as a “home away from home” for Jewish students, according to executive director Chani Oppenheim. And Oppenheim sees the kitchen as intrinsic to this mission.
“In our tradition, you can’t separate home from food,” she said. “If you’re a freshman, a little nervous, what are you looking for? A sense of home and safety. We give that to them.”
Some of the students at Hillel come from kosher homes, where kashrut is followed strictly. Others do not.
But at Hillel, Oppenheim said, “we keep the highest (kosher) standards. It’s a way of being inclusive.”
Hillel’s high standards mean that students from a variety of different traditions can eat together comfortably.
Kashrut comes from the Torah and the work of rabbinical scholars. In its most basic definition, kashrut defines the types of meat that may be eaten: beef and chicken is kosher when slaughtered according to kosher guidelines, while pork is never kosher.
Kashrut also dictates that dairy and meat are never stored, prepared, or served together.
This can prove a little difficult for kosher home cooks. Websites such as Chabad.org and jewfaq.org provide hints for home cooks, ranging from tips on purifying utensils between dairy and meat uses, to advice on storing dairy and meat in the same refrigerator.
But the Hillel kitchen was designed with kosher cooking in mind. There are two sinks, two countertops, and two separate refrigerators.
So at the Hillel kitchen, the student interns who select the week’s menu will choose to prepare either foods containing dairy or foods containing meat, not both.
Then the meals are prepared using Hillel’s color-coded dishes: red for meat, blue for dairy. The handles of pots and pans are marked with a strip of either blue or red tape. According to kosher guidelines, the same utensils are never used for both dairy and meat. Even the tablecloth on the center island is switched.
And because the kitchen was built with two sinks, one for dairy and one for meat, the sink not in use will be blocked off. Only the sink corresponding to that week’s choice—dairy or meat—will be used.
“We do that as a physical reminder so we don’t mix (dairy and meat cooking surfaces) at all,” said Oppenheim, who works with other members of the Hillel staff to ensure that all food prepared in the kosher kitchen meets their standards.
But the menus are student-designed and the cooking is student-led.
Intern Sammy Wilkin didn’t follow strict kosher guidelines growing up, she said. Cooking at Hillel meant learning to use a kosher kitchen for the first time.
But “it wasn’t that hard,” she said. “It’s very straightforward.”
Wilkin and fellow intern Ori Reches are responsible for organizing meals and services for the weekly Shabbat, a holy day of rest. Wilkin and Reches also coordinate holiday meals and events.
The Shabbat services at Hillel are student-led. Wilkin will often lead a service herself, or find another student to lead it. Afterward, the students gather for a kosher meal prepared in the kitchen.
This year, the interns had the idea to hold internationally-themed Shabbats, where the meal features dishes from another culture. So far, they’ve had Chinese, Russian, South African, Persian, Israeli, and Moroccan-themed Shabbats.
“Some parents (of Hillel students) want to come and share their heritage,” Reches said. “We see a lot of different heritages and cultures.”
The ethnic food is prepared by Hillel students or parents in the Hillel kitchen, following kosher procedures, because kosher isn’t a cuisine—it’s just a method of preparing food.
When not celebrating Shabbat with a certain theme, the students enjoy macaroni and cheese, lasagna, and other traditional comfort foods prepared in the kosher kitchen, Oppenheim said.
“Everything we do here, it’s to make them feel good about being here,” she said. “Food is a big part of our mission. … We fill the belly and we fill the heart.”
“I’ve met some of my best friends here,” Wilkin said. “I’m comfortable here. It is my second home.”

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Claire Lynch photo

By
March 11, 2015 |

The Claire Lynch Band promises to bowl you over with its bluegrass, Americana and country sounds when it plays Thursday, March 12, at The Palms Playhouse in downtown Winters. Courtesy photo

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Special to The Enterprise

NEXTGEN BUDGET SAVE

By
March 03, 2015 |

March 12

Gen Events

Independent Lifetime Sports controversy (Kellen)
Photos of author Yuyi Morales visiting Cesar Chavez
Birch Lane Love a Picture Book Month still going strong (with photos)

March 19
Gen Events
College Column

March 26
NO NEXT GEN — SPRING BREAK

April 2
Gen Events

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Anne Ternus-Bellamy

Michael Tilson Thomas photo

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Michael MusialW

Musician and and singer Michael Musial is the featured artist at next Sunday at I-House, set for Sunday, April 26. Courtesy photo

www.facebook.com/amyshumanphoto

The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn (Spencer Alexander) has a conversation with a plant he names "Audrey II" in the Woodland Opera House production of “Little Shop of Horrors.” The plant turns out to be much more than he expected. Courtesy photo

JenniferBorensteinW

Biketrip4 Bike path entranceW

The bike path entrance coming into Davis from the Yolo Causeway is marked with a sign. This part of the path is relatively smooth. Elizabeth Case/ Enterprise photo

12dhs boysLaxW

PasoFinoMapW

A map from Taormino and Associates shows the plans for the Paso Fino development, including eight Canary pines to be preserved on the eastern edge of the property. Courtesy graphic

WendyWeitzelW

Michael Tilson Thomas2W

Conductor Michael Tilson Thomas will lead the London Symphony Orchestra in the March 21 concert at the Mondavi Center. Courtesy photo

By
March 01, 2015 |

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Special to The Enterprise

By
March 01, 2015 |

Catalytic converter thefts – trend is causing a little drama

Mike Moore

When they cut that part out
really loud because car noise bypasses muffler
Very loud, sounds like an airplane

The reason they sell it is the metals they use in the CC are worth a lot of money
Recycling for cash

Throughout the city, not isolated to one part
Since Feb 6, we’ve taken 5 catalystic converter cases
primarily targeting apt. complex parking lots
And toyotas continue to be the most commonly targeted
Pipe cutters, quiet, don’t need a ratchet

Often pick pickup trucks easier to get under

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RC 2015 Spa Central

By
March 19, 2015 |

“We are very grateful to all that have supported Spa Central over the years,” said Kelli Fuller, owner of Spa Central. “We appreciate each and every one of you.”

Spa Central is proud to celebrate 10 years in business. Having moved to their current location just three years ago, they are thrilled with their clientele and location.

Spa Central’s signature facial is a 75-minute service and uses an aromatherapy line that is paraben-free.

“We want everyone to enjoy our services and feel relaxed when they leave,” Fuller said.

Spa Central has been the recipient of several “Readers’ Choice” awards since their 2005 debut, including three first-place awards this year.

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Enterprise staff

RC 2015 Razor’s Edge Barber Shop

By
March 19, 2015 |

“Thank you to all my loyal clients, new and old, for your votes,” said Sukh Banwait, owner of Razor’s Edge Barber Shop. “I am always asked what I like most about my job and I never have a good answer. Over the last year that has changed — the best part about my job is the hundreds of great people I have met over many years of working in Davis.”

“The relationships I have built with my clients is priceless and is the most important part of my job, “ Banwait said. “Oh, and giving a decent haircut, of course!”

Razor’s Edge first opened in 1986 by long-time owner Larry Lister. Banwait purchased the business in 2002 from Lister, making what he calls an “aggressive move,” having graduated from barbering school just a year and half earlier.

The growth of the business was slow, but steady, and gave Banwait the time he needed to build client relationships — and learn how to become a better barber and business owner.

Banwait’s clientele is a diverse group, consisting of toddlers, seniors and hundreds of students from all over the world; making him skilled in all hair types and cut requests.

The most commonly requested cut is what he refers to as “The Interview,” using clippers on the sides, no scalp showing and finishing up the top with a scissor-cut. Other standards are the buzz, fade, comb-over, mohawk and fauxhawk, spike, Ceasar and flat-top. But Banwait is up for the challenge when he receives an uncommon request — being a one-man show allows him to work with clients over time to perfect their look.

In 2014, due to the reconstruction of the corner building at Third and G streets, The Razor’s Edge was relocated to nearby G Street.

“This was a scary move for me but taught me that change is inevitable and to always be ready for it,” Banwait said. “Now I am a block away, but more importantly, my customers are happy and I get to keep working in this wonderful city.”

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Enterprise staff

RC 2015 Morse Remodeling Inc. and Custom Homes

By
March 18, 2015 |

“Thank you so much to all of our valued customers, friends, vendors, trades, and supporters of Morse Remodeling, Inc. and Custom Homes. We value your relationship and appreciate you taking time to cast your vote. We are grateful for all of the Enterprise readers who voted for us in the Best Remodeling Contractor category. And congratulations to all of the other “Best of Yolo County” recipients.” — Morse Remodeling Inc. and Custom Homes

Marty Morse opened Morse Construction for business in 1993, shortly after finishing his degree in Environmental Design/Architecture at UC Davis, and incorporated in 1999 to become Morse Remodeling, Inc. and Custom Homes. Nearly 22 years later, the firm has crafted the design-build model of renovating and constructing homes to provide the best service possible to their clients from the initial design concepts, to the final detailed clean up of the construction project.

Owner Marty Morse is a NARI (National Association of the Remodeling Industry) Certified Remodeler. Design Manager Ricardo Almanza earned his architectural degree from UC Berkeley School of Architecture. Production Manager Dave Horne and Lead Carpenter Mark Sutherland are NARI Certified Project Managers. Morse Remodeling, Inc. and Custom Homes has won NARI Contractor of the Year Awards in every year from 2006-2014. The company was the recipient of the prestigious Judges Choice Award in 2006 and 2007 and a regional winner in 2009.

COOL TOOLS: Three-dimensional and realistic photos and videos of their uniquely-designed spaces are used during the initial design phase. See it before it’s built.

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Enterprise staff

RC 2015 Brooks Painting Inc.

By
March 18, 2015 |

“Thank you for supporting us for the past 19 years,” said Jeremy Brooks, owner of Brooks Painting Inc. “Without your support and repeat business we would not be the business we are today.”

Starting in 1997, Brooks Painting has grown from a three-man operation working out of Brooks’ home with one pickup truck to a business of 25 employees and a fleet of vehicles.

“We are continually looking for ways to make our company better,” Brooks said. “For us it is all about service, and we want to provide the best experience possible.”

“Through relentless dedication to the customer, employees, and craftsmanship, our goal is to attract lifetime relationships,” he said.

Brooks Painting Inc. serves the greater Northern California area, traveling as far as the Tahoe region working on clients’ vacation homes.

In addition to complete painting services, both residential and commercial, Brooks Painting Inc. offers expert cabinet refinishing as well as hardware upgrades such as Euro hidden hinges, knobs and handles. No job is too big nor too small — from painting and refinishing entry doors to painting 500,000 square foot warehouses.

Brooks is also working on adding a carpentry license to his company’s resume, which will allow him to handle many other issues at job sites — such as dry rot and trim replacement.

“Our core beliefs are excellent customer service and giving back to our communities that we work and live in,” Brooks said. ” We focus on these two items more than anything else.”

Honors and associations of Brooks Painting Inc.:
* 18-year trade association member of the PDCA (Painting & Decorating Contractors of America)
* Accredited contractor through the PDCA contractor college, completing more than 40 hours of ongoing education
* Awarded the “Safety Bronze Certification” by Summit Service Inc, a national painting group
* Voted the “Best painting contractor in Yolo County” the past four years
* Members of the professional groups NARI (National Association of the Remodeling Industry), BOMA (Building Owners and Managers Association) and the Woodland, Davis and Vacaville Chambers of Commerce
* Voted “Business of the year” with both the Woodland and Davis Chambers of Commerce
* Owner Jeremy Brooks served as the president of the Davis Chamber of Commerce in 2009
* Proud to support more than 50 nonprofit groups every year with “Painter for a Day” gift certificates or cash donations

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UCNS registration 3/9

By
February 28, 2015 |

Hello,

I am a registrar from University Covenant Nursery School and we would like to submit a briefly for our annual Open House being held on March 9. Is it possible to have this briefly article appear a few times between now and March 9th? The article is below:

University Covenant Nursery School (UCNS) invites you to attend our annual Open House on Monday, March 9th from 5:30PM – 7:30PM at University Covenant Church at 315 Mace Blvd. in Davis. Open House is an excellent opportunity to come see our preschool facility and meet our caring and highly qualified preschool staff. Current UCNS parents will also be available to answer your questions.

UCNS is a week-day Christian preschool with programs for three-year-olds and pre-kindergarten students (ages 4-5). Our two three-year-old classes are held from 9:00AM – 12:00 PM Tuesday through Thursday. New for next year we will have THREE morning pre-kindergarten classes, that meet Monday through Thursday from 9:00AM -12:00PM. In addition, we are thrilled to introduce a new Stay & Play program. Stay & Play is an optional after school program providing care for enrolled UCNS students from 12:00-2:00PM, Monday through Thursday. Our preschool year closely follows the Davis Joint Unified School District calendar.

Registration forms will be available at Open House, on-line beginning March 3rd, and at the church office (2nd floor during business hours (Monday- Thursday 9:00AM – 4:00PM and Friday 9:00AM – 3:00PM). All completed registration forms and a $75 registration fee must be received before 4:00PM on Wednesday, April 1st. Registration forms may be mailed to UCNS (Attn: UCNS Registrar, 315 Mace Blvd, Davis CA 95618), or dropped off during the business hours listed above. Partial tuition scholarships are available. For additional information, please visit our website at www.ucnskids.com.

Thanks so much!

Melissa Loscutoff

UCNS Registrar

(530) 574-3887

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Enterprise staff

Blue & White Foundation

By
February 27, 2015 |

Debbie Davis suggested we do an update on the Blue & White Foundation; things like how many members there are, how much money has been raised/disbursed? What major projects is the foundation aiming to do now that the stadium is finished?

The Blue and White Foundation was formed in 2002 to meet a large facility need that existed at Davis High School. Joining with the District and the community, we spearheaded the effort to rebuild the largest classroom in the district, the track and field and football stadium facility. This remains the Foundation’s most widely-recognized achievement.

With that said however, The Blue and White Foundation serves the entirety of Davis High, not just athletic programs. We have, in recent years, contributed tens of thousands of dollars to an extremely wide variety of DHS students and programs.

This includes funding of individual students via our Student Activity Grant program, in which a student may apply for funding to support curricular or extra-curricular activities during his or her high school years. The program’s first year alone, we helped one student to publish a book of his art, others to take summer school classes or obtain tutoring, and others to travel abroad (to work and study in such places as
Nicaragua and Tanzania!).

We have also made contributions to groups at DHS, including buying new computers for the music department (so they could actually run the composition software they already owned), helping the Madrigals go to the Vatican, the Chess Club to enter a regional tournament, los Latinos Unidos in support of a trip to the Mexican Museum in San Francisco, and to the Citrus Circuits robotics team to enter the World Championships.

We have learned just last week that the Blue and White Foundation will be facilitating a contribution from Schilling Robotics to the Citrus Circuits in the amount of $20,000.

In 2014, the DJUSD, in conjunction with the Blue and White Foundation, has created a unique opportunity for business owners or an individual to directly support present and future students and programs of Davis Senior High School by sponsoring an item inside the stadium. The sponsorship will be acknowledged in a very visible way. Sixty percent of your sponsorship will go directly to the student group of the sponsor’s choice, the other forty percent will be directed toward the managing, upkeep, and improvement of the Ron and Mary Brown Stadium.

Also in 2014 we held our 10th annual Blue and White Golf Tournament which raised over $5000.00 thanks to the sponsors, golfers, and raffle prize donation and the annual Hall of Fame Induction Dinner September honoring Marcy Place Sheehan, Rachel Moore, Doug Arnold, Paul Ochs and Wanda Winton.

Dates to look forward to in 2015:

Blue and White Golf Tournament-FRIDAY, May 8, 2015
Nominations for Hall of Fame 2015 January 1st through March 31st
Blue and White Hall of Fame Induction Dinner-September 19, 2015
Student Activity Grant Program Applications Accepted September 1, 2015 through October 31, 2015

Feel free to email me your questions, once I have them we can set up a time to meet, sound good? Thanks!

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By
February 26, 2015 |

DAVIS MUSICAL THEATRE COMPANY
607 Pena Drive #10
Davis, CA 95618
(530) 756-3682
email: [email protected]

http://www.dmtc.org

“DMTC’s Young Performers’ Theatre Announces Auditions for ‘Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs’”

(February 1, 2015, Davis, CA). Davis Musical Theatre Company’s Young Performers Theatre will be holding auditions for its upcoming production of “Snow White and the Seven Dwarves,” a musical by Carol Weiss. Kendra Smith will direct this family musical featuring a zany, wisecracking Mirror who will only answer if spoken to in rhyme and a court full of funny and bubbling characters. With 14 lively songs, including a scary forest ballet, the production offers many roles for boys and girls of various ages.

Auditions will be held on Monday, March 9, 2015 and Tuesday, March 10, 2015 at 4:30pm and select call-backs on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 also at 4:30pm, at the Jean Henderson Performing Arts Center, 607 Pena Drive, Davis, CA,. Auditions require singing, acting and dancing at the director’s discretion, and auditioners should arrive with appropriate shoes, as well as sheet music of a song they are prepared to sing (please do not use a song from the show). A piano accompanist will be provided; no recorded music or a cappella singing, please.

Actors ages 7 through 17 may participate, as well as 18-year-old high school students or seniors who graduate this year. No experience is required, but selection is by audition. For those cast in the production, a $75 participation fee plus costuming costs are required, as well as 25 parent volunteer hours. Scholarships are available on a limited basis.

The general rehearsal schedule is 4:30 to 6:30 pm Monday through Thursday, beginning on Monday, March 16. Performances are: Sat, May 2, 2015-2:15pm; Sat, May 9, 2015-2:15pm; Sat, May 16, 2015-2:15pm; Fri, May 22, 2015-7:15pm; Sat, May 23, 2014-2:15pm; and Sun, May 24, 2015-2:15pm and include two school matinees on May 7, 2015 at 9am and noon.

For additional information, please visit dmtc.org or call (530) 756-3682.

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By
February 25, 2015 |

March 2015 LIVE MUSIC at Monticello Seasonal Cuisine
630 G Street, Davis, next to Davis Food Co-op

Sunday Brunch Music 11am – 1pm:
March 1: Sina Nejad, setar & tambur, traditional Iranian string
March 8 & 15: Bob Wren & Donna Wren, Irish, folk & classical

Tuesdays: Ricardo Rosales, classical bassoon, 5:00 – 7:00pm
Weekly wine tasting hosted by wine columnist “Wineaux” Susan Leonardi

Wednesdays: George Sheldon & Sandra Carter “Be Here Now”, 5:30 – 8:30pm

Thursdays: Charles Lang, pop & jazz piano bar, 5:30 – 8:30pm

Fridays: Bob Wren, violin & octave mandolin, 5:30 – 8;30pm
World music, Klezmer, jazz, Django Reinhardt, folk & Baroque

Friday, March 13: Bob Wren & Donna Wren, Irish, folk & classical, 5:30 – 8;30pm
Fiddles, octave mandolin, harp, concertina, Irish tenor banjo, guitar, piano & recorder

Saturdays (March 7, 21 & 28): Ken Kemmerling, piano jazz, 6:00 – 9:00pm
The Great American Songbook, jazz standards & requests

Saturday, March 14: Bob Wren & Donna Wren, Irish, folk & classical, 5:30 – 8;30pm
Fiddles, octave mandolin, harp, concertina, Irish tenor banjo, guitar, piano & recorder

For information:
(530) 792-8066
www.monticellocuisine.com

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Avid 3/15

By
February 26, 2015 |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
BAY AREA HISTORICAL FICTION AUTHOR PRESENTS SECOND “EMMA OF NORMANDY” NOVEL AT THE AVID READER MARCH 15
Historical fiction author Patricia Bracewell will read from the latest entry in her “Emma of Normandy” trilogy, “The Price of Blood” at The Avid Reader in downtown Davis at 617 2nd St. on March 15th at 2pm.
Readers first met Emma of Normandy in Patricia Bracewell’s gripping debut novel, “Shadow on the Crown.” Unwillingly thrust into marriage to England’s King Æthelred, Emma has given the king a son and heir, but theirs has never been a happy marriage. In “The Price of Blood,” Bracewell returns to 1006 when a beleaguered Æthelred, still haunted by his brother’s ghost, governs with an iron fist and a royal policy that embraces murder.
C.W. Gortner, author of “The Queen’s Vow,” says of Bracewell’s newest novel, “Her nuanced, heartrending portrait of Emma of Normandy brims with intrigue, courage, and sacrifice; vividly written…offers readers something different: a rarely explored era of dark superstitions.”
Patricia Bracewell is the author of “Shadow on the Crown” and “The Price of Blood,” books one and two of a trilogy about Emma of Normandy, who was a queen in England and a power behind the throne for nearly four decades.
Patricia grew up in California where she taught literature and composition before embarking upon her writing career. She holds an M.A. in English Literature and her historical research has taken her to Britain, France and Denmark. She has two grown sons, and she lives with her husband in Oakland, California and is currently at work on book three of the trilogy
The Avid Reader is a local independent bookseller offering new hardbacks and paperbacks, special orders at no charge, and complimentary wrapping. The Avid Reader hours are 10 am to 10pm Monday through Saturday, Sunday from Noon to 8pm. For more information, call (530) 758-4040.

Who: Patricia Bracewell
What: Author Event – Reading, Q&A, Discussion, and Signing
Where: The Avid Reader, 617 Second St., Davis, CA 95616
When: March 15, 2015 – 2:00 pm
Contact: Meredith Sweet, 530-759-1599, [email protected]

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Enterprise staff

Barcellos book 2/24

By
February 22, 2015 |

Press Release
February 19, 2015
For Immediate Release
For More Information:
Anthony Barcellos ([email protected]), 530-756-4866 Scott Crow, ARC Public Information Officer ([email protected]), 916-484-8647
DAVIS RESIDENT ATTAINS MILESTONES
Anthony Barcellos of Davis is marking two major milestones. On Tuesday, February 24, he observes the fortieth anniversary of delivering his first classroom lecture, a presentation on logarithms to a UC Davis calculus class in Wellman Hall. In 1975 Barcellos was a teaching assistant in the mathematics department and he was substituting for a faculty member who was out of town. The second milestone is the publication of his informal calculus primer: A Stroll through Calculus: A guide for the merely curious. The book is an effort to demonstrate that the basic notions of calculus are accessible to anyone who can understand a little high school algebra.
“People seem to think that calculus is super-hard math for super-brains,” said Barcellos, “but that’s not true at all. Anyone who understands that Length times Width equals Area is ready to learn calculus basics.”
A Stroll through Calculus is not the author’s first publication. He previously collaborated with Sherman Stein of UC Davis on Calculus and Analytic Geometry. Barcellos is also a published novelist whose Land of Milk and Money was praised by famous mystery writer John Lescroart as a “full-blooded tale” in its depiction of family conflict over a Central Valley farm inheritance.
Barcellos moved to Davis in 1974 for graduate study at UC Davis. Before attaining his current position as mathematics instructor at American River College in Sacramento, he worked as a science journalist (Albuquerque Journal), a legislative assistant (to state Sen. Albert Rodda), and a civil servant (in the office of state Treasurer Jesse Unruh). Barcellos has served multiple terms as chair of the ARC math department and last year received the college’s Patrons’ Chair Award for distinguished faculty service.
A Stroll through Calculus: http://astrollthroughcalculus.com/ Cognella Academic Publishing: https://titles.cognella.com/a-stroll-through-calculus-9781634871792.html Land of Milk and Money: http://landofmilkandmoney.com/

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Special to The Enterprise

Violet Richardson winner

By
February 20, 2015 |

Feb. 18, 2015

(With photo of Kelly Ostrom. Photo by Wendy Weitzel)
Soroptimists honor Davis girl for volunteer service
On Wednesday, Soroptimist International of Davis honored Davis High School sophomore Kelly Ostrom with its Violet Richardson Award. The grant recognizes girls for their volunteer service.
Ostrom, 16, is the daughter of Brook and Nancy Ostrom of Davis. She is a lead programmer for Citrus Circuits 1678, a FIRST Robotics Competition team at Davis High. In just her second year on the team, she helped recruit and launch a new robotics team in Woodland. Digital Minds (5458), includes several low-income, migrant and first-generation residents. Besides learning about Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, these rookie robot programmers also develop leadership and teamwork skills.
Meanwhile, Ostrom also has been leading a project with teammates to design, program, and distribute an app that will help Davis and Woodland police find available shelter beds for transients. It’s in its final stages before implementation.
Although there are no strings attached to the $1,000 grant, Ostrom announced Wednesday that she is donating the funds to Citrus Circuits, to further its mission and outreach.
The Violet Richardson Award is named after Soroptimist International’s first president, whose motto was, “It is what you do that counts.” It recognizes young women who volunteer in their community or school. The grant honors a specific project that demonstrates the kind of work Soroptimists hold dear. Applicants must be between the ages of 14 and 17.
Ostrom is the final Violet Richardson Award winner for the Davis club. Last year, Soroptimist International discontinued the award, but the club extended it. Next year, a new program will debut called “Dream It, Be It,” which offers career support for high school girls facing obstacles to success. It provides access to professional role models, career education and other resources.
SI Davis meets at 11:45 a.m. on Wednesdays at Odd Fellows Hall. The international organization supports programs that improve the lives of women and children. For more information, visit sidavis.org.

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Special to The Enterprise

Disrupting the college experience: Q&A with Stanford professors Mitchell Stevens and Michael Kirst

By
February 18, 2015 |

By Brooke Donald
In an interview, the scholars talk about their new book urging policymakers and academia to rethink higher education.

In “Remaking College: The Changing Ecology of Higher Education,” (link is external) co-editors Mitchell Stevens, associate professor at Stanford Graduate School of Education, and Michael Kirst, Stanford professor emeritus, argue that Americans need to rethink their understanding of learning after high school. The dream of the four-year residential campus is not a realizable one for many, they say, and “it may not even be a good idea.”

The book challenges policymakers and others to consider a different model for higher education. Maybe college isn’t a four- to six-year endeavor to be done in your early 20s; perhaps it’s something you move in and out of your whole life. Maybe it doesn’t even take place on a campus but through a series of online courses. And maybe you don’t always get a degree but a certificate, proving excellence in a particular craft.

Scholars from a range of disciplines contributed the essays that examine the history, economics, philosophy and politics surrounding higher education. The book trains particular focus on broad-access institutions – community colleges, for-profit colleges and comprehensive public universities. The editors point out that these schools educate the most people and have the biggest challenges yet have been relatively neglected by scholars and the general media.

“But they’re also some of the most innovative places,” Stevens says, making them the perfect sites for rethinking what college should be.

Below are excerpts from an interview with Kirst and Stevens about the book, published by Stanford University Press. The project was funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Why does college need reimagining?

Mitchell Stevens talks about remaking college. (Video by Marc Franklin)
Stevens: A golden era of higher education is over. That’s the period from the mid-1940s to about 1990, in which there was massive government investment in colleges coupled with almost complete institutional autonomy. That’s no longer the case. Since 1990 we’ve experienced overall decline in government subsidy and higher costs, yet a growing demand for a college education. Inherited models aren’t sustainable as they are, so it’s necessary to come up with a new ways of providing, measuring and experiencing higher education.

Kirst: Just look at the funding. In California, for example, we give community colleges less per pupil than we do to high schools. And we have the least funding and resources at the institutions with the most needy students. We’ve stressed the four-year residential model and underinvested in community colleges, which are doing the lion’s share of the work.

But the ideal “college experience” is the four-year model, correct?

Stevens: No. First, there’s the exorbitant cost of residential delivery. There are also tepid learning gains by any direct measure. For some young people, four-year campuses can be dangerous in terms of substance abuse, depression and feelings of alienation. Also, some teenagers just aren’t ready or able to commit to that because of money or family obligations. So the notion that the four-year residential model is the best way, the default way to experience college, is a problem. It’s important that Americans embrace a much wider diversity of college forms.

Kirst: There is a problem – both in policy and in people’s minds – with how college has been framed in the national conversation. We talk about needing to prepare everyone for college, but “college” currently is a loaded word that comes with implicit timelines and delivery expectations. What we want is a conversation about making quality higher education available in a wide variety of formats over the course of entire lives.

You say there is very little research on higher education outside of the four-year model. Explain.

Stevens: The majority of social science research of the last 50 years was built around an implicit expectation that it’s best to go to college right after high school, enroll full time unencumbered by paid work, and complete a bachelor’s diploma promptly. If that didn’t happen the analyst presumed some sort of failure—either of the student or the system. What we’re suggesting is that that is a profoundly limited way of thinking about how people best move through the time and space of school.

As scholars, we’ve often held community colleges to standards of four-year completion and judged them on that basis, but community colleges are not designed like four-year institutions and are not built to serve the same kinds of needs. So why do we measure them by the same yardstick? The research agenda needs to change.

Part of the ambition of this project is to put more of the research capacity available at schools like Stanford in the service of improving community colleges and other broad-access schools.

Michael Kirst talks about remaking college. (Video by Marc Franklin)
Policymakers, too, you argue, aren’t looking at colleges in a comprehensive way.

Kirst: That’s the point of Chapter 8 – why has so much attention and heavy-handed reform been aimed at K-12 while higher education has received such a lighter touch? The answer is that higher education enjoys much stronger public trust. The average citizen thinks K-12 schools are really in trouble. There’s not a public sense that the problems of colleges are as deep as the book points out they are. And relatively few policymakers have even attended a community college or know one of them well, so those institutions are often invisible to influential decision makers.

How are broad-access institutions already being innovative and remaking higher education?

Stevens: They’re much savvier with technology, for one. They embraced the web as a legitimate vehicle for instructional delivery years before the elite research universities did. The for-profit sector, especially, was way ahead in this regard. They match the rhythm of adult lives. They have lots of evening course times. They offer easy parking. Those little things matter a lot to people with jobs and children and hectic schedules.

Kirst: They recognize, too, that increasingly employers aren’t just looking for degrees, they’re looking for what people can demonstrably do. These schools offer multiple forms of credentialing. And many people who go to community colleges or for-profit schools aren’t actually going for the degree. They may already have one. They’re going for additional skills. In the book we’re really making a plea for more public attention to these schools and recognition of the wide range of learning that can happen in them.

___

Photo: Hartnell College in Salinas, Calif. (John Phelan/Wikimedia Commons)
This piece was published originally on the Stanford Graduate School of Education website.

I should add that Michael Kirst is the president of the State Board of Education. He was the primary architect of the new Local Control Funding Formula.

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Special to The Enterprise

From the mouths of guests

By
February 17, 2015 |

By Rebecca Black

They are exciting. They are beautiful. They can be a huge headache, and not just for the couple and those helping them plan.

As an expert in etiquette, guests and attendants frequently have questions for me — or just flat out tell me how they feel about wedding related events, gifts, and expectations.

Here’s what I’m hearing. Use this information to avoid these hiccups and pitt falls at your ceremony.

Your wedding truths

Sasha from Davis tells me, “Couples don’t seem to acknowledge their guests. It costs so much to attend a wedding, and it seems that the couple is only interested in posing. It’s as if they don’t care if I’m there or not.

Liam from twitter is bothered by the “blind adherence to traditions that neither the groom nor bride really want.”

Walethia from twitter has a common complaint: They almost never start on time.

Sarah from Davis says her biggest issue is “the endless flow of wedding obligations — the pre-wedding parties, gifts, and expenses for attendants — like the dresses.” But she doesn’t stop there. “The food never seems to taste good or reflect the couple or their families. Plus, it is the same wedding over and over again. Boring,” she said.

Richard from Davis has a list of complaints, but this was his main beef: “There seems to be no end to the tributes, mostly to the bride, at rehearsal dinners. It’s super boring and just gets worse as the evening wears on, probably due to drinking,” he said.

Raquel from Davis brings up a great point: “Couples must notify their guests when it may be difficult to walk at the venue.” She attended a wedding where guests had to park on a hill, walk in gravel and thistles, and then sit in the sun during the wedding. Many of the guests were elderly.

Ted from Facebook says, “The biggest gripe I had at my own wedding was people who were disrespectful of our cultural or religious traditions. Ted and his wife were interrupted during their yichud — a private time for only the bride and groom.

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Special to The Enterprise

Valentin Hewitt

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Michael MusialW

Musician and and singer Michael Musial is the featured artist at next Sunday at I-House, set for Sunday, April 26. Courtesy photo

www.facebook.com/amyshumanphoto

The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn (Spencer Alexander) has a conversation with a plant he names "Audrey II" in the Woodland Opera House production of “Little Shop of Horrors.” The plant turns out to be much more than he expected. Courtesy photo

JenniferBorensteinW

Biketrip4 Bike path entranceW

The bike path entrance coming into Davis from the Yolo Causeway is marked with a sign. This part of the path is relatively smooth. Elizabeth Case/ Enterprise photo

12dhs boysLaxW

PasoFinoMapW

A map from Taormino and Associates shows the plans for the Paso Fino development, including eight Canary pines to be preserved on the eastern edge of the property. Courtesy graphic

WendyWeitzelW

Michael Tilson Thomas2W

Conductor Michael Tilson Thomas will lead the London Symphony Orchestra in the March 21 concert at the Mondavi Center. Courtesy photo

ValentinesLai1w2

Taylor Inouye and Tiffanie Lai share a "Giants" love. Courtesy photo

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February 03, 2015 |

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Volvo’s entry car gets more power

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From page B3 | January 30, 2015 |

The Associated Press

With new, more powerful turbo engines, the 2015.5 Volvo S60 is a distinctive, European premium sedan that’s nimble, quick and has a surprisingly comfortable driver seat for 6-footers.

The new S60 with base turbo four cylinder also ranks among the top 10 non-hybrid, non-electric, gasoline-powered, compact and mid-size sedans in fuel economy this year. The federal government estimates fuel mileage at 25 miles per gallon in city driving and 37 mpg on the highway for a front-wheel drive S60 with base engine.

All 2015.5 front-wheel drive S60s come standard with energy-conserving brakes and an automatic start/stop mechanism that turns off the engine when the vehicle is stopped, say, at a stoplight, to save fuel. The engine automatically turns back on when the driver lets up on the brake pedal to get ready to go.

2015.5 Volvo S60 T6 Drive-E

Base price: $33,950 for base T5 FWD; $35,450 for T5 AWD; $39,250 for T6 FWD.

Price as tested: $46,825.

Type: Front-engine, front-wheel drive, five-passenger, premium compact sedan.

Engine: 2-liter, double overhead cam, turbocharged and supercharged, direct injection, Drive-E, inline four cylinder.

Mileage: 24 mpg (city), 35 mpg (highway).

Length: 182.5 inches.

Wheelbase: 109.3 inches.

Curb weight: 3,472 pounds.

Built in: Belgium

Options: Platinum package (includes Harmon Kardon premium sound system, active dual Xenon headlights with washers, adaptive cruise control, collision warning with full automatic braking, pedestrian/cyclist detection, lane keeping aid, rear park assist camera, accent lighting) $3,750; blind spot information system $925; 19-inch diamond-cut wheels and sport chassis $900; metallic exterior paint $560; heated front seats $500

Destination charge: $940

Best of all, the S60 earned top, five out of five stars in government crash testing for the third year in a row.

The S60 is Volvo’s entry-level model, with the lowest starting retail price of any Volvo. Starting manufacturer’s suggested retail price, including destination charge, is $34,890 for a base, 2015 front-wheel drive S60 T5 model with 240-horsepower, turbocharged four cylinder and eight-speed automatic transmission.

The lowest starting retail price for a 2015 S60 with all-wheel drive is $36,390. The lowest starting retail price for a 2015 S60 with uplevel, 302-horsepower, turbocharged and supercharged four cylinder is $40,190. This is a front-wheel drive model with eight-speed automatic.

Competitors include other premium sedans such as the rear-wheel drive, 2015 BMW 320i, which has a starting MSRP, including destination charge, of $33,900 with 180-horsepower, turbo four cylinder and eight-speed automatic. But a 2015 BMW 328i with a turbo four cylinder that has the same 240 horses as the base Volvo S60 is much more — $39,000.

The 2015 Mercedes-Benz C300 sedan with 241-horsepower, turbocharged four cylinder and seven-speed automatic transmission has a starting retail price of $39,325.

The S60 also undercuts any Lexus sedan, including the entry-priced 2015 Lexus IS 250, which has a starting retail price of $37,475 for a rear-wheel drive model with 204-horsepower V-6. Note, however, that the base IS comes standard with more features, including a power moonroof.

The S60 was the only Volvo car or sport utility to record a sales increase for calendar 2014 in the . S60 sales totaled 25,447, up nearly 10 percent from a year earlier.

It’s easy to see why.

At 15.2 feet from bumper to bumper, the S60 is the same length as a BMW 3-Series, so it’s compactly sized.

But the S60 is a couple inches taller, which results in a surprising amount of headroom — 39.3 inches when there is no sunroof installed.

Front-seat legroom in the S60 is 41.9 inches, and long seat track and seat height ranges as well as eminently accommodating, standard telescoping steering wheel mean many sizes of driver can find comfortable seating.

The front seats also have substantial support in the seat cushion, back and, of course, in those generously sized and close-to-the-head Volvo head restraints. As a result, driving the test S60 was fatigue-free.

The two new powertrains for the mid-2015 model year — hence, the 2015.5 label — are big news.

Both are 2-liter, turbocharged and direct injected four cylinders. But the power generated is impressive and similar to what a six cylinder might produce. The base 2-liter’s 240 horsepower, for example, compares with the 204 generated by the V-6 in the base, 2015 Lexus IS 250.

This engine also develops peak torque of 258 foot-pounds starting at a low 1,600 rpm. Indeed, Volvo reports a 0-to-60-miles-an-hour time of just 6 seconds for the S60 with this base engine.

Note the 2-liter, turbo four cylinder that’s in the base, 2015 C300 produces peak torque of 273 foot-pounds at 1,300 rpm.

Volvo’s uplevel engine — a 2-liter, turbocharged four cylinder that’s supercharged, too — is even more powerful with 302 horses and 295 foot-pounds of torque at 2,100 rpm. Volvo puts the 0-to-60-mph time for this one at 5.6 seconds.

With this engine, the test car would, after just a bit of turbo lag, zoom strongly forward as the turbo power kicked in. In fact, the car regularly got up to 50 mph without the driver noticing.

Maybe it was the aggressive driving or the majority of city travel, but the test S60 only averaged 21 mpg, rather than the 28-mpg average that the federal government computed from its tests.

Volvo’s press materials state both S60 turbos use regular unleaded gas, but the test car’s fuel cap specified premium.

With today’s lower fuel prices, this translated into a nearly 375-mile travel range on a single tank of premium costing less than $44.

The back seat of the S60 feels smaller than that in many other family sedans. Legroom back there is measured at just 33.5 inches, which is about what’s in the back seat of a Toyota Yaris hatchback.

Trunk space in the S60 totals 12 cubic feet, but nearly all the space is under the rear window shelf and the trunk opening is small. Even in the test car that had a $46,000-plus price tag, there was not a power trunk lid.

The S60 exterior is not visually distinctive; some passersby thought it was a Ford Fusion.

The tester, with sport chassis, had a busy, quite firm ride, and wind noise from the side windows arose at 65 mph.

With Volvo’s history as a safety leader, it was disappointing to see that a rearview camera is not standard equipment.

 

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Parent engagement photos

By
January 29, 2015 |

I’ve got a good Math Night picture and a good picture of Martha
>Beetley’s dialogic reading program that you could use. Both programs
>are presenting on Tuesday night.

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Special to The Enterprise

elias 2/17 Go slow on TPP

By
January 29, 2015 |

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2015, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“GO SLOW ON TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP PACT”

References to trade agreements were some of the very few passages during President Obama’s State of the Union speech late last month that moved Republicans to stand and applaud along with Obama’s Democratic Party allies.

And when Obama talks about trade bills pending in Congress, the biggest is a plan to give the President fast-track authority to move forward with the so-called Trans-Pacific Partnership, America’s newest putative free trade agreement.

Because of its location, this deal would affect California more than any other part of the nation. So far, there has been no movement toward opening up the negotiations to public scrutiny, which can only lead to speculation about what an eventual treaty might contain.

The Tea Party, for example, told its members in an email the other day that “Obama is secretly planning to ram through Congress one of the most ambitious free trade agreements ever negotiated…the launch pad for the ‘New World Order.’” Obama, the ultra-conservative organization warned, “fully intends to surrender U.S. sovereignty under this agreement.”

As often happens with outraged political rhetoric, there is a grain of truth behind some of the claims. In this case, leaked versions of the Trans-Pacific pact that may emerge from more than two-dozen negotiating sessions held in the last few years indicate it will set up the same kind of tribunal that exists under NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Such tribunals, as NAFTA’s history demonstrates, do tend to interfere with American sovereignty, sometimes allowing international judicial panels to overrule U.S. and state laws.

The most famous such case came while California in the late 1990s sought to rid gasoline here of the additive MTBE, whichfeatured noxious odors and taste, along with alleged cancer risks. MTBE leached into some drinking water as it leaked from rusty storage tanks and the engines of small boats into aquifers and reservoirs.

But the state’s MTBE ban, imposed by then-Gov. Gray Davis, threatened the profits of the Canadian Methanex Corp., which filed a $970 million claim for lost sales in a NAFTA tribunal, circumventing American courts. Methanex eventually lost its case for health reasons, but the point was made: In some cases, the U.S. Supreme Court may no longer be so supreme, especially when corporations manage to bypass it.

Another key NAFTA tribunal ruling went against U.S. dolphin-safe tuna labeling requirements because they could impede free trade.

That’s a major loss of sovereignty, one which could be widened under expected provisions of the Trans-Pacific agreement. Other countries that have already joined the pact and agreed to such terms include Brunei, Chile, Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia and Singapore. If the U.S. joins, the treaty will likely expand further to Canada, Japan, Mexico, Peru and Vietnam, too.

But no one outside the Obama administration and a few foreign negotiators knows what’s in the latest draft version of this agreement. If Congress gives Obama the fast-track authority he seeks and which most of Congress applauded during his speech, it’s possible no one will be able to prevent offshoring of millions of jobs (predicted by consumer advocate Ralph Nader) and rolling back banking reforms, safe food laws, Internet freedom and environmental safeguards.

That’s because fast-track authority prevents Congress from holding full-scale hearings or amending the treaty when it comes up for action there. There would be just one up-or-down vote, with no changes allowed on anything from copyright infringement provisions to human rights.

So going fast could lead not just to reduced American authority over our own affairs but to corporate lobbyists sneaking in self-serving elements that could not be exposed via Congressional hearings. That’s why any fast-tracking bill and any consideration of this agreement before it’s adopted should include mandatory publication of the entire agreement, so Americans are not forced to buy the proverbial pig in a poke.

This is the only way Americans can know what they’d get if this treaty ever becomes effective, and just what they’d lose.

-30-
Email Thomas Elias at [email protected] His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, go to www.californiafocus.net

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HI: Fences make good neighbors and add interest to landscape

By
June 20, 2014 |

Tawny Maya McCray
Creators.com

There are many reasons to put fences up in your yard. They allow you to enjoy your outdoor areas and often are used to provide a sense of privacy or security or to enclose pets and small children. And although there are a number of options, styles and materials to choose from when erecting a fence, some materials work better than others, depending on where you live.
Maria Prior, trade show manager for the American Fence Association, says that in places where the weather changes dramatically with the seasons, cedar wood or chain-link fences are typical. “You’re dealing with the fence post expanding and constricting because of the cold and hot weather,” Prior says.
In places where there is water and sea salt, Prior says common fence materials are vinyl, aluminum and ornamental iron.
She says glass fences, a new trend in fencing, are also popping up. “It’s very pretty, so a lot of places that have marinas (are) going with glass panel fencing to give it that aesthetic look,” Prior says.
Desert conditions lend themselves well to composite, vinyl, ornamental iron or aluminum fencing, Prior says.
She adds that just because certain materials lend themselves to certain regions doesn’t mean people can’t choose the exact fence they want. “Look at the different styles and the different options that are available to you, and most importantly, ask for a sample of what it is that you’re going to be getting,” she says.
Some fence materials, such as vinyl, can be used just about anywhere. “(Vinyl is) good for all weather. That’s what’s good about the fence,” says Monica Schraidt, a sales representative for USA Vinyl. “You don’t have to ever replace it. Once you put it up, it’s there to stay.”
Schraidt says USA Vinyl manufactures its vinyl with titanium dioxide, which acts like a sun blocker. “It doesn’t fade. It’s not going to get that yellowish color that other kinds of fencing will get from the sun,” she says.
Schraidt adds that there is also little maintenance required on vinyl fencing. She says people can opt to power-wash it once a year to keep it looking nice.
When it comes to choosing a fence installer, Prior says you should check to see whether a company is licensed, insured and bonded. Go for somebody who is affiliated with an association. “Those people are the best in the industry,” she says. “You can rely on them to follow some code of ethics.” And most importantly, she says, check references. “That way, you can weed out and find out: If something wasn’t done correctly or to their satisfaction, how did that fence contractor correct the problem?” Prior says. Lastly, if a fence contractor can’t provide at least three references for you to check, it’s best to eliminate it from the running.

COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM

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Creators Syndicate

Wedding pages: Etiquette 101–Wedding Gripes!

By
February 17, 2015 |

By Rebecca Black

To say that weddings have become more than just uniting two people is an understatement.  Weddings are big business these days.  Because of this, the simple ceremony where two people and their families gather to join in marriage has become this mammoth event with a life of its own.  So, many times and for many people, weddings have become a huge headache, with unrealistic expectations, debt, and hurt feelings all around.  And, for what, to have the “perfect” wedding (whatever that is), to pretend to be a princess for a day, or to just please mothers who want to be that perfect little princess vicariously through their daughters?  It can be exhausting.

And, how do guests and attendants feel about the current wedding climate?  How do they feel about the endless wedding related events, gifts, and expectations?  What are their gripes and feelings about the all important day to play dress-up, better known as the wedding.   It may sound as if I’m completely against grandiose weddings, but I’m not.  Really.  I feel that people should have what they want if it doesn’t hurt or offend anyone.  For the most part, I’m simply an observer.  I observe human interaction and try to understand it.   Some of the wedding craze, the event-of-the-century type of wedding expectation is difficult to fit into my aging brain.  Does anyone do simple any more (smile).

So, this is what you’ve told me.  Oh!  Thank you, by the way.

Your Wedding Gripes

Sasha, a young mother in Davis: Couples don’t seem to acknowledge guests any more.  It costs so much to attend a wedding, and it seems that the couple is only interested in posing.  It’s as if they could care less if I’m there or not.

Liam from Twitter: priced over the value and there is blind adherence to traditions that neither the groom nor bride really want.

Walethia from Twitter: They most never start on time.

Yasmine from Twitter: My biggest gripes are venues and vendors who try to take advantage, especially those who are blatant about it. I only work with those who don’t!

Sarah, a caterer from Davis:  The biggest issue is the endless flow of wedding obligations and mandates, the prewedding parties, gifts, and expenses for attendants, like the dresses. The food never seems to taste good or reflect the couple or their families.  Plus, it is the same wedding over and over again–boring.

Richard, a coffee buddy, from Davis had a list of complaints:  there seems to be no end to the tributes, mostly to the bride, at rehearsal dinners.  Super boring and gets worse as the evening wears on probably due to drinking.  Guests don’t  RSVP to the wedding.   Younger people should solicit help from parents or aunts and uncles about who to invite and who not to.  That said, parents need to remember that it is not their wedding.  And, the biggie of all wedding gripes  is the cake cutting ceremony where the bride and groom stuffs cake into each other’s mouth. This is so tacky but almost universally the practice.

Ashley, a young bride and professional baker: the cutting fee at venues!  I have to a pay per person charge if I bring in a cake I create.  Jeez.

Raquel from a local Market: Couples who don’t notify their guests when it may be difficult to walk at the venue.  She attended a wedding where guests had to park on a hill, walk in gravel and thistles, and then sit on a hill in the sun during the wedding.  Many of the guests were elderly.

Ted from Facebook: The biggest gripe I had in regard to my wedding is people who are disrespectful to certain cultural or religious traditions (or really, any tradition that might be of import to the bride and groom).   Ted and his wife were interrupted during their Yichud–very impolite.

Most suggested that wishing wells, card boxes, and the money dance, unless part of the culture of the family, are all above and beyond tacky and greedy.  And, pressuring friends and family to attend a destination wedding when it is expensive to do so is also widely mentioned.

In conclusion, let’s please remember, always, that when we invite, we host.  Our wedding guests are simply that, our guests.  They deserve to be treated as special.  For example, when we invite single young men, we should remember that they typically have very healthy appetites so we would plan to serve healthy portions.  We also shouldn’t expect our older, more fragile guests, to stand or to walk through uneven areas for the wedding.   They deserve better.

TAGLINE FOR REBECCA BLACK

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Special to The Enterprise

elias 2/13 Senate race

By
January 27, 2015 |

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2015, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“GOVERNOR COULD – BUT WON’T – DOMINATE SENATE RACE”

If the current large corps of potential candidates for retiring U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer’s job look to some like a gaggle of political pygmies, it might have something to do with the proverbial 800-pound gorilla lurking in their living room. That would be Gov. Jerry Brown, who could most likely have the job for the asking.

There are plenty of other names, including state Attorney General Kamala Harris, former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, a bunch of Congress members including Loretta Sanchez and Adam Schiff and John Garamendi and Xavier Becerra, and even Republicans like former party chairman Duff Sundheim, Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin and San Diego County Assemblyman Rocky Chavez.

But the reality is that if Brown wants the Senate seat, it’s almost certainly his.

He has coveted a Senate seat before. Back in 1982, he tried to move from the governor’s office to the Senate, only to be whipped by former San Diego Mayor Pete Wilson, who would himself become governor eight years later. It’s still the only loss of Brown’s 47-year political career.

Notoriously impatient, easily bored and always eager for new challenges, Brown could dominate the Senate race. But because Harris now employs Brown’s 2012 campaign manager and campaign spokesman, her presence means Brown won’t run, even though he’s said nothing on this.

Not only does he have more campaign money available than anyone else, but Brown sports an unusually high approval rating in every poll, his ratings higher than any other California figure.

Plus, Brown has moved the state’s nascent bullet train forward about as much as he can for the moment and has been stymied so far in advancing his “twin tunnels” water project.

And people his age (mid-70s) are much more common in the Senate than in governor’s mansions.

So, why isn’t he running? He would say it’s because he wants to finish what he started in 2010, when he began his second incarnation as governor. But maybe it’s also because he knows there are vulnerabilities in his record. One weakness: some of his appointments to key state jobs. This was never discussed in last year’s campaign, where the worst names Republican candidate Neel Kashkari called him were “lazy” and a “do-nothing advocate of the status quo.”

That was before Brown appointed non-Californian Leondra Kruger, who has never contested a legal case in California, to the state Supreme Court. No non-Californian in memory has ever been given a spot on the state’s highest court. The appointment was a slap in the face of the state’s huge corps of lawyers, who certainly believe many of them could do at least as good a job as someone who knows virtually nothing about California.

Then he named his former renewable energy adviser Michael Picker to replace the disgraced Michael Peevey as president of the vital and powerful state Public Utilities Commission. Peevey left after disclosure of private emails between him and officials of Pacific Gas & Electric Co. Since then, other emails have turned up showing he was also cozy with Southern California Edison Co. During the year Picker and Peevey were together on the five-member commission, Picker never voted against Peevey in any significant case.

There was also Brown’s reappointment of Robert Weisenmiller to head the state Energy Commission. Among other problems, Weisenmiller presided over awarding of multi-million dollar “hydrogen highway” grants despite the fact both he and Brown knew about serious conflicts of interest by one major recipient.

There have been other questionable appointments, too, some of them present and former Brown aides and cronies. He consistently refuses to discuss any beyond bland press releases announcing their appointments.

And there was his bill-signing message making it easier for parents to avoid getting their children vaccinated for diseases like measles and mumps, a possible factor in this winter’s measles outbreak.

So yes, Brown could likely be the top primary election vote-getter in the upcoming Senate race. But a little opposition research by any runoff opponent could make things at least a little unpleasant for Brown, and chances are he knows it.

Which could be one reason he’ll likely never run for office again.

-30-
Email Thomas Elias at [email protected] His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, go to www.californiafocus.net

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The place where food grows on water

By
January 14, 2015 |

The Butterfly Effects……
“The Place Where Food Grows on Water”

“I don’t know what to say about it,
When all your ears have turned away,
But now’s the time to look and look again at what you see,
Is that the way it ought to stay?”
”That’s the Way” by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant

By Debra Chase
A chill wind hits his face. Forging ahead in his canoe he travels the way his ancestors came before him, long pole in hand he pulls the rice stalks over into the canoe and with the pole hits the rice until he can see the fine grains fall into the bottom of the canoe. Looking around him he sees his brothers and sisters in their canoes doing as he has done, as his ancestors have done for many hundreds of years. Soon the harvest will be complete and the ancient ceremony of thanksgiving can begin.

It is said, over one thousand years ago the Anishinaabe People traveled from their home on the west coast of Turtle Island (North America) to the “place where food grows on water”. The great lakes region became their home and the native wild rice became more than just their food. It is used in their daily lives, ceremonies, and feasts of thanksgiving. The native peoples of America new the benefits of the rice, the cycle of life that the rice grass supported. The ecological importance of this native grass goes beyond providing habitat for a myriad of species; it is the power of water, patience and ultimately, oneness.

A warmer planet may mean less rice for the native peoples of the great lake region and ultimately for the rest of the world. It is showing us that what we do here and there affects the lives of the people there and here. It is reminding us of the great responsibility we have as individuals, as a community, as a people, to care for our great Mother Earth.

Before you go to bed tonight, take about ½ cup of wild rice, and place it in a large mason jar with 4 cups of water. Cover it with a sprouters’ lid or piece of cheesecloth held with a rubber band and let it sit overnight. Next morning, drain off the water into your potted plants or garden. Add clean water to the rice, cover, and let sit all day in a cool spot on your kitchen counter. In the morning and evening drain, rinse and add fresh water again. Do this for two to three more days. Every day as the rice soaks up the water you will watch the process of “blooming”, the rice will open its “petals” and a beautiful pale center will be exposed. After the petals have bloomed drain and rinse one last time. Notice throughout this process how much water you had to use to sprout this small amount of rice. Now think of the vast fields of rice grown here in America and around the world and the amount of water needed for those fields of rice to sprout and grow.

Place the rice in your most beautiful bowl add a dash of olive oil a little apple cider vinegar mixed with some raw honey a diced apple and some thin slices of red onion. Make it your own by adding grated ginger, garlic or chopped fresh herbs. As you enjoy your rice petal salad, reflect on the many generations that have come before you that preserved the rice and kept it safe for you to enjoy today and for many more years to come.

Should a butterfly flap its wings
The wind of worlds will swim and sing

BIO Short-
Debra Chase is a self-taught traditional chef with over three decades of professional experience. Originally from Tennessee she shares her culinary heritage, traditions and devotion to the planet through cooking classes and demonstrations. Once honored by the California State Legislature as a “Woman Dedicated to Saving the Planet” she weaves environmentalism and vegetarianism in a gentle fashion to assist individuals and families to be more mindful of the way their food choices affect the planet. She currently resides in Colusa County on a small farm.
Comments to be sent to [email protected]

Photo Credits
Colusa County Rice Field Full and Fallow by Debra Chase
Women Harvesting – By S. Eastman [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AWild_rice_harvesting_19th_century.jpg

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Special to The Enterprise

David Lacy

By
January 13, 2015 |

David Lacy will wed Tawny Thuytien Do on Sunday, May 17, 2015. The couple will hold a traditional Vietnamese tea ceremony in the morning at the home of the bride’s family and a traditional western ceremony and reception at the University Club at UC Irvine in the evening. Lacy, a 1998 graduate of Davis High School and 2006 graduate of UC Davis is a college lecturer and consultant. Do, a 2012 graduate of California State University, Long Beach, is currently a 2L at the UC Irvine School of Law. Lacy and Do, who spend most of their downtime with their energetic two dogs (a husky and a lab,) recently purchased a condo together in Lake Forest, CA.

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Enterprise staff

Stop creating terrorism

By
January 11, 2015 |

Dear Editor:
Please consider this timely perspective (below and attached) from the emerging discipline of Conflict Transformation by a rising young scholar, Dr. Patrick Hiller. He uses the research and analysis that suggest game-changing adaptations to our tragic cycle of violence. Kindly let me know if you choose to use it. For PeaceVoice, thank you,
Tom Hastings
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Fight terror again, and again, and again. Or end it by refusing to participate in its creation.

By Patrick T. Hiller

800 words

The cycle of violence. When will it be interrupted? The attack on Charlie Hebdo was another incident of “Terror in [fill in the blank]… attackers part of [fill in name of terror network]”. It was an incident of home-grown terror, since the attackers were French-born second-generation immigrants. It is time to shift away from ineffective, reactive tactics and strategies of dealing with this kind of terror toward conflict transformation, by transforming the structures leading to terrorism.

Let’s be clear. The assassins in Paris did not avenge the Prophet and their horrific violence cannot be reconciled with Islam. They were not noble, holy warriors, they were violent criminals. They killed 12 people and in addition to those lives, the lives of their families were destroyed. Their attacks opened space for further destructive cycles of conflict, support for security crackdowns, and virtually endless military campaigns as we still are seeing in the post 9/11/01 global war on terror. If we continue on this path we “condemn the global community to ongoing terror”, as political scientist Lindsay Heger argues in her piece Redrawing our Strategy on Terror.

Here’s the usual:

At the height of conflict several things take place. First, we tend to see generalizations as we hear in the “clash of civilizations”, “us versus them”, or the “battle between Islam and freedom of speech.” Second, there is stereotyping, as we can see in the generalizations and assumptions about all members of a group. In this case a group as large and diverse as the 1.6 billion Muslims in the world. Third, there are knee-jerk reactions like calls for “collective detention” or “nuke them” by many so-called internet trolls. These often come with dehumanization of the other group. Fourth, tit-for-tat tactics are used as we can see in the attacks on Mosques in France. Fifth, the issues are changed deliberatively as we can see in US mainstream media commentators using the attack to promote torture or criticize New York City’s Mayor de Blasio’s politics. Sixth, emotions are exploited, fear is installed, and drastic measures are advocated as we see in far-right National Front political party leader Marine Le Pen’s call for a referendum on reinstating the death penalty. All these are destructive, but very commonly used approaches of dealing with conflict. All these are ways of us participating in the cycle of continuing terror.

Here are some immediate better ways:

First and foremost, national and international law enforcement and judicial processes for individuals and groups involved in acts of terror.

Second, a call for unity from the international community, political, cultural and religious leaders condemning all forms of violent extremism.

Third, a societal response of answering hatred with love and compassion, as we have seen in Norway’s dignified response to the mass murder by islamophobic Anders Breivik.

Here are some long-term responses addressing broader, structural changes:

First, terrorism is a political problem. The colonial history and the current violent western presence in the Middle East as well as the arbitrary support for some dictators are key to providing terrorists with a support base without which they would not be able to operate and even exist. As we see this support base now goes far beyond the Middle East and has reached the suburbs of Paris and inspires other unconnected lone-wolf terrorists. Lindsay Heger argues correctly that we need to create creative governance solutions aimed at de-linking terrorists from societies. This applies just as much to groups like Boko Haram in Nigeria as it applies to the Muslim immigrant population in France.

Second, terrorism is a social problem. The gunmen were French-born descendants of Algerian immigrants. It is nothing new that there are tensions between the predominantly white, Christian, French society and mainly Muslim first and second generation immigrant populations of African origin. The majority of immigrants belong to the economic lower class of society. Poverty, unemployment and crime are common issues the young, male immigrants are facing.

Third, terrorism is a cultural problem. Muslim immigrant populations in Europe need to be able to freely develop and express their sense of self and sense of belonging. The politics of integration must allow for diversity and co-existence without imposed assimilation and inequality.

Some might argue that these suggestions have flaws, that they are not perfect, that they will never work, and so on. Yes, they have flaws, they are not perfect, and sometimes we do not know the outcome. What we know for sure is that more militarized security, sacrificing our rights, and more military campaigns makes us participants in terror. And they definitely do not work unless our intent is to recruit more terrorists.

Terrorists will be part of us as long as we don’t address the root causes and as long as we participate in it. Terror ends when we stop creating terrorists and when we stop participating in it.

***

Patrick. T. Hiller, Ph.D., Hood River, OR, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is a Conflict Transformation scholar, professor, on the Governing Council of the International Peace Research Association, and Director of the War Prevention Initiative of the Jubitz Family Foundation.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Special to The Enterprise

Universal Studios photos

By
January 06, 2015 |

Orendor 1: The Water World heronie/stuntwoman uses a zipline to escape a villian, who took a 30-foot fall into the water below. The stunt show features water stunts and explosions. Kim Orendor/Courtesy photo

Orendor 2: The calm outpost of the Water World stunt show explodes with numerous pyrotechnics during its finale. Kim Orendor/Courtesy photo

Orendor 3: Guests emerge from the dark after an 80-foot final drop on the Jurassic Park water ride. Kim Orendor/Courtesy photo

Orendor 4: Kim Orendor, Shea Nairn, Aurora Aisenbrey and Jen Graves poise in front of the iconic Universal Studios globe at the theme park’s entrance. Kim Orendor/Courtesy photo

Orendor 5: A beagle shows off his training by leaping an audience volunteer during the Animal Actors show. Kim Orendor/Courtesy photo

Orendor 6: The Studio Tour tram takes guests behind the scenes of movie making, including how to make a flash flood during a drought. Kim Orendor/Courtesy photo

Orendor 7: The Studio Tour tram goes underground and experiences a major earthquake that blows up a gas truck, derails a metro and floods the tunnel. Thanks to quick thinking the tram escapes unharmed. Kim Orendor/Courtesy photo

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Special to The Enterprise

Universal sidebar

By
January 06, 2015 |

By Kim Orendor
Special to The Enterprise
UNIVERSAL CITY – There are few things worse than standing in line at a theme park, with the exception of seeing others zoom passed you in separate queue.
First thoughts are “What line did they get in?” and “Are they famous?” Followed by “They don’t look famous” and “How do I get in that line?”
Been there, thought that.
But no longer. When I attended Universal Studios Hollywood with three friends on a “not too busy Saturday,” according to a park employee, we were issued Front of the Line Passes ($149/person), which includes one-day park admission.
The pass turned us into rock stars for the day. OK, not really, but we – and a few hundred others – were ushered to reserved seats at shows and were guided to the, well, the front of the line.
“If possible, get a front-of-the-line pass,” said Shea Nairn, who was on his third visit to the park. “It’s only a little more expensive than the regular day pass, but it allows you to save a lot time waiting in line, allowing you to get through everything in the park well before they close.”
The posted wait time for Despicable Me Minion Mayhem and The Simpsons Ride was 15 minutes. We walked right up to the turnstile. Transformers: The Ride-3D and Jurassic Park–The Ride both had a 25-minute wait. Again straight to the front. There was a posted 30-minute wait for Revenge of the Mummy–The Ride. We passed a snaking line of guests and were shown directly to our car.
We saved the Studio Tour for last. At approximately 4:30 p.m., the line for the tram ride – which also features King Kong 360 3-D – was an hour. Once again, we flashed our passes and were shown to a separate line. In slightly more than five minutes, we had our 3-D glasses and were sitting on the tram.
“The front-of-line pass is huge, enabling you to see every ride and show and still have time for a nice lunch at City Walk and do some shopping,” said first-time visitor Aurora Aisenbrey. “It was so much more enjoyable, without rushing around or waiting for an hour in line.”
In addition, the passes allow for special behind-the-scenes sessions for the Water World stunt show, Animal Actors performance and Special Effects show. The special shows are marked with, appropriately, a star.
There is a catch. The pass is good for just one front-of-line trip per ride. Guests may ride Transformers multiple times but may only use the special access pass once – it’s scanned when entering the line.
The bigger catch is it doesn’t work outside of the park. No matter how many time I flashed it at the grocery store, no one opened a new check-out stand.

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Universal Studios

By
January 06, 2015 |

Lights, camera, action
What: Universal Studios Hollywood
Where: 100 Universal City Plaza, Universal City
Tickets: http://www.universalstudioshollywood.com/

By Kim Orendor
Special to The Enterprise

UNIVERSAL CITY – Universal Studios Hollywood is to family vacations what Baby Bear’s bed was to Goldilocks: just right.

The theme park has a mix of high-intensity thrill rides and family-friendly attractions. There are also various film-industry themed shows throughout the day that allow visitors to set their own pace.

The Los Angeles area has its fill of theme parks but Universal Studios Hollywood is the one that pulls back the curtain and allows guests to peek into the world of film and television. The park highlights stunts, special effects and animal training, along with its famous tram tour that meanders through soundstages and the back lot.

Universal Studios Hollywood does a great job of designing rides and shows around films that appeal to most generations. There’s “Transformers,” “Revenge of the Mummy,” “Jurassic Park,” “Despicable Me” and “The Simpsons.”

The chance to become part of the movie experience is what draws many people to Universal Studios Hollywood. Where else can a person help the Autobots save the world from the Decepticons and get a “well done” from Optimus Prime? Or plunge down an 80-foot waterfall in a “raft” while fleeing dinosaurs on the rampage?

“My favorite ride was Jurassic Park,” said Aurora Aisenbrey, who was visiting the park for the first time. “It is the perfect movie to make into a ride because the movie itself is about an amusement park. You really feel drawn into the story right off the bat, plus there are some awesome roller-coaster drops and dinosaurs on the loose.”

First-time visitor Jen Graves was eager to ride “Despicable Me” Minion Mayhem, where guests are (spoiler alert) transformed into minions for a time.

“I love the little minions they are so adorable,” Graves said. “Yes, it was a lot fun to become a minion. I also liked that they had minions walking around and if you wanted you can wait in line and take a picture with them.”

Since opening 50 years ago, the park has undergone many changes, including a major expansion in 1991 that created a lower lot. The next big steps are Springfield (spring 2015), which takes guests into the land of the Simpsons; Fast & Furious—Supercharged (summer 2015), a hydraulic-motion ride that will take guests inside the world of underground car racing; and The Wizarding World of Harry Potter (2016), an “immersive land” for the whole family to explore.

Currently the lower lot houses the Transformer, Mummy and Jurassic Park rides, along with the NBCUniversal Experience that features props, wardrobe and more from various Universal productions. There is also a play area for children.

The Revenge of the Mummy (an indoor roller-coaster), Jurassic Park (a high-intensity water ride) and Transformers (part roller-coaster, part flight simulator, all awesome) rides all come with height restrictions and may not be suitable for children who actually are tall enough.

Universal Studios slick solution for families is the Child Switch area (no, you are not able to trade with other families). The Child Switch area near a ride exit allows one member of the group to stay with the child while the others members ride, then they switch places so the other adult may ride. In the upper lot, Despicable Me and The Simpsons offer the same option.

The park’s shows, Super Silly Fun Land (a water play area for children) and Studio Tour tram are all accessible in the upper lot. Show schedules are available at the main gate and LED signs are throughout the park reminding guests of show times and wait times for rides.

Shows include Water World stunt show, the Special Effects Stage and Universal’s Animal Actors. (Shrek was closed the day of our tour.) Shows run from 10:30 a.m. to 8:10 p.m.

The stunt show runs 20 minutes and features high-flying acrobatics, explosions and lots and lots of water. The special effects show is a 25-minute behind-the-scenes look into various “tricks” of the trade.

The animal training show runs 20 minutes and generates lots of “ooohs” and “awwws.” (Note: The show’s finale features animals moving at a high rate of speed over the audience. If any members of your party are easily startled, sit to the middle or back of the amphitheater.)

“I enjoyed the animal show because I’m an animal lover,” said Shea Nairn, who last visited the park 10 years ago. “I think it’s amazing that they can train so many types of animals, including pigs, birds, and even cats. I always thought cats were too stubborn to be trained. I (also) enjoyed seeing owls in person, closer than I’ve ever seen them in nature.”

While the park has added and removed attraction over the years, the tram ride is still there. However, it has had some overhauls and changes as well. It no longer drives through parted waters or nearly falls off a collapsing bridge or tangles with a giant yeti.

The current tram ride features a traditional guide and added video clips with Jimmy Fallon. Riders experience a major earthquake, an epic 3-D battle between King Kong and a couple Tyrannosaurus-rexes, a near munching by “Bruce” in Amityville, a flash flood, a harrowing chase by Norman Bates, and more, all while weaving through sound stages and back-lot neighborhoods.

“I enjoyed the tram ride because I like seeing behind-the-scenes sets and activities,” said Nairn, an instructor at Cal State Long Beach. “For instance, I watch ‘About a Boy’ and we were able to see the actual set that’s used in the backyard scenes. I also enjoy watching ‘Parenthood,’ and we were able to drive past the sound stage where the show is filmed.”

Aisenbrey had a similar reaction: “I was looking forward to the studio tour, and it was one of my favorite attractions. It’s always interesting to see some of what goes on behind the scenes. We even saw sets for some of our favorite shows that are airing right now.”

The park is easy to navigate with directional signs and staff strategically located at walking intersections. There are several places to eat inside the park or guests may exit the park (make sure to get a re-entry stamp) and explore Universal City Walk, which has shops and restaurants.

After successfully navigating the park on her first visit, what advice would Graves give to others?

“Be prepared to have lots of fun,” the Southern California transplant said. “Make sure to get to the shows early so you can get a good seat, and make sure you leave time for the (tram) tour and City Walk.”

Follow that advice, and your day should be “just right.”

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End of year copy

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December 30, 2014 |

WATER RATES

The City Council capped off a few years of acrimonious debate in September about a new water system and how to pay for it, by approving new water rates.

The council approved the results of a Proposition 218 protest public hearing for new water rates with only 35 protests registered out of 16,650 possible. The new rates — which went into effect in October — favor a month-by-month reading of water use, with 87 percent of the monthly charge tied to how much water a customer uses. The remainder is a fixed rate that doesn’t change from month to month.

Davis’ share of the $228 million surface water project — which will siphon water from the Sacramento River, treat it and pipe it to Woodland, Davis and UC Davis — was $106 million. The city figures to save about $11 million off that total as a result of UC Davis joining the project, along with another $36.5 million over 30 years as a result of a low-interest state loan for the water project.

The interest rate that likely will translate into lower per-month water costs for Davis water users. The city also has a pending application for an additional $35 million loan that could bring the total savings for ratepayers to about $51.5 million over 30 years.

FIFTH STREET

City workers put most of the final touches on the so-called “road diet” on Fifth Street, the culmination of perhaps 11-18 years of debate, narrowing four vehicle lanes to one in each direction and adding bike lanes with green coloring. A significant portion of the community predicted a traffic disaster that for the most part never materialized, even when UC Davis students came back to classes in the fall.

Bike advocates crunched police data on collisions along the stretch, showing it was one of the worst places in town for bicyclists to move along. The data convinced skeptical city leaders of yore that the changes were needed for safety purposes, and that motor traffic times would not be much affected by the change. It took years for federal grants to propel the work for the $1.57 million project.

In the end, safety won out over concerns about increased traffic. The city did some post-implementation tweaking with the timing of traffic signals and plans to add striping to better inform motorists coming into the stretch that it narrows.

Road etiquette was a major concern for many in town, although the rules of the road dealing with bike lanes hadn’t changed. Many people openly questioned the wisdom of conflict zones where motorists would have to turn right into the path of bicyclists, even though that’s what’s normally done for bike lanes. Green coloring of the bike lanes seemed to throw many off.

MRAP

The majority of the Davis City Council voted in late October on a process to send the former Davis mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicle back to the federal government’s military surplus program to do with as they saw fit.

The council also wanted to begin a conversation about buying a civilian armored vehicle that would look less ready to battle Taliban insurgents and more ready to combat local crime.

The Woodland City Council, on the other hand, voted to acquire the vehicle on Nov. 18, to be used in “live fire” incidents. It took Davis police three years to acquire the vehicle after requesting it. An MRAP in West Sacramento is still tied to the Davis SWAT team.

 INNOVATION CENTERS

The city received a formal proposal in October for the Mace Innovation Center from Ramco Enterprises, the Buzz Oates Group of Companies and Barbara Bruner for 229 acres of land at Mace Boulevard and Interstate 80, just north and east of Ikeda’s produce stand.

The proposal would create 1.5 million square feet of space for innovation businesses, not including 884,000 square feet for manufacturing, 160,000 square feet of hotel space and 100,000 square feet of retail establishments like restaurants. A proposal for the Davis Innovation Center followed later in October. The Davis Innovation Center is proposed by Hines and SKK Developments for a T-shaped 207-acre site abutting Sutter Davis Hospital in West Davis.

The two large projects would seek to accommodate both expanding tech businesses like Shilling Robotics and smaller operations, while injecting millions in desperately-needed tax revenue to city coffers.

 

 

 

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elias 1/6 voters succeed, create a de facto third party

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December 23, 2014 |

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405 FOR RELEASE: TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2015, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“VOTERS SUCCEED, CREATE DE FACTO THIRD PARTY”

The two major parties will be arrayed as usual when Gov. Jerry Brown looks out from the podium of the state Assembly chamber as he delivers his combination inaugural and state of the state speech, Democrats on one side and Republicans on the other.

But that will be slightly misleading. For voters have succeeded in one of the aims that was often stated when they created the top two primary election system via the 2010 Proposition 14: The California Legislature now includes Republicans, standard Democrats and a de facto third party that might best be called “business Democrats.”

All that’s needed to be sure this is true is to watch the votes of members of this new quasi-party and check out where they got their campaign money.

Yes, the business Democrats are still consistently colored blue on issues like immigration, same-sex marriage, gun-control and abortion. But when it comes to things that matter greatly to business, like industrial regulations, land development and minimum wage increases, these folks will often vote with Republicans.

This came about because in 2012, business interests like the state Chamber of Commerce began to understand that primary elections in many districts across California will for many years most likely produce same-party contests in November runoff elections for legislative and congressional offices.

Where that happens – mostly in districts whose voter registration is dominated by Democrats – business clearly understands it won’t work for them to fund Republicans in the primary. Instead, they now donate to some Democrats in primaries that are all but certain to produce a two-Democrat runoff.

Last fall, this produced major results for the business lobby. In seven out of 10 same-party races where a business-funded Democrat faced a more traditional liberal, the business-funded Democrat won.

One independent business group called Californians for Jobs and a Strong Economy spent about $1.1 million on such races. That group now figures Democrats in the Assembly will be about evenly split between folks it calls “moderates” and others more likely to back the party’s more traditional tough-on-business positions.

Few legislators themselves are willing to discuss the new configuration, but new Democratic Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins of San Diego did tell one reporter that the combination of top two and term limits has created “wholehearted change in how the Legislature is structured and comes together.”

A typical race occurred in 2012, when former Santa Monica Mayor Richard Bloom, backed by business funding, beat the labor-backed former Assemblywoman Betsy Butler after her previous district was decimated by reapportionment.

Another occurred in the Sacramento area last November, when business-backed Richard Pan defeated Roger Dickinson for a Senate seat in a faceoff between two Democratic assemblymen. Dickinson later told a reporter, “I think what it does is that it places a premium on being willing to align with business interests.”

Not that Pan and others didn’t also get some union funding. For labor often aligns with big business when it believes the measures business wants will create union jobs.

Many business Democrats prefer to call themselves moderates, and they didn’t all win, by any means. One loser was Steve Glazer, an Orinda city councilman and a former top adviser to Brown, who alienated labor by doing work for the chamber. He lost a bitter, expensive primary in the East Bay area; as a result, the seat eventually went to a moderate Republican.

All of which means voters have pretty much gotten what they wanted when they passed top two, at least in the Legislature. Many voters told pollsters then they wanted more moderation and compromise in government, less gridlock. They now have just that; there have been no notable legislative deadlocks over the last two years-plus.

No one can be quite certain how this will play out in the long term: A moderate wing for America’s most liberal state Democratic Party? A three-party system where moderate Democrats combine with moderate Republicans in a centrist party?

These are the kinds of non-automatic, unpredictable questions that should make following politics fun for years to come.

-30-
Email Thomas Elias at [email protected] His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, go to www.californiafocus.net.

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Criminal Injustice

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December 13, 2014 |

Although our criminal justice system gets many cases right, serious racial bias in in our criminal justice system has been repeatedly documented. The Sentencing Project’s 2013 report to the United Nations Human Rights Committee cites many studies showing that people of color are more likely than whites to be arrested, convicted, and severely sentenced. These disparities are not attributable solely to differences in crime rates, offense severity, or criminal history. For example, from 1980 to 2010 drug arrest rates for black youth were double that of white youth despite studies showing that drug use among black and white youth was similar. Recent Department of Justice data show that among police stops, black drivers are three times more likely to be searched and twice as likely to experience the use or threat of violent force by police than white drivers. Among homicide convictions, black defendants are much more likely to receive the death penalty than white defendants even when controlling for the severity of the case. The Sentencing Project report states, “If current trends continue, one of every three black American males born today can expect to go to prison in his lifetime, as can one of every six Latino males – compared to one of every seventeen white males.”

While the Civil Rights Movement made significant strides in terms of racial equality and justice, some have argued mass incarceration of non-whites during recent decades has significantly reversed this progress. The US incarcerates more of its ethnic minorities than any other county in the world – even higher than apartheid-era South Africa. These realities should help us understand the great mistrust that people of color have toward law enforcement and the criminal justice system. This distrust, of course, has deep historical roots. Within three years of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Ku Klux Klan began lynching blacks in South. For decades, African Americans implored the federal government to outlaw and stop lynchings, but no anti-lynching legislation has ever outlawed these barbaric crimes. Indeed, law enforcement officers often stood by and did nothing to stop lynchings; some even participated. In light of this history, we can understand the public outcry against the grand jury decisions in the cases of Michael Brown and Eric Garner –unarmed black men killed by white police officers.

Then the specifics of the cases cause more outrage. Robert McCulloch, the Ferguson prosecutor, should have recused himself given that his father, a police officer, was killed by a black man. Furthermore, the prosecutor conducted the grand jury in such an unconventional way that the real truth will probably never be known. Grand juries have job of deciding if there is enough evidence, or “probable cause,” to indict a criminal suspect. Normally the criminal suspect (in this case, Officer Wilson) is not questioned during the proceedings. In this case, McCulloch not only questioned Wilson but provided him with extensive time to defend himself. He also cross-examined witnesses with an intensity that Wilson was spared. In the case of Eric Garner, this unarmed black man was aggressively restrained by a police officer for the minor crime of selling loose cigarettes without paying taxes to do so. There is no plausible justification for the use of such extreme force in this instance.

What can be done to address persistent racial injustice and inequality in U.S. society? To begin with, we should more seriously investigate cases in which police officers kill civilians. The Sacramento Bee convincingly argues that grand jury prosecutors should come from different geographic regions than police officer defendants to avoid bias stemming from ties to local law enforcement. We also need to systematically collect data on civilians killed by law enforcement officers. This information could help assess the presence of racial bias in such deaths (and their judicial outcomes) and also track changes in these statistics that might occur as a result of interventions to reduce racial bias. The Department of Justice took a positive stop this year by announcing plans to collect data on stops, searches, and arrests by race in five U.S. cities in an effort to measure and reduce racial profiling. More cities should be included in such efforts.

Many have argued that strained relationships between law enforcement and the communities of color that they serve are a major cause of incidents like the one in Ferguson. We should support efforts to create more positive interactions between police and the community. The Summer Night Lights program in South Sacramento is an excellent example. During summer evenings last year, community members were invited to play sports, dance, create art, and eat free food in a safe community setting where police officers participated in the fun and showed they care. I have been told that crime rates dropped significantly last summer in South Sacramento, as they have in other California communities with similar programs.

I am Latina but am often mistaken for non-Hispanic white, so I will never know how it feels to be targeted by law enforcement. I will never have to tell my children that they have a high likelihood of being blamed for a crime they never committed like Dr. Murray Garcia has had to do (Davis Enterprise 11/30/14, Parallel Play and Race in America). If we can effectively address the racial bias in our criminal justice system, then maybe someday no one will have to communicate such a heart-breaking message of injustice to their child.

Lisa Baumeister

Davis

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Special to The Enterprise

The vanishing male worker: How America fell behind

By
December 14, 2014 |

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — Frank Walsh still pays dues to the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, but more than four years have passed since his name was called at the union hall where the few available jobs are distributed. Mr. Walsh, his wife and two children live on her part-time income and a small inheritance from his mother, which is running out.

Sitting in the food court at a mall near his Maryland home, he sees that some of the restaurants are hiring. He says he can’t wait much longer to find a job. But he’s not ready yet.

“I’d work for them, but they’re only willing to pay $10 an hour,” he said, pointing at a Chick-fil-A that probably pays most of its workers less than that. “I’m 49 with two kids — $10 just isn’t going to cut it.”

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RELATED COVERAGE

Nonemployed: Our Series on the Decline of Work: An IntroductionDEC. 11, 2014
document Nonemployed Poll ResultsDEC. 12, 2014
Nonemployed: The Rise of Men Who Don’t Work, and What They Do InsteadDEC. 11, 2014
video Paycheck to PaycheckDEC. 3, 2014
Nonemployed: Methodology of the Poll on NonworkDEC. 11, 2014
Working, in America, is in decline. The share of prime-age men — those 25 to 54 years old — who are not working has more than tripled since the late 1960s, to 16 percent. More recently, since the turn of the century, the share of women without paying jobs has been rising, too. The United States, which had one of the highest employment rates among developed nations as recently as 2000, has fallen toward the bottom of the list.

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Nonemployed
Articles in this series will examine the decline of work in the United States and its consequences, for individuals and society.
As the economy slowly recovers from the Great Recession, many of those men and women are eager to find work and willing to make large sacrifices to do so. Many others, however, are choosing not to work, according to a New York Times/CBS News/Kaiser Family Foundation poll that provides a detailed look at the lives of the 30 million Americans 25 to 54 who are without jobs.

Many men, in particular, have decided that low-wage work will not improve their lives, in part because deep changes in American society have made it easier for them to live without working. These changes include the availability of federal disability benefits; the decline of marriage, which means fewer men provide for children; and the rise of the Internet, which has reduced the isolation of unemployment.

At the same time, it has become harder for men to find higher-paying jobs. Foreign competition and technological advances have eliminated many of the jobs in which high school graduates like Mr. Walsh once could earn $40 an hour, or more. The poll found that 85 percent of prime-age men without jobs do not have bachelor’s degrees. And 34 percent said they had criminal records, making it hard to find any work.

The resulting absence of millions of potential workers has serious consequences not just for the men and their families but for the nation as a whole. A smaller work force is likely to lead to a slower-growing economy, and will leave a smaller share of the population to cover the cost of government, even as a larger share seeks help.

“They’re not working, because it’s not paying them enough to work,” said Alan B. Krueger, a leading labor economist and a professor at Princeton. “And that means the economy is going to be smaller than it otherwise would be.”

High Costs

The trend was pushed to new heights by the last recession, with 20 percent of prime-age men not working in 2009 before partly receding. But the recovery is unlikely to be complete. Like turtles flipped onto their backs, many people who stop working struggle to get back on their feet. Some people take years to return to the work force, and others never do. And a growing body of research finds that their children, in turn, are less likely to prosper.

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“The long-run effects of this are very high,” said Lawrence F. Katz, a professor of economics at Harvard. “We could be losing the next generation of kids.”

For most unemployed men, life without work is not easy. In follow-up interviews, about two dozen men described days spent mostly at home, chewing through dwindling resources, relying on friends, strangers and the federal government. The poll found that 30 percent had used food stamps, while 33 percent said they had taken food from a nonprofit or religious group.

They are unhappy to be out of work and eager to find new jobs. They are struggling both with the loss of income and a loss of dignity. Their mental and physical health is suffering.

Yet 44 percent of men in the survey said there were jobs in their area they could get but were not willing to take.

José Flores, 45, who lives in St. Paul, said that after losing a job as a translator for the University of Minnesota’s public health department in 2011, he struck a deal with his landlord to pay $200 a month instead of $580, in exchange for doing odd jobs. He has a cellphone that costs $34 a month and an old car he tries not to drive, and “if I really need clothes or shoes, I go to the thrift store.” He picks up occasional work translating at hospitals, but he has not looked for a regular job since August.

“If for some reason I cannot live in the apartment where I live anymore, then that will be basically a wake-up call for me to wake up and say for sure I need a full-time job,” Mr. Flores said. He added, “If I start working full time the rent will increase” — because he would no longer be available for odd jobs.

A Changing Society

Men today may feel less pressure to find jobs because they are less likely than previous generations to be providing for others. Only 28 percent of men without jobs — compared with 58 percent of women — said a child under 18 lived with them.

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What Nonworking Men Say
Among every 100 men ages 25 to 54 who do not work:

64 Want a job
45 Have looked for a job in the last year
25 Have looked for a job, and would be willing to take one that pays minimum wage
44 Think there are local jobs they could obtain, but they are not willing to take
34 Have been convicted of a crime
17 Say their physical health is poor
43 Say not working has been bad for their mental health
48 Say health problems or disability is a major reason they are not working
19 Say family responsbilities are a major reason
35 Say a lack of good jobs available is a major reason
30 Receive food stamps
4 Receive unemployment benefits
22 Get money from a spouse or other employed person in their house
20 Get income from temporary work or odd jobs
90 Have ever had a full-time job
25 Have had a full-time job, and earned more than $40k in their last job
22 Have missed a rent or mortgage payment because they stopped working
13 Have had utilities turned off because they stopped working
45 Say they are financially secure
25 Are mostly happy about not working
30 Think it’s very likely they will be working in 1 year
42 Think it’s very likely they will be working in 5 years
Source: The New York Times, CBS News and Kaiser Family Foundation poll, conducted Nov. 11 to 25, with 363 nonworking men (and 639 nonworking women, not shown) ages 25 to 54.
A study published in October by scholars at the American Enterprise Institute and the Institute for Family Studies estimated that 37 percent of the decline in male employment since 1979 could be explained by this retreat from marriage and fatherhood.

“When the legal, entry-level economy isn’t providing a wage that allows someone a convincing and realistic option to become an adult — to go out and get married and form a household — it demoralizes them and shunts them into illegal economies,” said Philippe Bourgois, an anthropologist at the University of Pennsylvania who has studied the lives of young men in urban areas. “It’s not a choice that has made them happy. They would much rather be adults in a respectful job that pays them and promises them benefits.”

There is also evidence that working has become more expensive. A recent analysis by the Brookings Institution found that prices since 1990 had climbed most quickly for labor-intensive services like child care, health care and education, increasing what might be described as the cost of working: getting a degree, staying healthy, hiring someone to watch the children. Meanwhile, the price of food, clothing, computers and other goods has climbed more slowly.

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And technology has made unemployment less lonely. Tyler Cowen, an economist at George Mason University, argues that the Internet allows men to entertain themselves and find friends and sexual partners at a much lower cost than did previous generations.

Mr. Katz, the Harvard economist, said, however, that some men might choose to describe themselves as unwilling to take low-wage jobs when in fact they cannot find any jobs. There are about 10 million prime-age men who are not working, but there are only 4.8 million job openings for men and women of all ages, according to the most recent federal data.

Millions of men are trying to find work. And among the 45 percent of men who said they had looked in the last year, large majorities said that to get a job they would be willing to work nights and weekends, start over in a new field, return to school or move to a new city.

Adewole Badmus, 29, moved to Houston in August to look for work in the oil industry and, in the evenings, to study for a master’s degree in subsea engineering at the University of Houston. He left his wife in Indianapolis, where she works as a FedEx security officer, until he finds work.

“I hope it will not take much longer,” he said. “I cannot move forward. I cannot move backward. So I just have to keep pushing.”

As an improving economy drives up hiring and wages, some of those on the sidelines also are likely to return to the labor market. Almost half of those who did not seek work in the last year said they wanted to work.

Yet many who have lost jobs will find it difficult to return.

David Muszynski, 51, crushed two nerves in his right leg in 2003 while breaking up a fight at a Black Sabbath concert outside Buffalo, ending his career as a concert technician. He worked eight more years as the manager of a sports bar in Tonawanda, N.Y., until that also became too much of a physical strain. In November, he went on federal disability benefits, replacing 60 percent of his income. Mr. Muszynski lives in a duplex he inherited from his mother, renting out the other unit.

He said he planned to take a night course to learn how to use a computer in the hope of finding a job that will place fewer demands on his body.

“I would rather be working,” he said. “Then I wouldn’t be so bored.”

But few people who qualify for disability return to the work force. Even if they can find work, they are afraid of losing their benefits and then losing their new job.

The decline of work is divisible into three related trends.

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INTERACTIVE MAP
Where Men Aren’t Working
Across the country, 16 percent of prime-age men are not working. Examine non-employment rates for every Census tract.

OPEN INTERACTIVE MAP
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RECENT COMMENTS

Jennifer 59 minutes ago
What IS the matter with boys these days? We are.GOOD GRIEF! Your suggesting this is because of “laziness and porn?” Give our men some…
John Miller 4 hours ago
Well, if you’re getting free money from American taxpayers though disability, why would you even want to go back to work? There’s zero…
Tony B 4 hours ago
Good thing Mr. Walsh doesn’t jump on every passing fad like email.
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Young men are spending more years in school, delaying their entry into the work force but potentially improving their eventual economic prospects.

Michael Cervone, 25, took shelter in school during the bleakest years of the post-recession recovery. He signed up for a triple major at Youngstown State University in Ohio, in early-childhood education, special education and psychology, “just to better my chances of getting a job because I knew how competitive it was.”

But with the job market improving, Mr. Cervone decided to hurry up and graduate this weekend with a degree in early-childhood education.

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“It feels like there’s a lot more jobs opening up, at least in my field,” he said. “I felt like it was the right time for me to start on the path that I chose.”

At the other end of the 25-to-54 spectrum, many older men who lost jobs have fallen back on disability benefits or started to draw on retirement savings. For some of those men who worked in manufacturing or construction, and now can find only service work, the obstacle is not just the difference in pay; it is also the humiliation of being on public display.

William Scott Jordan, 54, retired from the Army National Guard last December after a decade of full-time duty. He gets a partial disability benefit of $230 a month and a pension when he turns 60. He would like a job until then, but he doesn’t feel able to return to construction work.

Mr. Jordan, who lives in Sumter, S.C., checks for new job listings every day and has filled out “15 to 20” applications over the last year — at places as varied as paint stores and private detective agencies — but has been invited to only a single interview. He helps take care of his grandchildren. He cleans the house. He tried taking classes.

Mr. Jordan and his wife, who works with the families of deployed soldiers, are now living on $25,000 a year rather than $75,000, and he figures they can get by for another year before they start drawing on savings, “or I guess I go find me a job washing dishes.”

After a moment, Mr. Jordan adds, “I haven’t gotten that low yet.”

Trading Down

In the third group are men like Mr. Walsh, too young to retire but often ill-equipped to find new work. Like many sharing his plight, Mr. Walsh did not move directly from employment to the sidelines. He lost a job, and then another, and one more.

After waiting two years for work as an electrician, Mr. Walsh took a job in April 2012 at a Home Depot. He was fired a few months later, he said, after he failed to greet a “secret shopper” paid by the company to evaluate employees.

He drew unemployment benefits for another year before finding a warehouse job loading groceries for the Peapod delivery service. This time he was fired on Dec. 13 — like many who have lost jobs, he remembers the date immediately and precisely — after he asked for a vacation day, he said, to care for his dying mother.

Along the way, Mr. Walsh said he had drained the $15,000 in his union retirement account and run up about $20,000 in credit card debt. “We were constantly fighting because it’s fear,” he said of the toll on his marriage. “You don’t have the $50 you need for the lights and you don’t have the $300 you need for something else, and it gets kind of personal.”

He keeps paying union dues to preserve his shot at a pension, but that also means he can’t get nonunion work as an electrician. He says he would like a desk job instead. He used email for the first time last month, and he plans to return to community college in the spring to learn computer skills.

He says he is determined that his own children will attend college so their prospects will be better than his own.

“I lost my sense of worth, you know what I mean?” Mr. Walsh said. “Somebody asks you ‘What do you do?’ and I would say, ‘I’m an electrician.’”

“But now I say nothing. I’m not an electrician anymore.”

Correction: December 11, 2014
An earlier version of a picture caption with this article misstated the age of David Muszynski. He is 51, not 52.

Robert Gebeloff contributed reporting.

What Nonworking Men Say
Among every 100 men ages 25 to 54 who do not work:

64 Want a job
45 Have looked for a job in the last year
25 Have looked for a job, and would be willing to take one that pays minimum wage
44 Think there are local jobs they could obtain, but they are not willing to take
34 Have been convicted of a crime
17 Say their physical health is poor
43 Say not working has been bad for their mental health
48 Say health problems or disability is a major reason they are not working
19 Say family responsbilities are a major reason
35 Say a lack of good jobs available is a major reason
30 Receive food stamps
4 Receive unemployment benefits
22 Get money from a spouse or other employed person in their house
20 Get income from temporary work or odd jobs
90 Have ever had a full-time job
25 Have had a full-time job, and earned more than $40k in their last job
22 Have missed a rent or mortgage payment because they stopped working
13 Have had utilities turned off because they stopped working
45 Say they are financially secure
25 Are mostly happy about not working
30 Think it’s very likely they will be working in 1 year
42 Think it’s very likely they will be working in 5 years
Source: The New York Times, CBS News and Kaiser Family Foundation poll, conducted Nov. 11 to 25, with 363 nonworking men (and 639 nonworking women, not shown) ages 25 to 54.

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New York Times News Service

GG4: Just put it on my tab(let)

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December 18, 2014 |

By Anick Jesdanun

Time for a tablet?

People tend to hold onto tablets longer than smartphones, so take time to weigh your options. A major consideration is what phone you or your gift recipient already has. Although it’s possible for Android owners to have Apple’s iPads, for instance, there are advantages to sticking within the same system. You often can buy apps just once and share them across both devices, and you don’t need to learn two different systems.
Here are some buying tips organized by system. Prices listed are for base models. You can typically spend more for additional storage or LTE cellular connectivity.
___
Apple’s iOS
The iPad remains top of the line among tablets. The selection of apps designed specifically for it is unmatched. Those who already have iPhones will appreciate the ability to start email and other tasks on one device and finish on the other. You can even make phone calls from iPads, if you have an iPhone on the same Wi-Fi network.
The downside is the $499 price tag for the latest full-size model, the iPad Air 2. Many Android tablets are cheaper. You do get a light and skinny device for the price, with a camera that matches the iPhone’s 8 megapixels (though the iPad still lacks a flash). The new Air also has a fingerprint sensor to bypass security passcodes and to authorize online purchases using Apple Pay. It won’t work with in-store payments, though.
If you are on a budget or want a smaller device, consider last year’s iPad Mini 2 for $299. This year’s Mini doesn’t have many improvements over last year’s model, except for the fingerprint and Apple Pay capabilities. The convenience might not be worth spending more for the $399 iPad Mini 3.
You might consider putting the savings toward a mid-tier or higher-end model. With both the Air 2 and the Mini 3, you can upgrade to 64 gigabytes of storage from 16 GB for just $100 more. Or get 128 GB for $200 more than the base model.
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Google’s Android
Android phones and tablets don’t let you switch back and forth as easily as Apple devices do. The advantage of sticking with an Android tablet for Android phone owners is having a unified library of apps.
Samsung’s Galaxy Tab S is the best of the Android tablets I’ve tried. The display uses a technology called AMOLED to produce colors that pop out as you view video or browse the Web. But the Tab S also comes with a high price tag — $500 for the full-size model and $400 for the smaller one.
Samsung does offer an even-pricier Pro series, with screens of up to 12.2 inches diagonally, but that’s really aimed at professionals. Full-size models tend to be nine or 10 inches, while mini models are seven or eight inches. At the small and cheap end, Samsung offers the 7-inch Galaxy Tab 4 for about $180. Book lovers can choose a Nook edition, made in partnership with Barnes & Noble.
Google’s $399 Nexus 9 has the advantage of running an Android version that’s closest to Google’s vision. Samsung and other manufacturers typically add their own twists, which can confuse consumers. The Nexus does have a wireless chip for in-store mobile payments using Google Wallet, if you feel like waving it around in the checkout line.
I’m including Amazon’s Fire HDX tablets under Android, even though the system’s been modified so much that there’s little resemblance. App selection isn’t as good as what you get on purer Android devices. But Amazon is able to add such features as one-button access to live video help. It is great for first-time tablet owners and comes at a nice price — the full-size model for $379 and the smaller one for $179.
___
Microsoft’s Windows
Until Windows 10 comes out next year, there’s a huge divide between Windows phones and Windows tablets. Apps aren’t compatible, and Windows tablets have more in common with Windows desktops and laptops. A Windows tablet is best suited for someone looking to replace a PC. In fact, many Windows tablets are just laptops with detachable keyboards.
There are too many models to list, so I’ll use Microsoft’s own Surface Pro 3 as an example. You type on a touch screen or attach a $130 keyboard cover. The Surface itself starts at $799, though configurations go as high as $1,949 for those serious about ditching the PC. The Surface’s built-in kickstand can be adjusted to a range of positions, some better for desks and others for the lap. The best thing about Windows tablets is their ability to run regular Windows software, such as Office and Photoshop. Other tablets have, at best, a light version.

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The Associated Press

Thanksgiving sig page (test)

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From page B6 | November 20, 2014 |

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Gift boutique photo

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November 21, 2014 |

I am attaching the final article for our home tour on December 7th, to go with the pictures taken on Monday. Deanna and Mary Ann were wearing jewelry from the vendors and holding some of their bags, as they looked at gift items at Beyond the Garden Gate. It would be best if the article runs after Thanksgiving, but if it is earlier, I have added a “Briefly” piece for immediately before the event. Thanks for all of your help, Liz

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By
November 20, 2014 |

The kids at Camp Putah found them first, the dead and dying fish, flopping on the muddy bottom of the creek. In a normal year, they would learn how to canoe down a stretch of stream along the edge of the UC Davis campus. In 1989, their lessons on Putah Creek were a little more taxonomic.

Like so much of California, today’s Putah Creek creek bends and flows in patterns unrecognized by nature. Little about its shape or amount and variety of its water flows and almost nothing about the narrowness and depth of its canyon much resemble the meandering waterway that once poured from the mountains and drifted into the swamps and grasslands of the Sacramento Valley. Where it once changed course every decade, it now cuts a narrow path between towns and under highways. Where it once flooded, steep banks protect healthy walnut orchards and parks and roads. For thousands of years it had moved like so: bloated and manic in the winter, a trickle in the summer. Then the came the pioneers, their levees, our dam.

In this way, Putah Creek serves as a microcosm of California history: a natural system altered to suit the needs of pioneers. Farms and cities flourished as flora and fauna faded, or were replaced by more desirable species. It has always been a fishing hole, always a source of water for riparian farmers. But for a while it was forgotten as a wilderness, cleared by well-meaning government agencies to prevent clogging and floods. For a while it served as the de facto dump for couches and cars and refrigerators too expensive to drop off at the real one.

Then, in 1989, it ran dry, and the kids noticed, and this story begins.
________________________________________
Imagine Putah Creek in the days of the Patwin. From the Diversion Dam you see where the creek’s rhythm used to break from the irregular beat of water flowing over rocky riffles to the steady quiet flow through valley flatland. Here it meandered between great pools, losing its summer channel in vast swamp lands. Following winter rains, water roared down the creek, turning Patwin villages into islands in a sea of flood water and bringing salmon, steelhead and lamprey up from the ocean to spawn in the upper watershed.
– Peter Moyle

For 12,000 years, generations of people have lived in or near the Sacramento valley, between the coastal mountain range and the immense Sierras. Native Americans arrived around 500 A.D., and the Patwin people, the most southern Wintun population, made their homes from north of Colusa south to San Pablo and Suisun bays in 22,000 acres of lush riparian forest. Along the lengths of Putah and Cache creeks, and on the banks the Sacramento, Patwin hunted waterfowl, fished an abundance of salmon and seeded grasses for flour.

When Spanish missionaries and settlers roved inland, united tribes fought off the invaders for 17 years; in 1812, J.B. Wolfskin became the first recorded European to build along Putah – then Puto – creek. In 1817, Lieutenant Jose Sanchez drove a whole village of Solano to a grissly death, as families set their huts on fire and burned inside.

By the late 1800s, most of the southern Wintuns, the River Patwin, had been driven out by ranchers and pioneers who rolled in from the east, too, drawn both by gold and land to till . They built their houses and their carts with the wood from the river forest, clearing out huge swaths of land for farm operations. The land was so clear and so flat that in 1881 surveyors from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration plotted the baseline for the Survey of the 39th Parallel, which connected coastal surveys from the east and west coasts, establishing one of the most important precursors to GPS.

Originally, Putah Creek ran through the center of Davisville, but winter flooding exhausted farmers. Creek flow varied substantially: a trickle in the summer, and as much water as it rained in the winter. In the late 1870s, homesteaders took their donkeys south of the town and dragged plows through the ground to dredge the South Fork, diverting the river past the town. Records show the levees failed multiple times, carrying off houses in both Davisville and Winters, but eventually the river settled into its new channel.

This was the first of many adjustments made to the creek. The rerouting straightened the creek, causing it to run faster, cut 10 or 20 feet into the soft dirt. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reinforced the levees with concrete, and the isolated remains of the North Fork form a pond-like ecosystem known as UC Davis’ Arboretum.

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation began eyeing idyllic Monticello Valley for a reservoir as early as 1908, the decision finalized in 1948. Photographers Dorothea Lange and Pirkle Jones chronicled the dismantling of the sleepy hamlet in “Death of A Valley.”

Three hundred and four feet tall and 1,023 feet wide, Monticello Dam would change the Putah Creek system for perpetuity. When it was finished, a door that locked tight Devil’s Gate, Lake Berryessa would take xx years to form. At the time, its 1.4 million acre feet made it the second largest reservoir in the state.

The reservoir was the second biggest when it was built, xx acre-feet smaller than Shasta. It extends 26 miles through the valley – about as long as the lower half of Putah Creek.

When Monticello dam was erected, damming the creek at Devil’s Gate, it eliminated that rush and dry pattern in favor of a dependable water supply. But local fish and trees weren’t built for this steadiness. Warm, calm waters that washed into wide pools leftover from gravel mining operations favored alien lake fish like xx and xx. Eucalyptus, carried from xx by xx, displaced willows, and tall bushy arrundo, once recommended by xx as a bank stabilizer, reproduced like wildfire and started to choke the waterways.

Over the last 25 years, the creek has gone through something of a rebirth: steady, caring hands have cleaned its banks, a ten-year lawsuit returned water to the channel, and a streamkeeper spends his days studying the math of natural water flow, figuring out ways to return the creek to a natural state, if not its natural state.

And so Putah Creek is an example of what could be California’s future: despite a growing water demand from urban and rural interests, agricultural, environmental and political interests have banded together to restore the waterway to the wild. Enemies become friends and scientists become heroes, all for the good of the tule perch, the beavers, the willows and the hawks, who are finally able to come home.

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Elizabeth Case

Center for Poverty Research/small-city poor

By
November 13, 2014 |

Background on center
Oct. 10, 2011 (Karen Nikos-Rose)

UC Davis has received $4 million from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to establish a center for poverty research — one of only three such centers nationwide designated to study the causes and effects of and policies aimed at addressing poverty in the United States.

The interdisciplinary center, led by economics professors Ann Huff Stevens and Marianne Page, will promote research and education on poverty, with an emphasis on labor markets and poverty; health and education programs; the transmission of poverty from one generation to another; and immigration’s role in poverty. The grant will be spread over five years,.

“We are facing some of the country’s biggest challenges since the Great Depression,” said George R. Mangun, dean of the division of social sciences.

“We have more people living in poverty now than at any time in almost 70 years. Yet, we have one of the most powerful economies in the world, and our country’s higher education system is the envy of the entire world. With centers such as the new Center for Poverty Research at UC Davis, we can transform society.”

The other national poverty research centers are located at Stanford University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The UCD center’s research will draw on the expertise of scholars across campus and involve faculty, graduate and undergraduate students. In addition to funding research and outreach, the grant will help establish a freshman seminar in poverty to encourage students early in their college careers to consider poverty as a field of study.

“UC Davis is home to an incredibly productive group of researchers working on poverty. The center will build connections across campus that further strengthen this research, support the training of students to continue this research agenda and provide an improved structure for sharing our critical findings with other researchers, policymakers and the public,” said Stevens, who chairs the department of economics and will direct the new center.

UCD was chosen because of its strength in research on poverty and related issues. Among recent findings:

* The recession’s effects have been felt most strongly by men, black and Hispanic workers, youth and undereducated workers.

* Infant health improves when disadvantaged pregnant women have access to government assistance, such as supplemental nutrition programs or the earned income tax credit.

* Providing information about college admission requirements to disadvantaged high school students early in their high school careers can substantially improve the odds that they apply to and enroll in college.

* Long-term declines in real wages in the U.S. during the past several decades have made it significantly more difficult for the working poor to escape poverty.

* In contrast to prior research, immigrants do not reduce the well-being of low-wage U.S. workers and may actually stimulate the economy.

The grant calls for the UCD Center for Poverty Research to fund poverty research projects at other educational institutions, as well as finance graduate and undergraduate poverty research and study.

The research of the center can help identify which anti-poverty programs work and what the long-term effects of high poverty are likely to be for future generations, Stevens said. The research will also help to inform policymakers, she added.

— UC Davis News Service

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fire damage

By
November 11, 2014 |

Cecilia, Debra, Debbie & Chiefs,

I took a flight with my friend Steve Greenfield on Sunday, November 9th to SF Bay Area, around Marin/Napa/Sonoma and our return flight took us over the site of the 2014 Winters fire. In the attached photos, you can see Winters in the background.

Feel free to use/publish/share as you like.

Hopefully, if people see evidence of the complete destruction (4 months later), then they’ll be more careful during the fire season.

All the best,
Kemble

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Special to The Enterprise

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November 07, 2014 |

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Kimberly Yarris

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November 07, 2014 |

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Kimberly Yarris

LaCrosse rides Buick’s high reliability rating

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From page A16 | November 07, 2014 |

The Associated Press

The 2015 Buick LaCrosse is absolutely, positively not like the stodgy Buicks of old.

The LaCrosse sedan’s comfortable ride and attractive styling make it seem more expensive than it is. It offers two smart engine choices: A fuel-saving four cylinder with electric-assist for added zip and a strong V-6. Premium materials and a quiet interior define an upscale LaCrosse passenger environment.

Plus, there’s so much rear-seat legroom in this four-door car — 40.5 inches — it’s akin to what some other cars offer in the front seats.

2015 Buick LaCrosse Premium

Base price: $33,635 for base, front-wheel drive LaCrosse; $35,725 for Leather model; $38,025 for Premium

Price as tested: $44,510

Type: Front-engine, front-wheel drive, five-passenger, premium, mid-size sedan

Engine: 3.6-liter, double overhead cam, direct injection V-6 with VVT

Mileage: 18 mpg (city), 28 mpg (highway)

Length: 197 inches

Wheelbase: 111.7 inches

Curb weight: 3,895 pounds

Built at: Kansas City, Kansas

Options: Driver confidence package No. 1 (includes side-view monitor with lane change alert, rear cross-traffic alert, halogen fog lamps, head-up display) $2,125; driver confidence package No. 2 (includes adaptive cruise control, front automatic braking, safety alert seat) $1,245; power moonroof $1,195; White Frost tricoat exterior paint $995

Destination charge: $925

A variety of luxury features are available on the LaCrosse, including a power panorama moonroof, and for 2015 a rearview camera becomes standard.

Also for 2015, the LaCrosse comes with OnStar 4G LTE that can create a Wi-Fi hotspot at the car so passengers can use their mobile devices for video streaming or posting to social media. Initial three-month/3-gigabyte data plan is free; subsequent use charges apply.

Best of all, Consumer Reports recently named the LaCrosse with four-cylinder engine as having the highest predicted reliability in the large-car segment. In fact, Buick was the only domestic brand in Consumer Reports’ top 10 for predicted reliability of 2015 models.

With the average new-vehicle sales price now topping $32,000, the 2015 LaCrosse is priced just a bit above that.

Starting manufacturer’s suggested retail price, including destination charge, is $34,560 for a front-wheel drive, 2015 LaCrosse. This is increased just $100 from the base, 2014 LaCrosse.

Buyers can select either the 182-horsepower, four-cylinder engine with eAssist or the 304-horsepower V-6 at the same price.

The 2015 LaCrosse also is offered with all-wheel drive. The lowest starting retail price, including destination charge, for a 2015 LaCrosse with all-wheel drive is $39,655. All-wheel drive comes with the V-6 only.

Competitors include a wide range of mid-size and premium sedans.

The base, 2015 Toyota Avalon, which comes with a 268-horsepower V-6 and has 39.2 inches of rear-seat legroom, has a starting retail price of $33,110.

The 2015 Lexus ES 350 sedan, with 268-horsepower V-6 and 40 inches of rear-seat legroom, has a starting MSRP, including destination charge, of $38,475.

Note that Consumer Reports put the LaCrosse in the “large” car class. But the federal government, which provides official fuel economy ratings, classifies the LaCrosse as a mid-size sedan.

To be sure, the base LaCrosse doesn’t have everything on it that the Avalon or Lexus ES 350 have as standard equipment.

The base LaCrosse, for example, doesn’t come with leather-covered seats as the base Avalon and ES 350 do.

But all 2015 LaCrosses have OnStar as well as remote start that allows a driver to start the vehicle from, say, inside the house to get the interior warmed on cold winter mornings before starting the commute to work.

Parked next to an Avalon, the LaCrosse arguably looks more upscale on the outside.

The shiny, silver-colored grille distinguishes the LaCrosse from other mid-size sedans, and the LaCrosse’s side profile, with subtle contours on the side sheet metal, hints at a sporty, fastback look.

The test 2015 LaCrosse had the V-6 mated to a six-speed automatic and provided plenty of power to pass other vehicles, even on highways in the mountains.

Engine sounds came through predominantly during hard acceleration and conveyed confident power. Otherwise, the interior was impressively quiet. Even road and wind noise were minimal in the test car.

Shift points were scarcely noticed, too, especially during leisurely cruises.

Torque from this 3.6-liter, double overhead cam, direct injection V-6 peaks at 264 foot-pounds at a high 5,300 rpm and compares with 248 foot-pounds of torque at 4,800 rpm that’s produced by the ES 350’s 3.5-liter V-6.

Unfortunately, the test car, driven somewhat aggressively, averaged just under 18 miles per gallon in travel that was a majority city driving. This compares with the federal government fuel economy ratings of 18 mpg in city driving and 28 mpg on the highway, for a combined average of 21 mpg.

As a result, the test car’s travel range was less than 330 miles on a single, 18.5-gallon tank. With today’s lower gasoline prices, filling the LaCrosse tank can cost some $55.

But remember, the LaCrosse also can be had with a 2.4-liter, double overhead cam, EcoTec four cylinder with what’s called mild hybrid technology that helps boost performance while saving fuel. The system is called eAssist, and it includes a small battery pack to store energy recouped from regenerative braking. The electric power then is supplied when added torque is needed.

The eAssist LaCrosse also automatically shuts down the engine when the car is stopped, such as at stoplights, to save fuel and includes grille shutters that close when appropriate to improve the vehicle’s aerodynamics. Fuel economy ratings for this LaCrosse version are 25/36 mpg.

The test LaCrosse had a solid, stable feel and steering that felt a bit better than mainstream.

With Buick’s Hi-Per Strut suspension system, the test LaCrosse had a supple, well-managed ride that kept bumps away from passengers while not compromising good road feel for the driver.

One drawback in the LaCrosse is the trunk space. In the test car, it was 13.3 cubic feet, which compares with 16 cubic feet in the Avalon.

The 2015 LaCrosse in both front- and all-wheel drive earned top, five out of five stars in federal government crash testing.

Standard safety equipment includes frontal, curtain and side air bags, electronic stability control and antilock brakes. Many of today’s newest safety features, such as blind-spot monitoring, lane departure alert and cross-traffic alert at the rear of the car, are offered as options.

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GG4 Deck the halls with … snark and criticism?

By
December 18, 2014 |

By Terry Barnett-Martin

Fresh pine garland is draped just so over the hutch and bookcases. The Christmas tree is dripping with twinkling lights and colorful ornaments. Packages are strewn under the tree waiting to be opened. You look around one last time, checking to make sure everything is set, then the doorbell rings. The first of many family members has arrived.
Within minutes the house is bubbling with conversations and familiar holiday music. You’re crossing your fingers that all stays well. “So far, so good,” you proudly say to yourself.
You spoke too soon …
“Nice decorations, where’d you get them? You know, you should have checked with me first. I know where to get the best ones. Oh, and I wouldn’t have draped the garland like that. I would have done it this way,” says Bossy McBoss as she moves the garland you’d placed just so. As she rearranges it, a few specially placed decorations fall to the ground with a crash. She continues, “I wouldn’t have put those there either, see what can happen?”
Across the room you hear Bigsy B. Little clear his throat as he approaches your sister, Hope. “Incoming!” you whisper to yourself, wishing Hope could hear you and duck for cover. Too late. Bigsy B. Little is on the hunt. “Well, it looks like your New Year’s resolution didn’t quite stick. Twenty five pounds? Looks like you found them rather than lost them,” he criticizes.
Later, as everyone is seated for dinner, Bigsy B. Little says, “I pray the turkey isn’t dry like it was last year.” Everyone silently turns to look at you as if watching a ping-pong match and it’s your turn.
The holidays, for all of their hopeful preparation and sparkle, can come apart at the seams very quickly when difficult people do what they do. We all know some variations of people like these, who can strike fear and dread into the holiday experience – but you can change that.
* Don’t expect others to change. The fact is, they are who they are and you cannot change them. Our greatest power lies in creating change within ourselves. In fact, it’s a good idea to take a personal inventory to make sure you aren’t someone else’s difficult person. If you suspect you are, make the necessary adjustments and promise yourself you will give your best this year.
* Be aware and prepare. Knowing and owning your own vulnerabilities gives you the opportunity to decide how you want to address or deflect intentional insults. Difficult people often hone in on other’s vulnerabilities. Self-awareness and self-acceptance are the two strongest weapons against bullies like Bigsy B. Little.
* Use the power of your imagination. In any relationship – especially in the most difficult – boundaries are the key to a sense of personal well-being. But how do you create good boundaries? One highly effective exercise, Tending Fences, uses your creative mind to find solutions to these difficult relationships.
For instance, imagine you own a large piece of land that adjoins the property of Bossy McBoss. The current fence that marks the boundary is small and broken and Bossy often jumps the fence to snoop around on your land, leaving a mess. Because everything is possible in your imagination, you design a new fence – 30 feet tall and 5 feet thick – with features that allow her good qualities to come through while a Teflon finish ensures that her bossy negativity doesn’t stick. This clear message, mostly to yourself, ensures that nothing she says or does can get to you. Use this Tending Fences exercise for each difficult person.
* Review and resolve. For the week leading up to your holiday gathering, take a few minutes each day to review your Tending Fences work, tweaking each fence as you see fit. Know that when the offending person delivers an insult, the fence will do the work for you, keeping you safe and intact.
* Trust yourself. It will give you a sense of well-being and confidence that will not only be a gift to yourself, but to your family and friends as well.
With these five tips you can relax and know that you have everything you need to survive the family holiday gathering and truly enjoy yourself. You’ve got this!
– Terry Barnett-Martin, M.S., LMFT, is a relationship counselor in private practice in Southern California.

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Special to The Enterprise

gardner

By
October 24, 2014 |

WOODLAND — Hours after he allegedly brought fear and violence to the tranquil streets of Winters, William Carl Gardner III strolled into a Sacramento pawn shop where he’d become a regular customer.

“He wanted me to change his (on-file) address — he said he was going to be away for some time,” shop owner Kevin Pratt testified Thursday in Yolo Superior Court. “Possibly years,” he said Gardner told him.

Having met Gardner’s then-girlfriend, Leslie Pinkston, a year or so before, Pratt suggested that she come in to handle Gardner’s pawned items during his extended absence.

Gardner’s reply, according to Pratt: “She won’t be coming in.”

That’s because Pinkston was dead, fatally shot in the head by an assailant that Yolo County prosecutors have identified as the 31-year-old Gardner. The Nov. 18, 2013, shooting occurred three weeks before Gardner was due to stand trial on charges that he had stalked and threatened Pinkston, and she was on the District Attorney’s witness list.

“Her life was cut short, and she never saw it coming,” Deputy District Attorney Deanna Hays told a six-man, six-woman jury in her opening statement Thursday morning at Gardner’s murder trial. She said Gardner has a history of using women he can control, including one who unwittingly drove him to Winters on the morning of the shooting.

“You will see that everything Mr. Gardner does is intentional and deliberate,” Hays said, a line she repeated multiple times in her opening remarks.

According to the prosecutor, Gardner instructed his driver to circle block surrounding Pinkston’s workplace, Aleco Electric on Railroad Avenue, then park in a nearby lot. From there, he crossed the street and slipped into the back seat of Pinkston’s black BMW sport-utility vehicle, where the victim had been making a cell phone call.

From his position of “advantage and surprise,” Hays said, Gardner used one hand to pin Pinkston against her seat and the other to fire multiple shots from a 9mm Luger semiautomatic pistol — the first tearing through her right knee as she tried to flee, followed by the fatal shot to the back of her head. Two more bullets shattered the car’s driver-side window.

Crime-scene photos displayed in court showed Pinkston slumped forward in her seat, her legs turned sideways from her failed attempt to escape, her left hand still clutching her purse. In the courtroom audience, her friends quietly wept.

As witnesses to the broad-daylight shooting froze in stunned silence — many had mistaken the gunshots for a motorcycle backfiring — Gardner fled the scene. Authorities apprehended him three weeks later following a standoff with police in Las Vegas, the Luger still in his possession.

Gardner is charged with first-degree murder with the special circumstances of lying in wait and murder of a witness, as well as stalking and being a felon in possession of a firearm. His grand-jury indictment also carries the stalking, threats and vandalism charges that were pending against him at the time of Pinkston’s shooting.

Gardner has pleaded not guilty to all the charges. His court-appointed attorney, J. Toney, offered a brief opening statement Thursday urging jurors to keep an open mind about the case until they’ve heard all the evidence.

Toney said that includes details about Pinkston and Gardner’s tumultuous four-year on-again, off-again relationship, during which Pinkston reportedly avoided subpoenas to testify against Gardner in the stalking case and even paid a bail reinstatement fee that allowed Gardner to leave jail three days before the shooting.

“You’ll hear a real microcosm of their whole relationship,” during which Gardner became “depressed and suicidal” around the time of his alleged crime, Toney said. “It’ll become clear that Mr. Gardner was in a state of utter despair.”

Screams, then shots

Although nearly a year has passed since the fatal shooting, its details remain vivid in the minds of witnesses to the incident, many of whom knew Pinkston from being raised in Winters, working in its downtown district, or both.

For David Barbosa, that November morning began as his workdays usually did — emptying trash cans from his office before delving into the day’s business.

As he took out the first load just before 9:30 a.m., “I could hear some sort of a sound, kind of like a muffled scream” coming from across Railroad Avenue, Barbosa recalled. Uncertain of its source, he returned to his office for another can of trash, after which he heard a “pop.”

At first, Barbosa attributed the sound to a passing motorcycle, since “there’s not too many gunshots in Winters,” he said. But then he saw Pinkston struggling to get out of her car, and after two more pops “I knew what was going on.”

As Pinkston’s body fell limp in the driver’s seat, an African-American man emerged from the back seat, pulled a hood over his head “and headed in my direction,” said Barbosa, who recalled freezing “like a statue” as the two men made eye contact.

“Do you see that man in court today?” asked District Attorney Jeff Reisig, the case’s lead prosecutor.

“I do,” said Barbosa, pointing out Gardner in the courtroom.

Under cross-examination by Toney, Barbosa acknowledged he initially identified another man as the shooter when Winters police showed him a photo lineup several hours after the crime. Documents displayed in court showed Barbosa said that man was “most likely” the person he saw, but that he also identified Gardner as another possible suspect.

On Thursday, however, Barbosa said he was “very confident” that Gardner was the man he encountered on Nov. 18. “One hundred percent,” he added.

It was Barbosa who placed the first 911 call, a recording of which was played for the jury.

“Leslie, can you hear me?” Barbosa is heard saying after notifying the dispatcher that a woman had been shot in her parked car. “Uh, she’s breathing — get someone here quick.”

“You know her?” the dispatcher asks.

“Yes, I do,” Barbosa replied. “I saw the whole thing happen.”

— Reach Lauren Keene at [email protected] or 530-747-8048. Follow her on Twitter at @laurenkeene

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By
October 11, 2014 |

Elizabeth Case

Sharks photo

By
October 9, 2014 |

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SC: The city of Davis offers free classes on composting

By
October 03, 2014 |

Learn about composting

Food scraps can make up to 25% of your trash! Composting your food scraps can be surprisingly simple, pest free, and only take 5 minutes of your time each week.

Classes are held at the Veterans Memorial Center Game Room, 203 E 14th St.:

* Wednesday, Oct. 15 at 6 p.m.
* Thursday, Oct. 16 at 6 p.m.
* Tuesday, Oct. 21 at 6 p.m.

Each class is identical and runs 1 1/2 hours.

Courtesy of city of Davis, http://recycling.cityofdavis.org/general-notices/workshop-reducing-toxics-in-our-environment

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Special to The Enterprise

SC: Buying recycled completes the loop

By
October 03, 2014 |

Buying Recycled
The recycling loop is incomplete until recycled materials are re-manufactured into products and bought by consumers. Therefore, it is important to buy “recycled.” Products made from recycled materials consume less energy, use fewer or no raw materials and sometimes cost less. There are thousands of manufacturers and retailers offering great products made from recycled materials. Some examples of products made from recycled beverage containers are: tote bags, aluminum baseball bats, plastic playground equipment, backpacks, T-shirts, flip flops, etc.

What does “Recycled” mean?
The important thing to know when you want to buy a recycled product is how much post-consumer material is used. Post-consumer refers to material the public has used (not just manufacturing scraps) and then recycled. Look for a percentage of recycled content to be shown, e.g. 50%, and then for what part of the residual content, e.g. 10%, is post-consumer. The higher the number the better. Many organizations, such as the City of Davis, have instituted procurement policies for recycled products. This means that the City places a priority on the purchase of products made with recycled materials when they are available. The more people who buy recycled, the more the message is conveyed to manufacturers that a market for recycled products exists and investing in re-manufacturing is worthwhile. That makes investing less risky and helps bring down the cost of recycled products.

** For info box**
What’s the difference between these two symbols?

Recycle and Recycled

When you see the recycling symbol inside a circle on a product, it means that the product was made with recycled materials. When you see the recycling symbol on it’s own, that means that the product can be recycled; it does not indicate whether the product was made from recycled materials.

Courtesy city of Davis, http://recycling.cityofdavis.org/rebuy

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Special to The Enterprise

Notes on K. Stanley Robinson/Mars Trilogy into TV show

By
October 01, 2014 |

Kim Stanley Robinson
[email protected]

Stan will email me if it becomes a story.

Hollywood agent represents George RR Martin

It’s been explosive on social media, but not really a story yet.

the option is only the first of several necessary steps

There would have to be some development… write a screenplay

“Where the term “greenlighting” comes in I don’t even know” but it hasn’t been greenlighted

It’s either the 4th or 4 1/2 time that the Mars books have been optioned

Every time it doesn’t work, I think it decreases the chances.

I think it’s not a real story yet…

We are four big hurdles away

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OTG: Don’t let your ride get ripped off

By
August 28, 2014 |

None of us wants to walk up to an empty parking space where our car is supposed to be parked. These tips can help you avoid becoming a victim of car theft, and reminds drivers that almost half of all thefts are due to driver error, such as leaving the keys in the ignition or leaving the doors unlocked.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation reported an estimated 715,373 motor vehicle thefts nationwide in 2011, which translates to a vehicle stolen every 44 seconds. Those thefts total losses of more than $4.3 billion.

“Helping to prevent your car from getting stolen is important on many levels. It helps get people to work, kids to school, and business deliveries to customers,” said Cynthia Harris, AAA Northern California spokesperson. “Additionally, if a vehicle is stolen, the crime can have an emotional impact as well.”

Tips for preventing auto theft
* Use multiple layers of protection: locked doors, stickers stating the car is protected, a steering wheel lock, immobilizing devices like kill switches or tracking devices.
* Remove your keys from the ignition and take them with you.
* Always use your emergency brake when parking; this makes it more difficult for a thief to tow your vehicle away.
* Never leave your vehicle running, even if you’ll just be gone a minute.
* Park in a well-lit, populated area.
* Do not leave valuables in plain sight or in unattended vehicles. Even empty shopping bags, sunglasses or a change of clothes might look interesting to a thief.
* Do not leave the title inside your vehicle.
* Never hide a spare ignition key on the vehicle. Thieves look for keys in popular hiding places like inside a car bumper or wheel well.
* Contact your insurance company immediately after contacting the police to let them know your car is missing.

— Courtesy of http://www.calstate.aaa.com/

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Special to The Enterprise

Citrus Circuits continues winning ways

By
September 26, 2014 |

The Davis High School robotics team, Citrus Circuits, won first place competing against 20 other teams at the Capital City Classic, a robotics competition held at Pleasant Grove High School in Elk Grove last month.

In addition to coming in first place at the competition, Citrus Circuits also won awards for the most innovative robot design and for winning a bonus match, “Chicks in Charge,” in which teams play a match with an all-female drive team to encourage women in STEM.

Perhaps just as exciting, though, was the success of Team 9678 WP Robotics, made of up students from Pioneer High School in Woodland. In order to promote their passion for robotics beyond their own community, Davis students started and taught the Pioneer High School team.

And even though Pioneer’s team has only existed for a few months, the students did very well at the Elk Grove tournament, making it all the way through the qualifying matches and quarter finals and into the semi-finals, where they were eventually eliminated in their third match out of three.

WP Robotics captain, Christine Pamplona, called the team’s first competition “a challenge,” but said it was also “a very enjoyable experience, being able to work with other teams.”

“As a rookie team, we hope we can work our hardest and try our best and compete with other teams,” Pamplona said.

Davis students credited the Pioneer team’s outstanding performance to excellent robot driving by Gerardo Diaz and Mariah Raymundo and as well as great communication and morale within the team.

In the end however, the winner was the Davis-based Team 1678 Citrus Circuits, made up of high school and junior high students from Da Vinci Charter Academy, Davis High, Davis School for Independent Study and Harper, Emerson and Holmes junior high schools. The team is coached by Davis High teacher Steve Harvey and mentored by team alumni, parents and college students. Learn more about the team at

http://www.citruscircuits.org

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Anne Ternus-Bellamy

Protect journalists

By
September 26, 2014 |

It’s Time to Protect Journalists who Risk Their Lives to Report the News

By Caroline Little, president and CEO, NAA

Word count: 675

Journalists like to tell the story. They do not like to become the story.

Unfortunately, during the past several months, journalists have been thrust into the spotlight under tragic circumstances. Around the world, journalists are putting themselves in harm’s way to report on the most important stories of our time and, sadly, the results have been horrific.

In August, the gruesome and senseless murder of James Foley stunned the world. His death was a vivid and painful reminder of the risks journalists take when reporting from conflict zones. Since 2011, 66 journalists have died in Syria alone and another 30 are missing, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. This is not acceptable.

Only a few weeks after James Foley’s death, we were shocked and appalled again by the murder of journalist Steven Sotloff. As with Foley, a video showed the beheading of Sotloff, the second American journalist killed by ISIS.

The murders remind us of the dangers journalists face in seeking the truth, and reporting those truths to us. Reporting from the front lines, they shed light on the darkness of war.

If there is anything good that comes from these tragic and brutal murders, it is the hope they will further raise awareness about the importance of protecting journalists and freedom of the press. These are the men and women who ensure the public knows what’s happening in their neighborhoods and across the globe.

Foley and Sotloff lost their lives because they believed finding and delivering the truth was worth the enormous risk. We will never forget their contributions to the public’s knowledge and the craft of journalism.

In October, Foley will be honored at a service on the campus of the University of New Hampshire. His family announced the launch of the James W. Foley Legacy Fund to preserve his legacy and promote his ideals among future generations. The fund will seek to aid American journalists from conflict zones and contribute to quality educational opportunities for urban youth.

While these horrific acts of violence have drawn enormous attention, there are still many journalists at risk on a daily basis. In August, we lauded the fact that American journalist Peter Theo Curtis was released from captivity. However, we must remember that he was kidnapped and held in Syria for nearly two years.

This spring, two reporters – Anja Niedringhaus of The Associated Press and Nils Horner of Sveriges Radio – were killed in Afghanistan. In April, the Newspaper Association of America endorsed an Inter American Press Association (IAPA) resolution condemning the violation of human rights in Venezuela, where more than 100 reporters have been arrested, threatened or the victim of violence this year

These examples serve as sobering reminders of the world we live in and the great lengths journalists go to report on the news.

They believe, as I do, that the free flow of information is a key tenant of democracy and freedom. Without a proper understanding of what is going on, we cannot vote, make sense of the world events, or hold leaders accountable.

To maintain this freedom, we must prioritize protecting our courageous reporters and their newsgathering processes – both abroad and at home.

As a nation, we are collectively focused on responding to these terrorist threats and protecting those abroad, as we should be. But, we must not forget to protect our reporters on the home front as well.

The free flow of information by journalists gives the public the opportunity and responsibility to understand their communities their country and the world. And with that, the power to shape them. At NAA, we have been fighting for a media shield law, known as The Free Flow of Information Act. The bill sailed through the Senate Judiciary Committee with bipartisan support last year, but has yet to receive a full vote on the Senate floor.

It’s time for Americans to prioritize our courageous journalists and our right to know. We must protect journalists and honor those journalists who are killed, missing, threatened or held in captivity. It is critical for our democracy.

Hi Debbie,

Please consider the below op-ed by Caroline Little, president and CEO of the Newspaper Association of America, addressing the recent murders of Foley, Sotloff and other reporters. The op-ed speaks to the key role journalism plays in creating a thriving democracy, and America’s responsibility, in turn, to protect reporters at home and abroad.

Would this be of interest to you?

Thanks for your time and consideration, and I look forward to your feedback!

Best,
Megan

Megan Dutill
On behalf of the NAA
o: (484) 385-2949
m: (610) 715-2988
[email protected]

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Special to The Enterprise

Welcome back conquering heroes

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September 24, 2014 |

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Kimberly Yarris

PUC warns of flawed gas distribution pipes; West Davis leaks continue

By
September 23, 2014 |

News Release September 22, 2014

State PUC Studies Warn of Flawed Gas Distribution Pipes: West Davis Leaks Continue

The State Public Utilities Commission released two studies that paint a mixed picture about the large number of gas leaks in PG&E distribution lines in west Davis. One study, released in May, attributed most of the problem to construction defects on “tee caps” – a part that sits above the section of pipe where the distribution line diverts to the service line to each home.

The report also stated that PG&E established an adequate system to obtain leak data and prioritize all its leak repairs based on a leak cluster methodology. West Davis has experienced a total of 96 gas leaks in PG&E’s distribution lines since 2006, up from 90 in January 2013.

According to PG&E, most of the gas distribution pipe in the Stonegate subdivision is Aldyl A plastic, which is susceptible to brittle-like cracking and premature failures.

A second and more disturbing PUC report released in June, about vintage Aldyl A gas lines, the type of pipe in west Davis, stated that:

“there could be different waves of failures unique to the operator in the oncoming
decades. It is highly probable that the waves will occur sooner and with more intensity if the pipe is early vintage Aldyl A.”

“The danger associated with slow crack growth on Aldyl A is that although the failures develop slowly, when they do fail, they fail much more abruptly and rapidly than underground leaks on steel distribution pipes. Instead of small pin‐hole leaks developing slowly over a number of years, as is typical of steel pipes, leaks on Aldyl A are far more likely to be of a serious nature much more quickly. The 1996 San Juan (Puerto Rico) incident (where 33 people died) and the two 2011 California incidents are good examples of this abrupt failure characteristic.”

“All…(utility) operators examined by us have a sizable quantity of pipes with unknown manufacturing dates, unknown resin types, unknown lot numbers, or even unknown manufacturer sources. Without more robust material traceability to know with a great degree of certainty what assets are in the ground, risk assessment and risk mitigation strategies will be at best enormously expensive and at worst ineffective.”

The June PUC report criticized California gas operators, including PG&E, for not acting on federal safety warnings about Aldyl A pipes in a timely fashion. The report concludes that slow crack growth on Aldyl A pipes fundamentally poses a high level of risk due to the abrupt nature of leaks created by this mode of failure and more frequent leak surveys do not sufficiently mitigate the risk.

“These reports and the continued number of gas leaks confirm that we have a flawed system of distribution lines in west Davis. Gas pipes and tee caps made with vintage Aldyl A plastic are worse than we thought. We urge PG&E to do the right thing and replace these clearly unsafe gas lines, sooner rather than later. We plan to meet with PG&E representatives to discuss these concerns. Shareholder profits should never be placed ahead of neighborhood safety,” said David L. Johnson, a member of the Stonegate Citizens Safety Committee.

Although gas leaks have occurred throughout the entire Stonegate subdivision and other parts of west Davis, PG&E has replaced only about 2,000 feet of gas distribution lines and 28 service lines that lead to each home’s gas meter, or approximately 8% of the 4.7 miles of gas lines in Stonegate. The National Transportation Safety Board has recommended that all Aldyl A made through the early 1980s be replaced.

The June 11, 2014, California Public Utilities Commission report, Hazard Analysis & Mitigation Report On Aldyl A Polyethylene Gas Pipelines in California, can be found at: http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/NR/rdonlyres/5A3DBD9A-1786-4B80-AA34-D13108B063B6/0/AldylA.pdf

The May 9, 2014, CPUC report, Report on Staff Investigation Of Leaks At Stonegate Subdivision, is attached to the news release email.

###

Contact:
David L. Johnson
Stonegate Citizens Safety Committee (Not associated with the Stonegate Country Club)
(530) 756-2752
(530) 574-2576 (cell)
[email protected]

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Special to The Enterprise

Regents: Investment meeting

By
September 18, 2014 |

8 min of afternoon session

UC Chief Investment Officer Jagdeep Singh Bachher.

“UC Ventures” appears to be the third thing he will talk about.

Slide: “UC Ventures, Benefiting from UC Innovation”

Funding is only one component that needs to be done.

Need to actively promote entrepreneurial incubators and accelerators

Capital is one part of it.

What can capital do?

It is an important ingredient to succeed

We are in Silicon Valley, the hub of …

Think of some of the great companies that have come out of UC

Here’s what I learned as I met at campuses…

Other investors have made billions on UC’s innovation.

It’s pretty clear there are opportunities, they have been profitable, and they exist in our organization

We should do more

Put capital to work at all levels

All the way through becoming big companies who are attracting venture capitalists

How can we be an active participant in this engine of xxx

“What we loudly and clearly heard from everyone is that innovation is a local phenomenon”

We have five inventions a day…
“Very robust pipeline of investable entities.”

We use external managers

we can participate along with them

where are the opportunities?
57 percent life sciences
22 percent information technology
21 percent, materials, energy and agriculture

Investing $250M in UC Innovation
perspective
We already invest $2B in venture capital
this is part and parcel of that

We can attract a great team from a network of 1.7M alumni

We all agreed it should be an independent operation from the office of the CIO

We are asking for approval to help prove the *concept* of UC Ventures

the hard work of putting this together begins now

SLIDE: “Leveraging our competitive advantages”
Deep pool of capital and a long-term investment horizon

privileged access to UC opportunities

UC’s unrivaled network and domain expertise

How do we do more with what we have? How do we become an active participant in what is already a world leader in” … this innovation network

Regent compliments:
No. 1 recommendation by technology innovation group (I think)

Investing in our own discoveries

Regent: Richard Blum
“I don’t want to throw a lot of cold water on this”
We’re not exactly in the venture business, but we’ve done tings like this…

I thnk the university has left things on the table

Lots of companies started in teh university

Inventions done at the universtiy, why didn’t the universities have an interest in these companies for nothing. “We’re entitled to a piece of that company.”

Talks of “Big ideas” at UCB, I think. We pick a few to fund. None have turned a profit yet.

One of your problems is that if a faculty member comes up with an idea, why would (he) care about UC Ventures? Why wouldn’t I go to Kleiner-Perkins who have pros who’ve been doing this forever?

Taking these companies profitable requires a very difficult set of skills

Jagdeep’s answer: I fully agree with much of your observations.
this is a very challenging thing to do.

In two-to three years will be just dipping out toes into this. Long-term plan
=========
Regent: need to understand some of the risk, some of the downsides…what has happened as other universities have tried to do this?

Would we be hiring researchers who are more interested in making money than helping humanity?

Jagdeep” This is a concept right now, and we commit to come back regularly to show how the concept becomes a business plan. we will show how it all evolves.
Harvard and Stanford are doing this, different people trying dif things…early in this concept

“execution and implementation is very VERY important”

“The thought process getting us where we are today has been over three to four months…wanted to share where we are today…meant to be a complement to what else is being done”

UC will partner with venture capitalists
“We want to “crowd-in” to work with the venture capitalists and the companies” not be crowded out

Regent Gavin Newsom:
asked about “conflict of interest” something about SFO
Computer kept buffering…didn’t hear this!

Pattiz:
I love this idea, but that’s when my antenae go up…this has heartbreak written all over it.
Not that it’s not worth doing it…but a very difficult process

“Bureaucratic to the max”

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Learn more about 4-H

By
September 16, 2014 |

Interested in archery? How about arts and crafts? Or cooking, photography, robotics or animals?

Come to a 4-H Information Night on Tuesday, Sept. 30, at 7 p.m. at the Stephens Branch Library, 315 E 14th St., to learn about these and many more things you can do in 4-H, a nonprofit organization open to all children, ages 5–19.

Davis has three 4-H clubs: Golden Valley, Norwood and West Plainfield, and interested children are welcome to join any of them. All three clubs will have representatives at the information night to answer questions.

The Golden Valley 4-H Club holds its community meetings on the first Tuesday of each month, with the first one on Tuesday, Oct. 7, at 7 p.m. in the Birch Lane Elementary School multipurpose room, 1600 Birch Lane. For more information, contact Claire Phillips at (530) 219-5019 or [email protected] or visit goldenvalley4h.blogspot.com.

Golden Valley projects this year include archery, arts and crafts, beekeeping, chemistry, cooking, community service and dance.

The Norwood 4-H Club holds its community meetings on the first Wednesday of each month, with the first meeting this year taking place on Wednesday, Oct. 1, at 7 p.m. in the Holmes Junior High School multipurpose room, 1220 Drexel Dr. For more information, contact Scott Wetzlich at (530) 902-8605 or [email protected] or visit norwood4h.blogspot.com.
This year’s projects include dog care and training, hiking, knitting, leadership, movie criticism, photography and poultry.

The West Plainfield 4-H Club holds its community meetings on the second Tuesday of each month, with the first meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 14, at 7 p.m. in Lillard Hall on Road 95. For more information, contact Kris Lomas at (530) 902-3341 or [email protected]
West Plainfield projects include presentations, public speaking, quilting, robotics, small and large animals, sports and vet science.

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Anne Ternus-Bellamy

Despite FBS foes behind, schedule doesn’t lighten up

By
September 14, 2014 |

UC Davis — thanks to a strong finish last year — shoe-horned itself into a fourth-place tie in the Big Sky Conference, going 5-3 in league after that forgettable 0-4 start.

The Aggie reward? It’s toughest schedule in school history.

Now that the two games with Football Bowl Subdivision foes are behind them, Davis gets a week “off” in preparation for the Sept. 27 visit from No. 2 Eastern Washington.

Stanford and Colorado State were supposed to be the speed bumps, but Big Sky doesn’t get any easier.

KHTK radio personality Doug Kelly — a member of the Aggie trio calling Davis action this year — believes the locals drew the scheduler’s short straw.

“I look at conference having three levels: Eastern Washington, the Montanas and Northern Arizona are up here,” Kelly motions, creating an upper echelon with his hand above his head. “Teams like us, Cal Poly, Portland State, Southern Utah and Sacramento State are in the middle. Then there’s Weber State, Northern Colorado, North Dakota and Idaho (State).

“Have you seen our schedule?” asks Kelly, half laughing, scratching his head.

That top tier Kelly alluded to? UCD gets ‘em all. After EWU comes calling, Montana State (No. 20) visits for Homecoming on Oct. 11. Then it’s off to Mizzoula for No. 4 Montana before traveling on Nov. 8 to Northern Arizona (No. 25).

Cal Poly, who Davis meets in San Luis Obispo on Nov. 15, received votes in the Sports Network Football Championship Subdivision poll, as did Sacramento State (the Aggies’ regular-season final at home on Nov. 22).

“Did you see what some of the other powers have (on their slate)?” added Kelly. “I don’t know who scheduled these…”

The EW Eagles get North Dakota, Northern Colorado and Idaho State in conference. Northern Colorado and North Dakota are in Montana’s future after a nonleague slate that featured South Dakota and Central Washington. Idaho State, Weber State and North Dakota entertain MSU after the Grizzlies warm up with the likes of Black Hills State and Central Arkansas.

Northern Colorado, Weber and North Dakota lowlight the Lumberjacks’ Big West experience.

The Davis cream puffs? Just North Dakota (1-2 and 3-8 last season) and D-II Fort Lewis, a nice confidence-builder on Sept. 6.

So, batten down the hatches. Here comes the serious part of 2014.

Oh, the good news?

UC Davis gets a bye next week: a perfect chance to regroup, get healthy and await Eastern Washington.

The Aggies won’t have to deal with the riggers of a whirlwind road trip and they will have — it hopes — at healthy home crowd behind it.

Calisthenics: It looked great from the stands as UCD players formed a block Aggie C in doing stretching exercises before Saturday’s game. With starters OT Parker Smith (leg) and S Charles Boyett (ankle) watching, the all-white-clad locals looked like they meant business early.

Old friends in a thriller: Two ex-Aggie assistant head coaches — Keith Buckley and Mike Moroski hooked up in classic small-school season opener last weekend.

Pacific University (Forest Grove, Ore.) hosted Idaho in Moroski’s head-coaching debut. The Coyotes made Moroski’s coming out party a winning one, 35-34.

Moroski, the 1979 UCD grad who went on to play QB in the NFL for Atlanta, San Francisco and Houston, was retired coach Bob Biggs’ right-hand man until Bigg’s retired two years ago.

Buckley was Biggs’ assistant before Big Mike. He went to Pacific in 2010, resurrecting a football program that had been dormant for 19 years. Last year’s 7-3 campaign was a watershed season for the Boxers.

On Saturtday, Buckley’s Boys got a bye, while the ‘Yotes (as they’re called in the north) beat Montana Western, XX-X. Ah, that Aggie coaching tree…

 

 

 

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Bruce Gallaudet

Restoring freedom to information in the Freedom of Information Act

By
September 13, 2014 |

Enclosed is an op-ed on FOIA reform by Amy Bennett, Assistant Director of OpenTheGovernment.org. Please let me know if you are interested in using the piece. A photo of the author is available and credit to American Forum is appreciated.

Thanks!
Denice Zeck
American Forum
202-355-8875

——————————

Restoring Freedom to Information in the Freedom of Information Act

By Amy Bennett

Over time federal agencies have flipped the Freedom of Information Act (ACT) on its head. Congress clearly intended the FOIA to be a tool for the public to pry information out of federal agencies. In recent years, however, agencies have blatantly abused opaque language in the law to keep records that might be embarrassing out of the public’s hands forever.

One of the clearest examples of this problem has been playing itself out in court rooms over the last few years as the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has successfully argued against the release of a 30 year old “draft” volume of the official history of the 1961 Bay of Pigs Disaster. There are few records in the federal government that are seen to merit such secrecy. This draft CIA history is afforded stronger protections than the President’s records, or even classified national security information. Members of the public are able to access similar records generated by the White House as early as twelve years after the President leaves office. Even most classified national security information is automatically declassified after 25 years. Yet, the CIA continues to insist that releasing a draft volume of a history of events that occurred more than 50 years ago, and are already generally understood by the public, must be kept secret.

How is this possible? The record can continue to be withheld because it fits under the rubric of the FOIA’s exemption for “inter- and intra-agency records.” While this exemption was originally intended in part in allow agency officials to give candid advice before an agency has made an official decision, agencies have stretched its use to cover practically anything that is not a “final” version of a document. As long as a record meets the technical definition of an “inter- or intra-agency record,” there is nothing the public – or courts—can do to make an agency release it.

Thankfully, Congress has recognized this black hole in the public’s right to know, and has stepped in with a bill that promises to close the loophole and make other changes that would improve the FOIA process. Longtime FOIA champions Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Senator John Cornyn (R-TX) have reached across the aisle to develop and introduce S. 2520, the FOIA Improvement Act. The bill takes the common sense step of requiring agencies to weigh the public interest in the release of an inter- or intra- agency record when considering whether to withhold it, and also puts a time limit of 25 years on the use of the exemption. Far from radically changing how requests are currently processed, this narrowly tailored change to the law would help make sure historical records are available on a timely basis and stem the worst abuses by allowing a court to weigh-in where necessary to make sure records that would show waste, fraud, abuse, or illegality are released.

With trust in government at an all-time low, the public clearly has an appetite for laws that would make it easier to understand what the government is doing and why, and to hold government officials accountable for their actions. The public would also benefit from seeing that Congress can still work in a bipartisan fashion to address issues. Time is running out to make S. 2520 the law during this session of Congress, though.

While the House unanimously passed a bill that included many reforms that are similar to S. 2520 earlier this year, the House bill does not address the problem with inter- and intra-agency records. Once Congress comes back in September, members will have to work across the aisle and across the Capitol Dome to make sure they reach a compromise that can be put on the President’s desk before the session ends on January 3, 2015. This is work Congress can, and must, do to help restore freedom to information in the FOIA.

————————————————–

Bennett is Assistant Director of OpenTheGovernment.org.

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Special to The Enterprise

Pressure bomb photo

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Michael MusialW

Musician and and singer Michael Musial is the featured artist at next Sunday at I-House, set for Sunday, April 26. Courtesy photo

www.facebook.com/amyshumanphoto

The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn (Spencer Alexander) has a conversation with a plant he names "Audrey II" in the Woodland Opera House production of “Little Shop of Horrors.” The plant turns out to be much more than he expected. Courtesy photo

JenniferBorensteinW

Biketrip4 Bike path entranceW

The bike path entrance coming into Davis from the Yolo Causeway is marked with a sign. This part of the path is relatively smooth. Elizabeth Case/ Enterprise photo

12dhs boysLaxW

PasoFinoMapW

A map from Taormino and Associates shows the plans for the Paso Fino development, including eight Canary pines to be preserved on the eastern edge of the property. Courtesy graphic

WendyWeitzelW

Michael Tilson Thomas2W

Conductor Michael Tilson Thomas will lead the London Symphony Orchestra in the March 21 concert at the Mondavi Center. Courtesy photo

ValentinesLai1w2

Taylor Inouye and Tiffanie Lai share a "Giants" love. Courtesy photo

PressureBombW

Courtesy photo

By
September 05, 2014 |

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Fossil fuel companies see the need for climate action

By
September 02, 2014 |

Wednesday, Aug 27 2014 11:01 PM
JOHN REAVES & LEN HERING: Major fossil fuel companies are seeing the need for climate action
Major fossil fuel companies have spent much energy to determine whether the fuels they sell actually cause climate change. The bottom line? They do and, perhaps surprisingly, many of them own up to it and are calling for federal action.
The fossil fuel finding offers another firm reason to move forward to safeguard our future. Even if we’re uncertain of the potential worst effects, we need an insurance policy.
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There is growing concern among these major companies over climate change and a call for equitable federal action.
Shell minces no words: “CO2 emissions must be reduced to avoid serious climate change.” U.S. power provider NRG says, “Global warming is one of the most significant challenges facing humankind.” Major coal user, American Electric Power, also recognizes the problem.
Then there’s ExxonMobil, which according to DeSmogBlog pumped more than $23 million into climate denial groups, including Heartland Institute, from 1998 until a few years ago. ExxonMobil now reports “Rising greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) pose significant risks to society and ecosystems.” Furthermore, BP cites the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports as evidence of climate change. ConocoPhillips says burning fossil fuels can lead to climate disruption. Chevron, Hess, BHP Billiton and Total share these concerns. Most of these companies propose pragmatic policies to combat climate change.
For instance, BP proposes an economywide price on carbon that treats all carbon equally and makes lower-carbon energy sources more cost competitive. Shell wants a strong, stable price for GHG emissions within a comprehensive policy framework. Hess wants all affected parties treated equitably.
ExxonMobil wants a uniform, predictable carbon price and the market to drive selection of solutions. It wants to promote global participation, minimize complexity, and maximize transparency. It promotes a revenue-neutral carbon tax.
BHP Billiton supports broad, efficient, progressively introduced, market-based mechanisms. ConocoPhillips wants market-based mechanisms, investment certainty, and a level playing field among energy sources and countries.
Here’s a road map to consider that is consistent with the warnings and policy preferences of these companies. First, stop doing harm. Where practical, stop investing in fossil fuels and infrastructure that locks in additional GHG emissions for 50 years or more. Then address new energy needs using renewables while stretching our energy budget through efficiencies. Engage in massive energy research to ensure that storage systems, already entering the market, advance quickly, making large amounts of renewable energy available off-hours. Spread the use of geothermal and hydropower to address baseload demands. Finally, extend and fortify electrical grids to connect remote major renewable sources to markets and better integrate distributed energy services.
To make any difference, we must effectively price carbon emissions. A steadily rising, revenue-neutral carbon pollution fee is a most promising overarching policy. Returning all fees to all households would effectively create a progressive fee structure, because two-thirds of households would gain or break even. The dividend protects the least well off in society from harsh impacts and would be stimulative to the economy. Border tariffs would protect our businesses from competition that does not have a fee and therefore prompt other nations to adopt our fee. Consumers would have incentives to make better decisions about energy use, further stimulating innovation.
The International Monetary Fund also has called for a price on carbon: Energy prices around the world “are set at levels that do not reflect environmental damage, notably global warming.” Two bills have recently been introduced that move partly in the right direction: Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MA) (permit for fossil fuels; all returned to households) and Rep. Jim McDermott (D–WA) (permits; 75 percent returned to households; 25 percent to deficit reduction).
The fee and dividend improves on those bills. For several years Citizens Climate Lobby (CCL) has advocated this federal policy. CCL commissioned Regional Economic Modeling, Inc., a highly reputed economic policy forecasting company, to assess the impacts of such a policy. The results are attention grabbing. With $10 added yearly to a carbon fee and 100 percent rebated to households, by the 20th year there would be 2.8 million new jobs, $1.3 trillion boost to GDP, a quarter million lives extended (cleaner air), and 52 percent reduction in carbon dioxide.
Who can’t like an approach where economy and environment both win? The big question is: Will this be enough to make Congress finally act?
John H. Reaves , a San Diego business and environmental lawyer and mediator, was a founding director of the Citizens Climate Lobby. Len Hering, a retired Navy rear admiral, is executive director of the California Center for Sustainable Energy. This article originally appeared in The San Diego Union-Tribune.
and Bakersfield paper

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Special to The Enterprise

Historic Woodland Downtown Business Association plans some fun

By
August 22, 2014 |

Downtown Woodland turns back the hands of time on Saturday, Sept. 6, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. as The Historic Woodland Downtown Business Association partners with Stroll Through History group to take you back to yesteryear. Come see vintage Model A’s presented by the Capitol A’s organization, antique fire trucks beautifully restored by the The Woodland Fire Volunteer Support Branch and farm machinery sponsored by Hiedrick Ag Museum. Plus private collectors will be displaying their own pieces of equipment. This year the HWDBA and The City of Woodland will be closing the street from First Street to Third Street. Downtown merchants will be hosting a sidwalk sale in addition to the farmers market located in Heritage Plaza. With vendor booths and a thriving restaraunt scene including an old fashioned ice cream parlor there is something for everyone to enjoy. Take the family on a tour of a turn-of-the-century opera house in The Woodland Opera House, pose for picture in front of Corner Drug, a business that’s been operating sine the late 1800s, browse through antiques stores or go thrifting. Get there early and join the Kiwanas for their pancake breakfast or just stroll throgh the tree lined streets and enjoy the many victorian homes located in the area. For those wishing to see other beautiful homes in Woodland, tours will be available through The Stroll Through History organization. For more information contact George Rowland president of the HWDBA [email protected]

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Special to The Enterprise

An ounce of nuts daily prolongs life and prevents disease

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Michael MusialW

Musician and and singer Michael Musial is the featured artist at next Sunday at I-House, set for Sunday, April 26. Courtesy photo

www.facebook.com/amyshumanphoto

The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn (Spencer Alexander) has a conversation with a plant he names "Audrey II" in the Woodland Opera House production of “Little Shop of Horrors.” The plant turns out to be much more than he expected. Courtesy photo

JenniferBorensteinW

Biketrip4 Bike path entranceW

The bike path entrance coming into Davis from the Yolo Causeway is marked with a sign. This part of the path is relatively smooth. Elizabeth Case/ Enterprise photo

12dhs boysLaxW

PasoFinoMapW

A map from Taormino and Associates shows the plans for the Paso Fino development, including eight Canary pines to be preserved on the eastern edge of the property. Courtesy graphic

WendyWeitzelW

Michael Tilson Thomas2W

Conductor Michael Tilson Thomas will lead the London Symphony Orchestra in the March 21 concert at the Mondavi Center. Courtesy photo

ValentinesLai1w2

Taylor Inouye and Tiffanie Lai share a "Giants" love. Courtesy photo

PressureBombW

Courtesy photo

HealthNutsW

Studies show that people who regularly eat nuts are healthier than those who don't. Creators Syndicate

By
August 24, 2014 |

Dr. David Lipschitz
Creators.com

Nuts are generally considered bad choices for snacks because they’re so high in calories. It is why experts recommend avoiding cakes or desserts containing a high content of them, and why many of us keep them out of our diets.
But in recent years, more and more information has been indicating the tremendous benefits nuts have on improving health. The most encouraging report showed that adding nuts to your diet either prevented weight gain or promoted weight loss. Researchers have found dieters who consume an ounce of nuts daily are more likely to eat less at supper and, therefore, lose weight.
And now, from a large population study, comes remarkable evidence that nut consumption reduces the risk of heart disease in both men and women by as much as 50 percent. The benefit is so impressive that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is considering a proposal to allow foods containing nuts to state on their labels: “Diets containing an ounce of nuts per day can reduce your risk of heart disease.”
A massive study recently published in The New England Journal of Medicine shows that increasing nut intake also reduces the risk of many chronic illnesses, including heart disease and diabetes. It appears to reduce risk of death, too.
Researchers followed over 75,000 women from 1980 to 2010, and over 40,000 men from 1986 to 2010. Over the 30-year period, compared to those who never ate nuts, those who did once weekly had a 7 percent lower risk of dying, gradually reducing risk even more as they consumed more nuts. For those eating nuts at least once a day, the risk of death was lowered by a remarkable 20 percent. And further analysis revealed significant reductions in the risk of heart and respiratory diseases, diabetes, infections and cancer.
There was some concern at the outset of the study that daily nut consumption could lead to weight gain. The exact opposite turned out to be the case. Those eating nuts most frequently either maintained their weight or lost weight during the course of the study. Nut-eaters were overall healthier: They were less likely to be obese, had lower waist circumferences, lower cholesterols and blood-sugar levels than their counterparts not eating nuts. They also ate less, consumed more fruits and vegetables, and exercised more regularly. For this reason, it’s unclear whether the found benefits of nuts were a result of people committed to healthier lifestyles and living longer being less concerned about their weights and, hence, more likely to eat nuts.
There are many ways nuts promote health. They contain the best polyunsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids, are rich in vitamins, minerals and fibers, and have high concentrations of antioxidants (phenols and phytosterols).
Most experts recommend having an ounce of nuts as a snack in the afternoon and about two to three hours before dinner. They are calorically dense and take a long time to chew. This, in turn, helps promote satiety, as does their high calorie content. Nuts’ high level of fiber also makes you feel full and less hungry at dinnertime. Nuts make it easier to eat prudently, limiting your risk of becoming obese and making a diet program more likely to be successful.
Nuts reduce the risk of heart attacks in a number of ways. Monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids tend to lower cholesterol and decrease the risk of blood clotting. High concentrations of the amino acid arginine promote blood flow, dilate blood vessels and help maintain a lower blood pressure. And high fiber content reduces cholesterol and appears to decrease the risk of diabetes. High fiber and healthy fats in nuts also promote better gastrointestinal function and decrease the risk of colon, breast and prostate cancers.
Like an apple a day, an ounce of nuts will almost certainly keep the doctor away. The most important message you can extract from this information is that the best approach to dieting is not necessarily the consumption of low-calorie foods, but that learning to make the right food choices and eating in the right amounts will lead to a long and healthy life.

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Creators Syndicate

Here are some tips on breaking the junk-food habit

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Michael MusialW

Musician and and singer Michael Musial is the featured artist at next Sunday at I-House, set for Sunday, April 26. Courtesy photo

www.facebook.com/amyshumanphoto

The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn (Spencer Alexander) has a conversation with a plant he names "Audrey II" in the Woodland Opera House production of “Little Shop of Horrors.” The plant turns out to be much more than he expected. Courtesy photo

JenniferBorensteinW

Biketrip4 Bike path entranceW

The bike path entrance coming into Davis from the Yolo Causeway is marked with a sign. This part of the path is relatively smooth. Elizabeth Case/ Enterprise photo

12dhs boysLaxW

PasoFinoMapW

A map from Taormino and Associates shows the plans for the Paso Fino development, including eight Canary pines to be preserved on the eastern edge of the property. Courtesy graphic

WendyWeitzelW

Michael Tilson Thomas2W

Conductor Michael Tilson Thomas will lead the London Symphony Orchestra in the March 21 concert at the Mondavi Center. Courtesy photo

ValentinesLai1w2

Taylor Inouye and Tiffanie Lai share a "Giants" love. Courtesy photo

PressureBombW

Courtesy photo

HealthNutsW

Studies show that people who regularly eat nuts are healthier than those who don't. Creators Syndicate

HealthFoodW

Adding more delicious fruits and vegetables to each meal can help wean people away from junk-food diets. Creators Syndicate photo

By
August 24, 2014 |

Marilynn Preston
Creators.com

If I had my magic wand back — I was carrying it in the Halloween parade and it vanished — I would wave it and shazaam! all processed foods would disappear.
It’s harsh, I know. I love my Sour Cream and Onion Ruffles as much as the next person. But the truth is processed foods — the ones that come in colorful packages or cans with a long list of perfectly legal ingredients stacked under the label — aren’t good for you.
In fact, they’re bad for you. You can discover just how bad in books, videos and all over the Internet. Go there and be educated. It’s no secret that processed foods contain chemicals, additives, preservatives, artificial dyes, flavors, colors and other suspect ingredients that are linked to a variety of health problems. And not in a good way.
It’s not restful to dwell on the known negatives: the weight gain, the strokes, the fatigue, the diabetes, heart disease, cancers, and annoying digestive upsets that then must be addressed with little purple pills.
Instead, I’m going to share a positively intriguing resource for weaning yourself off processed foods, a 14-week plan that should be a required course in schools everywhere.
This step-by-step approach, created by the crusading Lisa Leake for eatLocalGrown.com, consists of mini-pledges that you take week by week, alone or with friends or, best of all, with your entire family.
Each week is another way to experience more real food and less junk. By the time 14 weeks are over, you’ll be closer than ever to eating clean. I’m not saying it’s easy — “the perfect is the enemy of the good” — but the cumulative rewards are remarkable.
When you eat clean, you feel lighter and more energetic. Chances are you’ll lose weight. Aches, pains and other symptoms that sent you to the doctor will lessen and might disappear because,  food is medicine. When you eat the real stuff, your body can thrive and heal itself. For more along these lines, go to Leake’s website 100DaysofRealFood.com and feast on her informative blogs.
And if you’re still not convinced that weaning yourself off processed foods is important, never mind. You’re not ready to change. You have a big fat disconnect between what you eat and how you feel. That’s OK. Your doctor probably struggles with the same problem, since she or he learned next-to-nothing about nutrition in medical school. (How crazy is that?!)
Ready for action? Here’s the challenge:
Week 1: (“I pledge to…”) Eat at least two different fruits and or vegetables — preferably organic — with every meal.
Week 2: Your beverages are limited to coffee, tea, water and milk. Don’t choke. Give it a go. One cup of juice is allowed per week, and wine, preferably red, is allowed in moderation. (Thank you, Lisa.)
Week 3: All meat consumed this week is locally raised. Limit yourself to three-to-four modest servings a week, treating meat as a side dish not the main course.
Week 4: No fast food or deep fried food. (Gulp!)
Week 5: Try two new whole foods you’ve never tried before.
Week 6: Eat no food products labeled as low fat, “lite,” reduced or non-fat.
Week 7: All grains must be 100 percent whole grains.
Week 8: Stop eating when you are full. (This means listening to internal cues.)
Week 9: No refined or artificial sweeteners. No white sugar, brown sugar, raw sugar, Splenda, stevia, agave, corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, brown rice syrup and cane juice. Your food and drink can only be sweetened with modest amounts of honey or maple syrup.
Week 10: No refined or hydrogenated oils. That means no vegetable oil, soybean, corn, canola, organic canola, margarine, grape seed oil.
Week 11: Eat at least one locally grown or raised food item at each meal. That means local honey, eggs, nuts, meats, fruits, vegetables.
Week 12: No sweeteners! Not even honey and maple syrup. (You’ve come this far … you can do it!)
Week 13: Nothing artificial. Avoid all artificial ingredients.
Week 14: No more than five ingredients. Avoid packaged food products that list more than five ingredients, no matter the ingredients.
Week 15: Email me at [email protected] and let me know how well this worked, or, if you insist, how miserable you were.

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Creators Syndicate

Sunflower photos

By
August 21, 2014 |

Those are Maggie’s photos. Here are the cutlines:

Photo by Maggie Burns

Shorter, single-headed female sunflowers grow in front of the branched male flowers in this field east of Winters.

Photo by Maggie Burns

A Turkovich sunflower harvester cuts dried heads from rows of female flowers.

Photo by Maggie Burns

A sunflower harvester pours black sunflower seeds into a waiting truck.

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Special to The Enterprise

The big picture on how to hang heavy art

By
August 21, 2014 |

By Peter Hotton

Readers submitted their questions on the dos and don’ts of hanging artwork. Say something good here.

Q. What’s the best way to hang a picture on a plaster wall? The picture is 20 inches by 24 inches and weighs about 10 pounds.

A. The simplest way (not necessarily the easiest) is the best one. Use picture hooks, sold in hardware stores. They come in several sizes. For your size and weight picture, use large hooks. Make sure there is a wire strung from each end of the picture a few inches down from the top. It’s the hanging wire. Use two hooks whether you are hanging the picture vertically or horizontally. You need two to keep pictures from going askew whenever an 18-wheeler passes by. Do not use any other gadgets that might be available. You can do a good job with only a 2-foot spirit level to make sure the hangers are level with each other.

To determine where the hooks will go, hold the picture against the wall, and mark the hook spots with a pencil. Now, place a 4-by-4-inch piece of duct tape over each pencil spot, and make sure you mark the spot on the tape. Now drive the hooks. They are designed to be nailed at a steep angle. This angle, plus the duct tape, will prevent breaking the plaster, whether is it is truly plaster or plasterboard or blueboard and skimcoat.

Q. What is the best way to prepare and paint a rusted wrought-iron railing?

A. I was looking at my own rusted wrought iron just yesterday when I was pointing brick steps, and this is what I will do. Sand off the rust as much as possible, paint those areas with Rust Reformer, and then spray or brush on one or two coats of Krylon wrought-iron paint.

Q. My daughter bought a house on Cape Cod and found an old mahogany table that was stained red. She tried to paint it. Oh, woe. The red stain bled right through the paint. What can she do?

A. Ah, yes, stained mahogany is virtually impossible to paint without the bleeding. Sanding down to the bare wood probably won’t work because mahogany is open-pored, and any stain gets stuck in the pores forever, it seems. Even heavy sanding and using a stain killer did not succeed on a similar table I had. I ended up resanding to the bare wood, staining it a darker color, and varnishing it.

Q. What do you think of air-duct cleaning? The ducts in my home are for hot-air heat and air conditioning. I don’t know how long they have gone without being cleaned, and I get no bad smells from either the heat or the air conditioning.

A. I think air-duct cleaning is good but expensive. If you don’t know when the ducts were cleaned, chances are they need it. My ducts were 50 years old and there was no smell, but you should have seen what came out of them when they were cleaned. Have them cleaned every 10 years. And make sure to clean out the dryer vent at least once a year: These can fill with lint and cause fires.

Q. I had trouble with my back door. The carpenter installed a new frame that was short, so he used filler pieces, which are coming off. What now?

A. Hoo-boy! You have a carpenter from hell, so get rid of him and find someone who can build a new frame, including jambs and possibly the threshold. If you need a new door, however, you can buy a setup that includes the casing (frame) and threshold.

Q. Any ideas on how to get that ugly green stuff off my shed roof?

A. There are two kinds of “green stuff” on roofs, always on the shady side. I am surprised you didn’t see my earlier columns on the subject, in which I jabbered away on two green things. One is algae, a form of seaweed that is bright green and does not have any form or height; it sits there on the roof. Treat it with a solution of one part bleach and three parts water, or douse it with vinegar, which will kill it. Dead, it does not have to be scraped.

The other, if it has a shape like little dull green plants, is moss, and it must be removed because it can damage the roof. Treat it the same way you would algae, but after it dies, scrape it off with a wood spatula.

And here is how you can keep it from coming back. Buy zinc strips at a hardware store or from a roofer. They are 3 to 6 feet long and 6 inches wide. Slip them under the second-highest row of shingles parallel to the ridge with 2 to 3 inches of zinc exposed. Rain washing over the strips will deliver dissolved bits of zinc down the roof, preventing new growth. This is also effective against mold. The strips will prevent new growth, but will not kill existing green stuff.

Aye, there’s the rug

The Handyman received several complaints after he advised the use of area rugs. The writers said area rugs are accidents waiting to happen, especially for older people, who can trip over the edges.

My reply: Just what are area rugs? To me, they are not scatter or throw rugs, but large ones (8 by 12 feet), padded, and definitely not wall to wall. To guard against tripping, I suggest tacking down the edges. In the future, I promise to write “large area rugs.”

— The Boston Globe

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The Associated Press

Summer veggies were just the first round

By
August 21, 2014 |

By Lee Reich

In the heat of summer, it’s hard to imagine that the weather will ever be cool again. And with dry weather it’s hard to imagine it becoming rainy again.

But of course the weather does change, and you’ve got to plan what vegetables to grow for the cool and rainy days ahead that sap the vitality from tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers and other summer vegetables.

Growing fall vegetables is like having another whole growing season in the garden. Cool weather brings out the best flavor from vegetables such as kale, broccoli and carrots. And the harvest season is long; fall vegetables just sit pretty, awaiting harvest at your leisure. In spring and summer, cool-season vegetables like spinach, radishes and lettuce bolt, sending up a flower stalk and becoming poor for eating if not harvested quickly enough.

Commit yourself
Before beginning to plan for fall vegetables, you need to make three commitments. The first is to maintain soil fertility. Remember, you are getting another growing season out of your garden, so apply fertilizer and liberal amounts of compost or other organic matter to the soil. Fall’s predominantly leafy vegetables are heavy feeders.

Second, don’t forget to water. Seedlings beginning life in summer often cannot get enough water for themselves. Natural rainfall and cooler temperatures eventually will lessen or eliminate watering chores as fall approaches.

And third: Weed. Summer weeds compete with vegetable plants for water, space and nutrients.

Timing is important
To figure out when to sow any fall vegetable, look on the seed packet for the “days to maturity.” Cool weather and shorter days dramatically slow growth as fall approaches, so count on any vegetable being fully grown and ready for harvest around mid-September in northern gardens, and a few weeks or months later the further south you garden.

For vegetables that usually are transplanted, such as broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage, add three weeks, which is how long they need to grow to transplant size.

In northern climes, it’s too late to sow fall broccoli, endive, cabbage, carrots, beets and parsley, all of which need a relatively long season to mature. Mark your calendar for next year.

Enough time remains, though, even in northern regions, for a second wave of planting of such vegetables as lettuce, Chinese cabbage, kale and collards.

Check the days to maturity for Chinese cabbages; there are many varieties, and quicker maturing ones will bolt if sown too early. This sowing of lettuce should be the first of a few. Sow small amounts every couple of weeks and you will have a continuous supply of tender leaves for your salad bowl. Include some extra cold-hardy varieties, such as Winter Density, Rouge d’Hiver and Arctic King.

Vegetables in this second wave of planting for fall might follow your earlier plantings of bush beans or sweet corn, or you can sow in seed flats for transplanting three weeks later. The nice thing about using transplants is that there is no need to plant a whole row at once — you can tuck plants in here and there as space becomes available.

Later this month, when you have gathered up mature onions and perhaps dug up cucumber vines that finally succumbed to bacterial wilt, it’s time for yet a third wave of fall planting. Sow directly in the ground seeds of spinach, mustard, arugula and turnips. Also plant small radishes, the kind you normally sow in spring. And consider trying some offbeat fall greens, such as mache, miner’s lettuce and shungiku, an edible chrysanthemum.

A final sowing, for your soil
The final crop for the fall vegetable garden — sown any time before the end of September — is not for you, but for the soil. This would be a so-called cover crop, usually rye grain or oats, sown to protect the soil from rain and wind, conserve nutrients and improve tilth.

Legumes, such as peas or alfalfa, add nitrogen to the soil via symbiotic bacteria in their roots and garner it from the atmosphere.

A cover crop also looks nice, a verdant blanket over the ground late into fall.

Local seed racks are often cleared out after midsummer. If this is the case, or if you seek varieties that are unavailable locally, you can order seeds by mail.

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The Associated Press

Delays with contractor over, 5th Street striping begins

By
August 5, 2014 |

It seemed all about the left turns Tuesday morning on Fifth Street near F and G streets.

No more scrambling to go west on Fifth Street from F Street, trying to beat

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For eye health page

By
August 01, 2014 |

By Dr. Schrader

Survey Reveals Parents Drastically Underestimate the Time Kids Spend on Electronic Devices

Home and classroom digital device use is up among school-age children; Dr. Wayne Schrader recommends yearly back-to-school eye exams

According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), parents severely underestimate the time their children spend on digital devices. An AOA survey reports that 83 percent of children between the ages of 10 and 17 estimate they use an electronic device for three or more hours each day. However, a separate AOA survey of parents revealed that only 40 percent of parents believe their children use an electronic device for that same amount of time. Eye doctors are concerned that this significant disparity may indicate that parents are more likely to overlook warning signs and symptoms associated with vision problems due to technology use, such as digital eye strain.

Eighty percent of children surveyed report experiencing burning, itchy or tired eyes after using electronic devices for long periods of time. These are all symptoms of digital eye strain, a temporary vision condition caused by prolonged use of technology. Additional symptoms may include headaches, fatigue, loss of focus, blurred vision, double vision or head and neck pain.

“When parents think about their kids’ mobile consumption habits, they often don’t think about how much time they spend on devices in the classroom,” said Dr. Wayne Schrader. “Each year when school starts we see an increase in kids complaining of symptoms synonymous with eye strain. Essentially, they’re going from being home over the summer with a minimal amount of time spent using their devices back to a classroom full of technology, and their time on devices often doubles, leading to a strain on the eyes.”

Optometrists are also growing increasingly concerned about the kinds of light everyday electronic devices give off – high-energy, short-wavelength blue and violet light – and how those rays might affect and even age the eyes. Today’s smartphones, tablets, LED monitors and even flat screen TVs all give off light in this range, as do cool-light compact fluorescent bulbs. Early research shows that overexposure to blue light could contribute to eye strain and discomfort and may lead to serious conditions such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which can cause blindness.

When it comes to protecting eyes and vision from digital eye strain, taking frequent visual breaks is important. Children should make sure they practice the 20-20-20 rule: when using technology or doing near work, take a 20-second break, every 20 minutes and view something 20 feet away. According to the survey, nearly one-third (32 percent) of children go a full hour using technology before they take a visual break instead of every 20 minutes as recommended.

Additionally, children who normally do not require the use of eyeglasses may benefit from glasses prescribed specifically for intermediate distance for computer use. And children who already wear glasses may find their current prescription does not provide optimal vision for viewing a computer screen. An eye doctor can provide recommendations for each individual patient.

The AOA suggests the following guidelines to help prevent or reduce eye and vision problems associated with digital eye strain:

Check the height and position of the device. Computer screens should be four to five inches below eye level and 20 to 28 inches away from the eyes. Digital devices should be held a safe distance away from eyes and slightly below eye level.

Check for glare on the screen. Windows or other light sources should not be directly visible when sitting in front of a computer monitor. If this happens, turn the desk or computer to prevent glare on the screen. Also consider adjusting the brightness of the screen on your digital device or changing its background color.

Reduce the amount of lighting in the room to match the computer screen. A lower-wattage light can be substituted for a bright overhead light or a dimmer switch may be installed to give flexible control of room lighting.

Adjust font size. Increase the size of text on the screen of the device to make it easier on your eyes when reading.

Keep blinking. To minimize the chances of developing dry eye when using a computer or digital device, make an effort to blink frequently. Blinking keeps the front surface of the eye moist.

The AOA recommends every child have an eye exam by an optometrist soon after 6 months of age and before age 3. Children now have the benefit of yearly comprehensive eye exams thanks to the Pediatric Essential Health Benefit in the Affordable Care Act, through age 18.

“Parents should know that vision screenings miss too many children who should be referred to an optometrist for an eye examination to correct vision,” added Dr. Schrader. “Eye exams performed by an eye doctor are the only way to diagnose eye and vision diseases and disorders in children. Undiagnosed vision problems can impair learning and can cause vision loss and other issues that significantly impact a child’s quality of life.”

To find an optometrist in your area, or for additional information on children’s vision and the importance of back-to-school eye exams, please visit www.aoa.org and www.WayneSchraderOD.com.

About the American Eye-Q® survey:
The ninth annual American Eye-Q® survey was created and commissioned in conjunction with Penn, Schoen & Berland Associates (PSB). From March 20-25, 2014, PSB conducted 1,000 online interviews among Americans 18 years and older who embodied a nationally representative sample of the U.S. general population. (Margin of error is plus or minus 3.10 percentage points at a 95% confidence level)

About the Children’s Omnibus survey:
The children’s Omnibus survey was created and commissioned in conjunction with Penn, Schoen & Berland Associates (PSB). From March 24-31, 2014, PSB conducted 200 online interviews from March 24-31, 2014 with children ages 10 to 17. (Margin of error is plus or minus 6.93 percentage points at a 95% confidence level)

About the American Optometric Association (AOA):
The American Optometric Association, a federation of state, student and armed forces optometric associations, was founded in 1898. Today, the AOA is proud to represent the profession of optometry, America’s family eye doctors, who take a leading role in an individual’s overall eye and vision care, health and well-being. Doctors of optometry (ODs) are the independent primary health care professionals for the eye and have extensive, ongoing training to examine, diagnose, treat and manage disorders, diseases and injuries that affect the eye and visual system, providing two-thirds of primary eye care in the U.S. For information on a variety of eye health and vision topics, and to find an optometrist near you, visit www.aoa.org.

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Special to The Enterprise

Ken’s Bike-Ski-Board

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July 16, 2014 |

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University Honda

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July 16, 2014 |

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Special to The Enterprise

List of CSAs

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July 14, 2014 |

1. > Good Humus
2. >Full Belly

3. > Eat Well

4. > Terra Firma

5. > Pacific Star Gardens

6. > Del Rio Botanical

7. >Farm Fresh to You/Capay Organics

8. > Riverdog

9. > Devoda Gardens

10. > The Student Farm

11. > Soil Born

12. >Free Spirit Farm

13. > Say Hay Farms

14. > Heavy Dirt

15. > Shooting Star

16. > Coco Ranch

17. > Steiner College CSA

18. Capay Valley Shop Farmshares- http://capayvalleyfarmshop.com

19. UC Davis Student Farm – http://asi.ucdavis.edu/sf/studentharvest

20. http://thecloverleaffarm.com/

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Elizabeth Case

The Paint Chip

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July 12, 2014 |

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DeBartolo & Co Fine Jewelers

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July 12, 2014 |

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Bubble Belly moms | babies | kids

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July 12, 2014 |

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Tres Hermanas

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July 12, 2014 |

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Special to The Enterprise

All in the Family 2014 – Tres Hermanas

Crary, Evans & SpurginW

Crary, Evans and Spurgin will play at The Palms on Saturday, April 25. From left are Bill Evans, Dan Crary and Steve Spurgin. Courtesy photo

ChathamW

Chatham County Line will perform at The Palms on Wednesday, April 29. Courtesy photo

VocalW

The Vocal Art Ensemble will perform at three different venues, two in Davis, from May 1 to 3. Courtesy photo

www.styush.com

Alina Kobialka will be playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2. The violinist was a prizewinner in Mondavi's Young Artists Competition a few years ago. Her dad, Daniel Kobialka, was a member of San Francisco Symphony for many years. Courtesy photo

Michael MusialW

Musician and and singer Michael Musial is the featured artist at next Sunday at I-House, set for Sunday, April 26. Courtesy photo

www.facebook.com/amyshumanphoto

The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn (Spencer Alexander) has a conversation with a plant he names "Audrey II" in the Woodland Opera House production of “Little Shop of Horrors.” The plant turns out to be much more than he expected. Courtesy photo

JenniferBorensteinW

Biketrip4 Bike path entranceW

The bike path entrance coming into Davis from the Yolo Causeway is marked with a sign. This part of the path is relatively smooth. Elizabeth Case/ Enterprise photo

12dhs boysLaxW

PasoFinoMapW

A map from Taormino and Associates shows the plans for the Paso Fino development, including eight Canary pines to be preserved on the eastern edge of the property. Courtesy graphic

WendyWeitzelW

Michael Tilson Thomas2W

Conductor Michael Tilson Thomas will lead the London Symphony Orchestra in the March 21 concert at the Mondavi Center. Courtesy photo

ValentinesLai1w2

Taylor Inouye and Tiffanie Lai share a "Giants" love. Courtesy photo

PressureBombW

Courtesy photo

HealthNutsW

Studies show that people who regularly eat nuts are healthier than those who don't. Creators Syndicate

HealthFoodW

Adding more delicious fruits and vegetables to each meal can help wean people away from junk-food diets. Creators Syndicate photo

TresHermanas2W

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July 11, 2014 |

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Fleet Feet Sports

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July 04, 2014 |

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Special to The Enterprise

The road left unpedaled: Davis looks to take advice from the best cycling knowledge in the world

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June 26, 2014 |

Soon, Davis residents may be biking like the Dutch.

With one of the highest bicycle-friendly ratings of any American city by the exacting League of American Cyclists, Davis has few places left to look for new bicycling standards but abroad.

Far away from sunny Davis, the Dutch and Danish have built cycling empires throughout their road networks tested over decades. The Swedes have their “Vision Zero” — just adopted by New York City — to radically ensure the fewest number of traffic-related deaths as humanly possible.

Their advice is sought after worldwide, they tend to advise what is, in America, vastly unfamiliar kinds of roadway solutions and Davis has been instructed by the City Council to seek out their vision on specific pieces in Davis’ East Covell Corridor Plan.

City Councilman Brett Lee convinced his colleagues to direct city staff to seek out the Dutch Cycling Embassy on April 22 to address where the best location and design of grade separated crossings would be at the Cannery development and the East Covell Corridor Plan.

Lee said in an interview that his motivation was not purely to seek out international advice, but instead noted experts.

“We were talking about $14 million,” he said, adding that a then-estimated $25,000 cost on the front end to ensure the designs would work was quality control.

“When Davis needs some advice on bicycle connectivity, I think in Holland and in Denmark they are leaders,” Lee said. “If we picked a random U.S. city out of a map, we would be ahead of them.”

Lee raised the issue after he determined that neighborhood meetings made the prioritization of projects, and not experts.

“The people taking the leadership should be the architects and engineers,” he said. Lee worked for many years as a project engineer himself. “I f we were planning on making a $100,000 improvement, we wouldn’t need outside experts to come in.”

Lee cautions that Davis doesn’t have to have a Dutch system, but the community can gain from the transfer of knowledge.

Davis has been talking with the Dutch Cycling Embassy for months, and could sign a contract with a member agency sometime in the near future, according to Dave “DK” Kemp, Davis active transportation coordinator.

 

 

 

 

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City wrestles with tax idea, water rates

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June 19, 2014 |

The City Council took on a new tax measure and water rates at a study session Tuesday, coming to no final conclusions but seeming to figure out where each other’s positions are staked out.

The council zeroed in on wanting to pay for roads, sidewalks and refurbish existing community pools with any money it might get from a parcel tax or a general tax, such as a surcharge on utility bills, but it couldn’t provide much direction to city staff on exactly what kind of tax it would like and how long a life it would have.

On water rates, the council split.  Mayor Pro Tem Dan Wolk and Mayor Joe Krovoza want the Utility Rate Advisory Committee to focus on a pay-as-you-go conservation rate authored by residents Donna Lemongello and Matt Williams that would peg only 13 percent of its charge on fixed rates, leaving the rest up to how much water is used.

Brett Lee and Lucas Frerichs had concerns about tiers being unfair and wanted more information from city staff about how much money someone who used no water would be charged and the ease of finding financing for a largely volume-based rate, instead of a rate with a substantial fixed rate.

Newly-re-elected Councilwoman Rochelle Swanson was on vacation with her family and Councilman-elect Robb Davis, who sat in the audience and will be sworn in July 1, did not offer his views of specific tax measures or water rates during public comment. Mayor Joe Krovoza presided over one of his last public meetings as a member of the City Council.

 

 

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Notes on Made in Yolo

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June 14, 2014 |

Made in Yolo notes and assignments

Linda and Kim (Kim, I’m only telling you because this affects a couple of your interns):

(Other assignments to make: 

* Farm to fork (side bar with CSAs, farm tours)

* Service orgs…profile R&R, new location, money to mental health; STEAC, Davis Community Meals; Team Davis (pull from Thomas’ LL story) — Rachel

* High tech story…Bio Consortia story from Jason McAlister

* RIKI profile on Ursula Labermeier who designs most (all?) fashions for the store. Crystal Lau

* Davis Live Music Collective story: 22 members so far, people pay quarterly to attend concerts; grew out of house concerts; sold out a recent show at the Vets Memorial; performers are people you’d pay to see but couldn’t sell out a big show. Feature on who they’ve brought to town, who they will bring. Danny Tomasello involved, Kyle Monhollen is the leader. Landon Christenson
Debbie and I brainstormed some stories for Made in Yolo, and here’s what we’ve come up with. 

1. A lengthy farm-to-fork story that touches on many aspects. Assigned to Elizabeth:

Farmers markets are huge in this area (Davis, UCD’s, Woodland Healthcare, Sutter should all be mentioned, maybe just in a box, or maybe as a segment of the story.

Some details can be found in the following press release, and I grabbed a couple briefs about Sutter and Woodland Healthcare’s farmers markets (below that). 

Also, Monticello Bistro in town is a farm-to-fork restaurant, and Ann Evans and Georgeanne Brennan are columnists for us who might be good to interview (pioneers for this movement in the area, and Ann Evans is a co-founder of the Davis Farmers Market…). We have a story in WordPress about the Farmers Market cookbook that Evans and Brennan wrote, in case that offers any info.

—————

From press release for Yolo Farm to Fork (Jan. 7)

Yolo Farm to Fork is pleased to announce the appointment of Davis resident Beth Harrison as the nonprofit’s first executive director. Harrison brings more than 15 years of strategic leadership and nonprofit management experience to the organization.

“Beth Harrison comes to us with experience, energy and commitment to our mission and is a person of exceptional skills, both personally and professionally,” said Yolo Farm to Fork’s president, John Mott-Smith. “With a passion for farm-to-fork programs, she is perfectly suited to guide our organization’s continued growth and development.”

Having served in senior positions with large and small organizations based in the United States and abroad, Harrison’s expertise encompasses food and health, education, the arts, international development and the political landscape. She has managed fiscal operations and led and directed marketing communications, organizational fundraising and development, capacity building, media and public relations, and education outreach.

“I am thrilled to combine my professional background with my passion for good food, health, education and recycling, and to be an integral part of the continued growth and implementation of Yolo Farm to Fork’s programs,” Harrison said in a news release.

Yolo Farm to Fork has been providing farm and garden-based education, increasing local farm-fresh foods in school meals, and reducing sold waste through recycling and composting with the flagship and nationally recognized Davis Farm to School program for 13 years. The organization also recently initiated Kids Dig It garden-learning programs in Woodland schools.

“Over the years we have made enormous strides developing grants that have primarily supported Davis schools,” Mott-Smith said. “We have expanded our mission and are launching farm-to-fork-related initiatives throughout the county, as well as sustaining our current programs.

“Our leadership now represents many of the communities in Yolo County, including Davis, Woodland, West Sacramento, Winters, Capay and Clarksburg. We are confident in Beth’s ability to lead our growth at such an exciting time.”

In 2014, Yolo Farm to Fork will continue its landmark programs and present the fifth annual Tour de Cluck in May and the 10th annual Village Feast in August. To begin the new year, the organization is launching three new, groundbreaking initiatives: Harper Harvest, Taste Our Garden and Futures.

For the Harper Harvest project, broccoli and lettuce being grown at Harper Junior High on East Covell Boulevard in Davis will be served in Davis school lunches. School garden programs will be reimbursed for the 2,400 broccoli plants that will be harvested in February by volunteers.

The Taste Our Garden initiative, sponsored exclusively by Sutter Davis Hospital, will provide 10 grants to schools, with the highest priority being those where 50 percent or more students eligible for free or reduced-price meals.

The Futures program, supported by Orchard Hill Family Fund, will fund six schools to expand edible garden programs that will include a curriculum coach to help garden coordinators integrate garden learning activities into classroom instruction.

“I am honored to be selected as Yolo Farm to Fork’s executive director, especially at this defining moment in the organization’s history,” Harrison said. “I have seen the deep personal commitment that these dedicated professionals and volunteers have to Yolo Farm to Fork’s compelling mission and I share their profound sense of purpose.

“We are geared up and ready for significant expansion in 2014 and in the years to come.”

For more information, visit www.yolofarmtofork.org.

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Farmers market returns to Woodland Healthcare (May 28)

The Woodland Farmers Market returns to the lawn of Woodland Healthcare’s Cancer and Neurosciences Center, 515 Fairchild Court, from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays, beginning next week. The market, which continues every Tuesday through Aug. 26, is made possible by a donation from the John and Eunice Davidson Fund.

A Saturday farmers market takes place at Heritage Plaza, Second and Main streets in downtown Woodland.

Locally grown fruits and vegetables will be available for purchase at each market. The market accepts WIC coupons and Cal Fresh EBT cards, plus debit and credit cards as well as cash.

For information, contact Mora at 530-666-2626 or visit woodlandfarmersmarket.com.

============

Sutter farmers market (May 14, 2013)

The Sutter Davis Hospital Farmers Market will reopen Thursday and will continue from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursdays through Aug. 29, at the hospital’s entrance at 2000 Sutter Place in West Davis.

Opening-day festivities include cooking demonstrations and tastings, face time with Dinger and Sacramento River Cats players (bring your cameras), giveaways, plus a market filled with farm-fresh produce, local honey, baked goods, flowers, plants and garden starts.

The hospital’s market accepts EBT cards, WIC and senior coupons. Shoppers with no cash in hand also can purchase market scrip using debit or credit cards.

=======================

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FD: Fit Food: For Father’s Day, prosciutto poppers recipe

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June 06, 2014 |

By Sara Moulton
What to do on Father’s Day when it’s time to eat and you want to serve something manly and filling? Other than steak, that is. Here’s a nominee that re-engineers a classic sports bar appetizer — jalapeño poppers.
Standard jalapeño poppers are thumb-sized hot peppers stuffed with cream cheese and cheddar cheese, then breaded and deep-fried. Yummy, but most home cooks aren’t too excited for the mess of deep-frying.
That’s why there also is a baked version — half a jalapeño stuffed with cheese and wrapped in bacon. Both types are delicious, but neither is all that healthy. After all, we want to keep Dad around for a while.
So my version delivers guy’s-guy gratification without overdoing it.
From a culinary point of view, jalapeño poppers make complete sense. Nothing tames a chile’s heat like dairy. That’s why so many cultures serve their fiery entrées with dairy as a side dish. The Mexicans team up spicy tortillas with crema. The Indians serve hot curries with yogurt-based raita. And that’s why cheese is right at home in a jalapeño popper.
But it doesn’t have to be high-fat cheese. The fresh goat cheese in this recipe delivers the required creaminess, while a very modest amount of Parmigiano-Reggiano delivers the required flavor.
I brightened up the filling with scallions and lemon zest, then wrapped the stuffed jalapeño in prosciutto, my substitute for bacon. Though it has a lot less fat than bacon, prosciutto boasts big pork flavor. And when it’s baked, as it is here, it’s nice and crispy, which eliminates the need to coat the pepper with breadcrumbs.
A couple of tips for preparing the jalapeños. First, be sure to wear rubber gloves when you’re halving and gutting the peppers. No matter how macho you’re feeling, you don’t want those capsaicin oils burning your hands. Also, use a grapefruit spoon, if you have one, to remove the pepper’s innards — its ribs and seeds — which are the hottest parts of a chile.
Then serve it to the big guy with pride. He’ll never notice that many of its typical ingredients have gone AWOL.
Baked Prosciutto-Wrapped Jalapeño Poppers
Start to finish: 45 minutes (30 minutes active).
Servings: 6
Ingredients
4 ounces fresh goat cheese
1 ounce grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
¼ cup finely chopped scallion greens
2 teaspoons grated lemon zesthttp://www.willitsnews.com/ci_25885683/fit-food-fathers-day-prosciutto-poppers-recipe#
Page 2 of 3 Jun 05, 2014 11:06:05AM MDT
6 jalapeño peppers
3 ounces (12 slices) prosciutto
Directions
Heat the oven to 450 F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil, then coat it with cooking spray.
In a medium bowl, combine the goat cheese, Parmigiano-Reggiano, scallion greens and lemon zest.
Halve the jalapeños lengthwise and carefully remove the ribs and seeds (wear rubber gloves if necessary
to protect your hands). Stuff each half with the cheese mixture, being sure to use all of the cheese
mixture.
Wrap 1 slice of prosciutto around each stuffed jalapeño half, overlapping the ends of the prosciutto on the
bottom of the jalapeño. Arrange the poppers on the prepared baking sheet, then bake on the oven’s
center rack until the prosciutto is slightly crispy, about 15 minutes.
Nutrition information per serving: 110 calories; 60 calories from fat (55 percent of total calories); 7
g fat (4 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 25 mg cholesterol; 2 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 10 g
protein; 540 mg sodium.

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The Associated Press

Prosciutto popper photo

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June 06, 2014 |

Baked prosciutto-wrapped jalapeño poppers use fresh goat cheese for the required creaminess, while a very modest amount of Parmigiano-Reggiano delivers flavor. (Matthew Mead, The Associated Press)

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The Associated Press

YOLO notes (May 2014)

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May 08, 2014 |

REMEMBER FACEBOOK AS A PLACE TO FIND PHOTOS

“Flexibetical” listing…All As together, Bs together, etc.

Cover photos: main art should be Yolo County Fair, with a fireworks photo, pumpkin patch and bikes

USE “Courtesy photo” for all the shots from non-Enterprise photographers

=============
JUNE:
Downtown trick or treat
Earthquake festival
Public pools
Stroll through history
Yolo county fair
Movies in the Park
fun runs to include turkey trot write-up (from first edition)
check festivals
Impossible Acres pumpkin patch (from first edition)

JANUARY:
Davis Double Century
Ride 200 miles in one day through Yolo, Napa, and Lake counties on the most popular and one of the best supported double centuries in California. Always the 3rd Saturday in May.

Whole Earth
Scottish Games
Capay Almond Festival, Black history Day in Capay,
Pence Gallery Garden Tour
Picnic Day

Misc notes about 2014 #1
Picnic Day needs to be its own entry
Grand Fondo and Double Century should be in bike events

Misc notes about 2014#2
Add Dock Store to Sudwerk
Add Third Space events/activities — include Art Theater of Davis

============
9/25/13
(from Debbie)
This would be good to hold on to for a future YOLO magazine piece (if you wanted something longish) or Welcome. It’s a great wrap-up of local agricultural stuff. It’s running as a guest opinion piece tomorrow.

By Alan Humason
When it comes to Sacramento’s Farm to Fork initiative, Yolo County is all in. How could it be otherwise?

Yolo County is the farm to Sacramento’s fork. This fact goes well beyond supplying produce and proteins to Sacramento restaurants. Here’s how:

Yolo County is one of the most diverse farming regions in the nation, producing several hundred commodities including tomatoes, wine grapes, rice, a variety of grains, almonds and walnuts, olives, honey and, of course, our signature sunflowers. In addition, Yolo County is one of the nation’s leaders in the highly technical world of seed research and development.

Yolo County is the home of leading nonprofits such as the Center for Land Based Learning — dedicated to creating the next generation of farmers through its California Farm Academy — and Yolo Farm to Fork — a leader in expanding local school nutrition and education programs.

Yolo County Supervisor Don Saylor’s visionary Farm to Every Fork initiative — embracing Yolo Food Connect, Yolo County Farm Bureau and other progressive groups — means to address food security, distribution and nutrition issues in myriad ways.

We have wonderful farmers markets in Woodland, West Sacramento and most famously in Davis.

Yolo County is home of Farm Fresh To You (by Capay Organic), perhaps the largest Community Supported Agriculture service in Northern California; they even have a presence in San Francisco’s Ferry Building, the Taj Mahal of Bay Area markets.

In fact, there are several CSA providers based in Yolo County. You can find them via Harvest Hub Yolo, an online resource created by Yolo County Agricultural Commissioner John Young, connecting numerous farm producers to the general public. Another unusual outlet for locally grown produce from small family farms is the online Capay Valley Farm Shop.

Yolo County isn’t “small potatoes.” We help to feed the world, exporting to 95 countries from Afghanistan to Yemen.

Our county is home to three dozen olive oil producers, many of them award winners, such as Bondolio in Winters, gold medal winner at the 2013 New York International Olive Oil Competition. We can also lay claim to the new, state-of-the-art olive mill press owned and operated by Séka Hills in Brooks.

On the dining scene, Yolo County has its share of farm-to-fork restaurants: Kitchen428 in Woodland, Seasons and Monticello Seasonal Cuisine in Davis, and The Eatery in West Sacramento, just to name a few.

Yolo County wines are undeniably outstanding; you can find them in Clarksburg, Davis, Winters and the Capay Valley. Several have been picked for the Legends of Wine event at the state Capitol. What’s more, the dessert course at the Tower Bridge dinner will feature Yolo County wines exclusively.

Yolo County farms and vineyards host tours and events throughout the year in our gorgeous countryside. In just this October, you can enjoy the Hoes Down Harvest Festival at Fully Belly Farm, the Palate Project at UC Davis, Fresh Press Weekend — a Roots to Wine event — throughout the county and the annual Taste of Capay.

We claim UC Davis and the Robert Mondavi Institute for Food and Wine Science. Enough said.

Yolo Arts in Woodland sponsors an innovative program called the Art & Ag Project, connecting artists, farmers and the community, stressing the importance of preserving farmlands and the visual arts, culminating in a top-flight art show this fall. This program is so good, it has been recognized by the National Endowment for the Arts.

I could go on, but you get the idea. You can find out more when you visit the Yolo County booth at the Farm-to-Fork Festival on Saturday in Sacramento.

But to really taste, experience and savor the farm of the farm-to-fork movement, come to Yolo County; you’ll love it here.

— Alan Humason is executive director of the Yolo County Visitors Bureau.

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Afraid to camp? Nothing to fear but fear itself (Hold for Tanya)

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May 16, 2014 |

By Solvej Schou

Growing up in Los Angeles, I loved camping.

My family and I regularly escaped the city’s concrete sprawl for California’s wilder edges, driving deep into the desert or high up into the mountains. We’d set up a tent and plunk down sleeping bags, each trip a dusty, if slightly smelly, adventure.

Then something changed. As an adult, I stopped camping. Though still an avid nature-lover and hiker, I didn’t want to abandon the modern perks of home — roof, electricity, bed! — or similarly equipped hotels.

This year I decided to break that 15-year-long camping drought. I joined my stepmother, sister, aunt, uncle and Danish father, who has averaged three camping trips a year since he moved to California in 1977, on a three-day camping excursion in Pinnacles National Park, south of San Jose. The experience turned out fun, freeing and easier than I thought it would be.

Here are five things you might be worried about when it comes to camping, along with ways to cope.

Sleeping
Forgoing a comfy mattress for a sleeping bag may not sound appealing, but there are ways to lessen the ick. Driving to a campground versus hiking in means you can stuff your vehicle with provisions — including a tent you can stand up in for maximum comfort.

The taller the entrance to your tent, the less it affects your back. Then make sure to have a self-inflating mattress, like a Therm-a-Rest, or an air mattress you can inflate with a pump. Slip it under your sleeping bag to avoid the sleepless scenes from “The Princess and the Pea.” Another option is a collapsible camp cot.

Camping in spring and summer means using lighter rectangular sleeping bags stuffed with synthetic material. When it’s cold, go with a down-filled mummy-shaped sleeping bag that cinches around your face. I also found bringing a bedroom pillow helped. It smelled and felt like home.

Unplugging
These days some commercially operated campgrounds offer Internet access. But if you’re heading to wilderness-type parks, depending on location, you may not even have cellphone service.

You can always bring an external battery pack and angrily play Candy Crush for hours, but that really defeats the purpose of being outdoors. I did bring my excellent Jackery Fit portable battery pack, but only to make sure my iPhone was charged enough to take photos during hikes into Pinnacles’ winding mountain caves.

Channel the great naturalist Henry David Thoreau, and remember that the internet will still be there later. Play cards, eat, drink, breathe in fresh air, hike, build a campfire and enjoy the company of others — in person instead of online.

Critters
You love food, and so do animals, including squirrels and bears, whose sense of smell overshadows ours and who may find your fragrant dinner supplies irresistible. Just remember: They want your food, not you.

Never leave trash, toiletries, dirty dishes, food or drinks unattended. Don’t leave trash and open containers in your car or around the campsite. Look for metal lockers to store trash and food onsite. Keep your tent zipped up, and keep in mind that bugs and birds also enjoy nibbling on half-eaten peanut butter sandwiches, so don’t give them the chance.

As for ticks and mosquitoes, insect repellent works. For major bug phobias or when biting insects are thick, outdoor supply stores and websites sell inexpensive, lightweight mesh jackets that you can zip yourself into — including your hands and face if need be.

Bathrooms and electricity
You can live without electricity, a full-length mirror and private bathrooms without sacrificing hygiene or general spiffiness.

Most developed tent campgrounds you can drive to have communal bathrooms with running drinking water, sinks and showers, but check in advance. Pretend you’re at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, strap on a floppy hat and embrace a wind-swept, natural look.

Try gas- or battery-powered lanterns for preparing food and hanging out in the evening. A headlamp works well for midnight bathroom runs and as a makeshift night-light hung in a tent.

Meals
Leaving your smoothie blender home doesn’t mean you can’t have delicious food while camping.

Get a decently sized cooler that can keep your food cold for a few days before the ice needs to be changed out, and a small basin to wash dishes. Bring a propane gas-powered camp stove with one or two burners. In campgrounds with grills, you can fire-roast anything from portobello mushrooms to zucchini. At night my family and I made gooey s’mores.

“Approach camping as an adventure with possibilities of new experiences of fun, and the possibility of challenges,” my dad told me. “Camping gives you a sense of togetherness in a natural environment you’re not usually in, that you end up enjoying together.”

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The Associated Press

Ads are for real: Buick gets double takes

By
From page A9 | April 25, 2014 |

The television ads where neighbors, friends and family can’t identify a new car as a Buick are true to life.

The attractive styling on a 2014 Buick Regal test car so stumped admirers, many could not believe it was a Buick. The common question was, “What kind of car is that?” — even as they stared at the Buick and Regal badges.

Still others couldn’t believe the 2014 Regal only has four-cylinder engines. In fact, a newly improved, direct injected, turbocharged four cylinder is offered on every trim level for 2014 and delivers a commendable 259 horsepower and 295 foot-pounds of torque.

2014 Buick Regal GS AWD

Base price: $29,690 for base Regal FWD; $31,560 for Premium I FWD; $31,865 for base Regal AWD; $33,735 for Premium I AWD; $33,760 for Premium II FWD; $35,935 for Premium II AWD; $36,905 for GS FWD; $39,270 for GS AWD

Price as tested: $44,275

Type: Front-engine, all-wheel drive, five-passenger, mid-size sedan

Engine: 2-liter, turbocharged/intercooled, double overhead cam, direct injection, inline four cylinder

Mileage: 19 mpg (city), 27 mpg (highway)

Length: 190.2 inches

Wheelbase: 107.8 inches

Curb weight: 3,981 pounds

Built at: Oshawa, Ontario, Canada

Options: Driver confidence package #2 (includes adaptive cruise control, automatic collision preparation) $1,695; power moonroof $1,000; driver confidence package No. 1 (includes forward collision alert, rear cross traffic alert, lane departure warning, memory settings for front seats and outside mirrors) $890; Crystal Red tintcoat exterior paint $495

Destination charge: $925

Subtly restyled with new light-emitting diode headlights and infotainment display for 2014, the Regal can come with front- or all-wheel drive. New safety features, such as cross traffic alert when the vehicle is backing up out of a parking space, are added to the equipment offerings. Plus, every Regal includes two years/24,000 miles of free scheduled maintenance.

Best of all, the 2014 Regal earned top, five out of five stars overall in federal government crash testing.

It’s also a recommended buy of Consumer Reports magazine where predicted reliability is average.

Starting manufacturer’s suggested retail price, including destination charge, is $30,615 for a base, front-wheel drive, 2014 Regal with 259-horsepower, turbo four cylinder and six-speed automatic. The lowest starting price for a 2014 Regal with all-wheel drive is $32,790, or $2,175 more. And the top, Regal GS has a starting retail price of $40,195 for 2014. But it does not include a power moonroof. That’s $1,000 extra.

Competitors include other premium, front-wheel drive sedans with four-cylinder engines.

As an example, the 2014 Acura TSX sedan has a starting MSRP, including destination charge, of $31,620 with 201-horsepower four cylinder and automatic transmission. The TSX, however, is not available with all-wheel drive.

Meantime, the front-wheel drive, 2014 Volvo S60 with 240-horsepower, turbocharged four cylinder and automatic transmission has a starting retail price of $34,225. The lowest starting MSRP, including destination charge, for a 2014 S60 with all-wheel drive is $35,725.

The Regal tester, a top-of-the-line GS AWD model with six-speed automatic, looked good in its tasteful Crystal Red Tintcoat paint and 19-inch alloy wheels. The car had a rich appearance and was visually interesting even on the sides, where door panels have an attractive sculpting line.

Fit and finish on the test car was excellent, too, with gaps between exterior metal body panels small in size and well aligned.

The car impressed with its quiet passenger compartment and overall handling, no matter which of three drive control modes it was in.

In standard drive control, the ride was the most compliant for daily commutes or leisurely weekend drives. It was definitely not harsh but still felt well-controlled.

The GS mode setting — activated by a button near the top of the dashboard — made the throttle more responsive, stiffened the ride and increased the steering effort needed. This setting worked well to manage body lean of the car as it traveled twisty mountain roads. The increased steering effort fit well, too, with the well-sized and tactilely pleasing steering wheel.

In between standard and GS drive settings is a sport mode with its own button on the dashboard. But in the test car, it wasn’t easy to notice much change in this middle setting, and the test car spent much of its time in standard or GS.

The Regal’s 2-liter, direct injected turbocharged four cylinder engine worked so smoothly, some passengers didn’t recognize a turbo was under the hood. Power was strong and steady, with just a hint of a lag as maximum torque of 295 foot-pounds hit by 2,500 rpm. The peppy, yet refined performance is good, considering the Regal GS AWD weighs nearly 4,000 pounds. Buick reports this model has a 6.8-second time from 0 to 60 miles per hour.

The 2014 Regal GS FWD with six-speed manual transmission — yes, Buick offers a manual on the Regal — is fastest, with a 6.2-second time.

Fuel economy isn’t as high as might be expected in this mid-size sedan. The federal government rates a 2014 Regal GS AWD model with automatic at just 19 miles per gallon in city driving and 27 mpg on the highway. The test car averaged 18 mpg in city driving and not quite 24 mpg on the highway with a lot of spirited driving.

Premium fuel is suggested but not required, and the Regal’s 18-gallon fuel tank — which can provide a combined city/highway range of less than 400 miles — can cost nearly $70 to fill with mid-range gasoline at today’s prices.

At less than 16 feet long from bumper to bumper, the Regal feels right sized, and the tester was agile and easy to park.

The back seat, with 37.3 inches of legroom and 36.8 inches of headroom, looks smaller than it is. Smaller stature adults at the outboard seat positions back there found decent space for feet and legs if front seats were moved up a bit on their tracks. The middle spot, however, is tight when three adults are back there. And the middle person has to contend with a sizable hump in the floor.

Trunk space in the Regal is 14.2 cubic feet, just a tad more than the 14 cubic feet in the TSX.

The 2014 Regal with automatic transmission is among the General Motors Co. vehicles recalled this month because a cable in the transmission may disengage from the shift lever. If this occurs, the driver may be unable to put the Regal into “park,” creating the risk the car could roll away.

 

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Pleasants/Hoskins

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April 10, 2014 |

The Pleasants/Hoskins “Joyful Ranch” will be the site of the May 1 Winters History Symposium. Courtesy photo

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Special to The Enterprise

Winters history photo

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April 10, 2014 |

The picture is from the Vacaville Museum collection, showing the earliest fruit growers in Solano County. The people in the picture have their age following their names, and in parenthesis the year they arrived in this area. The picture was taken April 29th, 1894 at the James M. Pleasants ranch in upper Pleasants Valley to celebrate the 85th birthday of J.M. Pleasants.

Front row, Left to Right, John Reid Wolfskill, 90 (1836); M.R. Miller, 76, (1849); James Madison Pleasants, 85 (1849); J.R. Collins, 67, (1849); and G. W. Thissell, 65, (1850)
Back row, Left to Right, William James Pleasants, 60, (1849); E.R. Thurber, 68, (1850); Richardson Long, 74 (1849); and Edwin C. Rust, founder of the Winters Express in 1884.

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PD 2014: Past themes

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April 03, 2014 |

Every year, the Picnic Day board of directors selects a theme to reflect the mission and vision of that year’s Picnic Day. The theme is incorporated into many of the events at Picnic Day, especially the Picnic Day Parade.

2013 – Snapshot
2012 – Then, Now, Always
2011 – Rewind
2010 – Carpe Davis: Seizing Opportunities
2009 – Reflections: 100 Years of Aggie Legacy
2008 – A Kaleidoscope of Voices
2007 – Making Our Mark
2006 – Celebrate Today
2005 – Live on One Shields Ave.
2004 – Shifting Gears for 90 Years
2003 – Rock The Picnic
2002 – Open Mind, Open Door
2001 – Aggies Shine Together
2000 – Life’s A Picnic
1999 – Moo-ving Into the Future
1998 – Breaking New Ground
1997 – UC Davis Outstanding in It’s Fields
1996 – Carrying the Torch of Tradition
1995 – Down To Earth
1994 – Students Shining Through
1993 – Faces of the Future
1992 – Moovin Ahead
1991 – Catch the Spirit, Building a Better U
1990 – Shaping Our Environment with Diversity, Tradition and Style
1989 – Challenging Our Future Today
1988 – Progress Backed By Tradition
1987 – On The Move
1986 – Reaching New Heights
1985 – Setting The Pace
1984 – Celebrating Excellence: UCD’s Diamond Anniversary
1983 – Meeting the Challenge
1982 –
1981 – ’81 A Vintage Year
1980 – Decade Debut
1979 – Aggie Energy
1978 – Davis Directions
1977 –
1976 – UCDiversity
1975 – Hay Day
1974 – Cycles
1973 – The Farm Mooves
1972 – Remember the First
1971 – Memories of the Past… A Challenge to the Future
1970 – Blowing in the Wind
1969 – Freewheeling & Friendly
1968 – Know Your University and 100 Years Later
1967 – Farm
1966 –
1965 – Aggie Country
1964 – Today’s Aggie Family
1963 – Aggie Jubilee
1962 – Kaleidoscope ’62
1961 – Workshop for the World
1960 – Foundations for the Future
1959 – U-Diversity
1958 – Showcase of Progress
1957 – Campus Cavalcade
1956 – Aggie Milestones
1955 – Future Unlimited
1954 – California Cornucopia
1953 – At Home
1952 – Preview of Progress
1951 – Harvest of Science
1950 – Cavalcade of Agriculture
1949 – Research Makes the Difference
1941 – We Are Still Behind the Plow
1940 – Agriculture, the Nation’s Foundation
1937 – Cal Aggies, Farmer better living, partners in Agricultural progress
1936 – Be entertained
1935 – Agriculture Ahead
1934 – 25 years ago
1933 – A New Day in Agriculture
1930 – Twenty Years Ago in Agriculture
1928 – Look Beneath the Surface
1923 – Follow the Sign

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Enterprise staff

PD 2014 Campus Rec events (from online newsletter)

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April 02, 2014 |

PICNIC DAY CENTENNIAL
The 100th Picnic Day is right around the corner on April 12, and Campus Recreation and Unions is ready to celebrate! Here’s a sneak peak at what our units have planned.
Activities and Recreation Center (ARC): Open house, 11 a.m.–4 p.m.
Cal Aggie Marching Band: CAMB will strut their stuff in the Picnic Day parade, 8–10 a.m. Catch them again at the Arboretum during Battle of the Bands, 2–10 p.m.
Craft Center: Open house, noon–3 p.m.
Equestrian Center: Open house, noon–3 p.m.
Games Area: Arcade open 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Bowling and billiards available 5–11 p.m.
Outdoor Adventures: Open house, 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Check out the new facility and learn about the exciting activities and classes offered in spring.
Sport Clubs: Sport Clubs will host the Men’s Waterpolo Alumni Game, 9–10 a.m., and the Women’s Waterpolo Alumni Game, 10–11 a.m., at Hickey Pool.

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PD 2014: Parade marshals from UCD website

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March 29, 2014 |

Hal & Carol Sconyers
The centennial Picnic Day Board of Directors is pleased to introduce this year’s parade marshals – Hal & Carol Sconyers and Sandy Holman. We believe that these individuals exemplify what it means to have Aggie Pride and spirit through their pivotal contributions and roles on the UC Davis campus. These individuals have helped make Davis what it is today.

For their part, Hal & Carol Sconyers have proven that that they both are true Aggies. Having both graduated from Davis, the Sconyerses now reside at the University Retirement Community just a mile from campus. Hal graduated from UC Davis in 1952 with a degree in Agronomy from the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He initially enrolled at Davis as a veteran using the G.I. Bill to pay for his tuition. When Hal first came to Davis in 1948, he registered as a pre vet major; this was the same year that UC Davis’ School of Veterinary Medicine opened. Carol began her time at Davis in 1951 as a Home Economics major. While at Davis, Hal was a part of the Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity. Hal and his then new wife, Carol, were both on the Alpha Gamma Rho float as a part of the 1952 Picnic Day parade.

Through his studies in agronomy at UC Davis, Hal was able to gain experience in making farm loans at a major bank in Sacramento, which started him on a long career in financial services. This would lead him to becoming the founding CEO and President of the Modesto Banking Company (MBC). After spending many years in the banking industry in Modesto, the Sconyerses made their return back to Davis in 1994. It was at his desk in the the MBC bank that Hal received a call from a UC Davis development officer asking for his financial support of the Alpha Gamma Rho room in the soon-to-be built Walter A. Buehler Alumni Center; it was the building of the Walter A. Buehler Alumni Center that catalyzed his & Carol’s return.

It was during this return that the Sconyerses both fell in love with the Davis community and campus for a second time. Hal was on the California Aggie Alumni Association board for four years, from 1991 to 1995. He also served on the UC Davis Foundation board from 1995 to 2001. It was through such contributions that started the now successful CAAA. The Sconyerses were also very great friends with the fifth chancellor of UC Davis, Larry Vanderhoef. When Chancellor Vanderhoef initially started his tenure, one of his goals included a campaign to create a performing arts center on campus. The goal was to bring world-class performers to Davis students and surrounding communities. After hearing his plans, the Sconyerses became very instrumental in bringing the idea into fruition. They were on the early steering committee and helped raise the initial seed money for what is now the Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts. When the facility was being built, they were able to participate in hardhat tours and were present on the opening night and very first performance at the Mondavi Center. Carol took a particularly large role at the Mondavi Center. She was the President of “Friends of UC Davis Presents” for a year before it became the “Friends of the Mondavi Center,” which she led for 2 years. To this day, the Sconyers continue to take an active role in the arts. They volunteer as ushers at matinee shows at the Mondavi Center.

In addition to their aforementioned contributions, the Sconyerses have contributed to UC Davis’ Intercollegiate Athletics, the Cal Aggie Marching Band, UC Davis Medical Center, Graduate School of Management, as well as both CAAA and CA&ES scholarship programs. Hal & Carol also still attend UC Davis sport games on a daily basis – always cheering for their favorite Aggie team! It is through such contributions and reasons that the 100th Picnic Day Board of Directors is excited to have them as this year’s parade marshals. Through this nomination, the board feels we are celebrating the Sconyerses for their many contributions to UC Davis as a great institution.

Sandy Holman
Sandy Holman has also proven to display Aggie pride through her admirable work. She graduated from UC Davis in 1987 as a Psychology major. With her degree, Sandy was able to work with the two things that she loved in life – people and writing. All of her experiences would eventually lead to her starting the Culture Co-Op. While at Davis, Sandy took an active role on campus through her multiple jobs, including a job at the Tape Lab, where students could rent out tapes of lectures, as well as was on the volleyball team. While at Davis, Sandy was also able to meet her husband, who is also a fellow Aggie alumnus. Next year, they will have been married for 25 years!

After graduation, Sandy began to write on the side, which eventually culminated to her publishing many books that have been nationally and internationally circulated. She found a great interest in the interactions between people and how that is sometimes manifested through prejudices and biases. It was her goal to fight such prevalent social injustices through her work, which was aided by her experience in dealing with different groups of people. It is Sandy’s goal to counteract these social injustices, which would result in people realizing their fullest potential.

After working several jobs, which included interacting with children, Sandy started the Culture Co-Op in 1991 as a way to fight against hate. It is her hope that she leaves a legacy that “encourage[s] people to love themselves and others and to share power and resources in the world.” In addition to spearheading the Culture Co-Op, Sandy also served on the board at the International House for 3 years. While on the board, Sandy collaborated on the International Festival, which brought three thousand people in its first year. The focus of the festival is to bring different cultures of many countries to the people of Davis for a day as an educational experience.

Through her work in fostering diversity and community at Davis, the 100th Picnic Day Board is very proud to nominate Sandy Holman as the other parade marshal for this centennial celebration. It is our belief that through Sandy’s continued and past work, such feelings of unity are felt throughout the UC Davis campus and in the city of Davis.

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Honda Smart House

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March 22, 2014 |

MAK Design+Build is proud to announce the opening of the Honda Smart Home US, a showcase for environmental innovation on the UC Davis campus in the West Village net-zero neighborhood. This demonstration home is a showcase for cutting edge green living and transportation technologies.

MAK designed the interior spaces and provided sustainability consulting for interior details including fixtures, appliances, furniture and finishes. All furnishings and finishes were selected to maintain the highest levels of indoor air quality and minimize environmental impact. Efficient plumbing, lighting, and appliance selections will reduce the consumption load for the life of the house. Beautiful finishes and furnishings ensure that the home is as enjoyable as it is healthy and responsible.

Other local businesses involved with the project include Davis Energy Group, Monley Cronin, Cunningham Engineering, and the California Lighting and Technology Center.

The Honda Smart Home US is located at 299 Sage Street in the West Village area of campus and will be open for public tours on March 25 from 12 pm to 4 pm. The house will be open again Friday, March 28, Saturday March 29, and Sunday March 30 from 11 am to 4 pm. More information is available at http://www.hondasmarthome.com/.

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Ski camp notes

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December 01, 2013 |

As part of the Davis High School ski team for three seasons, junior Davis Perez has regularly heard coach Bob Brewer say at the last meeting of the year, “If you really want to improve your skiing, consider going to race camp this summer.”

So Davis, his younger brother, Tate, and five of their friends took Brewer’s advice to heart and booked spots at Timberline Summer Snow Race Camp at Mt. Hood, Ore.

(Details about ski camp)
So what can one expect at summer ski camp?

Timberline Summer Snow Race Camp (http://www.timberlinesnowcamps.com/)

So who else attended ski camp?

Ski team kids as well as kids who want to be on the DHS team getting a head start. Besides then-seventh-graders Tate Perez and Kyle Powell, two of this year’s freshman racers, Josh Lovell and Jackson Lutzker attended last summer.

National license plates from many of the 50 states; but international skiers … heard Russian, Japanese, and kids skied beside members of the Canadian Olympic team.

2,100 lift tickets sold on Monday (looks far less crowded)

32 stayed with Timberline that we used….Major benefit is it’s the only race camp with lift line-cutting privileges.

You can stay at the Timberline Lodge, recognizable as the exterior of “The Overlook Hotel” from The Shining, or rent a place. Talk about our place and how the kids loved it.
Kids who stayed at camp did afternoon activities…Mt. Hood Adventure Park, rafting on XXX river,

Can demo skis in Govt. Camp

Daily videoing gets done, and at the end of the ski day, students sit with their instructors to go over the day’s footage…instructor analyzes footage with skiers. Send a DVD home at the end of the camp.

From Timberline website:

Quality coaching from our experienced and dedicated staff provides participants with an optimal training experience. Our emphasis during Performance Camps is on gate training for Giant Slalom and Slalom. This camp is ideal for both the beginner racer and the very experienced competitor. Summer race camp is the perfect opportunity to focus on fundamentals and make changes that will make you faster for the coming season. Groups are divided based on age and ability.

Details about the cabin/recreation in the area

Entertainment in the area…Alpine Slide (name of that park?), Portland not too far (look this up) and a jet boat along the Willamette River. Huckleberry milkshakes!

(move this lower)
My husband, Steve, and I assumed we’d have the week off to do whatever we wanted while the kids were at camp, but our older son approached us and asked if we’d consider renting a place near ski camp for the group of friends (with Steve and I as chaperones). Long story short, we opted for that rather than having the kids lodge at Timberline.

Once we got to Mt. Hood, we knew several other Davis students who attended camp and stayed at the lodge, and those we talked to reported enjoying it. But our guys were very happy having the cabin as a home base.

The lodge, it should be said, is the famous Timberline Lodge, recognizable as the exterior of “The Overlook Hotel” from Stephen King’s horror movie, “The Shining.”

Tyler Powell:

3. The conditions were very icy in the morning, then got to a good condition of snow after an hour of skiing. The rest of the day was slushy!

4. My coach was very awesome! They went to the personal level, learning your name and wanting to help you ski better.

Tyler Powell
========
Joel Almeida:

6. The best part was probably the alpine slide, that was crazy. We originally had planned to spend some of the day there and most at the other part of the amusement park but we ended up going back to it because it was so fun. It probably never would have been allowed in California; there were no safety regulations like helmets, which made it way cooler. I almost fell out a couple of times, but I never did, so the risk just made it better. Getting air on it was also awesome.
5. I would do absolutely do it again, no question about it. I don’t know if I would do it if I wasn’t gonna be in the cabin with my friends, though. That was the best part, because while our coach, Ben, was great, the conditions of the mountain weren’t. While it was nice to be skiing in the summer, it wasn’t very good skiing. There were no trees, no powder, just the icy, salty, steep race course. However, being with friends and getting to go do crazy awesome things like the alpine slide and riverboat tour was super cool, and it was good to get the practice in for the next season. (That sorta answered some of the other questions too I guess)
========
Timberline notes:

Timberline Summer Snow Race Camp (http://www.timberlinesnowcamps.com/)

Ski team kids as well as kids who want to be on the DHS team getting a head start (Lovell, Lutzker)

National license plates from many of the 50 states; but international skiers … heard Russian, Japanese, and kids skied beside members of the Canadian Olympic team.

2,100 lift tickets sold on Monday (looks far less crowded)

32 stayed with Timberline that we used….Major benefit is it’s the only race camp with lift line-cutting privileges.

You can stay at the Timberline Lodge, recognizable as the exterior of “The Overlook Hotel” from The Shining, or rent a place. Talk about our place and how the kids loved it.
Kids who stayed at camp did afternoon activities…Mt. Hood Adventure Park, rafting on XXX river,

Can demo skis in Govt. Camp

Entertainment in the area…Alpine Slide (name of that park?), Portland not too far (look this up) and a jet boat along the Willamette River.

Daily videoing gets done, and at the end of the ski day, students sit with their instructors to go over the day’s footage…instructor analyzes footage with skiers. Send a DVD home at the end of the camp.

Huckleberry milkshakes!

From Timberline website:

Quality coaching from our experienced and dedicated staff provides participants with an optimal training experience. Our emphasis during Performance Camps is on gate training for Giant Slalom and Slalom. This camp is ideal for both the beginner racer and the very experienced competitor. Summer race camp is the perfect opportunity to focus on fundamentals and make changes that will make you faster for the coming season. Groups are divided based on age and ability.

AGE 10 AND UP (younger age possible with approval)

OVERNIGHT C