Friday, April 18, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
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April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

In less than four years, students in the little Ghanain

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
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UCD admits record number; 4,284 from abroad

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April 20, 2014 | Leave Comment

UC Davis has offered admission to 24,550 out of 60,536 applicants of freshman standing, both record figures, as it continues marching toward its 2020 Initiative growth goals.

That includes offers to 4,284 foreign students — second-most in the UC system to only UC San Diego’s 5,080, according to preliminary statistics released on Friday.

UCD expects to enroll about 5,200 freshmen for fall.

The campus has offered admission to a greater percentage of students from of all three applicant pools: 5.1 percent more Californians — and slightly more than 33 percent more higher-paying students from outside of the state and outside of the country.

UCD’s overall admission rate increased to 40.6 percent, up from 39.4 percent. The average grade point average for those admitted remained about the same as last year — 4.07 compared to 4.08 — while the average SAT or converted ACT score improved to 1950 from 1932.

UCD offered admission to:

* 17,813 of 46,808 California applicants, or 38.1 percent — that’s up from 37 percent in 2013 but down from 44.5 percent as recently as two years ago, when UCD admitted 18,922 in-state students;

* 4,284 of 9,390 international applicants, or 45.6 percent — that’s more than double both the number who applied and were admitted two years ago. It extended offers to 47.4 percent of international applicants last year, 52.3 percent in 2012.

* 2,454 of 4,338 out-of-state applicants, or 56.6 percent — that’s almost 1,000 more admitted than 2012 and a growing percentage, as well, when compared to 54.6 admitted last year and 53.1 two years ago.

UCD’s 2020 Initiative seeks to expand  the campus by 5,000 students and 300 faculty and 600 staff by decade’s end. More out-of-state tuition money will foot most of the bill. Next year, in-state students will pay an estimated $13,896 in tuition and fees — $22,878 less than nonresidents.

The racial and ethnic makeup of California residents admitted to the Davis campus has continued to shift, with greater percentages of Asian and Hispanic/Latino students: 41.5 percent and 21.1 percent, compared to 40.8 and 19.1 percent, respectively, in 2013.

The percentage of white students admitted fell from 32.4 to 29.7. The percentage of admitted students who are black  (2.8 percent), American Indian (.7) and Pacific Islanders (.2) remained about the same.

Also up are the percentage of admitted Californians who are:

* first-generation college students, to 35.3 percent (compared to 32.8 percent in 2013),

* from low-income families, to 31.8 percent (28.9 percent)

* from low-performing schools, 19.4 percent (17.9 percent).

The University of California admitted 2.2 percent fewer in-state students, while systemwide percentages climbed for both international students climbed, by 28.5 percent, and out-of-state students, by 14.3 percent.

UC Berkeley and UCLA admitted the lowest percentage of applicants, at 17.3 and 18.2, respectively — including less than one in every five in-state students. UC Merced admitted the largest percentage: 64 percent overall, 65.9 percent of Californians.

Students admitted have until May 1 to return their statement of intent to register.

Also on Friday, UCD was set to release admissions decisions for 14,400 transfer applicants. It plans to enroll about 3,200 of them.

The UC system plans to open up its application period two months earlier this year, on Aug. 1. Applications remain due from Nov. 1 to 30.

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
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Bob Dunning:

BobDunning2W

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From page A2 | April 20, 2014 | Leave Comment

It’s no surprise that city officials want us to vote “Yes” in June on the proposed “half-percent” sales tax increase that is mistakenly being billed as a “half-cent” sales tax increase.
As such, members of the Davis City Council are free to write op-eds or letters to the editor or one-sided ballot arguments or offer their opinions at forums, coffees and neighborhood gatherings. They can even send out glossy, full-color brochures if they wish.
The only thing they can’t do is spend your dime or my dime on such activities.
Some folks are convinced that is exactly what’s happening. One of them is my friend Bill, who writes: “I am a homeowner and resident in the city, and my wife and I just received our water bill.”
I hope yours was less than mine, Bill.
“What surprised us was that tucked in with our city utility bill was what amounted to a piece of campaign mail in favor of Measure O.”
Same story here, Bill, but I must say, I wasn’t surprised. The city wants desperately for Measure O to pass.
Bill goes so far as to suggest that the city’s mailing may violate FPPC rules against using public money to advocate for ballot measures.
In other words, while the city is free to use public dollars to send out basic information, it can’t advocate on one side or the other for something that people will be voting on.
One of the measuring sticks the FPPC uses in determining whether a public agency has stepped over the legal line is the use of “argumentative” language.
For my money, given that we’re within two months of an election, any mailing from the city detailing what will or won’t happen if Measure O does or doesn’t pass is highly suspect.
If city officials wish to convince us that Davis will become Woodland if we don’t vote “Yes” on Measure O, they should form a campaign committee, solicit donations and send out as many doom-and-gloom scenarios as they wish.
While the city will no doubt claim the mailer deals simply in facts, many of those “facts” scream for a rebuttal from those who oppose this measure.
The mailer is titled “Bringing the City Budget to You” and gives the council a serious pat on the back in the opening sentence that begins “As stewards of public funds, we are committed to maintaining financial responsibility of public services.”
Notice the positive buzzwords – stewards, committed, responsibility, services – in that one short sentence. The council is clearly made up of outstanding, committed, responsible stewards who are trying to bring wonderful services to us all.
Argumentative? If you’re on the other side of this issue, those are fighting words. But I doubt it will do much more than raise an eyebrow or two at the FPPC.
“Despite spending cuts and reductions over the last few years, projections show a budget shortfall for the general fund.”
Naysayers will ask how spending a million dollars to study taking over PG&E represents a cut in spending.
Noting projections that show a $7 million shortfall by 2018-19, the mailer goes on to claim “While the city continues to improve efficiencies, the city must secure additional revenue streams to avoid cuts to services like police, fire, parks and recreation and infrastructure maintenance.”
Note the words “the city must secure additional revenue streams.” Concentrate on that word “must”. Straight facts or a one-sided argument? Or something between those two extremes?
Adds my friend Bill “The timing of this piece less than two months before the election makes this city-paid mailer” a campaign piece.
On that we can agree. But I doubt the FPPC will give it more than a wink and a nod while applying its “See No Evil” stamp of approval.

Reach Bob Dunning at bdunning@davisenterprise.net

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Saylor Thomson letter

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April 20, 2014 | Leave Comment

Debbie

Please print this letter from Jim Provenza, Helen Thomson and me as space allows. Thanks.

————————————–

Dear Friends:

Each of the three of us has worked on behalf of the children of Yolo County for many years. As former school board members we value the importance of education in our communities. We’re aware of the challenges and the obstacles we must overcome to provide a quality education to every child.

That is why we’re supporting Dr. Jesse Ortiz for County Superintendent of Schools. Dr. Ortiz has a lengthy track record of working for better schools, improved learning environments for children and for reaching out to ensure disadvantaged children have an opportunity to learn.

Dr. Ortiz’ professional background is extensive and relevant to the wide array of needs of Yolo County students. After serving in the United States Marine Corps, Dr. Ortiz earned his Bachelors of Arts Degree from San Jose State, a Masters in Social Work degree from Sacramento State University and a Doctorate in Education Administration from Brigham Young University. His professional education experience includes service as a counselor, school social worker, and administrator in the Elk Grove USD, the North Sacramento USD, and the Santa Clara and Sacramento County Offices of Education. He has also served as a dean, instructor and counselor for both the Los Rios and Yuba Community College Districts, where he now works. Jesse holds a K-12 Administrative Credential, a K-12 and Adult Education Pupil Personnel Services Credential, and several Community College Teaching credentials.

Dr. Ortiz understands and works collaboratively with elected Boards. He currently serves as a Trustee of the Yolo County Board of Education. He also served for ten years as a Board Member and President of the Board of Trustees for the Woodland Joint Unified School District.

Dr. Ortiz has a record of effective commitment to Yolo County communities as a board member for the Yolo County Special Olympics, the Yolo County Health Council, the Yolo County Multicultural Council, and the Yolo Family Resource Center. He’s also volunteered as a referee and coach for a variety of youth sports. Most recently he spearheaded an effort to raise money for homeless children placed in foster homes.

We agree with his priorities. As a candidate for County Superintendent of Schools, Jesse Ortiz has laid out a clear plan for improving Yolo County schools by:

o Providing preschool for all children

o Ensuring all third-graders are able to read at or above grade level

o Encouraging parent-to-school engagement

o Creating college partnerships

We hope you will join with us in supporting and voting for Dr. Jesse Ortiz as County Superintendent of Schools. His nearly four decades of exemplary public service to local school children set him apart. We believe in our local schools. We think there is no higher priority than ensuring that all children have an opportunity to learn and to grow. We encourage you to vote for a candidate with a proven record of accomplishment and dedication right here in Yolo County.

Signed,

Helen Thomson – Jim Provenza – Don Saylor

Former Davis School Board Members

————————

Don Saylor
Yolo County Supervisor, District 2

www.donsaylor.org

For County Business, please contact:

dsaylor@yolocounty.org
(530) 757-5557

For personal, non-county business, please use:

ddsaylor@gmail.com

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Kindness of Strangers

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April 20, 2014 | Leave Comment

Dear Editor,

As a Davis resident for 19 years, I take the camaraderie in this town for granted. I take for granted the easy nod and smile, through forays in Farmers Market and through walks in the greenbelts. But behind this is a kindness that was brought home to me vividly last evening when I tripped and fell head first on a concrete sidewalk in front of Davis Swim and Fitness in South Davis. Through my shock, dizziness, and excruciating momentary pain, I felt strong hands straighten me and hold me firmly, strangers placing an ice-pack to my bleeding forehead, making me sip water, talking gently amongst each other and thereby calming me immensely, and waiting with me while my husband rushed to get the car and take me to the ER.

To Mary S, Rachel J, Farrah G, Mary J, who helped me, a complete stranger, with such deep kindness, I cannot thank you enough. But I can always use you as role models for how to help another in need.

Thank you so much.

Poornima Balasubramanyam

Davis

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Ajay Dev vigil cutline

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April 20, 2014 | Leave Comment

Supporters of Ajay Dev of Davis take part in a vigil Friday outside the 3rd District Court of Appeal building in downtown Sacramento, where an appeal of Dev’s 2009 conviction on charges that he sexually assaulted his adopted daughter is currently under consideration. Dev’s appellate lawyer contends that “grievous errors” made during the Yolo Superior Court trial resulted in the conviction, for which Dev currently is serving a 378-year prison sentence. The Yolo County District Attorney’s Office has defended its handling of the case.

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April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
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April 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

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Criminal Defense Lawyers group supports Beronio

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April 16, 2014 | Leave Comment

Debbie: Here’s a short press release for you. Please note that there are number of local attorneys from the office of the public defender who support Janene. However, they are not permitted to use their titles as “deputy public defender” in their endorsements. So please simply refer to them (as I have done below) as criminal defense lawyers. Thank you! Dave

*************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

The Beronio for Judge Campaign announced today that a number of local criminal defense attorneys have formed a group called “Criminal Defense Lawyers for Beronio” to support her campaign for election as Yolo Superior Court Judge. Campaign Senior Adviser and spokesman Judge Dave Rosenberg said, “Janene’s campaign has been endorsed by a large number of local prosecuting attorneys as well as local defense attorneys. It’s really a remarkable thing to receive such levels of support from both sides of the aisle – at bottom, it’s a testament to Janene Beronio’s record of fairness and equal treatment.”

Yolo Superior Court Commissioner Janene Beronio is a candidate for election to the Yolo Superior Court. The election is June 3. Beronio has served as a Superior Court Commissioner for Yolo County for the past 25 years, and is supported by all the Yolo Judges, both active and retired, and a wide spectrum of practicing attorneys and citizens throughout the county.

Head of the Yolo County Conflict Defense Panel J Toney will co-chair the Criminal Defense Lawyers for Beronio, and said today, “It’s hard to imagine anyone better qualified to be a Superior Court Judge. Commissioner Beronio is meticulous and compassionate. She is extremely fair to both sides. Her experience as a former deputy district attorney and long-time Court Commissioner will allow her to be an effective Judge from her first day on the Bench.”

Also co-chairing Criminal Defense Lawyers for Beronio is long-time local criminal defense attorney Martha Sequeira who said, “Lawyers who defend people accused of crime simply want Judges who know the law, who listen, who are courteous and calm on the Bench, and who will give fair and equal treatment to all sides. Janene Beronio has done that as a Commissioner and will do that as a Judge.”

Co-chair Rodney Beede, another long-time local criminal defense attorney will also co-chair. Mr. Beede added the following, “In my 35 years of criminal defense I have come to trust Commissioner Beronio to give a fair, thorough review to my clients. I look forward to relying on her wisdom and experience as a great addition to the Yolo Superior Court Bench.”

Other members of the steering committee for Criminal Defense Lawyers for Beronio are criminal defense lawyers Amber Posten, Chuck Pacheco, and Jenny Stoneburner.

A seventh major Yolo County law enforcement organization has endorsed Yolo Superior Court Commissioner Janene Beronio in her election for Yolo Superior Court Judge, her campaign announced today. “This is an unprecedented clean sweep of every local law enforcement association in Yolo County,” said campaign spokesman Judge Dave Rosenberg.

The new endorsement comes from the UC Davis Police Officer Association. In a letter to Commissioner Beronio, Association President Rob Sotelo said, “It is with my expressed delight that I share with you that you have the full support of the UC Davis Police Officer Association as you run for the judicial seat for the Yolo County Superior Court.”

Yolo Superior Court Commissioner Beronio now has the endorsement and support of the following seven local law enforcement associations:

Davis Police Officers Association
UC Davis Police Officer Association
West Sacramento Police Officers’ Association
Winters Police Officers Association
Woodland Professional Police Employees Association
Woodland Squad Club of the California Highway Patrol
Yolo Deputy Sheriffs Association

Commissioner Beronio has also received the endorsement of the Davis Professional Firefighters Local #3494, a public safety association, as well as Yolo County Sheriff Ed Prieto and Yolo County District Attorney Jeff Reisig.

“Getting the support of public safety employees from every city in this county, plus UCD and the sheriff’s deputies is gratifying and appreciated,” said Commissioner Beronio. These men and women work in the criminal justice system every day, and are often in court. I welcome their support.”

Yolo Superior Court Commissioner Janene Beronio is a candidate for election to the Yolo Superior Court. She has worked as a Yolo Superior Court Commissioner – a judicial officer position – for the past 25 years, and has garnered the support and endorsement of every Yolo County Superior Court Judge, both active and retired, in her campaign for election.

# # # # #

Family law practitioners in Yolo County have formed a support group on behalf of judicial candidate Janene Beronio, her campaign committee announced today. The new group is called “Family Law Attorneys for Beronio” and will be co-chaired by long-time local family law lawyers Alexandra Fullerton and Bill Kopper.

“Family law attorneys throughout Yolo County support Yolo Court Commissioner Janene Beronio for election as our next Yolo Superior Court Judge. There is so much emotion and turmoil in the family law arena, and we who practice in that area every day know that Janene Beronio brings the calm demeanor, the steady hand, the agile mind, and the kind heart that is needed for a family law Judge,” said Ms. Fullerton.

“No other candidate for Judge brings such a lengthy, broad and deep level of service and experience to this campaign,” said Mr. Kopper. “Family law attorneys in this county are not looking for an advocate on the Bench. We are looking for an experienced neutral. There is no better choice than Commissioner Janene Beronio.”

Other family law attorneys on the steering committee of Family Law Attorneys for Beronio include: Raquel Silva, Yasmin Spiegel, Brian Pakpour, Sarah Orr and Chuck Jensen.

Due to the announced retirement of Yolo Superior Court Judge Steve Mock, there will be an election for Judge on June 3. Yolo Superior Court Commissioner Janene Beronio is a candidate for election to this judicial position. She has over 25 years’ experience as a Court Commissioner, all for the Yolo Superior Court. In addition to Commissioner Beronio, three attorneys have also announced that they are running for the position of Yolo Superior Court Judge.

# # # #

# # # # #

Enterprise staff

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Weather spotter training 4/30

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April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Beth Gabor, Manager of Public Affairs
April 16, 2014 (530) 666-8042 [w] ▪ (530) 219-8464 [c]

Weather Spotter Training April 30
(Your spotter reports can help Yolo County prepare when severe weather occurs!)

(Woodland, CA) – The Yolo County Office of Emergency Services and the National Weather Service want to train you to become a weather spotter on Wednesday, April 30, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in Marsh Hall at Esparto High School, located at 17121 Yolo Avenue in Esparto.

Storm spotters play a valuable role in the severe weather warning process. The National Weather Service relies on visual observations from spotters to provide critical information that would otherwise not be available to forecasters. Spotter reports are combined with data from doppler radar and satellite pictures to provide a complete understanding of severe storms and their impact on the public.

During the free training, sponsored by the Yolo County Office of Emergency Services, future weather spotters will learn:
How to observe, recognize and report severe weather;
What severe weather types are experienced in the Yolo County area;
How to volunteer for Project SKYARM™ to help keep local communities safe;
Severe weather safety tips; and
Operations of the National Weather Service

Spotter guides, cloud charts and severe weather pamphlets will be provided to potential new weather spotters, as well as applications to become a volunteer weather spotter. Once an application is received, a spotter number I assigned and an information packet sent.

There will also be opportunity during the training to discuss and join the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network – a unique, non-profit, community-based network of volunteers of all ages and backgrounds working together to measure and map precipitation (rain, hail and snow) across the U.S.

For more information and to RSVP, contact Eric Kurth (eric.kurth@noaa.gov) with the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Sacramento.

###

Beth Gabor, Yolo County Manager of Public Affairs
625 Court Street, Room 204
Woodland, CA 95695
Phone: (530) 666-8042
E-mail: beth.gabor@yolocounty.org
Website: www.yolocounty.org

ü Please consider the environment before printing this email.

Enterprise staff

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New short-range facility to aide Aggie, El Macero golfers

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April 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

A short-game practice facility that is expected to be a feather in the cap of the UC Davis golf program will be constructed at El Macero Country Club.

Construction, due to begin in two weeks, will be funded by alumni, families and friends of the Aggie men’s and women’s links teams. It will cost $250,000 and be maintained by the club, according to outgoing El Macero General Manager Rich Riffle.

“(Men’s coach) Cy Williams has been the force behind this,”  says Riffle, adding his club’s members also will have access to the facility. “It really solves both of our needs … making it a world-class destination for UCD recruits.”

To be called the Aggie Short-Game Training Center, the layout will feature chipping, bunker and pitching areas that can provide “every type of short-game shot.”

A wedge range — with multiple targets at varying distances — and two putting greens also are part of the project.

Riffle says the facility will be built between the first and 10th holes near Putah Creek.

Both Aggie golf programs call El Macero their home course and Williams says “other golf courses and golf teams will definitely want to emulate this.”

“Currently, when we practice, we are very limited in our ability to get on a real green and hit chips and pitches because of the high traffic of golfers on the course,” Williams explained. “This state-of-the-art training facility gives us a dedicated short-game area where we can go out and spend hours working on the shots that ultimately make the most difference in a round of golf.”

UCD women’s coach Anna Temple weighed in:

“This facility is not only a tremendous tool for the development of our current student-athletes, but is also an asset in recruiting great players to come and compete for UC Davis. It’s a huge step in continuing the excellence of Aggie golf.”

“This facility is clearly a win-win for El Macero Country Club and the UC Davis golf programs,” CC Board member Bob Bullis says. “We share a goal to provide membership and collegiate golfers the best possible facilities that we can. This will enhance an already wonderful course.”

Bullis retired as senior associate athletics director of UCD in 2009.

Two Northern California powerhouses — Stanford and California — have benefitted mightily from their short-game practice facilities.

In 2004, the Cardinal began construction of their layout and three years later won the National Championship. The Golden Bears — who have made five straight trips to the NCAA final eight — opened their short-game set up in 2008.

“Last year, (Cal) had arguably the best season in the history of college golf,” pointed out Williams, who noted his Aggies from 2005-10 “beat Cal seven times … since then we’ve beaten them only once.”

Cal lost to Illinois in the 2013 match-play semifinals in Atlanta.

Cal’s short-game facility at Metropolitan Golf Links cost $500,000 and the school pays $40,000 to maintain it, according to Williams. At El Macero, the country club will maintain the site.

Notes: Donations to the men’s golf program are accepted by Williams and should be payable to UC Regents with “UC Davis Men’s Golf Development Fund” on the memor line. Send donations in care of Coach Cy Williams, 3314 Monterey Ave., Davis. …Golfweek ranks UC Davis women 41st in the land; the men are 65th. El Macero Country Club is managed by Troon Prive, which, among other courses, also runs Fieldstone CC (Delaware), Silver Creek (San Jose), Cranbourne South (Australia) and London’s Bearwood Lakes Golf Club.

Bruce Gallaudet

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Tom Adams seeks Davis school board seat

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April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

Longtime Davis resident and parent Tom Adams is one of the applicants seeking the appointed seat on the Davis school board (the appointee will be picked by the school board at a special meeting on May 8), and plans to run as a candidate in November, probably for the two-year seat that will be on the ballot at that time.

Adams is a curriculum specialist — he works for the California Department of Education in Sacramento, and since 2003 he’s been director of the CDE’s Curriculum Frameworks and Instructional Resources Division, overseeing a staff of about 50 people.

Adams also has a daughter who’s come up through the Davis public schools, attending Chávez Elementary and now Emerson Junior High. And at times, his professional life an his life as a parent overlap.

For instance, back in 2000 (when Adams was a curriculum staffer, before he became director) the California legislature passed a law creating a state holiday in honor of farm labor leader César Chávez. The law also directed the California Department of Education to develop a model curriculum as a resource for teachers. Adams was one of the people in charge of that project. “But we found that many of the archived documents and pictures were at Wayne State University (in Michigan)” — a long way for California teachers to travel. So Adams and the curriculum team digitized historic pictures and documents, and placed them online for teachers to use. (The model Chávez curriculum is still available for free at http://chavez.cde.ca.gov/ModelCurriculum/Intro.aspx

“For my own daughter to end up attending Cesár Chávez Elementary in Davis, and find myself working at the California Department of Education (CDE) with Jose Velasquez (who worked for the United Farm Workers early in his career)…” Adams reflected in a 2009 interview with The Enterprise. “Sometimes, I see (curriculum) material go through the review process (at the CDE), and then one day your child brings it home from school, and you think ‘I remember when that was reviewed.’”

Adams served on the site council at Chávez Elementary from 2005 through 2012, including five years as site council chair. He is now on the site council at Emerson Junior High, which has an extension of the K-6 Spanish Immersion program. Adams has also served on the Spanish Immersion Master Plan Committee.

Like every school district in California, Davis is implementing the Common Core academic standards, and Adams — who is leading the CDE’s work in curriculum and instructional materials relating to the Common Core — said he could lend his background in this area as a school district trustee. “I would be able to explain the district’s efforts to parents and articulate parental concerns to teachers and administrators. My goal is for the Davis school board to be a model for our children in making sound and thoughtful decisions,” Adams wrote in his candidacy papers.

Adams did his undergraduate work at Chico State, and came to Davis in 1984 as a graduate student, and has lived her pretty much continuously since that time. (He lived in France during the 1991-92 academic year.) He earned his Master’s degree and Ph.D. (in Modern European History) at UC Davis. He taught several courses in the UC Davis history department in the 1990s.

Adams said he’s inclined to seek the two-year school board term on the November ballot (rather than one of the four-year terms) because he’d like to take on duties as a trustee on something of an “a la carte basis.”

 

 

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Empyrean Ensemble to premiere new pieces written in honor of Holoman

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April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

The Empyrean Ensemble — the professional new music group based at UC Davis — will celebrate longtime music professor D. Kern Holoman (who retired last summer) with the premiere of new works that were composed in Holoman’s honor during the Empyrean concert on Monday (April 28) at 7 p.m. in the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre at the Mondavi Center.

Composer and music department faculty member Kurt Rohde said “the centerpiece of the concert will be ten new short works by composers that all have significant relationships with D.Kern Holoman. These new works are meant as tributes to Holoman, paying homage to his substantial and significant musical and scholarly career at UC Davis — and beyond. The works will be by Yu-Hui Chang, Steve Mackey, Darin Wilson, Kurt Rohde, Mika Pelo, Sam Nichols, Ross Bauer, Pablo Ortiz, Christian Baldini and Laurie San Martin.”

Kurt Rohde said that his piece, titled “final lecture,” takes taped samples from Holoman’s final lecture at UCD (at which Holoman spoke about the Beethoven symphonies) and “incorporates those samples in a series of arabesques that are realized by percussionist Chris Froh.”

Composer Pablo Ortiz, another faculty member, wrote a piece called “Harold in Davis,” which references “Harold in Italy,” the well-known piece for orchestra and viola soloist by the French composer Hector Berlioz (which was in turn inspired by a lengthy narrative poem titled “Childe Harold” published by Lord Byron in the early 1800s). Holoman published a widely respected biography of Berlioz in the 1989. Ortiz said his piece is a “micro-tone poem, describing the trials and tribulations of Childe Harold in Davis — with a very happy ending. It is loosely bsed on the letters D, K and H from the viola part in Berlioz’s immortal ‘Harold in Italy.’”

Ortiz added “I always think of Kern as a young man, exiled from Princeton, in a 1970s Davis, full of energy and ideas. A genteel, somehwhat less developed atmosphere with room for relaxed lunches at the Faculty Club. I had a fleeting glimpse of the way it may have been when I first came here 20 years ago.”

Composer and music faculty member Laurie San Martin wrote a piece called “HDKH (Homage to D. Kern Holoman).” She said “Holoman was one of the first people I met when I came to UC Davis in 1987. It was my first year as an undergraduate, and I was facing tough decisions: should I play for the orchestra (which Holoman conducted) or join the water polo team? They met in the same time slot.”

“At my (orchestra) audition, I found Professor Holoman a bit intimidating — actually, he was a lot intimidating,” San Martin recalled. But despite my terror, I had a sense that he was a nurturing and dedicated person.”

In writing a piece to honor Holoman, “I kept finding myself back in 1987, reliving my first concert at UC Davis. It was an ambitious program (Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony) celebrating the reopening of Freeborn Hall. I had the impression that I was catching UC Davis at a prime moment in its history. What I soon learned is that Kern makes eery moment — whether it’s the opening of a hall, an orchestral tour of Australia, or a simple noontime show — seem  vivid and special.”

Composer and faculty member Sam Nichols wrote a piece called “disjecta membra no. 1a.” Nichols said “The phrase ‘disjecta membra’ appears in Horace’s ‘Satires’ as ‘disjecti membra poetae.’ This is apparently a tribute to the earlier Roman poet Ennius. A literal translation from Latin might be ‘limbs of a dismembered poet.’ A less strict translation of Ennius’s words might be something like: “Even if you were to tear this poet into pieces, the scattered fragments would still sing.’”

Nichols continued “Kern has many accomplishments — it’s hard to single out any one — but what always strikes me is his immediately recognizable voice as a writer. His prose is vivid, fresh, exactingly specific and particular. Even when ripped out of context, you can still tell who wrote it.”

Also on the program will be composer Steven Mackey’s “It’s Equals It Is.” Mackey came to UC Davis as an undergrad in the 1970s — at the time, he was a rock-and-roller. Mackey enrolled in Holoman’s music history class, and embarked on a career as Grammy-winning composer/guitarist/professor, Mackey is now a music professor at Princeton.

Holoman, who is seldom at a loss for words, needed a days before he responded to a request by The Enterprise for a comment: “Well I’m flattered, of course, by the gifts of newly composed music and fresh scholarship. A wonderful posse of colleagues is involved, composers and performers and ‘ologists who go on filling every day with new adventures. But in point of fact I’ve been fully retired since last July, so the predominant feelings so far are real satisfaction and faith in the folks now stewarding the program(s) and wide-eyed awe at how far we came in just a few decades.”

 

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UCD Music Department honors Holoman with all-day symposium

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April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

The UC Davis Music Department will honor Professor Emeritus D. Kern Holoman with an all-day symposium, with multiple talks and panel discussions to be held in (LOCATION?) on Saturday, May 3.

The events, which are open to the public, include:

10:30 a.m.- 12 noon: Beverly Wilcox (University of California, Davis): “From the Salle des Cent Suisses to the Salle des Concerts du Conservatoire,” and Nicholas Mathew (University of California, Berkeley); and “Wagner’s Eroica, and After”

1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.:

Christopher Reynolds (University of California, Davis): “Programming Beethoven in the Year After His Death”; and Mark Clague (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor): “The Atlanta School of Composers: Using History to Bring New Music to New Audiences”

3:15 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.:  Carol Oja (Harvard University): “Leonard Bernstein, Everett Lee, and the Racial Politics of Performance in the 1940s”; and John Spitzer (San Francisco Conservatory of Music): “”The death and transfiguration of American orchestras in the 20th century”

5 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.: Roundtable Discussion on the Future of the Symphony Orchestra: Mark Clague, Susan Key, John Spitzer, and Michael Morgan.

6:15 – 6:45 p.m. Reception

7 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.: Concert in Jackson Hall by the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra

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Measure P: Are the water rates fair?

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April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

Do you think paying more for water is justified given the river water diversion project?

That is the question behind Measure P, the initiative that allows the community to weigh in on the city’s more expensive current and future water rate structure.

Proponents say it’s giving democracy a chance to decide the rates’ fate and opponents say it’s an unnecessary revisiting of a process that involved the community already.

Why pay more?

The water rates that residents are paying now and the potentially more expensive consumption-based rates that take effect in January were recommended two years ago by the Water Advisory Committee. The City Council approved the rates using a Proposition 218 process that included giving property owners a chance to protest.

As the members of the City Council point out in their ballot argument, Yolo Superior Court Judge Dan Maguire ruled against the most substantive claims of a lawsuit against the water rates in late January. Other aspects of the case will be decided after a Nov. 5-7 trial.

“Opponents of these approved rates are challenging them yet again,” Measure P opponents’ ballot argument reads. “We urge you to vote ‘No’ to end the delay tactics.”

The city is part of a $228 million Sacramento River water diversion project that was passed in March 2013 as Measure I, an all mail vote.

Now, with the project having broken ground this month and the train leaving the station on Davis’ estimated roughly $106 million share of the cost of the project, the water rates that could triple the cost to the average homeowner are set to pay the bills.

However, the consumption-based rates as the name implies, base their price on water usage through the dry months of May through October, a six-month period. That sets the rate for the rainy and summer months for the next year.

Why reject the rates?

Some proponents of the initiative, like Ernie Head, have said their efforts are an attempt to derail the river water diversion project. Many other Measure P supporters focus in on the fairness of a consumption-based rate that measures usage only during the summer.

Former Mayor Sue Greenwald and Mark Sigler, vice chair of the Water Advisory Committee, say voters should approve Measure P to spur the City Council to revisit the consumption-based model and work up a 12 month measurement, instead of the six-month summertime measure.

“The new CBFR water rate structure is extremely punitive to those who use more water in summer, as it relies on summer water use to determine year-round rates,” Proponents say in their ballot arguments. “However, there is no evidence that provision of summer water is significantly more costly. The rates therefore are arbitrary and unfair and will create great discrepancies unrelated to ratepayer income…We cannot conserve our way out of higher bills.”

So to be clear, if Measure P passes, the rates will be reconfigured one way or another. If Measure P is defeated, water rate opponents lose one more battle, but not the war. That will be decided if the lawsuit against the rates is wholly defeated after the result of the Nov. 5-7 trial and there is no appeal.

— Reach Dave Ryan at dryan@davisenterprise.net or call 530-747-8057.

 

 

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Kids learn the Davis Way

By Walter Sadler
The Davis School District’s latest fiascos regarding the firing and then rehiring of Coach Crawford provided further evidence of the inability of the Board to provide leadership. Issues surrounding the Coach Selection process, are not the only issue whereby the Board, over the years, has demonstrated their disdain for providing oversight and leadership for the District; this lack of concern or caring is engrained and embodied in their process for selecting personnel. It isn’t their money, why should they care?
At the 2011 High School graduation ceremony, a local politician gave a speech titled the “Davis Way”. With the Women’s Varsity Basketball Coaching melodrama and the cold pathetic actions of the Board and their hand selected administration and Superintendent fresh on the minds of the Graduating Class, what a “Life Lesson!” Is this what was meant by the Davis Way?
My daughter was on Mr. Christian’s Women’s Varsity Basketball team and witnessed the events that unfolded, including expletives, etc. Statements and actions taken, much to the Board and Superintendent’s chagrin are not privileged as they were stated in public, irrespective of the local media stating “what happens in the locker room stays in the locker room.” Correspondence between Mr. Christian’s and the Districts’ attorneys, provided the Board with ample access to the facts, that is, if they wanted to show the leadership to inquire.
During the course of events, the team was treated to witnessing the manipulative efforts of two team members and their mother, sound familiar, together with the unwillingness of the Superintendent to enforce District Policy and the Educational Code. Lack of action or involvement by the Board was obviously elating to the local political community, as the Board succeeded in making the issue go away. This core gang of four (Board Members) now adds insult to injury with a similar situation regarding the Varsity Volleyball Team, once again teaching the “Children” as Mr. Roberson calls these young adults, by example that “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others!” Now one of those selected elites wants to represent you on the City Council based on her “proven record of active leadership.” Is this the Davis Way, no accountability of past actions?
Discrimination is an ugly characteristic, but to the District it appears to be a District Value. Whether you define it as not allowing the same benefit to all for some reason other than individual merit or on the flip side, preferential treatment for a selected few; either way, this Value is continually reinforced by the Board and their management staff, both subtly and blatantly. The most blatant example of discrimination occurred with Mr. Christian’s firing. For the righteous and politically correct citizens of Davis and more specifically the Political Machine behind Ms. Allen, Mr. Christian was painted by the brush of someone pulling the color card on him; the Superintendent took the bait and fired Mr. Christian within 24 hours without ever talking to Mr. Christian. Smells, looks, and has the bitter taste of discrimination! The Board wasn’t naïve, just didn’t want to exercise leadership by asking those hard questions, which might lead to having to make a decision. Is this the Davis Way?
Where was KCRA’s correspondent of color, who was at Mr. Christian’s door immediately after the Superintendent fired Mr. Christian? One wonders who called him! The Peterson drama went on for months if not years, with no KCRA presence! However, to his credit, the Superintendent is consistent in his actions, no respect for any form of formalized management structure. Once again, the Athletic Director, Dennis Foster, gets thrown under the bus, and the Board keeps asking you to just move on, they have. You may wonder how much the District spent on investigating the merits of this complaint, Zero would be an accurate amount. But then guilt is an amazing motivator. Kudos to Mr. Christian as he suffers from a moral compass pointed in the correct direction, unlike the Board; he selected not to put the team members in the middle, something the “caring” Board didn’t have a problem with then and now.
Having grown up in Davis, I am not surprised that the Administration and Board are obsessed with the issue of, “which college did you attend?” or “who do you know?” rather than the core issue of “are you qualified”? I remember when individuals ran for the School Board on meaningful issues such as financial stability and leadership, not the current trend of political self-justification so that they can appease the political structure and move up! This was not the Davis Way I knew.
Knowingly employing individuals that have questionable if not non-existent experience for their District position, such as the Superintendent, HR Director, Elementary Principals, and California Credentialed positions is a management strategy. This strategy ensures that the Board and the administrative staff will have obedient staff who will protect the status quo; however, this also requires a bonus system. Don’t worry it is only public money. PhD anyone? Deferred compensation, health insurance. If you were hand selected, the District will help you. This management concept is embodied in the following principles:
Promoting selected members of staff into management positions ensures obedience and a cohesive team to protect the Bureaucratic higher order that ensures stability for the Board without regard for the District’s mandated educational objectives.
Do not expect administrators that have no previous experience in the position they have been promoted to, to do anything other than go with the flow as it ensures higher pay (retirement).
Administrators promoted into a position they are inexperienced in makes them dependent on lower staff and thus reinforces loyalty to the existing Bureaucratic structure; some call this the Secretary Syndrome.
Hiring employees that do not have the minimum requested qualifications provides for employees that are obedient and can be groomed to go with the flow and thus not question anything.
Qualifications and experience may be the reason some individuals are not selected as they might question the educational, and management objectives of the system.
Without leadership, Staff at all levels will fill the power void and set (unwritten) policy that benefits them, regardless of the fiscal impact to the District.
If you are one of the selected few, the District will grant you a leave of absence to try a position at another District, if you aren’t hired or want to come back, they are obligated to rehire you; don’t worry no written policy and the Board will approve it.
Keeping the public (voter) off balance with crisis to crisis management and/or development of meaningless policies such as a Conflict of Interest Policy for Board Members is essential to giving the illusion of active leadership and concern for the public trust. Why not a Policy on qualification based hiring, cronyism, or gift of public funds?
Stonewalling the public for one or two meetings under the guise of “confidentiality” is a proven technique of making the public “move on.”
I have observed some of this behavior in the “adult” world, and history is replete with examples; however, the District is amazing in their ability to continually deny events and fool the public as they move on. Now the District wants to hire a Public Information Officer; someone who can frame these management concepts and actions as being beneficial to the District and more particularly the students. Will this help Sheila’s campaign?
As stated by a former State Politician in a Davis Enterprise article titled, Council, show some leadership, “A leader … fosters policies that promote friendly communities …., encourage safety, honesty and fairness between and among its citizens. Such leaders are open, just, patient, honest and encouraging of good policies and good practices …” I don’t see those qualifications being exhibited by any member of the Board, particularly Sheila Allen who wants your support for City Council. Perhaps the author of that statement regarding what makes a leader, Delaine Eastin, who is openly supporting Ms. Allen, can help those of us outside the political circle understand what elements of the Board’s and Ms. Allen’s actions, recent and historical, are examples of this leadership and “caring” concern for the students.
Amazing what the Women’s Varsity Basketball and Volleyball team members learned before they even graduated, they won’t forget the lessons, and it wasn’t “It’s time to move on” more likely it was “silence is concurrence” or more obviously the Davis Way, “some animals are more equal than others.”
Walter Sadler is a Davis Resident and the father of two daughters that were members of Varsity Teams at Davis High School.

Special to The Enterprise

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Wendy Weitzel

Wendy Weitzel

Wendy Weitzel is a longtime journalist and Davis resident. She is a former managing editor of The Davis Enterprise, working there from 1998-2008. She has written her Comings & Goings business column since 2001. Today, she does freelance writing, editing, marketing and design.
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Fly Fishers talk to focus on healthy streams, rivers

BobDunning2W

Mather steelheadW

Kevin Mather shows off a steelhead caught on the Zymoetz River. Courtesy photo

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April 17, 2014 | Leave Comment

Dan Brosier, president of the Sac-Sierra chapter of Trout Unlimited, and secretary Kevin Mather are the guest speakers Tuesday, April 29, for the Fly Fishers of Davis.

The duo will outline Trout Unlimited’s (TU) conservation, advocacy and education work within California and in the local area. TU is the nations largest cold water fisheries conservation group with more than 150,000 members nationwide. Brosier and Mather, both dedicated steelhead junkies, are board members of Sac-Sierra TU, the local grassroots chapter. Sac-Sierra TU was recently awarded an “Embrace a Stream” grant for erosion control work on Secret Ravine, a tributary of Dry Creek in Sacramento which supports both salmon and steelhead.  They will be discussing the project and opportunities for people to become involved.

The Fly Fishers of Davis normally meet to swap fish stories at 7:30 p.m. on the last Tuesday of the month in the multipurpose room at Harper Junior High School. The meetings are free and open to newcomers and guests. Come around 7 p.m. to check out the various outings, ask about the club, or try your luck at the monthly raffle.

If you’re interested in learning to fly fish come to the meeting and ask anyone about our introductory and intermediate Fly Fishing courses. The club is also working on a program for young fly fishers (under 16).

For more information call Lowell Ashbaugh at 530-797-6722 or visit the club’s web page at http://www.flyfishersofdavis.org.

Enterprise staff

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Stovall letter

Dear Debbie:

I so enjoy our civic leaders’ use of that quaint term – “structural deficit”. Like it is anything but fiscal mismanagement at its core. You arrive at such a dire crisis by spending more than you take in and you keep doing it year after year after year. They then pretend to be concerned by nibbling at the edges – firing a few low-level bureaucrat bottom feeders (who probably did most of the real work anyway) or cutting back on services just to give us a hint of how terrible things can get if we don’t fall in line. (I do get annoyed at being lectured to by a bunch of pinheads.)

Well, according to the website transparentcalifornia.com/salaries our esteemed bureaucrats and their prodigious staff have an average total compensation [for 2012] of $57,377 per year, give or take. Interestingly, the median is only $35,000 which statisticians will tell you indicates a skewed curve. This skew is to the bloated end of the compensation scale to the point where the top 100 are averaging nearly $152,000. And if you throw out all the non-benefited positions the average compensation is $100,000. Must be nice. The compensation figures listed on the website are eye opening in the extreme. Clearly I did not make a wise career choice – little did I realize that small towns like ours compensated so handsomely and for so many semi-skilled positions.

But now our enlightened leaders, sarcasm intended, are here to try and remedy part of that little problem, albeit, temporarily. I can see them struggling and thinking “Let’s see, why don’t we ask city staff to come up with recommendations on how they can preserve their own jobs and high compensation.” Their solution – take more of our money (in the form of increased taxes) to give to those that are causing most of the deficit problem in the first place. Brilliant! Why didn’t I think of that? There are apparently NO other remedies.

But let’s not get fooled by them telling us they will finally be taking care of our long-ignored infrastructure. Most of the tax increases will be to continue to pay for pensions and benefits, the level of which most of us do not currently enjoy. I just had to laugh at a recent “threat” in a news article that parks maintenance will be virtually a thing of the past if they don’t get their way on a tax increase. Yeah. Right. Like we’ve been enjoying a lofty level of service all along.

Well, I have a better solution to our “structural deficit”. I propose we declare bankruptcy and void all our current contracts, union and otherwise. Then we re-advertise most of the current positions [reducing duplication and streamlining] at say two thirds the current base pay and reduce benefits to one quarter of the current rate. (I am willing to adjust these numbers upward, somewhat, for employees at the lower end of the pay scale.) Furthermore, overtime (where one employee made over $81,000) will not be tolerated except under extreme conditions, allowing less than 10% of the current $1.5 million expenditure.

I can already hear the wailing and gnashing of teeth with cries that “we must be competitive to retain our best and brightest”. Hogwash. Based on the overwhelming response to recently advertised firefighter positions there is certainly no shortage of qualified applicants in today’s job market. I am sure the same could be said for all the rest of our city positions. It is truly a seller’s market. One that we should take advantage of. With this plan I have reduced part of our employee costs by over $22 million per year.

I should point out that the education system expenses are covered under a separate budget so those employees’ compensation packages are unknown. But, I would wager, could stand some serious pruning, especially in the administration line item.

Sincerely,

Greg Stovall
Resident and Taxpayer
Davis
756-5261

Special to The Enterprise

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Transparency, set in stone

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April 11, 2014 | Leave Comment

The issue: No more loopholes, no more questions; local government must be accountable

California voters will have an opportunity in June to strengthen laws requiring local governments and agencies to provide access to documents and meetings.

THOUGHT THE laws were strong enough? The Public Records Act and the Ralph M. Brown Act on open meetings sure seem like clear declarations of transparency, but when it comes to money, nothing is certain.

The key point is that under current legislation, the state must reimburse local government for the cost of complying with these laws. During the fiscal crisis, the state sought to trim the budget deficit by suspending these payments, creating confusion about which parts of the laws are still in force. Local agencies were left in limbo, not entirely sure how to proceed. But clearly, transparency can be guaranteed only as long as there is will in Sacramento to pay for it.

Proposition 42 will change all that. It creates an unambiguous constitutional requirement for local government to keep its records, documents and meetings open to the public. This is no trivial issue, it’s a critical part of a working democracy.

As the Yes on 42 committee put it, “Without Prop. 42, Californians will never fully know what’s happening in their local  governments and agencies. And after all the scandals we’ve had in California cities like Bell, where there was widespread abuse and mismanagement of taxpayer dollars, it’s clear that citizens need to have access to public meetings and records.”

Never mind Bell; what if the Davis City Council didn’t have to disclose the cost of the regional water project? Or the latest employment contract with the firefighters’ union?

TO BE SURE, this could end up costing local governments, and they will lead the resistance to Prop. 42. In the past, whenever they were caught out of compliance, they could simply bill the state to make up for it. With Prop. 42, they will own their mistakes.

Now, every lost document or overlooked financial statement would be their responsibility. Ideally, this will give cities, counties and special districts an incentive to be open at all times, rather than after the fact. If not, the extra expense will be on them.

Openness should not depend on the state’s financial condition; transparency should be built in to the government’s DNA. Voting yes on Proposition 42 on June 3 will accomplish just that.

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Tour renovated YCCC facility Thursday

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April 13, 2014 | Leave Comment

Construction is completed and the doors will be open from 2:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 24, to tour the renovated Yolo Community Care Continuum Farmhouse.

After the indoors tour, visitors may walk through the garden where YCCC and Farm-to-Mouth employees have been hard at work. Snacks and beverages will be served.

Improvements were made available through the city of Davis Community Development Block Grant.

Enterprise staff

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Hospice offers free grief workshops

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April 13, 2014 | Leave Comment

Yolo Hospice is offering free workshops. These groups, led by a qualified facilitator, are available to anyone experiencing grief and provide support through mutual understanding and education. Registration is required.

* Sudden Loss: Coping With Unexpected Death
This workshop is for those seeking grief support resources for coping with or helping others co-pe with the sudden loss of a loved one. It will meet from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Friday, May 2, at Yolo Hospice.

* Understanding Children’s Grief
Individuals may learn ways to support children through grief. For teachers, counselors, clergy and other professionals who are supporting children and teens. This workshop meets from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 29, at Yolo Hospice.

For more information, call Yolo Hospice Bereavement Services at 530-601-5756 or 800-491-7711 or visit www.yolohospice.org. Groups and workshops are subject to change.

Enterprise staff

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One-day challenge looks to raise funds for area nonprofits

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April 10, 2014 | Leave Comment

GiveLocalNow is gearing up for the region’s first Big Day of Giving, a 24-hour giving challenge benefiting the region’s nonprofit sector.

The event — under the leadership of the Sacramento Region Community Foundation, Placer Community Foundation, Yolo Community Foundation, and others — will run from midnight Tuesday, May 6, to 11:59 p.m.

The region has set a goal to collectively raise $1 million and engage 5,000 donors on the Day of Giving. The region aims to enlist 400 nonprofits and provide $250,000 in match and prize money to participating nonprofits. Each individual donation will get a boost by a pool of matching funds on a pro-rated basis, making every gift go farther.

The Big Day of Giving also will serve as a launch for the area’s first nonprofit database, GivingEdge, which represents a key resource for nonprofits, funders and donors. It is co-branded with GuideStar, the nation’s largest and trusted resource for nonprofit information, and currently holds vetted information for over 400 of our region’s nonprofits.

To participate, starting at midnight May 6, visit www.givelocalnow.org and make a gift as little as $25 to any of the 400 participating nonprofit organizations. There is a 24-hour window to make donations. Nonprofits can be searched by key words. Multiple donations may be made.

For more information, visit www.givelocalnow.org.

Enterprise staff

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Gibson House May Festival features local talent

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April 13, 2014 | Leave Comment

Local talent will be in the spotlight from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 4, on the main stage of the 36th annual Gibson House May Festival.

Two bands, a Folklorico troupe and a cowboy trick roper and whip expert will fill the live entertainment program during the 36th annual event.

The Kick-N-’60s band — with local lead guitarist, Mark Crawford — starts the day. They play only ’60s music: the Beatles, Byrds, Beach Boys and more.

Woodland’s own trick roper and whip master, James Barrera, appears for three encore performances.

The Putah Creek Crawdads, an acoustic vocal and string band, will fill the afternoon with folk, Americana, gospel and bluegrass music.

The Ballet Folklorico de Beamer is a dance troupe from Beamer Elementary School in Woodland. The group creates the festive sights and sounds of classic Mexican folk dancing and will be performing two shows at this year’s May Festival.

Admission and parking are free.

Enterprise staff

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Thank you

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April 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

Davis School Arts Foundation has just wrapped up another successful Elementary Art Show and Young at Art! Festival. We would like to extend a special thank you to all of those who helped pull it off. Davis Arts Center generously donated their facility for our Elementary Art Show, 2nd Friday Art About and Young at Art! Festival. Woodstock’s Pizza donated several pizzas that we were able to sell by the slice with all proceeds going to DSAF. Nugget Market donated amazing cheese and vegetable trays for our 2nd Friday Art About reception. The success of our event depends on volunteers and we are very grateful to Alpha Phi Omega, a co-ed community service fraternity at UCD, and to the DHS National Honor Society for providing volunteers to help us hang art and to lead the arts and crafts tables at the YAA Festival. Many thanks go to the choruses and music ensembles that performed at the Young at Art! Festival: Willett Elementary Chorus, Montgomery Elementary Chorus, Emerson/Harper Intermediate Orchestra, Divertimentalists, Mariachi Puente, Ginkyo Music Studio strings students, and Hattie Craven. Many of these groups have directly received, or have benefitted from, Davis School Arts Foundation grants. It was a very fun day filled with excellent musical talent from around Davis. DSAF would also like to extend its gratitude to all of the Davis elementary school students and their teachers who provided art for the Elementary Art Show. There are some truly amazing young artists in our town! Please thank our sponsors when you come across them. The generosity of our sponsors and volunteers enables Davis School Arts Foundation to bring music and arts into the classrooms of all Davis public schools.
Sincerely,
Davis School Arts Foundation Board of Directors
Rebecca Breitbard, Tara Diel, Julie Cuetera, Eva Jakab, Brian Miller, and DeKristie Adams

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Slow Food tour covers three area farms

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April 05, 2014 | Leave Comment

To celebrate this turning of the season, Slow Food Yolo — a local branch of the national Slow Food USA organization — will be hosting a farm tour and lunch from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, May 18. The tour and luncheon will feature a selection of young and beginning farmers taking root in the Capay Valley.

The “Young Farmers, Young Chefs” tour will visit three small farms, including Skyelark Ranch, Pasture 42 and Leap Frog Farm offering tastings of olive oil, milk, butter, fruits, veggies, chicken, lamb and pork. The day will end with lunch prepared with ingredients off the farms by local young chef Justin Severson of Capay’s Road Trip Bar & Grill.

“This event is such a great event to highlight the next generation of Yolo County farmers,” Slow Food member Kristy Lyn Levings said. “The weather will be beautiful and so will the food. The farmers are excited to share their farms with visitors.”

Slow Food is dedicated to the enjoyment and pleasure of good food, artfully prepared, and raised or grown with intention. It upholds a lifestyle opposite the “fast-food culture” popular today.

Advance tickets required. Visitors will drive their own cars beginning at the first destination. Tours and tastings will be guided by the farmers with a full lunch at the final destination. Limited spacing, book early. Tickets may be purchased by calling 530-304-4218 or emailing joyhardi@pacbell.net.

Enterprise staff

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Gen Events MASTER

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August 16, 2012 | Leave Comment

Ongoing
* Be a part of the excitement, glitz and glam that is Grad Night 2014! Volunteers have planned an amazing event for the graduating seniors from all Davis high schools; to bring this dream to fruition, help is needed. Even if you are not a parent of a high school senior, Grad Night organizers appreciate help from everyone. Openings are available for decorators, check-in helpers, event monitors, poker and black jack dealers, raffle team workers, café workers and security assistants. Choose a shift(s) for Thursday, Friday or Saturday (June 12-14). For more information and to sign up, see http://www.davisgradnight.org/volunteers

* Davis High School’s Blue Devil basketball camp will run from June 16-19 in the gym, 315 W. 14th St. Camp for fourth- and fifth-graders is 8 a.m. to noon; camp for sixth- through eighth-graders is noon to 4 p.m. The camp is designed to have young basketball players learn the fundamentals of the game through drills as well as team and individual competitions. Future Blue Devil basketball players will learn what is necessary for competitive basketball at the next level, while getting to know the program and staff. The registration fee is $100. Go to www.dhsbluedevils.com to download a camp flyer.

* Davis Grad Night 2014 is looking for sponsors to support this year’s big event celebrating Davis’ high school graduates. Donors receive a variety of fabulous publicity, and much gratitude, for their financial support of this treasured Davis tradition. More information is available at http://www.davisgradnight.org/donors. Organizers also are requesting donations of items for the Grad Night raffle as well as food, drinks, boxer shorts and various supplies. For a specific list of items needed, please go to http://www.davisgradnight.org/what-to-donate. Davis Grad Night is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, so most donations will be tax deductible. Please contact donations@davisgradnight.org for more information.

* Get your Grad Night tickets! If you haven’t gotten a ticket yet for your graduating senior student, purchase it online through the Davis Grad Night website at http://groups.dcn.org/davisgradnight/tickets. Alternatively, download a form from the website and mail in a check. Ticket prices are $90 through May 31; after that, tickets must be purchased at the door for $110. Scholarship tickets are available through school counselors. Once you have purchased a ticket, submit a photo of your child during his or her kindergarten year for the “Kinder Wall” at Grad Night. For more information on this, please visit http://groups.dcn.org/davisgradnight/kindergarten-photo-wall.

Saturday, April 26
Birch Lane Elementary School will celebrate its 50th anniversary with a party at Davis Community Church’s Fellowship Hall, 421 D St. in downtown Davis. The event will start at 6:30 p.m. and will include appetizers, a dessert buffet and silent and live auctions. Tickets will be $10 and may be purchased at http://blepta.ejoinme.org/atickets or at the door. All proceeds will go toward helping Birch Lane students. For more information, visit www.birchlanepta.org or email Mike Clark at birchlanepal@gmail.com.

Monday, April 28
Local residents are invited to enjoy a burrito for a great cause between 5 and 8 p.m. at Chipotle, 227 E St. in downtown Davis. Fifty percent of the sales that evening will go toward a technology upgrade at Emerson Junior High School that has been four years in the making. The goal is to raise $1,500 that evening. Supporters must mention Emerson or the Da Vinci Charter Academy when they make their purchases.

May 2-4
Come support Yolo County’s 4-H members who will be showing off their projects at the annual Spring Show at the Yolo County fairgrounds. Youths ages 5 to 19 will be presenting the animals they’ve raised as well as other projects including photography, baking, engineering, rocketry, archery and more.

Saturday, May 3
Support Yolo County’s Center for Families by participating in “Cycle de Mayo,” a benefit bike ride that begins at 8 a.m. in either Davis or Woodland with Plainfield Station serving as a rest stop/party location in between, complete with music and wild bikes on display. Woodland riders depart from Woodland High School, 21 N West St., and Davis riders depart from Davis High School, 315 W 14th St. Advance tickets are $25 for adults, $10 for children over age 12, students and seniors. Children under 12 are free. Order tickets online at http://cycledemayo.brownpapertickets.com. Tickets are $35 and $15 the day of the ride and registration begins at 7:30 a.m. For more information, contact Maria Contreras at 530-753-1125. All participants will receive a Cycle de Mayo backpack and entry to the Plainfield Station party.

Friday, May 9
Kids between the ages of 1 and 12 are invited to Friday Night Live from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the city of Davis Gymnastics and Dance Center.  For a $5 fee, children can work on gymnastics skills, jump on the trampoline and more. Gymnastics and dance staff will be available for coaching questions, supervision and fun. Children under 4 must be supervised on the gym floor by a parent or guardian. For more information, call 530-757-5626.

Friday, May 30
Kids between the ages of 1 and 12 are invited to Friday Night Live from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the city of Davis Gymnastics and Dance Center.  For a $5 fee, children can work on gymnastics skills, jump on the trampoline and more. Gymnastics and dance staff will be available for coaching questions, supervision and fun. Children under 4 must be supervised on the gym floor by a parent or guardian. For more information, call 530-757-5626.

Friday, June 6
Kids between the ages of 1 and 12 are invited to Friday Night Live from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the city of Davis Gymnastics and Dance Center.  For a $5 fee, children can work on gymnastics skills, jump on the trampoline and more. Gymnastics and dance staff will be available for coaching questions, supervision and fun. Children under 4 must be supervised on the gym floor by a parent or guardian. For more information, call 530-757-5626.

Anne Ternus-Bellamy

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Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
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The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
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Name Droppers MASTER FILE

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December 20, 2013 | Leave Comment

Two UC Davis students have received scholarships as part of the Merck Animal Health Veterinary Student Scholarship Program. A total of $100,000 is being awarded to 20 students.

Through a partnership with the American Veterinary Medical Foundation, the program recognizes outstanding second- and third-year students who are pursuing careers in large animal and companion animal medicine.

UCD’s winners are:

Tracy Huang, from Bangkok, Thailand, is a third-year student. Following graduation in June 2015, she plans to pursue a career in animal welfare advocacy in rural and low-income communities.

She holds a bachelor of science in biochemistry/cell biology from UC San Diego, and master of science in vision science from UC Berkeley. She is co-president of the International Veterinary Outreach, a nonprofit organization that provides veterinary care to rural communities in Nicaragua.

Eric Nickerson, from Anaheim, is a second-year student. Following graduation in May 2016, he plans to pursue an internship and residency in small animal cardiology.

During undergraduate studies, Nickerson worked as a veterinary technician at the Veterinary Specialty Hospital in San Diego and a research assistant in respiratory physiology at UC San Diego. He also participated in ecological field studies research at the University of Queensland, Australia.

He holds a bachelor of science in ecology, behavior and evolution from UC San Diego. He represents UCD as the student American Veterinary Medical Association delegate and is the student representative for the Sacramento Valley Veterinary Medical Association.

“These students are our future visionaries and will become the backbone of the veterinary profession,” said Norman Stewart, D.V.M., livestock technical services manager for Merck Animal Health. “Through this program, we are reinforcing our long-standing commitment to education, personal development and the science of healthier animals. It also allows us to help support the cost of veterinary education, as well as recognize and celebrate, the next generation of leaders.”

More than 800 students from 13 veterinary schools accredited through the AVMA applied for the scholarships. Award recipients were selected based on academic excellence, financial need, leadership and area of interest within the profession.

————

Patrick Henning of West Sacramento was appointed director of the California Employment Development Department.

Henning has been chief deputy appointments secretary in the Office of Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. since 2011.

He was a legislative advocate for the California State Council of Laborers from 2004 to 2011, assistant secretary for legislation and intergovernmental affairs at the California Labor and Workforce Development Agency from 2003 to 2004 and deputy director for legislation at the California Department of Industrial Relations from 2000 to 2003.

Henning was a member of the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission from 2005 to 2011, a member of the California Career Technical Education Standards and Framework Advisory Group in 2003 and a member of the California State Assembly Speaker’s Commission on Labor Education from 2001 to 2010.

This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $150,112.

————

Emily Darby, Dillon Dong and Hannah Wyment-Steele, of the Class of 2015, have been awarded Barry M. Goldwater Scholarships, which provide up to $7,500 per year for educational expenses to sophomores and juniors intending to pursue careers in mathematics, natural sciences or engineering. They were selected from a field of 1,166 students nominated by their colleges.

Emily Darby, a chemistry major with a math minor, has studied atmospheric chemistry with Prof. Frederick Grieman since her sophomore year. She is currently working on an independent research project studying the electronic spectroscopy of molecular ions to better understand the reaction pathways in the atmosphere so that a more comprehensive model of the atmosphere can be developed.

Last summer, Darby conducted solar energy research at Vanderbilt University through a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU). She was the primary researcher and sole undergraduate on a project entitled Photoactive Films of Photosystem I on Transparent Reduced Graphene Oxide Electrodes. The team submitted an article to the journal Langmuir, and, if it is accepted, she will be listed as first author.

In addition to her research, Darby is a mentor with Pomona’s High Achievement Program, a teaching assistant for the organic chemistry lab and a math and chemistry tutor for two to five elementary through high school students each year.

Her future plans include earning a Ph.D. in chemical engineering with an emphasis on alternative energy, then becoming a faculty member at a research university while continuing research in alternative energy that is sustainable and efficient.

Darby is a resident of Davis, Calif, and the daughter of Jeannie Darby. She attributes her early interest in chemistry to her “wonderful high school chemistry teacher, Mr. van Muyden.”

Dillon Dong, a physics and math double major, has conducted astronomy research since the second semester of his freshman year, when he worked with Prof. Phil Choi on the Pomona College Adaptive Optics Instrument. The next summer, with Choi’s help, he became a research assistant at Carnegie Observatories working with Dr. Eric Murphy on the Star Formation in Radio Survey (SFRS).

This summer he will be working with Murphy characterizing the far-infrared spectral energy distribution of galaxy halos as part of the Herschel Edge on Galaxy Survey (HEDGES). He will also be collaborating with Kristina Nyland, from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, on “a 5GHz observation using the VLA of the likely AGN host galaxy NGC1266 and using that observation along with SFRS data and archival VLA data to make spectral aging, index and curvature maps of NGC1266′s massive molecular outflow.”

Post-Pomona, Dong plans to earn a Ph.D. in astrophysics and become a physics/astronomy professor. A resident of San Francisco, he is the son of Allan Dong and Liping Dong. He attended Lowell High School, where he says, his “physics teachers, Mr. Dickerman and Mr. Shapiro, were the first people to really spark my interest in physics. Prof. Phil Choi really helped spark my interest in astronomy in particular.”

Hannah Wayment-Steele, a math and chemistry double major, has been a member of Prof. Mal Johal’s lab since her first year at Pomona, working on projects ranging from biological physics to inorganic materials. She recently submitted a manuscript on dye desorption from semiconductors, “for the purposes of improving the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells,” and is currently using molecular dynamics simulations and the Quartz-Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation instrument (QCM-D) to study the detrimental effects of aluminum ions on lipid membranes.

She has also conducted research with Dr. Sofia Svedhem in the Biological Physics Department of the Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, and will return this summer funded by the Beckman scholarship.

Wayment-Steele credits Johal and Dr. Lewis Johnson, a post-doc in the Johal lab, for providing the rich experiences that made her decide on a research career. “They have been outstanding mentors, providing endless support and helping me gain valuable experience: I’ve given oral presentations on my work at the SPIE Optics & Photonics Conference and the American Vacuum Society National Symposium, traveled internationally to conduct research, and submitted papers on which I am the first author.”

Wayment-Steele plans to earn a Ph.D. in biophysics or materials science. Her ultimate goal is to be a professor with her own research group, using computational techniques to help develop bio-nanomaterials for medical applications. A resident of Flagstaff, Arizona, Wayment-Steele is the daughter of Heidi Wayment and Craig Steele.

————

Kurt Snipes, PhD was appointed by the California Division of the American Cancer Society to be its President of the Board of Directors for 2014.

Dr. Snipes is a graduate of the University of California, Irvine and received his master’s and doctorate degrees from the University of California, Davis.

Dr. Snipes will help guide objectives that assist the Society’s more than 300,000 California volunteers in creating a world with less cancer and more birthdays by helping people stay well, get well, by finding cures and by fighting back.

Dr. Snipes has been a volunteer leader with the Society in California for over 12 years. He is currently chief of the Cancer Surveillance and Research Branch for the California Department of Public Health.

————

Sophomores Alexandra R. Barbaria and Erin C. Leary and junior William M. Young made the Scholastic Honor Roll Winter term at Oregon State University.

To be on the Honor Roll, students must carry at least 12 graded hours of course work and receive a grade point average of 3.5 or better.

 ————
Shannon Booth, a 1979 graduate of Davis High School, was named instructor of the year at Castle School in Newbury, U.K.
Castle School is solely a school for special needs students, where Booth is an Assistant Head.
 ————

The UC Davis Donald A. Strauss Foundation awarded Anna Peare a $10,000 public service scholarship to carry out project in her junior year.

The Strauss scholarships fund public-service projects that the students have proposed and will carry out during their junior or senior year. Peare, who hails from Lafayette, will be running the Amigos de las Américas: Backyard Program, a project that aims to give youth of all backgrounds the opportunity to become catalysts for positive development and change in their own community.

 ————

Twyla Thompson of Woodland is one of four Northern California women who have been selected as recipients of the 2014 Common Threads Award. They will be honored during a luncheon and awards ceremony Thursday, April 24, at the UC Davis.

All of the honorees have past or present roots in agriculture and have shown outstanding involvement in the agricultural industry for many years. They also have made positive impacts by actively giving back to their communities and participating in philanthropic endeavors.

The luncheon and awards ceremony will be held in the Activities and Recreation Center Ballroom of the UC Davis campus from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Registration for the event will begin at 11 a.m.

Tickets cost $49 each for advance registration or $60 each at the door.  To register in advance, contact the Butte Agriculture Foundation at (530) 370-3879 or colleen@buttefarmbureau.com

  ————
The Woodland Healthcare Foundation Board of Trustees has named two new members: retired Woodland Clinic physician Jim McGibbon, MD, and Woodland realtor Jan Whittle. McGibbon joined the board in February; Whittle joined in March.

McGibbon spent his entire career as an obstetrics and gynecology physician with Woodland Clinic, retiring twelve years ago after twenty-eight years of service. In addition to his involvement with the board of trustees, McGibbon is actively involved with the Woodland Rotary and Holy Rosary Church, as well as volunteering with the UC Davis School of Medicine, interviewing applicants for admission.

Whittle, has co-owned Whittle & Associates Property management with her husband, Mahlon, since 1998. In addition to her new role as a Trustee, Whittle has served on the Board of Directors for Woodland United Way, where she is a past president and 1999’s Volunteer of the Year, and on the board of Court Appointed Special Advocates.

  ————

Cherie Schroeder, program director at Woodland Community College’s Foster Kinship Care & Education program was honored with First 5 Yolo’s High 5 Award for Excellence at the commission meeting Wednesday, April 9.

The First 5 Yolo Children and Families Commission gives this special award when an individual or funded provider has created exceptional outcomes for young children and their families in Yolo County.

Under Schroeder’s direction, the WCC FKCE has become recognized as a statewide leader with measurable results in increasing the quality and quantity of licensed foster and kinship homes in Yolo County.

————

Katherine A. Rauen, professor in the Department of Pediatrics and a physician-scientist affiliated with the UC Davis MIND Institute and UC Davis Children’s Hospital, on April 15 received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) at a ceremony in Washington, D.C.

White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Director John Holdren was the keynote speaker for the event, held in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Jefferson Auditorium. Agency officials, friends and relatives of the 102 award recipients attended the event. Afterward the recipients were greeted at the White House by President Barack Obama, who thanked them for their outstanding achievements.

PECASE award recipients are selected from among individuals who either are funded or employed by federal departments and agencies. The National Institutes of Health honored Rauen for her studies on the role of germline mutations in the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway on skeletal myogenesis. She is one of 35 awardees acknowledged through their association with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and one of the 20 National Institutes of Health honorees. She is one of only eight recipients in the University of California system.

Rauen is an internationally respected leader in the study of the Ras/MAPK pathway genetic syndromes, and coined the term “RASopathies.” Ras/MAPK regulates cell growth, which is critical for normal fetal development and, when dysregulated, can cause cancer. She earned her master’s degree in human physiology and her doctorate in genetics at UC Davis. She earned her medical degree at UC Irvine and completed residency training in pediatrics and a fellowship in medical genetics at UC San Francisco.

 ————

Robin Harlan, Winters resident and business owner, joined the Yolo Farm to Fork board of directors.

The nonprofit is dedicated to bringing locally grown farm-fresh food to school lunches, reducing solid waste through recycling and composting programs, supporting school and community gardens and helping Yolo County residents get to know where their food comes from and the farmers who grow it.

Today, Harlan and her husband Henry, who is a beekeeper, own Henry’s Bullfrog Bees and PURE All Natural Honey, producing and bottling raw all natural honey from bees they have placed throughout Yolo, Sacramento, Solano, Colusa, Petaluma, Bodega Bay, and the San Francisco Delta.

————

— Do you know of someone who has won an award or accomplished something noteworthy? Send it, preferably by email, to newsroom@davisenterprise.net, or to Name Droppers, The Davis Enterprise, P.O. Box 1470, Davis, CA 9561

Enterprise staff

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Willett running club invites community to “run with the owls”

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April 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

When the bell rings at Willett Elementary School on Tuesdays and Thursdays and children in grades 1-3 are released for the day, they don’t all head to the bike racks or pick-up zone.

At least 60 to 70 of those kids head to the field behind the school and start running. And they run and run, around and around the field, quarter-mile after quarter-mile for a full half-hour.

Second-grader Gazaw Baker is often at the head of the pack, slowing down only long enough to receive a mark on his arm each time around in order to keep track of his laps.

He regularly runs two or three miles during the 30-minute “Challenge Club” session.

His biggest complaint, says teacher Lindsay Upcraft, “is when we say, ‘OK, last lap,’ and he says, ‘What? Can’t I do three more?”

“For some of them, anything less than 12 (laps) and they’re upset,” she added.

Parent Stephany Cavatoni loves that these kids love to be out there running.

They don’t even have to do much to sell the activity to kids — students see their classmates and friends out there running and immediately want to join in.

“It gets them some exercise after school, instead of going home and playing on the iPad,” she noted.

And it’s a nice activity for students who normally have to wait around for older siblings who aren’t dismissed until a half-hour later.

The Challenge Club afterschool running program has been taking place for a number of years and always concludes with the “Running of the Owls,” named after the Willett mascot. The family fun run is open to to all Davis families, not just Willett families, and takes place Sunday, May 4, beginning at 8 a.m. at 1207 Sycamore Lane.

The runs — which include a 1/4 mile, a 1 mile and a 5K — begin in Sycamore Park with the longer runs going over the pedestrian overpass and through Arroyo Park.

All finishers receive a Fun Run Dog Tag award

And the fun doesn’t end with the run — activities will continue back at the school after the running is over, including a pogo tournament, a basketball knockout game and a fitness contest. Food and drink vendors will also be present, Cavatoni said.

Race-day registration fees are $25 for the 5K and $15 for the 1/4 mile and 1 mile races.

For more information and to see the race routes, visit http://www.eventbrite.com/e/willett-elementary-family-fun-run-tickets-10984971345

Last year about 150 people participated in the fun runs and organizers are hoping for even more.

They’ll have some stiff competition in these Willett runners though.

Last Tuesday featured runner after runner hitting the two-mile mark before the session was even over.

Teachers Upcraft and Kris Inouye have been running the Challenge Club this year and are out there on Tuesdays and Thursdays, tallying laps and encouraging the students on. More than 100 students have signed up for the running club this year and many will top 50 miles by the time the school year ends.

Reach Anne Ternus-Bellamy at aternus@davisenterprise.net or 530-747-8051. Follow her on Twitter at @ATernusBellamy.

Anne Ternus-Bellamy

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Dutch Bros. 5/2

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April 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

Dutch Bros. Coffee Annual “Drink One for Dane” Day
to Donate Proceeds to Muscular Dystrophy Association

GRANTS PASS, Ore., April 17, 2014 — Friday, May 2, is `Drink One for Dane’ Day, when more than 215 Dutch Bros. Coffee locations in seven states will donate proceeds to the Muscular Dystrophy Association , the world leader in fighting Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

The event kicks off ALS Awareness Month and is held annually in honor of company co-founder, Dane Boersma, who was diagnosed with ALS in 2005 and passed away in late 2009.

Dane’s memory continues to inspire everyone within the company to give their all every day. On Drink One for Dane Day, all employees and loved ones proudly wear and proclaim the event slogan, “Drink One for Dane.”

“We are eternal optimists and believe one day there will be a cure for ALS,” said Travis Boersma, Dane’s brother and Dutch Bros. Coffee Co-Founder. “The services provided to families facing this disease are so vital, and we are pleased to support those families.”

Last year, Dutch Bros. contributed a record-breaking $271,500 to MDA for research and family services funding. Since becoming involved with MDA in 2007 Dutch Bros. has donated over $896,500.

“MDA is immensely grateful to have Dutch Bros. as a partner in helping fund research for ALS and providing services for those served by MDA,” said MDA Area Director Arlene Wedsted. “To see the outpouring of love and support for Dane, and the thousands of others living with ALS, during the annual ‘Drink one for Dane’ campaign is truly special and we thank everyone who visits Dutch Bros. on May 2 to support the fight against this devastating disease.”

ALS is a disease that affects the parts of the nervous system that control voluntary muscle movement. There is no cure for ALS, and most people with ALS die within three to five years. To learn more about the MDA and ALS, visit mda.org.

To find the location nearest you, visit www.dutchbros.com/locations.

About MDA
The Muscular Dystrophy Association is the world’s leading nonprofit health agency dedicated to saving and improving the lives of anyone with muscle disease, including muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neuromuscular diseases. It does so by funding worldwide research to find treatments and cures; by providing comprehensive health care services and support to MDA families nationwide; and by rallying communities to fight back through advocacy, fundraising and local engagement. Visit mda.org and follow us at facebook.com/MDAnational and @MDAnews. Learn more about MDA’s mission by watching this video.

- MDA -

Enterprise staff

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Chamber Music Society to present Mahler, Copland classics at Mondavi for Earth Week

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April 17, 2014 | Leave Comment

The Chamber Music Society of Sacramento will present a special concert in the Mondavi Center’s Jackson Hall on Friday (April 25) at 7:30 p.m., featuring the Schoenberg/Rhien arrangement of Gustav Mahler’s “Das Lied von der Erde” (“The Song of the Earth”) plus the original chamber music version of Aaron Copland’s ballet score “Appalachian Spring.”

The program will also include historic video of the late American conductor Leonard Bernstein commenting on “The Song of the Earth,” which Bernstein regarded as Mahler’s greatest piece.

William Barbini, music director of the Chamber Music Society, played under Bernstein in the 1970s and early ’80s. Barbini graduated from Juilliard in 1970, and joined the violin section of the New York Philharmonic a short time later. Bernstein had stepped down as music director of the New York Philharmonic in 1969, but Bernstein continued to be closely associated with the orchestra. “As conductor laureate, Bernstein conducted six or seven weeks out of the season,” Barbini recalled. “And Bernstein basically did almost all of the tours — about four weeks annually.” Like many musicians who played under Bernstein, Barbini speaks reverently when Bernstein’s name comes up: “He was the greatest,” Barbini said.

Barbini first met Bernstein when Barbini was a boy, and Bernstein would occasionally materialize at master classes and student recitals where the young Barbini would perform. “I remember being nervous about standing up and playing for Bernstein when I was 10 or 11,” Barbini said.

Through Bernstein, Barbini also meet Aaron Copland. “Copland came to the New York Philharmonic many times, he was a close friend of Bernstein, so when we played Copland’s pieces, he showed up.”

Copland wrote “Appalachian Spring” for the Martha Graham Ballet in 1944. The music was scored for 13 instruments — a double string quartet, bass, flute, clarinet, bassoon, and piano. That’s the version that the Chamber Music Society will perform at Mondavi. (Copland later rearranged the ballet score as an orchestral suite, and the larger version is heard more often nowadays).

Mahler’s “Song of the Earth,” by contrast, started out as a big piece for orchestra and two vocal soloists, composed in 1908-1909 — a year after Mahler’s daughter Maria died (just short of her fifth birthday), Mahler was diagnosed with a heart ailment, and Mahler was forced to resign an important conducting post. The music in “Song of the Earth” reflects those tragedies through themes of parting and salvation, as well as Mahler’s sense of mortality (he died in 1911.)

Schoenberg began scoring a chamber orchestration of “Song of the Earth” in the 1920s. Schoenberg finished almost all of the adaptation, but left the last portion incomplete. After Schoenberg’s death in 1951, his chamber arrangement was eventually completed by Rainer Riehn in 1980.

“There’s something clearer about the smaller version of both pieces,” Barbini observed. As a musician who’s spent much of his career playing in large ensembles, “I wish I could say there’s a more luscious sound with the full orchestra version, but there isn’t,” Barbini added.

Barbini left the New York Philharmonic in 1983 to become concertmaster with the Sacramento Symphony, he has long made his home in El Macero. He has been music director of the Chamber Music Society of Sacramento since 1987; nowadays he is also on the faculty of the San Francisco Conservatory, in addition to teaching privately and performing with chamber music ensembles and orchestras around the state.

The Chamber Music Society’s April 25 performance will feature conductor Dawn Harms (music director of the Bay Area Rainbow Symphony, and also one of the top violinists in the San Francisco-based New Century Chamber Orchestra), soprano Carrie Hennessey (who has appeared in several Sacramento Opera productions), and tenor Christopher Bengochea (who has appeared with Opera San Jose and other companies).

The concert will be presented during Earth Week — April 25 is also Arbor Day — fitting in with the Chamber Music Society’s season-long theme of “Song of the Earth,” with music by various composers on the theme on each of the season’s programs. The concert is co-sponsored by the UC Davis Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences. Tickets are $30 general, $15 students, available through the Mondavi Center box office, www.mondaviarts.org or (530) 754-2787. Tickets for the originally scheduled April program by the Chamber Music Society (which was to have been held at Congregation Bet Haverim in Davis, and at the Music Recital Hall at Sacramento State) will be honored.

 

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Vocal Art Ensemble prepares for UK tour with local performances

BobDunning2W

Mather steelheadW

Kevin Mather shows off a steelhead caught on the Zymoetz River. Courtesy photo

Vocal Art Ensemble 2014W

The Vocal Art Ensemble will be performing twice in Davis. Courtesy photo

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April 13, 2014 | Leave Comment

The Vocal Art Ensemble (VAE) has earned a reputation for its worldly music, presenting ethnic pieces alongside historic and modern repertoire at every concert since the group’s inception in 2008. The Davis-based choral group even received national recognition for its unique style of programming, winning the American Prize for creative programming and collaboration in 2012.

This season they will be traveling the world through music in a more literal sense, embarking in early May on a second European performance tour that will take the Vocal Art Ensemble to historic venues in England and Scotland.

In preparation, the ensemble will present three local “expedition” concerts on April 25, 26 and 27 as a preview of their tour program. Entitled “Compass — From the Four Corners of the Earth,” these concerts (each featuring the same program) will explore varied geographical locations as well as the four seasons associated with each of the cardinal directions, forming one all-encompassing musical journey.

An example: the West section of the concert will reflect American music that sets poetry about autumn, fading light, or living each moment to its fullest. on the other hand, the East section includes rich and beloved choruses, all which herald from the heart of the European continent.

Tracia Barbieri, the Vocal Art Ensemble’s director, added that “ ‘North’ delves into the mystery and wonder of long winters with transcendent music from Sweden and Russia, while ‘South’ explodes with dance and energy from music born in the Southern hemisphere.”

The ensemble’s tour of England and Scotland will have them performing in cathedrals and historic village churches, some being the actual places where the composers of their pieces worked and lived. “We plan to perform William Byrd’s ‘Sing Joyfully’ in Lincoln Cathedral,” enthused Barbieri. “Byrd grew up in Lincoln, and Lincoln Cathedral is where he had his first post as organist and choirmaster back in 1563.”

VAE will also have a joint concert with the Scottish chorus Cadenza in Edinburgh, and plan to sing in a village church listed in the Domesday Book dating back to the 11th century and built of ironstone and limestone.

The VAE’s first tour was of Ireland in 2010, where they performed for local and visiting audiences in places like Kylemore Abbey, St. Canice Cathedral in Kilkenny, and the 12th century St. Kevin’s church in Glendalough. VAE also sang in an Irish Catholic mass and a joint performance with two Irish choirs. The group’s final performance at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin was attended by Dr. David Mooney, whose arrangement of the Irish folk song “Dulaman” was performed in Gaelic by the group throughout the tour.

The “Compass—From the Four Corners of the Earth” program will be performed three times in the local area:

–Friday April 25 at 7:30 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church in Sacramento (2620 Capitol Avenue, Sacramento).

–Saturday, April 26 at 7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Davis (27074 Patwin Road, Davis).

–Sunday, April 27 at 4:00 p.m.  at Davis United Methodist Church (1620 Anderson Road, Davis).

A suggested donation of $6 – 20 will be accepted at the door. For more information, see www.vae.trug.com or call Barbieri at 530-757-2396.

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Soroptimists

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April 17, 2014 | Leave Comment

Hello,
Attached is a press release for immediate publication. We would appreciate it! I’ve also incorporated it at the body of this email.

thank you!

Lane Parks
Sierra Nevada Region Public Awareness Chair
Soroptimist International

916-863-2500

Reno, Nevada
Soroptimist International of the Americas, Sierra Nevada Region will hold its 38th Annual Region Conference in Reno, Nevada April 25-27, 2014 at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa. Soroptimist is an international organization of business and professional women whose mission is to improve the lives of women and girls in their communities and around the world. Over 300 women with this goal in mind will convene to celebrate their local successes in their 60 individual clubs ranging from northern California to all of Nevada. Current Region Governor, Janice Labadie, from Newcastle, CA will be presiding over the conference. This year they will be honoring several recipients of awards, including high school girls who give service to their communities and women going back to school to improve the lives of their own families by obtaining a degree to start a career.

Soroptimist clubs undertake many local projects ranging from helping local women’s shelters, providing resources for sex and human trafficking victims, educating and empowering girls through various types of programs in schools and communities, to disaster relief. This year at conference, the region will be honoring women who have served or are currently serving our country in the military. Most of the 60 clubs will be sending an honoree to be featured at Friday night’s program.

To learn more about Soroptimist and locate a club in your neighborhood, go to www.LiveYourDream.org or www.Soroptimist.org.

Enterprise staff

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Bruce Gallaudet

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Comics: Thursday, April 17, 2014

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Hitchhiking dog photo

BobDunning2W

Mather steelheadW

Kevin Mather shows off a steelhead caught on the Zymoetz River. Courtesy photo

Vocal Art Ensemble 2014W

The Vocal Art Ensemble will be performing twice in Davis. Courtesy photo

HitchhikingDogW

Courtesy photo

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Nichols-Poulos letter

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April 15, 2014
Letter to Editor

The right person at the right time

I urge the school board to appoint Madhavi Sunder to the open seat on May 8th. I am confident that Madhavi has what it takes to be an excellent member of the DJUSD Board of Trustees. Madhavi, a product of public schools and universities, is committed to seeing that Davis schools continue to provide a high quality education for all our students.

Madhavi showed her willingness, even before her kids were in school, to work on behalf of Davis’ schools when she led the campaign to name the new school after civil rights hero Fred Korematsu. Even though Madhavi works full time as a professor at UC Davis King Hall, she is a tireless volunteer in our schools. She has served on the Korematsu PTA, the GATE advisory committee, and the Strategic Planning Committee Action Team, to name just a few.

Although, with two elementary aged children of her own, Madhavi has a personal stake in the quality of our schools, she is dedicated to the needs of all our students. Whether they are bound for trade schools or colleges and universities across the country, she wants to be sure their experiences in the Davis schools are the best they can be.

Madhavi already has an impressive track record of work on behalf of Davis students. She is knowledgeable about budgets and programs. She is committed to representing the community as she addresses the challenges ahead.

As a former teacher in the Davis schools for 24 years, as the mother and step-mother of four and the grandmother of three who have attended K-12 in Davis, I feel that I have a good idea of the kind of person we need on our Board. I believe Madhavi Sunder is the right person at the right time. We are so fortunate she is willing to serve. I hope the Board will appoint Madhavi to the open seat.

Sincerely,
Deborah Nichols Poulos

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Tony Fields tribute has new sound, same great style

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April 17, 2014 | Leave Comment

In the know

What: “What I Did for Love — A Tribute to Tony Fields”

Where: Brunelle Performance Hall at DHS, 315 W. 14th St.

When: 7 p.m. Friday, April 25, and Saturday, April 26

Tickets: $10 general, $8 for seniors over the age of 60 and $5 for students. Tickets will be available at the door.

The annual “What I Did for Love — A Tribute to Tony Fields” commemorates the passion and drive of the inexhaustible Tony Fields, a successful dancer and performer who, after making it in Hollywood, returned to Davis to direct several Davis High plays before dying of AIDS in 1995.

A ’70s themed show, performances range from Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” to Gloria Gaynor’s “I Will Survive” to Earth, Wind and Fire’s “September.” The DHS drama department produces the musical, which will be held at 7 p.m. Friday, April 25, and Saturday, April 26, in the Brunelle Performance Hall at DHS.

Fields, a DHS alumni, led a fruitful career as a professional dancer, appearing in Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” music video, playing Al De Luca in the movie “A Chorus Line” and dancing on the popular music television series “Solid Gold.”

Gwyn Bruch first met Fields through a community theater production of “Gypsy.” Then a Jazz Choir and drama student, Fields “skated through classes as the resident entertainer,” according to Bruch. The pair worked together in a production of “Bye Bye Birdie,” and in their later years “A Thousand Clowns,”

After a thriving career in the Los Angeles area, Fields returned to Davis due to illness in 1994. He began coaching DHS students in the local drama department. Intense and passionate, he demanded nothing but the best and pushed his students to the height of their talent with his bold teaching manner.

“I was drawn to his unbridled energy,” Bruch said.

This year’s interpretation of his tribute will differ vastly from former years with the incorporation of symphonic instruments and a focus on the ’70s. (Prior years have been on the ’80s).

“This year feels like a renewal of energy and commitment to our tribute — students are giving selflessly and passionately — led by our musical directors senior Mandy Chen and junior Utsav Bhargava,” Bruch said. “(It’s) our repayment to Tony for our friendship and the gifts he gave to DSHS Drama.”

Bhargava acts not only as co-music director but also as conductor of the band. He notes enjoying the variety of talent offered at DHS. Although most performances put on by the drama department feature some form of singing with background instrumentals, this particular event highlights everything from a boys’ dance number to an acting number to a few vocal performances.

“Singing, dancing, acting and playing instruments will all be showcased in this year’s show,” Bhargava said. “I hope to gain experience working with a fabulous cast and band to create wonderful entertainment.”

Bhargava looks to commemorate Fields through the tribute, as he feels a connection the individual on a personal level.

“I relate to this performance because I want to honor Tony’s memory by doing what he loved to do,” Bhargava said. “You’ll get much more than your money’s worth by attending.”

The theater family at Davis High bonds together for this special and more intimate performance. Dancer and chorus singer junior Lois Kang describes falling in love with the show and attributes many of her favorite memories to the production of the tribute.

“All the songs and dance numbers are fantastic. … I fell in love with this show last year. I started theater in ninth grade and I cant say I regret being a part of the theater family,” Kang said. “As a part of ‘A Chorus Line’ actors, being a part of the big picture is fun!”

Fields has earned the respect of Kang through his dedication and determination, which in turn led him to find success in the arts industry.

“Tony Fields was actually a student here at DHS,” Kang said. “He’s famous and he made it in the Arts. Being able to celebrate Tony’s successes and to honor him is just amazing. Because the arts are very competitive, and there’s very little room for a lot of people.

“Even if I don’t go on to do this in my adult life, the memories will stay and I will continue to support the arts. The theme of Tony is forever. It’s always remembered. … I learn from Tony his flexible and easy-going nature.”

Deeply enthusiastic, she strongly encourages everyone to come, promising a fun night in which the audience can even get involved in some of the musical numbers.

“I love it all! The dancing and singing … it’s like a musical,” she added.

A Tribute to Tony Fields includes songs from hit productions such as “Mamma Mia” and “Carwash.” Incorporated are a break dance number, a few lead vocalist solos with backup dancers and an ensemble band.

Co-music director senior Mandy Chen looks forward to the makeover of the annual tribute and hopes the audience will be just as impressed as she is with the results.

“This year’s production is a near total revamp. We’re doing ’70s pop songs — the kind of music Tony might have listened to when he was in high school. We’ve also added a live band,” Chen said. “The cast, crew, band members and production staff have been working so hard to make this a fresh and fun show. It’s a team effort. The rehearsal process has been all about collaboration. This show is a tribute to Tony Fields, a celebration of his hard work, commitment for excellence and passion for the performing arts.”

The night will end with Bruch’s solo rendition of “What I Did for Love,” sang in “A Chorus Line.” Bruch recalls struggling to keep from crying during her performance of the song her first year.

“I feel the piece wraps up the show perfectly. A Tribute to Tony Fields is about honoring an amazing, talented man who was passionate about what he did. He worked hard to get where he got as a performer. In being part of this production, I think we get to experience a little of what that passion means for ourselves,” Chen said.

Part of the proceeds for the show will go to a Tony scholarship to a notable DHS student. The awardee will be announced after the performance. Tickets are $10 general, $8 for seniors over the age of 60 and $5 for students. Tickets will be available at the door.

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Joe Nocera: CEO pay goes up, up and away!

BC-NOCERA-COLUMN-NYT/837
Commentary: CEO Pay Goes Up, Up and Away!
By JOE NOCERA

c.2014 New York Times News Service

At 79, Graef “Bud” Crystal is the grand old man of executive compensation critics. Once a top compensation consultant, he switched sides in the 1980s, becoming a fierce critic of many of the practices he helped institutionalize, and analyzing executive pay for other media like Fortune and, most recently, Bloomberg News. He’s been known to call his second career “atoning for my sins.”

The other day, Crystal was recalling what it used to be like trying to cobble together pay information about a chief executive based on reading the disclosure documents required by the Securities and Exchange Commission. There was no rhyme or reason to the way the numbers were put together, and shareholders were often left scratching their heads.

“I remember writing an article for Fortune in the late 1980s, using Goizueta’s pay at Coca-Cola,” Crystal told me. (Roberto Goizueta was the chief executive of Coke from 1981 until his death in 1997.) The proxy statement showed that he made $800,000 that year in salary. But about 15 pages later, it showed that he had received an additional $56 million in stock options. Except that, instead of being written numerically, the option grant was spelled out, thus easy to overlook. “It was deliberate obfuscation,” Crystal said.

For the most part, it isn’t like that anymore. In the mid-2000s, the SEC passed rules forcing companies to place all the compensation information for top executives in one place. There were people who thought that this effort at pay “transparency” would help get CEO compensation under control — in effect shaming compensation committees and chief executives from letting executive pay get any more out of hand than it already was.

Not exactly how it turned out, is it?

On Sunday, The New York Times published its annual list of the compensation of the top executives at the 100 largest publicly traded American companies. (The survey is conducted by Equilar for The Times.) Topping the list, as he often has, was Larry Ellison, chief executive of Oracle, who, despite being the world’s fifth-wealthiest person, raked in an additional $78.4 million in 2013, a combination of cash, stock and stock options. That was more than twice as much as the second and third place finishers, Robert Iger of Disney and Rupert Murdoch of 21st Century Fox. Not that they had anything to complain about, at $34.3 million and $26.1 million respectively.

The Times reported that the median compensation for CEOs in 2013 was $13.9 million, a 9 percent increase from 2012. The Wall Street Journal, which did its own, smaller survey a few weeks earlier, described the 2013 pay increases as representing “moderate growth.”

Nell Minow, another longtime critic of corporate governance and executive compensation practices, told me that the last time she harbored hope that executive pay might be brought under control was 1993. That was the year that Congress passed a bill capping cash compensation at $1 million. But the law also exempted pay that was based on “performance.”

Two things resulted. “Immediately, everybody got a raise to $1 million,” said Minow. And, second, company boards began setting performance measures that were easy to clear — and larding pay packages with huge stock option grants. “I hadn’t realized how easy it would be to manipulate performance measures,” Minow said.

Since then, nothing has stopped executive compensation from rising. When the market fell after the financial crisis, many companies gave their chief executives big option grants to “make up for” what they’d lost. When performance measures were toughened, chief executives responded by demanding larger grants because they were taking more “risk.”

It’s a rigged game. When the company’s stock goes up, says Crystal, the chief executive views himself as a hero. And when it goes down, “it’s Janet Yellen’s or Barack Obama’s fault.”

Plus, there’s simple greed. When I asked Crystal about Ellison’s pay package, he laughed. “There are billionaires like Warren Buffett and Larry Page who don’t pig out,” he said. (As the chief executive of Google, co-founder Page takes a $1 annual salary.) “But there are others who can’t keep their hands off the dough. Ellison is in that category.”

Soon enough, the SEC is going to require yet another disclosure. As a result of the Dodd-Frank financial reform law, companies will have to publish a ratio comparing the chief executive’s pay to the median pay of the company’s employees. At most large American corporations, the ratio is likely to be very high, hinting at how corrosive these huge executive pay packages have become, and the degree to which they play a role in furthering income inequality, a point made in “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” the new book by Thomas Piketty, the economist. The ratio is going to make people mad.

But will it reduce executive pay? We already know the answer to that.

New York Times News Service

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Ross Douthat: Diversity and dishonesty

BC-DOUTHAT-COLUMN-NYT/824
Diversity and Dishonesty
By ROSS DOUTHAT

c.2014 New York Times News Service

Earlier this year, a column by a Harvard undergraduate named Sandra Y.L. Korn briefly achieved escape velocity from the Ivy League bubble, thanks to its daring view of how universities should approach academic freedom.

Korn proposed that such freedom was dated and destructive and that a doctrine of “academic justice” should prevail instead. No more, she wrote, should Harvard permit its faculty to engage in “research promoting or justifying oppression” or produce work tainted by “racism, sexism, and heterosexism.” Instead, academic culture should conform to left-wing ideas of the good, beautiful and true, and decline as a matter of principle “to put up with research that counters our goals.”

No higher-up at Harvard endorsed her argument, of course. But its honesty of purpose made an instructive contrast to the institutional statements put out in the immediate aftermath of two recent controversies — the resignation of the Mozilla Foundation’s CEO, Brendan Eich, and the withdrawal, by Brandeis University, of the honorary degree it had promised to the human rights activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali.

In both cases, Mozilla and Brandeis, there was a striking difference between the clarity of what had actually happened and the evasiveness of the official responses to the events. Eich stepped down rather than recant his past support for the view that one man and one woman makes a marriage; Hirsi Ali’s invitation was withdrawn because of her sweeping criticisms of Islamic culture. But neither the phrase “marriage” nor the word “Islam” appeared in the initial statements Mozilla and Brandeis released.

Instead, the Mozilla statement rambled in the language of inclusion: “Our organizational culture reflects diversity and inclusiveness. … Our culture of openness extends to encouraging staff and community to share their beliefs and opinions. …”

The statement on Hirsi Ali was slightly more direct, saying that “her past statements … are inconsistent with Brandeis University’s core values.” But it never specified what those statements or those values might be — and then it fell back, too, on pieties about diversity: “In the spirit of free expression that has defined Brandeis University throughout its history, Ms. Hirsi Ali is welcome to join us on campus in the future to engage in a dialogue about these important issues.”

What both cases illustrate, with their fuzzy rhetoric masking ideological pressure, is a serious moral defect at the heart of elite culture in America.

The defect, crucially, is not this culture’s bias against social conservatives, nor its discomfort with stinging attacks on non-Western religions. Rather, it’s the refusal to admit — to others, and to itself — that these biases fundamentally trump the commitment to “free expression” or “diversity” affirmed in mission statements and news releases.

This refusal, this self-deception, means that we have far too many powerful communities (corporate, academic, journalistic) that are simultaneously dogmatic and dishonest about it — that promise diversity but only as the left defines it, that fill their ranks with ideologues and then claim to stand athwart bias and misinformation, that speak the language of pluralism while presiding over communities that resemble the beau ideal of Sandra Y.L. Korn.

Harvard itself is a perfect example of this pattern: As Patrick Deneen of Notre Dame pointed out when the column was making waves, Korn could only come up with one contemporary example of a Harvardian voice that ought to be silenced — “a single conservative octogenarian,” the political philosophy professor Harvey Mansfield. Her call for censorship, Deneen concluded, “is at this point almost wholly unnecessary, since there are nearly no conservatives to be found at Harvard.”

I am (or try to be) a partisan of pluralism, which requires respecting Mozilla’s right to have a CEO whose politics fit the climate of Silicon Valley, and Brandeis’ right to rescind degrees as it sees fit, and Harvard’s freedom to be essentially a two-worldview community, with a campus shared uneasily by progressives and corporate neoliberals, and a small corner reserved for token reactionary cranks.

But this respect is difficult to maintain when these institutions will not admit that this is what is going on. Instead, we have the pretense of universality — the insistence that the post-Eich Mozilla is open to all ideas, the invocations of the “spirit of free expression” from a school that’s kicking a controversial speaker off the stage.

And with the pretense, increasingly, comes a dismissive attitude toward those institutions — mostly religious — that do acknowledge their own dogmas and commitments and ask for the freedom to embody them and live them out.

It would be a far, far better thing if Harvard and Brandeis and Mozilla would simply say, explicitly, that they are as ideologically progressive as Notre Dame is Catholic or BYU is Mormon or Chick-fil-A is evangelical, and that they intend to run their institution according to those lights.

I can live with the progressivism. It’s the lying that gets toxic.

New York Times News Service

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Michael Bisch oped on city budget

Enterprise Editorial 04.15.14
Boiling the Frog
“People don’t pay attention until cities talk about bankruptcy, but by then the frog has already been boiled to death.” -David Crane, lecturer in the Public Policy Program at Stanford University*
According to Crane, reduction of building, street and vehicle maintenance, elimination of arts and cultural programs, cuts in park maintenance and closures are all indications of the social and cultural bankruptcy that comes long before financial bankruptcy. All the while, the politicians aren’t setting aside sufficient funds to pay for the promises they’ve made to the public employees. Does any of this sound familiar?
I’m not here to argue that the City of Davis is destined for municipal bankruptcy, but it certainly isn’t taking sufficient action to avert it. It’s not even clear whether effectively meeting the fiscal emergency is the city’ top priority given everything else they are pursuing. Whether the city can walk, chew gum and balance a checkbook all at the same time remains to be seen.
There are two aspects to the city’s handling of the fiscal emergency that leave a lot to be desired:
1) Defining the full scope of the problem along with a full range of viable solutions.
2) Engaging in effective & sustained community outreach and input to ensure a robust and productive community discussion leading to an informed electorate.
The city is currently projecting an approximately $5 million structural deficit every year for as far as the eye can see. As shocking as this may be, the city is significantly understating the severity of the fiscal crisis. The $5 million deficit projection is entirely arbitrary, virtually pulled out of thin air. The deficit projection only reflects $2.5 million per year to address the road and bicycle path maintenance backlog when the annual amount required to reduce the backlog is far, far greater. Why the city has budgeted only $2.5 million in annual maintenance expenditure is a mystery. $2.5 million results in worse roads and bike paths, not better, and a far greater backlog over time. The voters deserve the right to vote on whether we have fully maintained roads and bike paths or ever deteriorating roads and bike paths. Instead, the city is only allowing us the right to vote on the rate of decline. I for one would like to vote on a plan that actually fixes the problem.
Furthermore, the $5 million structural deficit does not account for the maintenance backlog for city-owned infrastructure apart from roads and bike paths. What’s the backlog for parks and recreational infrastructure, buildings, lights, street lights, parking lots, etc.? Nobody knows. How can the voters cast informed votes if they don’t know the extent of the problem? It appears we are destined to vote on a never ending series of band-aid tax measures amounting to a tax version of Chinese water torture.
Even if the city were being fully transparent regarding the extent of the fiscal emergency, and a full range of solutions to deal with it, how would the voters even know about the emergency? Expecting the voters to follow city council deliberations or media reports does not cut it. The city knows full well that many voters do not follow regularly follow these matter, i.e. they have “checked out”. Bemoaning the fact that many voters have checked out is not productive. What is productive is to engage in a cutting-edge community outreach and input effort suited to our age intended to engage the voters. An extraordinary fiscal emergency requires an extraordinary community engage effort.
Our community deserves to be fully informed, be allowed to weigh a full range of solutions, and to cast informed votes. None of this is currently the case. The voters are not children to be “guided” or “steered” by the city and the politicians in their desired direction. An immediate course correction is in order.
–Michael Bisch

*Although Mr. Crane is not without political controversy, his observation is no less relevant.

Special to The Enterprise

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Libertarians award scholarships 5/31

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April 17, 2014 | Leave Comment

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE…

Woodland, CA – [April 15th, *2014]* – The Libertarian Party of Yolo County is pleased to announce the recipients of the Liberty Scholarship for the Fall of 2014. This year’s winners are Rehan Shafqat (Pioneer High) and Dianne Cervantez (WCC). They will officially award the scholarships at the Libertarian Party of Yolo County’s Annual Banquet on May 31st at 6:30 p.m. at Spring Garden Restaurant in Woodland.

The Liberty Scholarship is a $1,000 dollar scholarship offered by the Libertarian Party of Yolo County to encourage Yolo County students in their pursuit of higher education. These funds may be used by students to help pay the costs of tuition, books or other school expenses in one of Yolo County’s institutions of higher learning or a nearby Sacramento college.

The Libertarian Party of Yolo County is dedicated to promoting peaceful change of our County and local government that fulfills the principles of individual freedom, free-market economics, and limited government. More information about the Libertarian Party of Yolo County can be found at www.yololp.com

————————————————————————————————————————————
For additional information contact: Eric Osborn at ericosborneo@gmail.com or Ph.# 530-402-1489

Enterprise staff

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Talk circle 5/17

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April 17, 2014 | Leave Comment

Dear Debbie -
Here is the basic info. / Briefly that we spoke of attaching to the article I wrote and sent to you. Let me know if this works? Thanks Debbie! – Gregory

The next Community Men’s Talk Circle will meet on Wednesday, May 14th, from 7:00 – 9:15 pm, at the Davis International House (10 College Park & Russell Blvd). All men 18 years and older are welcome, and there is no charge for these monthly events. For more information, call (530) 758-2794. We can be followed on Facebook, (search under: Community Men’s Talk Circle). All men are welcome!

P. Gregory Guss, LCSW
Community Men’s Talk Circle

Enterprise staff

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Beronio for Judge

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April 17, 2014 | Leave Comment

Beronio for Judge

I am supporting Janene Beronio for Superior Court Judge. When I first started practicing law in Yolo County in 1983, Janene was a deputy district attorney. Although she was an adversary, she was fair. She was hard-working.

Twenty-five years ago, the Court hired Janene as a court commissioner. She runs a very efficient courtroom and has done so ever since she was appointed.

She has handled a broad range of assignments including civil, criminal and juvenile cases. She developed a misdemeanor disposition schedule which has been used as a model by other courts.

Since that time, Janene has become my colleague and a mentor. I have been on the bench for over seven years. I appreciate her advice and insight that her judicial experience offers. She has served the Yolo County courts for nearly 35 years.

The other candidates have chosen to pursue careers outside of Yolo County. They have had little contact with our court.

Janene Beronio is the best qualified candidate for Superior Court Judge. Elect her on June 3rd.

Judge David W. Reed Yolo Superior Court

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Measure O: Saving the city or more waste?

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April 15, 2014 | Leave Comment

Whether voters support or oppose a new sales tax for the city may come down to their perception of how well the city has been managing its money.

According to the ballot argument for Measure O — the city’s wish to increase the sales tax rate from 8 percent to 8.5 percent and extend another existing sales tax from its 2016 sunset to 2020 — the measure would provide $3.6 million to pay for what’s billed as essential community needs.

They are listed in the ballot argument as “road, sidewalk, bike path, street light repairs” and money for parks, landscaping and street tree maintenance.

The current $4.99 million estimated structural deficit in the budget comes despite slightly increased revenues, according to City Manager Steve Pinkerton. Yet health care and other employee benefit costs are up, among others, as well as the price the city pays for water during a dry year.

Without the revenues from an additional half percent to the sales tax, the city is looking at an across the board 12 percent cut to all departments, including fire and police. Another option is to protect public safety from cuts and dig 25 percent into other city departments. This is on top of what the city says is 22 percent in cuts made to city staff during previous years.

Opponents to the measure contend in their argument that the city “failed to explain why the taxpayers should pay for their mismanagement of $5.1 million of taxpayer money.”

$5.1 million was the former December estimate for the city structural deficit, and was accurate at the time the ballot arguments were submitted.

Steve Pinkerton, Davis city manager, recommended a 0.75 percent sales tax increase to the city, saying that without the extra revenues in the short term, the city would in effect function not like a city, but an unincorporated region of the county.

The ballot argument for the measure was signed by all members of the current City Council and the argument against it was signed by five Davis residents: Ernie Head, Janet Zwahlen, John Smith, Thomas Randall, Jr. and Jose Granda.

Some of the opponents were involved in legal action against the measure. Granda and Randall filed a lawsuit claiming the city incorrectly used the word “cent” in place of “percent” on the amount of sales tax the measure would extract. The lawsuit was thrown out of court last month for suing the wrong parties. Granda is seeking a seat on the Davis Joint Unified School Board.

Opponents also decry Pinkerton’s salary, saying $188,000 per year is too much for the city’s CEO.

“He left Davis for another city that pays him $13,000 less and now the council has postponed setting up the salary of the new (city manager) pending the result of this election.”

The reality is Pinkerton left for Incline Village General Improvement District, not another city. The district handles recreation, sewer and waste for the northeast shore of Lake Tahoe, in Nevada.

City council members have said in public meetings they are leaving the decision of hiring and paying for a city manager to the new City Council that will convene after the results June 3 election. It is possible that up to two seats could change on the council, and one seat is for sure going to be vacated in favor of a new member. The current council’s reasoning is that they don’t want to make a decision that so clearly affects the next council now.

Opponents also blame the city for creating “additional economic hardship” when it set the water rates now newly in effect. They say water rates could triple.

While the potential cost of the water rates are not so much in dispute, and whether individual voting Davisites can afford it is an open question, the water project was voted in by a majority of Davis voters and the city followed a legal Proposition 218 process that has been backed up by the Yolo County Superior Court.

— Reach Dave Ryan at dryan@davisenterprise.net or 530-747-8057

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Learn more

What: “Call of the Wolf”: an Earth Day celebration plus awards presentation
When: 2:30-4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 27
Where: Veterans’ Memorial Theater, 203 E. 14th St., Davis
Admission: $10 adults, $5 children
Pre-register: at www.cooldaviscallofthewolf.eventbrite.com
Info: info@cooldavis.org

Enterprise staff

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Comics: Wednesday, April 16, 2014

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Thank you, from Tuleyome

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April 16, 2014 | Leave Comment

Tuleyome held its annual fundraiser at the Odd Fellows Hall in Davis, CA on March 21st and we want to thank everyone who came out to support our organization and programs.

Silent auction donations were provided by the Berryessa Gap Winery, Big 5 Sporting Goods, Charlie and Logan Schneider, Culler Wine, the Dark Horse Golf Course, Davis Paintball, Dixon Dance, El Pollo Loco, Flying Dolphins, Fungi Perfecti, Hedgerow Farms, photographer Jim Rose, author Kaye Hall, photographer Kevin English, artist Margaret Eldred, the Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens, author Nancy Bauer, Pier 39, Richard and Judy Wydick, Rocknasium, Solar Cookers International, Spotlight Dance and Fitness, Susan Hodgson, the California Academy of Sciences, The Cubby Woman’s Walkabout blog, the San Francisco 49’ers and San Francisco Zoo, the Tallman Hotel in Lake County, and Tributary Whitewater Tours.
We also owe a special thanks to our keynote speaker; author and wilderness expert Doug Scott, along with Good Humus Produce for providing the beautiful flower arrangements, our photographer Stacey DeBono, Chef Jeff Oblinger and Inspiration Point Catering, and the crew at the Davis Odd Fellows Hall.

Lastly, we want to thank everyone who attended. You made this event really special and we are grateful to have so much support for the work that we do in this amazing region.

Sara Husby-Good, Executive Director, Tuleyome

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Safety first at Russell and 113

By Meghan Skaer Thomason

Twice already in the past two weeks, my wife and I have seen two bicyclists hit by cars at the Russell Boulevard exit from northbound Highway 113. These are not the first two accidents at this site we’ve seen since moving to Davis five years ago, but the compressed time scale and seeming total lack of reliable safety at this intersection has motivated me to reach out to other Enterprise readers, community members, and, I hope, City Council members.

The Russell bike path as it crosses Highway 113 can be treacherous on both sides (northbound exit, mentioned above, and southbound on-ramp). In fact, the worst accident I’ve seen occurred with a car entering the southbound Highway 113 on-ramp. However, the frequency of car-bike interactions at the northbound 113 exit should merit some consideration and, ideally, some safety planning and updates.

The problem
A large volume of traffic travels on northbound 113, exits at Russell Boulevard and then turns right toward the UC Davis campus and town. Although it is illegal to turn right on a red light here, many drivers do not notice the small sign, and creep forward into the crosswalk, and then proceed when they perceive a break in traffic.

Unfortunately, at no point in this process do the drivers look to their right, where many bicyclists are crossing on their green light and walk signal. This is the problem.

While my wife and I have been lucky to avoid injury, both of us have come so close to cars making this “creep” move, I’ve had to stop my momentum by placing a hand on their hood.

Current safety measures
Currently, there is a small “no turn on red” sign displayed for drivers wishing to turn right. Many Davis residents are aware of the sign and the safety rules at this intersection, but many drivers are not aware. The small sign does not catch the attention of drivers.

Proposed safety measures
I would like to see the installation of a dedicated right-turn signal in addition to the current traffic light design. This addition would make it undeniably clear when it is legal to turn right (green light!), and when it is not (red arrow!). I believe a dedicated red arrow light, in addition to a sign explaining “no turn on red arrow,” would go far toward helping drivers understand the correct traffic flow at this intersection.

This change would make my wife and me — and countless other bicyclists traveling to and from West Davis — feel much more safe and secure on the Russell Boulevard bike path.

— Meghan Skaer Thomason is a Davis resident, UC Davis student and concerned community member

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Mark Rollins: Republicans are wrong on economics

REPUBLICANS ARE WRONG ON ECONOMICS

Washington Republicans have a sorry record of making economic predictions. They are consistently wrong but that does not stop them from making more wrong predictions.
John Boehner in August of 2010 said that health care costs will skyrocket next year thanks to Obamacare, and in January of 2011 Paul Ryan said that unless this law is repealed it will exacerbate the spiraling costs of healthcare.
Of course, the opposite happened. In fact healthcare cost spending is now increasing at the lowest rate in fifty years.
The mainstream media has failed to call out the totally wrong predictions by Republicans even though those same wrong predictions keep getting repeated.
In 1993 Newt Gringrich said this about Clinton’s proposed tax increases:
“Tax increases will so weaken the economy that jobs will be killed, revenue will go down, and the deficit, instead of decreasing, will increase. I believe that that will in fact kill the current recovery and put us back in a recession.”
Those huge tax increases proposed by Bill Clinton were passed later that year with every single Republican in the House and the Senate voting against the bill.
Every Republican in both bodies of Congress said that the Clinton tax increases, would badly hurt the economy and most of them specifically predicted a recession.
Every one of them was wrong. The economy soared after those tax increases. In fact here is what Tom Brokaw reported on the evening news in January of 1999.” Brokaw: “Think about it. There probably have never been better times than these, when so many people are doing so well in an economy that just gets stronger and stronger. The numbers that are in from the end of 1998 are sensational.”
How much more wrong could the Republicans have been? Well here is an example; How about five years of totally wrong predictions about run-away inflation which was always supposed to happen any day now but never did, according to the Wall Street Journal editorial page and CNBC, and there has not been one inkling of an admission of error, let alone any kind of apology from these ‘respectable sources’.
So instead of apologies the Republicans resort to denials like saying for five years now, that The Recovery Act, or “Stimulus” was a complete failure, never mind that most economists say almost the exact opposite.
Now the big denial is that the seven million who signed up for Obamacare is a fake number. When the numbers were horrible in the beginning of the rollout, then of course the numbers were all too real.
Scholars have reminded us that the Republican Party used to embrace Keynesian economics along with Democrats, as a necessary way to repair the economy in times of recession. They believed in government spending to make up for lack of private spending to boost the economy, during economic slumps.
Tea Partiers don’t seem to understand that science can be counterintuitive. They don’t get that if you pay down debt in a depressed economy it actually increases debt, and they don’t get that most of our debt is money that we owe to ourselves or that it is the ratio of debt to GDP that is much more important than the absolute amount, or that printing money in a depressed economy is not inflationary, or that debt is essential for a capitalist system and is not a dirty word.
The Republican Party has become the anti-science, anti-fact, anti-everything party. They have become the Petty Party. They have been taken over by radicals and radicals have never had any use for facts or for what the majority of the country wants. Therefore fact checkers are a nuisance because they reveal the ugly truth about their predictions.
The radical right has become entrenched in our government even though we the people voted for a democratically controlled federal government in 2012, with more people voting for Democrats in the House while gerrymandered districts in seven states kept Republicans in control. This new radicalism is not conservatism, so the media needs to stop labeling it as such.aYou know they might be radicals when they call an obviously moderate, and reasonable president like Barak Obama, a radical or a dictator and keep shouting ‘Impeach’ without ever naming one law that he broke.
Republicans say Obama’s policies are hurting our economy. I say, what policies? The radicals have kept austerity spending in place for the most part, and have summarily rejected Obama’s big jobs bill. History shows that their theories don’t work and Democratic policies do work. Radical right policies are in place and are causing real pain for millions of real working people, while data shows that the rich are doing better than ever.
The GOP’s economic predictions are always wrong. We do not need to hear debates about the fact that Democratic tax policies in the 90’s created the best boom period in recent memory, (and some of us do remember it), any more than debate about where babies come from.
When some people say; “I don’t talk about politics” it goes much deeper than that. The situation is much more serious than just politics as usual. It is now about one party’s agenda to weaken our very Democracy, and there is nothing political about calling out extremists. It is simply patriotic. We are re-hashing old debates that were settled decades ago, and that includes other things like abortion rights, voting rights and even civil rights.
Rank and file and old fashioned conservatives are way ahead of these institutional Republicans.
We used to have two parties that believed that we all do better when we all do better, that a good economy lifts all boats, but now it seems one party wants a small elite group to have a wild party on one boat and doesn’t care if the rest of us even have water for our little boats to sink in.

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Bonner letter

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Hi Letter to the Editor Folks,

Would you please get this out when possible. Also, my older computer will not allow me to properly note the accent marks on Cesar Chavez – would you please add them before printing?

Thank you!!

Jill Bonner
530-330-4315

Cesar Chavez Bike Swap Another Success!!

A big, big thanks to all the families who participated in the Cesar Chavez Elementary 2nd Annual Citywide Bike Swap Event which took place on Sunday, April 6th. It was a win-win situation for those who sold their bikes, donated their bikes or bought bikes at the swap.

More than 200 bikes were consigned or donated, the majority of which sold – all for great prices! The Bike Swap was a true community service effort with support from many sources. Business and local organizational support came from Ink Monkey who helped us get the word with colorful, catchy banners that were hung around town. Then we had B & L Bike Shop, Blisworks and Davis Wheelworks all offering bike tuneup discounts to folks that bought bikes at the Swap. Apex Bikes was on site for several hours at the Bike Swap answering bike questions and doing bike adjustments, Green Bike Depot consigned a ton of bikes, bike lights and bike locks for us to sell (which the school got a percentage of), UCD TAPS sold quite a few bike licenses at the Bike Swap and several UCD Iota Phi Theta Fraternity student volunteers came to help out plus City of Davis Street Smarts Program Manager Rachel Hartsough and Bike Coordinator DK provided Street Smart Bike Safety Information to distribute. As for handling the bike intake, bike clean up and bikes sales throughout the Bike Swap, a thank you to Davis Bicycles School Committee volunteers in addition to many Cesar Chavez families plus several independent bike-knowledgeable volunteers.

Lastly, a big Thank You to Debbie Davis with the Davis Enterprise for helping to promote the Bike Swap Event. Since this was a citywide event – we could not have gotten the word out without your publicity assistance.

All profits from this annual event support the Cesar Chavez Elementary Spanish Immersion Parent and Teachers (SIPAT). Thank you again to all who made this continuing event so successful and so fun. Hope to see you again next year!

Jill Bonner & Caroleen Becker
Cesar Chavez SIPAT Bike Committee
Davis

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Yolo County Superintendent of Schools Election

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Dear Editor,

I have had the good fortune to work in the public schools for 32 years, primarily as a school administrator. Most recently I served as the Director of Student Services for the Davis School District and then as the Director of Special Education for the Yolo County Office of Education until my recent retirement. It is from this experience that I support Sam Neustadt in the upcoming election for the Yolo County Superintendent of Schools.

The county office operates programs throughout Yolo County. These include Head Start preschool services and alternative education programs for students that have either been expelled from a local district, incarcerated at juvenile hall or have not been successful in district programs. The largest programs are in the area of special education. The county offers programs for students with disabilities that are challenging to serve through district programs due to the highly specialized services needed by these students. These programs support students infant through adult age that are deaf, blind, autistic, emotionally disturbed, developmentally delayed, medically fragile or physically handicapped. These services are provided through special day class programs and itinerant services throughout Yolo County.

The Yolo County Superintendent of Schools oversees these programs and has many other responsibilities, such as fiscal oversight of the districts. The election in June has only one candidate with the background and experience for this position. Sam Neustadt has been a teacher, school principal, assistant superintendent and a leader for years within the K-12 school system. He is a long time resident of Yolo County and currently administers these same special education programs for the Solano County Office of Education. It is critical that the superintendent of schools have a deep understanding of the complex issues associated with these programs. I urge the voters of Yolo County to learn more about Sam through his website at www.samneustadt.com and vote for him on June 3, 2014.

Jim Coulter
Davis, CA

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Measure O is in the Court of Public Opinion

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April 15, 2014 | Leave Comment

In the last few days the Davis City attorney requested the Superior Court not to hear the court case Tom Randall and I brought up to keep our local government honest. Placing a false and misleading question on the ballot as Measure O does not speak very well for the City Attorney or the City Council members. It was in the best interest of the city and the public to let the court decide if the following question is or is not false and misleading. That question now has moved to a better Court, the “Court of Public Opinion” you are the judge.

“Shall Ordinance No. 2432, which would authorize the City of Davis to reauthorize and extend the existing half cent sales and use tax for general government purposes and increase the sales and use tax by an additional half cent, for a combined one cent tax, through December 31, 2020, be adopted?”

This is supposed to convey to you that it is two taxes and that it denies you the right to vote on it in 2016. States “a combined one cent tax”, so one penny. What is one penny? This is false and misleading because they tell you is “one penny” but they want to dip in your pocket and charge you “one percent”. It is deliberately conceived with the idea of making it easier to pass. Stop this dishonesty, Vote NO on Measure O.

Bringing the sales tax in Davis, to 8.5% would be devastating to Davis businesses. Collapsing business and unemployment is never good for any city. The “O” oh NO! Measure is bad for Davis.

Expect scare and threatening tactics from the City Council to pressure you into voting to approve it. If it passes, expect a third tax in the form of an increase in your mortgage, a new parcel tax in November. This would be number 5 in Davis in less than three years between the School Board and the City Council. Unless you vote NO, it will never end. You be the judge. Vote NO on measure O.
Jose J. Granda
Davis

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Endorse SB1272, The Overturn Citizens United Act

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Our 238-year-old democracy is being destroyed by the current Supreme Court’s recent decisions to allow a corporation to be equivalent to human beings and to allow unlimited money to have unlimited media influence over voters.
Our forefathers supported one human being for one vote. The Supreme Court has destroyed that revolutionary concept with the two rulings mentioned above, and our youthful democracy is now on the road to failure.
Shame on you, Supreme Court! You have foresaken the American spirit of our Constitution! You have now directed America to being ruled by corporations which exist to maximize money and by rich people who have maximized their money. Supreme Court, you have just cut the heart out of America. A human being dies without a heart. America is now dying.
Kathleen Marie Williams-Fossdahl
Davis

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Cory Golden

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Arboretum events 4/19

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Sign up now!

Camp Shakespeare
July 7 – July 18: Session 1 (Ages 13-17) (Not in Arboretum, location TBD)
July 21 – August 1: Session 2 (Ages 7-12)
August 4 – August 15 Session 3 (Ages 7-12)
9 a.m.-3 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis campus

Sign up today for the best summer camp in Davis! Join the Davis Shakespeare Ensemble for exciting theater games, acting workshops, and a special camp production. This summer campers will play clowns, villains, and soldiers in one of Shakespeare’s most popular comedies: Much Ado About Nothing. There are options for early drop off and late pick up. For more details and online enrollment, visit www.shakespearedavis.com.

PHOTOS:

Camp Shakespeare

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.
________________________________________

Wednesday, May 14 & June 11

Walk with Warren: West-end Gardens
12-1 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis campus

Join Warren Roberts, the Superintendent Emeritus of the Arboretum and famous storyteller and punster for an always-engaging noontime exploration of spring at the UC Davis Arboretum’s west-end gardens. The event is free; limited, free one-hour parking is available along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55 where parking can be paid by meter or by purchase of an $8 daily pass. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

Fridays, April 25; May 9 & 23; June 6 &20

Folk Music Jam Session
12–1 p.m., Wyatt Deck, Arboretum Drive, UC Davis campus
Folk musicians are invited to play together informally during this acoustic jam session at the Wyatt Deck, located on Arboretum Drive (formerly Old Davis Road) next to the redwood grove in the UC Davis Arboretum. Pull out your fiddles, guitars, mandolins, penny whistles, pipes, flutes, squeezeboxes (you name it) and join your fellow musicians for a little bluegrass, old-time, blues, Celtic, klezmer, and world music over the lunch hour. All skill levels welcome. Listeners welcome! The event is free; parking is available for $8 in Visitor Lot 5, at Old Davis Road and Arboretum Drive. For more information, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

PHOTOS:
Past Folk Music Jam Sessions

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.

 

Thursday, April 24
Poetry in the Garden: Heera Kulkarni and Kenya Mitchell (+ Open Mic)
12-1 p.m., Wyatt Deck, UC Davis Arboretum

Heera Kulkarni holds two masters degrees from Asia and North America in Social Work and Education, respectively. She teaches Indian classical music and is director of Raga Academy School of Indian Music. She writes poetry in Hindi, Marathi, and English, and has recorded some of her poems and songs in an album called Shama.

Kenya Mitchell is a Ph.D. candidate at UC Davis. She explores the intersection between race, femininity and class in her poetry and prose. Kenya has published two books, Aftermath of a Sociopath and Blue Line To Wonderland, and has pieces in publications ranging from Harvard School of Education’s ALANA Anthology to New York Magazine.

After the readings there will be an open mic available for other poetry readings.

The event is free; parking is available in Visitor Parking Lot 5 where parking can be paid by purchase of an $8 daily pass. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.
________________________________________

Saturday, April 26
Arboretum Plant Sale
9 a.m.-1 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Teaching Nursery
(Garrod Drive near La Rue Road, across from Vet Med), UC Davis campus

THE NEW FRONT YARD: Prepare your landscape for long-term water conservation with attractive, drought-tolerant, easy-care, region-appropriate plants including a large selection of California natives and Arboretum All-Stars.

Not a member? Join at the door! All members receive 10% off their purchases; new members also receive an additional $10 off as a thank you for joining. The benefits of membership far outweigh your cost! For more information on the benefits of membership visit: http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/join_the_friends.aspx.

The event is free; parking is free and available in nearby. For more information and directions, visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx or call (530) 752-4880.

PHOTOS:
Member Appreciation Plant Sale (Spring 2013)
Public Plant Sale (Spring 2012)

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.
________________________________________

Sunday, April 27
Fun with Food: Eco-friendly Tie-dye
12-2 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis campus

Bring a white item you want to tie-dye: t-shirt, socks, shorts, pillow-case, you name it! The UC Davis Arboretum Ambassadors will help you tie-dye and explain how to make the plant- and food-based, eco-friendly dyes provided. The event is free; parking is available at no charge on the weekends along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum..ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.
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Sunday, May 4
Wild Family Day
1-3 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis campus

Join Wild Campus for our 3rd annual Wild Family Day. A UC Davis student organization, Wild Campus is dedicated to the conservation of local flora and fauna. Enjoy games and activities, as well as educational displays and live animals! The event is free; parking is available at no charge on the weekends along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55. For more details, email wildcampus411@gmail.com. Co-sponsored by the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden.
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Tuesday, May 6
Big Day of Giving 2014
24 hours; 12 a.m.-12 p.m.

24 hours to give where your heart is! The BIG Day of Giving is a local initiative to inspire philanthropy in the Greater Sacramento region. The UC Davis Arboretum is participating in this one-day online giving event. Donors will have the chance to support an organization they love while leveraging their giving through matches and fun prize challenges. For more information about the Big Day of Giving visit http://givelocalnow.org/; the organizational profile of the UC Davis Arboretum will be available for viewing there soon.

If you are interested in helping our organization spread the word about this one-day event, contact Suzanne Ullensvang, Resource Development Manager, at sullensvang@ucudavis.edu or (530)752-8324.
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Saturday, May 17
Arboretum Plant Sale (Clearance Sale)
9 a.m.-1 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Teaching Nursery
(Garrod Drive near La Rue Road, across from Vet Med), UC Davis campus

THE NEW FRONT YARD: Prepare your landscape for long-term water conservation with attractive, drought-tolerant, easy-care, region-appropriate plants including a large selection of California natives and Arboretum All-Stars.

Not a member? Join at the door! All members receive 10% off their purchases; new members also receive an additional $10 off as a thank you for joining. The benefits of membership far outweigh your cost! For more information on the benefits of membership visit: http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/join_the_friends.aspx.

The event is free; parking is free and available in nearby. For more information and directions, visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx or call (530) 752-4880.

PHOTOS:
Member Appreciation Plant Sale (Spring 2013)
Public Plant Sale (Spring 2012)

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.
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Sunday, May 18
Storytime Through the Seasons: Under the Tuscan Sun
1-3 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis campus

Explore the natural, cultural, and flavorful world of the Mediterranean in this program for children and families. Take part in readings, tastings, and hands-on activities in the Arboretum’s spectacular Mediterranean Collection. Sponsored by the UC Davis Arboretum Ambassadors. The event is free; parking is available at no charge on the weekends along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55. For more information and directions visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx or call (530) 752-4880.

PHOTOS:
Storytime Through the Seasons: Expedition to Africa (Winter 2013 program)
Storytime Through the Seasons: Under the Redwood Tree (Fall 2013 program)

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.
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Thursday, May 29
Poetry in the Garden: Frank Dixon Graham and Tim Kahl (+ Open Mic)
12-1 p.m., Wyatt Deck, UC Davis Arbortetum

Frank Dixon Graham is the author of Out On the Reach and The Infinite In Between. Graham’s work, which consists primarily of observations of art and people, nature and love, is published in over twenty-five journals, including: Hawaii Pacific Review, Evansville Review, Clackamas Literary Review, and Harvard University Scriptorium.

Tim Kahl is the author of Possessing Yourself and The Century of Travel. His work has been published in Prairie Schooner, Indiana Review, Ninth Letter, Notre Dame Review, The Journal, Parthenon West Review, and many other journals. He appears as Victor Schnickelfritz in the poetry and poetics blog The Great American Pinup and the poetry video blog Linebreak Studios.

After the readings there will be an open mic available for other poetry readings.

The event is free; parking is available in Visitor Parking Lot 5 where parking can be paid by purchase of an $8 daily pass. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

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Saturday, May 31
Yoga in the Arboretum
1:15 p.m., Grassy area east of Putah Creek Lodge, UC Davis campus

Join us for an hour of yoga appropriate for all skill levels led by certified instructor Loshan Ostrava. Dress comfortably. Please bring a towel or yoga mat and water bottle. Sponsored by the UC Davis Arboretum Ambassadors. The event is free; parking is available at no charge in the Putah Creek Lodge parking lot. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.
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Sunday, June 1
Bugtopia 3.0: Discover Everyday Insects
1-3 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis campus

Learn about the hidden insect wonders of the Arboretum from UC Davis Entomology Club members and UC Davis Arboretum Ambassadors. Tour the collections and learn insect names, trapping methods, and ecology.

The event is free; parking is available at no charge on the weekends along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55. For more information and directions visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx or call (530) 752-4880.

PHOTOS:
Bugtopia 2.0 (Spring 2013)

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.

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Tuesday, June 10
3rd Annual Farewell Reading of the UC Davis Creative Writing Program
7 p.m., Wyatt Deck, UC Davis Arboretum

The Creative Writing MA program and the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden present the 3rd annual student reading on Wyatt Deck. Graduating writers will read selections from their theses. The event is free; parking is available in Visitor Parking Lot 5 where parking can be paid by purchase of an $8 daily pass. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

________________________________________

Katie F. Hetrick
Director, Marketing & Communications

UC Davis Arboretum & Public Garden
One Shields Avenue • Davis, CA • 95616
Tel: 530.754.4134
Fax: 530.752.5796
Email: kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu

Websites:
arboretum.ucdavis.edu
publicgarden.ucdavis.edu

Social Media:

Enterprise staff

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Leonard letter

Voters: soon you’ll be given the opportunity to choose 2 new members for the Davis City Council. This letter is not about whom to vote for but how to make the choice you eventually make.

In the past, I’ve voted for several City Council-people who were elected based on who I thought they were and upon how I thought they would vote when on the City Council. In some instances, I was happy with the choice and in others I regretted the choice I made.

I wonder: was there anything I could have done so that my choice would’ve been one that I would be proud of rather than embarrassed by? I think the answer is ‘yes’ for then and also for the future. There is a method.

The first part for improving my/your choice is to study the candidate statements. They are located on the City of Davis webpage at: http://city-managers-office.cityofdavis.org/city-clerk/elections. One of the things to look at is the tone of the statement, for example is it open and inclusive, demanding and authoritarian in tone, and so on. Another is how each statement addresses economic, social, and environmental issues; if a candidate, for example, claims to be all things to all people, what are the choices he/she will really make when on the council; will he, for example, sacrifice environmental interests for economic ones or always be a defender of the poor no matter what etc.? Finally, if you know anything about the candidate, how do his/her past or present actions compare to the what he/she claims she will vote for in the future and who supports him/her, with what affiliations?

The second part is to determine how committed each candidate is to the economy, society, and the environment; assign a number, from 1 to 10, as to how strong any candidate’s commitment is on each one of these 3 issues. Add the numbers up in each column separately and sum the columns as well. For example, candidate A may be a 6 on the economy, a 9 on social commitment, and 5 on the environment for a total of 20. Candidate B may be 5 on the economy, 10 on social issues, and 10 on environmental issues. How do your values compare to those of the candidates; which of the candidates will you choose?

The last part is to look at the future, assuming that some or all of the candidates you choose get on the Council. What is the likelihood you will be betrayed? The numbers you tabulated in the first part may help you answer the question about betrayal. Let’s say the candidate you chose was an 8 on the economy and a 5 on the environment and you are a 4 on the economy and a 10 on the environment, the likelihood of betrayal would be great; your candidate would choose the economy over the environment much more than you would.

Of course, other factors unrelated to issues also account for how we vote. Do we like the candidate, for example?

I wish you happy voting and hope my voting decision will not be ones that I will come to regret.

Jim Leonard

442 University Avenue

Davis, CA 95616

530-220-4314

Special to The Enterprise

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Paul Krugman: Health care nightmares

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April 12, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-KRUGMAN-COLUMN-NYT/796
Commentary: Health Care Nightmares
By PAUL KRUGMAN

c.2014 New York Times News Service

When it comes to health reform, Republicans suffer from delusions of disaster. They know, just know, that the Affordable Care Act is doomed to utter failure, so failure is what they see, never mind the facts on the ground.

Thus, on Tuesday, Mitch McConnell, the Senate minority leader, dismissed the push for pay equity as an attempt to “change the subject from the nightmare of Obamacare”; on the same day, the nonpartisan RAND Corp. released a study estimating “a net gain of 9.3 million in the number of American adults with health insurance coverage from September 2013 to mid-March 2014.” Some nightmare. And the overall gain, including children and those who signed up during the late-March enrollment surge, must be considerably larger.

But while Obamacare is looking like anything but a nightmare, there are indeed some nightmarish things happening on the health care front. For it turns out that there’s a startling ugliness of spirit abroad in modern America — and health reform has brought that ugliness out into the open.

Let’s start with the good news about reform, which keeps coming in. First, there was the amazing come-from-behind surge in enrollments. Then there were a series of surveys — from Gallup, the Urban Institute, and RAND — all suggesting large gains in coverage. Taken individually, any one of these indicators might be dismissed as an outlier, but taken together they paint an unmistakable picture of major progress.

But wait: What about all the people who lost their policies thanks to Obamacare? The answer is that this looks more than ever like a relatively small issue hyped by right-wing propaganda. RAND finds that fewer than 1 million people who previously had individual insurance became uninsured — and many of those transitions, one guesses, had nothing to do with Obamacare. It’s worth noting that, so far, not one of the supposed horror stories touted in Koch-backed anti-reform advertisements has stood up to scrutiny, suggesting that real horror stories are rare.

It will be months before we have a full picture, but it’s clear that the number of uninsured Americans has already dropped significantly — not least in McConnell’s home state. It appears that around 40 percent of Kentucky’s uninsured population has gained coverage, and we can expect a lot more people to sign up next year.

Republicans clearly have no idea how to respond to these developments. They can’t offer any real alternative to Obamacare, because you can’t achieve the good stuff in the Affordable Care Act, like coverage for people with pre-existing medical conditions, without also including the stuff they hate, the requirement that everyone buy insurance and the subsidies that make that requirement possible. Their political strategy has been to talk vaguely about replacing reform while waiting for its inevitable collapse. And what if reform doesn’t collapse? They have no idea what to do.

At the state level, however, Republican governors and legislators are still in a position to block the act’s expansion of Medicaid, denying health care to millions of vulnerable Americans. And they have seized that opportunity with gusto: Most Republican-controlled states, totaling half the nation, have rejected Medicaid expansion. And it shows. The number of uninsured Americans is dropping much faster in states accepting Medicaid expansion than in states rejecting it.

What’s amazing about this wave of rejection is that it appears to be motivated by pure spite. The federal government is prepared to pay for Medicaid expansion, so it would cost the states nothing, and would, in fact, provide an inflow of dollars. Health economist Jonathan Gruber, one of the principal architects of health reform — and normally a very mild-mannered guy — recently summed it up: The Medicaid-rejection states “are willing to sacrifice billions of dollars of injections into their economy in order to punish poor people. It really is just almost awesome in its evilness.” Indeed.

And while supposed Obamacare horror stories keep on turning out to be false, it’s already quite easy to find examples of people who died because their states refused to expand Medicaid. According to one recent study, the death toll from Medicaid rejection is likely to run between 7,000 and 17,000 Americans each year.

But nobody expects to see a lot of prominent Republicans declaring that rejecting Medicaid expansion is wrong, that caring for Americans in need is more important than scoring political points against the Obama administration. As I said, there’s an extraordinary ugliness of spirit abroad in today’s America, which health reform has brought out into the open.

And that revelation, not reform itself — which is going pretty well — is the real Obamacare nightmare.

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David Brooks: The moral power of curiosity

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April 12, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-BROOKS-COLUMN-NYT/844
Commentary: The Moral Power Of Curiosity
By DAVID BROOKS

c.2014 New York Times News Service

Most of us have at one time or another felt ourselves in the grip of the explanatory drive. You’re confronted by some puzzle, confusion or mystery. Your inability to come up with an answer gnaws at you. You’re up at night, turning the problem over in your mind. Then, suddenly: clarity. The pieces click into place. There’s a jolt of pure satisfaction.

We’re all familiar with this drive, but I wasn’t really conscious of the moral force of this longing until I read Michael Lewis’ book, “Flash Boys.”

As you’re probably aware, this book is about how a small number of Wall Street-types figured out that the stock markets were rigged by high-frequency traders who used complex technologies to give themselves a head start on everybody else. It’s nominally a book about finance, but it’s really a morality tale. The core question Lewis forces us to ask is: Why did some people do the right thing while most of their peers did not?

The answer, I think, is that most people on Wall Street are primarily motivated to make money, but a few people are primarily motivated by an intense desire to figure stuff out.

If you are primarily motivated to make money, you just need to get as much information as you need to do your job. You don’t have time for deep dives into abstract matters. You certainly don’t want to let people know how confused you are by something, or how shallow your knowledge is in certain areas. You want to project an image of mastery and omniscience.

On Wall Street, as in other areas of the modern economy, this attitude leads to a culture of knowingness. People learn to bluff their way through, day to day. Executives don’t really understand the complex things going on in their own companies. Traders don’t understand how their technological tools really work. Programmers may know their little piece of code, but they don’t have a broader knowledge of what their work is being used for.

These people are content to possess information, but they don’t seek knowledge. Information is what you need to make money short term. Knowledge is the deeper understanding of how things work. It’s obtained only by long and inefficient study. It’s gained by those who set aside the profit motive and instead possess an intrinsic desire just to know.

The heroes of Lewis’ book have this intrinsic desire. The central figure, Brad Katsuyama, observes that the markets are not working the way they are supposed to. Like thousands of others, he observes that funny things are happening on his screen when he places a trading order. But, unlike those others, this puzzling discrepancy between how things are and how things are supposed to be gnaws at him. He just has to understand what’s going on.

He conducts a long, arduous research project to go beneath the technology and figure things out. At one point he and his superiors at the Royal Bank of Canada conduct a series of trades not to make money but just to test theories.

Another character, Ronan Ryan, taught himself how electronic signals move through the telecommunications system. A third, John Schwall, is an obsessive who buried himself in the library so he could understand the history of a particular form of stock-rigging called front-running.

These people eventually figure out what was happening in the market. They acquire knowledge both of how the markets are actually working and of how they are supposed to work. They become indignant about the discrepancy.

They could have used their knowledge to participate in the very market-rigging they were observing. But remember, the pleasure they derived from satisfying their curiosity surpassed the pleasure they derived from making money. So some of them ended up creating a separate stock exchange that could not be rigged in this way.

One lesson of this tale is that capitalism doesn’t really work when it relies on the profit motive alone. If everybody is just chasing material self-interest, the invisible hand won’t lead to well-functioning markets. It will just lead to arrangements in which market insiders take advantage of everybody else. Capitalism requires the full range of motivation, including the intrinsic drive for knowledge and fairness.

Second, you can’t tame the desire for money with sermons. You can only counteract greed with some superior love, like the love of knowledge.

Third, if market-rigging is defeated, it won’t be by government regulators. It will be through a market innovation in which a good exchange replaces bad exchanges, designed by those who fundamentally understood the old system.

And here’s a phenomenon often true in innovation stories: The people who go to work pursuing knowledge, or because they intrinsically love writing code, sometimes end up making more money than the people who go to work pursuing money as their main purpose.

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Big Night a big success

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April 08, 2014 | Leave Comment

PRESS RELEASE – April 7, 2014

Rotary Club of Davis “Big Night” Huge Success

On February 9th, 2014 the Rotary Club of Davis hosted its most successful Child Abuse Prevention fund raiser ever. The 14th annual “Big Night” gala was held at the El Macero Country Club where approximately 170 people joined together to raise money for this most worthwhile program. The event to date has raised more than $300,000. Bob Dunning, Davis Enterprise columnist of the “Wary I,” served as master of ceremonies and treated the guests to his humorous comments about Davis’ peculiarities. The evening consisted of cocktails and a raffle, a live auction, a gourmet dinner, and desert followed by dancing.

The event raised more than $34,000 to be spent on primary child abuse prevention projects. Several child abuse prevention non-profits in the area were the recipients of the proceeds of last year’s efforts, including Yolo Crisis Nursery, Multi-Disciplinary Interview Center, Yolo County Children’s Alliance, Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Center (now called Empower Yolo), and Yolo Family Services. Additionally, the annual “Have a Heart for Children” award was presented to Ms. Kalyca Seabrook, nominated by the Yolo County Children’s Alliance, as an individual who dedicated countless hours to helping prevent child abuse through direct service, public awareness and education. All and all, everyone had a great time and the Rotary club thanks all of the sponsors and those that donated the auction item, which made this event so successful.

When the program was conceived the plan was to start locally, then move the efforts to a regional basis, and then progress to an International level through Rotary International. We have done that by taking one step at a time. Your support of this program has and will allow us to take bigger steps and thereby save more children from the horrors of child abuse. The International program was expanded by the award of a Rotary International Vocational Training Global grant for $49, 750 to send a team of child abuse experts to Kenya, East Africa to teach Kenyan physicians, medical students and nurses on how to identify abusive head trauma (also knows as Shaken Baby Syndrome). Judy Wolf and Kay Resler, from the Rotary Club of Davis, along with a forensic pediatrician, a forensic nurse, and a social worker spent two weeks visiting hospitals and schools of medicine in Nairobi, Eldoret Kisii, and Mombasa providing training on this devastating act of child abuse.

The Club’s next “Big Night” event will be held on Saturday, February 7, 2015 and we urge all of you to mark that date on your calendars.
* * *

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Davis School district

Hello My name is Viviana Garcia. My son attends Patwin school In Davis Ca.
My son is a part of a program call ELD ( english learner) last year several childern had complaints about the teacher mis treating them . I contacted the school, but never heard from them, because they thought I did not speak english. they made me sign a waiver ( not the correct one) to have my son removed from the program although they were still receiving money for him to attend this class. my son was removed and I never followed back up. Summer came along and Patwin would not allow my child in the program first reason the teacher I had make the complaint about said there was no room for my son to attend, even though I signed paper work that he would be attending. then I got a different answer from the office and it was because I signed the wavier. Patwin did not allow my son to attend. I was later given many different answers. I made a complaint to DJUSD it was investigated and I was not happy with the outcome due to they had me sign the wrong waiver at the beganing there excuse for not contacting me was it was over looked. I met with DJUSD again filling a appeal. they said it would be investigated again…. I’ve called 2 twice since last October and emailed… no answer??? what is one to do??? thank you,
viviana garcia

Special to The Enterprise

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UCD cheese: a lost legacy

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April 10, 2014 | Leave Comment

Did you know?

It takes 21.2 pounds of whole milk to make 1 pound of butter, and 10 pounds of whole milk to make 1 pound of cheese

Gone are the days in which UC Davis made its own cheese, milk and ice cream.

Those wanting to study the art of making dairy products from a practical — and not theoretical — standpoint have to hike down to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, which still has a dairy processing plant.

Theoretical sciences of processing cows’ milk still takes place at UCD. The university’s dairy production currently supports a small staff of four and a half, plus four undergraduate veterinary students. The students provide the behind-the-scenes, around-the-clock care for the dairy department’s 110 Holsteins and jerseys, who provide around 1,000 gallons of milk per day, 365 days a year, said Ed DePeters of the Dairy Teaching Research Facility — “Dr. D” to his students.

Samantha Eisner, 19, a freshman animal science major, works to milk, feed and care for milk cows in the department.

“It’s a great opportunity — one you can’t get anywhere else. Part of the reason I took calf-feeding is because of how unique it is,” said Eisner, who plans to become a small animal veterinarian. “It’s unlike anything you could do here and you get a lot of hands-on experience you wouldn’t get just sitting in a lecture hall.”

All of UCD’s milk today, and for roughly the last decade, has gone to the Hilmar Cheese Company. The Northern California company employs 1,000 people, in a town with a population of around 5,000. UCD’s milk is a small fraction of the 2 million gallons of milk per day and 2 million pounds of cheese per day produced by Hilmar. Before then, UCD milk went to Crystal Creamery in Sacramento.

Under perceived pressure from California dairy producers, UCD closed down the campus’ dairy processing plant in 1959. Local dairy makers felt it unfair that a public institution cut into their private dairy profits.

With the UCD creamery closing, the university focused on diversifying majors into the modern science frontier spurred on by increased research funding during the cold war.

Lost to history with the closing of on-campus milk processing was UCD’s hallmark “brick cheese — a light cheese, white and soft, like a pepper jack — that was our reputation,” said John Bruhn, UCD emeritus cooperative extension specialist, who handled outreach education and research in the Food Sciences Technology and began working for the university in 1962.

Similar “reputations” are still found in land-grant universities like University of Wisconsin, Washington State and Penn State, who produce signature ice creams and cheeses, he said.

According to Ann’s Scheuring’s 2001 publication Abundant Harvest: The History University of California, Davis: “After WWII, when scientific research intensified in every field, the dairy division changed the organization of its subject matter for instruction. By the early 1950s the previous emphasis on the manufacturing of major commodities — butter, cheese, ice cream and market milk — shifted to a modified chemical engineering approach, with emphasis on the application of specific processing techniques to products in general.

“Many firms in the dairy industry were by this time large and prosperous enough to offer their own training to new employees, and enrollments in the UCD non-degree dairy program, so long a mainstay at the campus, began to wane. When the university officially terminated the two-year curricula in 1959, the Department of Dairy Industry was administratively merged into the Department of Food Technology, and the historic unit, after 51 years, ceased to exist as an entity. The commercial operations of the university creamery, which had sold campus-manufactured dairy products to local customers for many years, also ceased in 1959.”

George Waye, 73, sometimes reminisces of UCD’s dairy production facility in its heyday.

“All of the production that our campus used to give to the town — it’s not like it used to be,” said Waye, a life-long Davis resident. “When a crop was done and it was time to harvest, they managed to find ways to provide (food) for the campus workers. The dairy industry used to make ice cream on campus and sell it to the citizens on the town with a UCD logo at a rock bottom price.

“They weren’t just learning fermentation, but they were learning marketing to make the sales, and the town loved it because they could send it to their friends, and they were proud of Davis,” Waye added.

Bruhn remembers the old times as well.

“People would come around Christmas time and ask where the dairy store was,” he said. “They operated a creamery and a store. Campus and the city could come in and buy ice cream, cottage cheese, milk and cheese.”

Bruhn said there were around eight milk brands available in Davis in the 1950s such as Borden and Crystal, as well as a local drive-in dairy processor at the location of the current downtown Subway restaurant.

“These companies were upset that UCD was competing with them for their market,” he said. “We weren’t really putting anyone out of business, but the companies said we were a public institution receiving tax dollars.”

Additionally, profits made from UCD dairy sales went into the university’s general fund and not back to the creamery itself, which made the creamery appear to not be profitable. In reality, it was profitable, he added.

“I don’t have numbers, but it was relatively small volume because we weren’t in a commercial setting,” he added. “We wanted to make enough so that the students learning how to do this would have a learning experience — just enough to teach them.”

Bruhn said there has been some talk of bringing back the UCD logo Brick Cheese, perhaps made by a nearby cheese maker under the original UCD recipe.

— Reach Jason McAlister at jmcalister@davisenterprise.net.

Jason McAlister

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UCD dairy department awaits new facilities

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April 10, 2014 | Leave Comment

The UC Davis Dairy Teaching and Research facility may soon be moved and receive some long-awaited upgrades.

The facility’s 10 acres — 5 of which are for feed storage and barn corrals, the other 5 of which are for grazing for a herd of around 200 head — are scheduled to be moved to one of several locations by mid-2016, UCD officials say.

Two possible locations, each around 14 acres, have been named so far. The options are either near the corner of Hutchison Drive and Hopkins Road at the north end of the university airport runway near the Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, or between the sheep and beef barns on Brooks Road near Highway 113, said Dan Sehnert, animal facilities coordinator for the department of animal science.

The facility’s existing 5 acres of grazing land are scheduled to become a women’s field hockey arena soon, he said, which would temporarily strain grazing space for the herd.

Barns currently used for sleeping corrals and food storage were built in the 1950s with a low roof height, which causes heat to be trapped in the summertime. The facility combats the heat by misting down and fanning cows on hot days, said Sehnert, who hopes that the roof height can be at least doubled from its current 12 feet.

“There are a lot of different phases to this,” Sehnert said. “It’s building a new dairy and a new animal science teaching facility.”

The new animal science teaching facility would be moved to Putah Creek Lodge Road where there currently is an abandoned waste water treatment facility, he added.

The old waste water facility, which is now home to the campus electric shop, would need demolition at around $2 million and another $1 million to relocate the electric shop, he said.

A UCD firm a year ago gave a preliminary estimate of $13.5 million in expenses for a new dairy; and $3.8 million for the new animal science teaching facility. A newer estimate four weeks ago — from an outside consulting firm — projected the teaching facility at closer to $8 million, he added.

“Once you get into the details — housing, lighting and temperature controls for animal rooms —” the costs increase, Sehnert said.

The current animal science teaching facility, near the water tower adjacent to the dairy facility, was completed around 1960 to house approximately 350 undergrads. Today there are approximately 1,100 students. There is a need for more classroom space for the 17 lab sections per week with 20 students per lab, he added.

The new teaching facility would bump the number of classrooms to three instead of the current two.

“We probably need more but happy to get it,” Sehnert said.

The dairy facility’s website notes the milking parlor was reduced from a 12 herringbone layout to six in the early ’90s. There were promises to expand later but it never happened, said Ed DePeters of the Dairy Teaching Research Facility, who has worked at UCD since 1979.

The university’s dairy production currently supports a small staff plus undergraduate veterinary students who aid in caring for the dairy department’s 110 Holsteins and jerseys, who provide around 1,000 gallons of milk per day, said DePeters.

Students learn hands-on working with the cattle here to monitor for signs of health as well as the practical aspects of milking cows.

Ears down and droopy eyes can be telltale signs of a bacterial infection, while ears up and eyes bright — as seen in Holstein calf #2588, born March 24 — are signs of good health, DePeters said.

Number 2588 was given her mother’s first milk within 6 hours of birth — colostrum containing antibodies for the calf to maintain passive immunity for 2-3 months until her own active immune system kicks in.

Several score of young calves here are taken from their mothers from Day 1 and fed a milk replacer and a mixture feed of barley, oats, molasses, canola, corn and a protein pellet.

Samantha Eisner, 19, a freshman animal science major, keeps an eye on her favorite calf.

“I call her Gucky,” she said. “She has these really wide eyes and it looks like they have stuff in them. She was born Jan. 6.”

DePeters said a new dairy facility on 14 acres of land may be enough space.

“We could never be the size of a commercial dairy,” he said. “To have 1,000 to 2,000 cows would be difficult for us. That gets to be a job. Our goal and why we’re here is for teaching, research and for outreach.”

He would like to see additional space for fermenting silage and a separate space for food storage.

“We don’t have a commodity barn,” DePeters said.

The facility currently relies on a temporary makeshift storage for whole cotton seed, almond hulls, corn grain, which are mixed in mixer wagons two to three times per day.

– Reach Jason McAlister at jmcalister@davisenterprise.net.

Jason McAlister

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Maroney-Bryan Distinguished Lecture 4/18

The public cordially invited to attend Biomedical Engineering’s annual Maroney-Bryan Lecture, Friday April 18, 2014 4:00 PM 1005 GBSF. Reception follows at 5:00 PM.

Functional Molecular Imaging with MR-PET

Bruce R. Rosen, MD, PhD
Massachusetts General Hospital
Athinoula A. Martinos Center

The field of molecular imaging has grown at a rapid rate in recent years, as imaging technologies enable ever-finer examination of the human brain and other organs, and as clinicians and researchers alike seek to understand the mechanisms that underlie conditions such as cancer, heart disease, brain disorders and diabetes. Early detection of disease and monitoring of potential therapeutic interventions requires technology sensitive to the subtle changes that occur at the cellular and molecular level.

PET and MRI are widely used in vivo for both clinical and research applications. Used with novel MR, nuclear, and multimodal probes, these imaging modalities have begun to revolutionize the types of questions that can be asked in vivo, permitting examination of physiological and pathological functions in living cells, tissues, and organs at their most basic level. Used in combination, the individual strengths of MRI and PET can inform one another to yield new insights that expand the types of physiological information that can be gained through in vivo imaging and thus also expand the impact of human health imaging by enlarging the window of anatomical size, time scales, resolution, sensitivity, and specificity of detection for which imaging is currently used.

Combined MR-PET imaging technology allows investigators to employ the benefits of MRI such as phased array coils for high speed, high resolution functional imaging, while simultaneously acquiring quantitative metabolic or receptor-specific neurochemical data. Simultaneous MR-PET imaging has the distinct advantage of spatial co-registration of biochemical function with anatomical structure. Perhaps more importantly, MR-PET allows researchers to temporally co-register physiological data using PET and functional MRI (fMRI), such that the hemodynamic information from fMRI may be used to feed quantitative analysis of PET data. Using this information, researchers can understand the interplay between blood flow, receptor occupancy, and metabolism—as well as the contributions of each in disease and therapy response. As such, combined MR-PET has significant clinical potential to impact not only all aspects of patient care, from screening to disease assessment and therapy monitoring, but also to lead to new dual-modality MR-PET probes that can provide complementary information for precise quantitative assessment of biological function not obtainable in other ways.

Bio: Dr. Rosen is Professor of Radiology at the Harvard Medical School and Professor of Health Science and Technology at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. He is Director of the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Dr. Rosen is a world-leading expert in functional neuroimaging. Over the past thirty years he has pioneered the development and application of many novel physiological and functional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to measure hemodynamic and metabolic changes associated with brain activation and cerebrovascular insult as well as complementary tools to measure microvascular and microstructural morphology. These and other techniques he has developed are used by research centers and hospitals throughout the world to study and evaluate patients with stroke, brain tumors, dementia, and neurologic and psychological disorders. Most recently, Dr. Rosens work has focused on the integration of fMRI data with information from other modalities, including positron emission tomography (PET), magnetoencephalography (MEG) and noninvasive optical imaging. By using fMRI tools to evaluate the linkage between neuronal and physiological (metabolic and hemodynamic) events during periods of increased neuronal activity, his studies will allow researchers to better interpret fMRI signal changes and develop new ways to probe brain function.

Dr. Rosen leads the activities of several large interdisciplinary and inter-institutional research programs including the NIH Blueprint-funded Human Connectome Project, the NIBIB Regional Resource Center, the Center for Functional Neuroimaging Technologies (CFNT), and the Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN) Collaborative Tools Support Network. He is Principal Investigator/Program Director for two neuroimaging training programs. He has authored more than 300 peer-reviewed articles as well as over 50 book chapters, editorials and reviews.

Dr. Rosen is the recipient of numerous awards in recognition of his contributions to the field of functional MRI, including, most recently, the 2011 Outstanding Researcher award from the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), and the Rigshospitalets International KFJ Prize from the University of Copenhagen/Rigshospitalet. Dr. Rosen is a Fellow and Gold Medal winner for his contributions to the field of Functional MRI from the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.

For more information, please visit our website: http://www.bme.ucdavis.edu/articles/2014/04/04/maroney-bryan-bruce-rosen/

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elias 5/2: natural gas exports

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April 12, 2014 | Leave Comment

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: FRIDAY, MAY 2, 2014, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“NATURAL GAS EXPORTS WILL RAISE PRICES, AND SOON”

Because of hydraulic fracturing in states like North Dakota and Wyoming, Californians and other Americans have enjoyed lower natural gas prices over the last two winters than anytime in the last 15 years. That continues right up to this moment.

But if the natural gas industry and the Obama Administration have anything to say about it, today’s relatively low-cost heating and cooking may soon be matters of nostalgia.

That’s the meaning of the three approvals already issued by the Obama-appointed Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for either building new terminals to export liquefied natural gas (LNG) or to convert existing import plants to export facilities. More are likely to be approved soon.

Californians should well remember LNG, natural gas frozen into a fluid state near its source and then shipped around the world for use in places that don’t produce their own. The new American export plants, carrying benign-sounding names like Cove Point and Sabine Pass and Jordan Cove, aim to send LNG to places like Europe, Japan, Korea, China and India. They’ve gotten new impetus from ongoing disputes between Ukraine and Russia, source of most of Europe’s natural gas.

Less than 10 years ago, Californians were battling over whether and where to put plants for importing LNG, the result of a decision by the state Public Utilities Commission to give up some of the state’s reserved space on pipelines bringing gas here from Texas, Oklahoma and Colorado.

The answers were no and nowhere. Proposals for plants near Eureka, Oxnard, Long Beach and Santa Monica all died because companies promoting LNG imports never proved the state would ever need gas imported by sea. The later discovery of vast quantities of gas right in California, available if the massive deposits in the Monterey Shale geologic formation are ever fractured, or fracked, means California may soon need no imported gas at all.

So this state dodged a financial bullet, not getting stuck with hyper-expensive LNG.

But prices here will nevertheless rise because of the export licenses now being handed out for gas the industry has defined as “surplus.”

This likely fact of life emerges in a remarkable letter sent to Alaska’s Republican U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski last fall by a top federal Energy Department official.

Murkowski has pressed for quick approval of an LNG export facility in her state, warning that “The United States has a narrowing window of opportunity to join the global gas trade.” Seeking oil and gas-related profits and jobs for Alaska, Murkowski never acknowledges the certain effect exports will have on domestic gas prices, sure to rise if the current surplus goes overseas.

In California, price effects will probably be immediate with the opening of planned LNG export plants near Coos Bay, Ore., and near Prince Rupert on the coast of British Columbia. Both would take allegedly surplus gas from western Canada fields that now supply California and the Pacific Northwest.

But FERC doesn’t care, according to its letter to Murkowski. “We take very seriously the investment-backed expectations of private parties,” wrote Deputy Assistant Energy Secretary Paula Grant. Would FERC rescind an export license if domestic gas prices rise precipitously because of that permit? No, said Grant. “DOE has no record of having vacated or rescinded an authorization to import or export natural gas over the objections of the authorization holder.”

The Energy Department is also ignoring protests by other U.S. industries whose recession recoveries have partly been fueled by low gas prices.

A group of firms led by Dow Chemical has demanded that FERC – which works hand-in-glove with the Energy Department – slow the rush to sell off America’s energy bonanza.

FERC, the companies say, should “clearly articulate in advance its criteria” for deciding what is in the public interest.

So far, no response. Which indicates that even with a majority of commissioners appointed by an allegedly consumer-oriented Democratic President, FERC is no more responsive to the interests of utility customers than it was during the energy crunch of 2000-2001, when Republican George W. Bush was president and the commission refused to stop predator companies that cheated Californians out of more than $10 billion.

It all assures gas prices here will rise sharply in the next year or two unless California’s congressional delegation unites to put the brakes on LNG exports, and soon.

-30-
Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” now available in an updated third edition. His email address is tdelias@aol.com. For more Elias columns, go to www.californiafocus.net

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Health in all policies

Health in All Policies
By Mark Horton

What is “Health in All Policies” (HiAP) and what are its implications for public health practice and for policymakers in all sectors of the community? HiAP is simply the acknowledgement that virtually all policies, programs, and services put in place that affect the community as a whole will likely have an impact on the health of the community and its constituents. It is obvious that policies, programs and services put into place relating to the health care and public health systems have (or hope to have) a direct impact on health. It is also obvious that many other community services that are put in place to serve society’s interest in maintaining and improving the wellbeing of the community also have a direct or indirect impact on health. Examples include law enforcement, fire and rescue services, waste and sewage management, regulatory programs that monitor air quality and food safety, the design of consumer products, traffic control, etc. Not so obvious is that yet other sectors put in place policies, programs or services that have a direct or indirect impact on the community’s health. Here examples include agricultural policy (what foods are grown, how and where they are grown, and whether they are subsidized); transportation policy (where and how roads are built, how fast automobiles are allowed to travel on the roads, what other vehicles share right-of-way on the roads, who has access to public transportation and how much it costs); education policy (requiring immunization prior to school entry, providing healthful foods in the school cafeteria); zoning policy (where commercial and industrial enterprises are located relative to residential areas, where critical community services like hospitals and schools are located).
HiAP has significant implications for the practice of public health. The public health process typically involves the identification and diagnosis of an acute or chronic health condition or threat to the community (e.g. rising levels of obesity or an outbreak of influenza in the community); the development and implementation of a plan to address the condition or threat, which may involve mobilizing health care (e.g. medications) or preventative health (e.g. immunizations) interventions; and the ongoing monitoring of the condition or threat with an eye to ensuring that everyone is benefitting from the plan that’s been put into place and that the impact of the condition or threat on the community has been reduced or eliminated. This process by its nature focuses on health conditions or outcomes (e.g. deaths from heart disease or HIV/AIDS) and/or risk factors for those conditions or outcomes (e.g. smoking, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity) which lead to the development of programs that are focused on those conditions or threats, funded and carried out by public health entities or agencies at the appropriate jurisdictional level depending on the scope of the condition or threat.
Through a HiAP approach we acknowledge that there are social factors (e.g. poverty, unemployment rate) and environmental factors (e.g. access to parks and transportation, community safety) that play a powerful role in determining the degree of likelihood of citizen exposure to an environmental threat or in influencing human behavior. These social and environmental factors or determinants of health are frequently the result of a broad range of policy decisions, programs or services that have been put into place by many different sectors of the community. This acknowledgement of the health impact of a broad range of social and environmental health determinants leads to an expanded role for Public Health. Public Health must educate the community about the role of social and environmental factors in determining the health of the community and must bring partners in those various community sectors to the table to develop processes for systematically assessing the health impact of policies, programs and services being considered prior to their being implemented. When these assessments are done formally, we call them environmental impact or health impact assessments. All sectors of the community need to be made aware of the potential health impact of the policies, programs and services they put into place and evaluate every policy they are considering putting into place through a health lens. The ultimate goal of a HiAP approach to health, however, is not simply the avoidance of unintended health consequences of policies, programs or services being considered or implemented. Rather, the ultimate goal is for every community sector to be aware of and acknowledge the potential health impact of everything they do, and to adopt as part of its core mission the maintenance and improvement of the health of the community.

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YIIN letter

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April 12, 2014 | Leave Comment

Yolo Interfaith Immigration Network (YIIN) P.O. Box 74295, Davis, CA 95617
Letter to the Editor The Davis Enterprise
On April 5, 2014, the Yolo Interfaith Immigration Network (YIIN) held its third annual fund raising dinner at Davis Community Church. It was a sold-out event, and we raised more than $9400. Of those proceeds, $5000 will be used to provide financial aid to immigrant college students at UCD and Woodland Community College who struggling to pay for their educations. The rest of the money will be used to support YIIN’s programs.
The success of the event depended on the work and support of many different groups and individuals. YIIN would like to thank Davis Community Church (and its Church and Society Ministry) for allowing us to use their facilities; Mary Philip and her wonderful crew of volunteer cooks for making a delicious Indian feast; and volunteers from several UCD student groups, including Las Hermanas Unidas, Las Mujeres Ayudando la Raza, SPEAK, and the Lamba Theta Phi Latin Fraternity. Youth from Woodland Presbyterian Church and St. Martin’s Episcopal Church helped run the raffle. Mariachi Puente provided wonderful music. YIIN also thanks the following businesses and individuals who donated raffle and silent auction items and who made generous financial contributions: Bogle Winery, Cable Car Wash, Cache Creek Casino Resort, Cindy Davis Photography, Creme de la Creme, Davis Food Co-op, de Luna Jewelers, Dos Coyotes Border Café, f&f multiprint, In-N-Out Burger, Konditorei Austrian Pastry Café, the Mexican American Concilio of Yolo County, Mikuni Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar, Peet’s Coffee & Tea, Regal Davis Stadium 5 Cinemas, Sacramento Coca-Cola Bottling Co., Taqueria Guadalajara (Davis), Teach Your Children, The Paint Chip, The Wardrobe, Trader Joe’s, Tres Hermanas, Yolo Berry Yogurt, Sheila Allen, Cynthia Belgum & Gerrit Platenkamp, Janene Beronio, Robb Davis, Lucas Frerichs, Rick Gonzales, Joe Kravoza, Robin Kulakow & Bill Julian, Janet Lane & Bob Holm, Peter & Marion London, Jesse Ortiz, Susan & Randy Padgett, Don Saylor, Karen Shepard, and Linda Sternberg. In addition, several local artists and artisans contributed their work, including Dick Berry, Betty Betreaux, Dori Marshall, Mary McComb, Jill Van Zanten and Ann Wright.
YIIN is also grateful for the support of all who attended the dinner.
Sincerely, Alison Pease President, Yolo Interfaith Immigration Network

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Comics: Friday, April 11, 2014

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Comics: Friday, April 11, 2014

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Water project groundbreaking

BobDunning2W

Mather steelheadW

Kevin Mather shows off a steelhead caught on the Zymoetz River. Courtesy photo

Vocal Art Ensemble 2014W

The Vocal Art Ensemble will be performing twice in Davis. Courtesy photo

HitchhikingDogW

Courtesy photo

WaterW

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Thanks from DHS Baroque Ensemble

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April 11, 2014 | Leave Comment

Last Sunday evening, the Davis community was treated to a Baroque concert of superb caliber. Renowned violinist Rachel Barton Pine performed with the Davis High School Baroque Ensemble, directed by Angelo Moreno, at the DHS Brunelle Performance Hall, which was filled to its 500 person capacity. The opportunity provided to the young musicians and the concert enjoyed by the audience are among the best our students and community have seen. Rachel Barton Pine performed this as a benefit concert, as part of the Sacramento Philharmonic educational outreach program. Admission to the concert was free, but unexpected and exceptionally generous donations from the audience will go a long way to get the DHS Baroque Ensemble, its instruments (violins, violas, cellos, and bass), and its director to Italy this summer for an educational experience of a lifetime. We are very grateful for the support of our community, the Sacramento Philharmonic who arranged for Rachel to be here, and for Rachel Barton Pine for her fine performance, musicality, history of the music, and her amazing energy and talent, and our Director Angelo Moreno for going above and beyond to provide our students with a world class educational concert experience. The students will not forget this experience, and we hope the community will warmly remember the music of Vivaldi’s Summer, as well as other compositions by Vivaldi, Milandre, and JS Bach. If you’ve enjoyed the student’s music and want to hear more or if you want to hear the DHS Baroque Ensemble for the first time, our next fundraising event for their Italy trip is “A Taste of Baroque” to be held on May 10 from 5:00 to 8:00 pm in the Good Life Garden of the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science, under the olive trees, on the UC Davis campus. Tickets: www.brownpapertickets.com/event/578966 and Watermelon Music.

With heartfelt thanks,

DHS Baroque Ensemble students and families

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Pleasants/Hoskins

The Pleasants/Hoskins “Joyful Ranch” will be the site of the May 1 Winters History Symposium. Courtesy photo

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Thursday, April 10, 2014

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Thursday, April 10, 2014

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College corner: What is the right number of APs to take?

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Around February every year I field the same basic question from a variety of families and students. No, not which team will win March Madness, but actually something even more mysterious … how many advanced placement courses should I take? Since this question requires some careful self-assessment, the answer is different for different students.  

What is an AP class?
The College Board, the not-for-profit organization in charge of the Scholastic Achievement Test also runs the AP placement program. The point of this program is to provide high school students the opportunity to benefit from exposure to college-level material.

A committee of college and high school faculty develop the course curriculum based on typical syllabi from introductory college-level courses in that subject. According to the College Board website — http://advancesinap.collegeboard.org — AP courses and exams are periodically revised to “enhance alignment with current best practices in college-level learning.” This year AP physics 1 and 2, and AP U.S. history have the honor. Next year it will be AP art history and AP European history’s turn.

After completing an AP class, a student can choose to take the AP subject exam. Students are not required to take the exam, but colleges use information about the scores — a 5 point scale, ranging from 1 which is “no recommendation” to 5 which is “extremely well qualified” — to help determine how they will count the coursework.

Why take AP classes?
There are several compelling reasons to consider taking APs. But that does not mean a student should take every AP possible. Nor does it mean that every student should take an AP. Here are the main reasons why it is worthwhile.

1. Demonstrate ability to handle rigorous classes. College admissions officers want to see a track record that proves a student is ready for and will be able to succeed in college. Doing well in AP courses shows a student is up to the task.

2. Additional points in GPA. Students can earn an extra point in their GPA calculation for earning a C or better in an AP course. Some schools cap how many extra points may be earned. For instance, the UCs and CSUs cap it at eight courses. 

3. Increase competitiveness compared to other applicants. Colleges consider applicants within the context of their school. The more APs offered at your high school, the more college admissions officers want to see students avail themselves of those opportunities. Taking only a few when 20 are offered does not impress admissions officers. (See the box regarding Davis High School’s AP information.)

4. Earn college credit and/or skip introductory level courses in college. Students who pass AP exams (usually with a 3 or above) may reduce tuition expenses by earning credits toward graduation or by skipping certain prerequisites. Another benefit is taking a reduced course load and thus freeing up time to devote to studying or internships. Make sure to check each college’s policy since there is a wide variation.

Recent developments
I feel this column would be remiss if I did not mention the recent concern expressed by several colleges and universities about whether a high AP exam score actually represents subject mastery. Dartmouth, for example, conducted an informal survey and found that 90 percent of its freshmen who earned a 5 on the AP psychology exam, who were then were given a condensed version of the college’s final exam on the subject, failed the final.

Some schools now only grant credit for a score of 4 or 5. Others, like Dartmouth, will not award college credit for high AP scores effective beginning with the high school class of 2018. With this in mind, be sure to do your research and learn about the policies of the schools on your college list.

The big reveal
Ok, you may be thinking, “Now I know more about APs, but she has not answered my question yet. How many APs should I take?” Well, only you (the student), your family and your teacher can really answer this question. The goal is to challenge yourself, take the most rigorous classes available, but maintain a solid GPA.

Be strategic and take APs in your areas of strength and interest. If you can handle all APs then go for it. But most students should aim for not too many nor too few. Make sure to factor in sports schedules, family commitments and extracurricular activities, all of which can undermine your ability to put your best effort into the class. 

A few parting words
I want to end with well wishes for those of you who are studying for AP exams. Best of luck! And, here are a few last issues to remember.
* Take the hardest classes in your favorite subjects.
* Avoid taking an “easy” AP just for the bump in GPA if this is not an area of interest. Colleges are well aware of this practice.
* Please take the AP exam whenever possible. Colleges want to see that you followed through and made the effort to demonstrate subject mastery.  
* Remember to build in time for fun and free time. This is a marathon not a race. Do not overload yourself and compromise your social/emotional well being. Because, no matter what, there is a right college out there for you!

Advanced placement at DHS
* 19 AP courses plus 11 Honors classes
* Recommends limiting the number of weighted classes per year to two in 10th grade and three in 11th and 12th grades.
* In 2013, 593 DHS students took 1,098 AP exams
* 89% earned 3 or higher

Jennifer Borenstein

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Marissa Wong and Ivy Zhou photo

Eco-Hero award winners Marissa Wong, left, and Ivy Zhou, leaders of the Holmes Junior High Green Team, show off one of their recycling projects with real items included in the display to demonstrate which materials can be recycled. Michelle Millet/Courtesy photo

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Beerfest will benefit Citizens Who Care

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April 10, 2014 | Leave Comment

Save the date for the 10th annual Davis Beerfest — Saturday, June 7, from 2 to 5 p.m. — in the parking lot at Sudwerk Brewing Co., 2001 Second St. in Davis. Some 100 hand-crafted beers will be available for tasting.

All proceeds will benefit Citizens Who Care, a nonprofit organization in Yolo County that provides social support programs and respite services to the frail elderly and their family caregivers.

For tickets, visit www.davisbeerfest.org, call 530-758-3704 or get them in person at Sudwerk or at the Citizens Who Care office, 409 Lincoln Ave. in Woodland.

Enterprise staff

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Winters history photo

The picture is from the Vacaville Museum collection, showing the earliest fruit growers in Solano County. The people in the picture have their age following their names, and in parenthesis the year they arrived in this area. The picture was taken April 29th, 1894 at the James M. Pleasants ranch in upper Pleasants Valley to celebrate the 85th birthday of J.M. Pleasants.

Front row, Left to Right, John Reid Wolfskill, 90 (1836); M.R. Miller, 76, (1849); James Madison Pleasants, 85 (1849); J.R. Collins, 67, (1849); and G. W. Thissell, 65, (1850)
Back row, Left to Right, William James Pleasants, 60, (1849); E.R. Thurber, 68, (1850); Richardson Long, 74 (1849); and Edwin C. Rust, founder of the Winters Express in 1884.

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Print edition Friday, March 21, 2014

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April 9, 2014 | Leave Comment

BobDunning2W

Mather steelheadW

Kevin Mather shows off a steelhead caught on the Zymoetz River. Courtesy photo

Vocal Art Ensemble 2014W

The Vocal Art Ensemble will be performing twice in Davis. Courtesy photo

HitchhikingDogW

Courtesy photo

WaterW

a1

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Picnic Day Multicultural Children’s Faire

On Hoagland Hall’s lawn from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., kids can make crafts such as:
* African Rainstick
* Aboriginal Australian Dot Art Chinese Paper Lantern Antarctica Snowflakes
* Native American Dream Catchers
* Japanese Carp Kites
* Mexican Pinatas
* South American Maracas
* Ojos De Dios
* North American Floral Headbands
* Peacock of India
* Queen’s Guard Peg Dolls
* Penguin and Orca Masks

Performances at the Multicultural Children’s Faire include:
* Jishin – JASS Yosakoi Team
12:30 – 12:50PM
A high-energy Japanese dance style that mixes traditional and modern elements of dance and is characterized by the use of wooden clappers. Experience Japanese culture!

* Red Maple Cultural Connection
2 – 2:20 p.m.
Two Chinese Ethnic Dance programs:
Flying Horses and Gazelles and Grand Eagle

— Information provided by UC Davis Picnic Day committee

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Yolo County real estate sales

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April 7, 2014 | Leave Comment

750-1000

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Frank Bruni: The new gay orthodoxy

BC-BRUNI-COLUMN-NYT/1188
Commentary: The New Gay Orthodoxy
By FRANK BRUNI

c.2014 New York Times News Service

To appreciate how rapidly the ground has shifted, go back just two short years, to April 2012. President Barack Obama didn’t support marriage equality, not formally. Neither did Hillary Clinton. And few people were denouncing them as bigots whose positions rendered them too divisive, offensive and regressive to lead.

But that’s precisely the condemnation that tainted and toppled Brendan Eich after his appointment two weeks ago as the new chief executive of the technology company Mozilla. On Thursday he resigned, clearly under duress and solely because his opposition to gay marriage diverged from the views of too many employees and customers. “Under the present circumstances, I cannot be an effective leader,” he said, and he was right, not just about the climate at Mozilla but also, to a certain degree, about the climate of America.

Something remarkable has happened — something that’s mostly exciting but also a little disturbing (I’ll get to the disturbing part later), and that’s reflected not just in Eich’s ouster at Mozilla, the maker of the web browser Firefox, but in a string of marriage-equality victories in federal courts over recent months, including a statement Friday by a judge who said that he would rule that Ohio must recognize same-sex marriages performed outside the state.

And the development I’m referring to isn’t the broadening support for same-sex marriage, which a clear majority of Americans now favor. No, I’m referring to the fact that in a great many circles, endorsement of same-sex marriage has rather suddenly become nonnegotiable. Expected. Assumed. Proof of a baseline level of enlightenment and humanity. Akin to the understanding that all people, regardless of race or color, warrant the same rights and respect.

Even beyond these circles, the debate is essentially over, in the sense that the trajectory is immutable and the conclusion foregone. Everybody knows it, even the people who still try to stand in the way. The legalization of same-sex marriage from north to south and coast to coast is merely a matter of time, probably not much of it at that.

There will surely be setbacks, holdouts, tantrums like the one in Arizona, whose Legislature in February passed a bill that would have allowed discrimination against gays and lesbians on religious grounds. (Mississippi enacted a vaguely similar measure last week.) Arizona’s governor of course vetoed the legislation, after being pressured by corporate leaders, and their lobbying underscored the larger and more lasting story. At least beyond the offices of Chick-fil-A, it’s widely believed — no, understood — that being pro-gay is better for business than being anti-gay. Hence the inclusion of a same-sex couple in the famous faces-of-America commercial that Coca-Cola unveiled during the Super Bowl. Hence a more recent television spot, part of the Honey Maid food company’s “This is Wholesome” ad campaign. It showed two dads cuddling their newborn.

The Mozilla story fits into this picture. Eich was exiled following not just employee complaints but signs and threats of customer unrest: The online dating site OkCupid was urging its users to boycott Firefox.

The business community has in fact been a consequential supporter of marriage equality. Wall Street firms lined the coffers of the campaign for marriage equality in New York, and 20 major financial service companies pay substantial membership dues to belong to and underwrite Out on the Street, an industry group that advocates LGBT equality.

“You want to talk about a sea change?” Todd Sears, the group’s founder, said to me. “Fourteen financial services companies signed onto an amicus brief in the Edie Windsor case.” That was the one that asked the Supreme Court to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act, which the court essentially did last June.

The language in the high court’s ruling “demolished every argument put forward to justify marriage discrimination,” said Evan Wolfson, the founder and president of the advocacy group Freedom to Marry. And that ruling, he added, helped to pave the way for all the court victories — in Utah, in Oklahoma, in Texas — since. This coming Thursday, the U.S. circuit court in Denver will hear an appeal of the decision by a federal judge in Utah to allow gay and lesbian couples there to wed. The case could have a sweeping effect on a region of the country not typically considered progressive. It could also wind up at the Supreme Court and give the justices a chance to do what they stopped short of last year: decree marriage equality nationwide.

Wolfson noted a fascinating angle of the recent court rulings and of the blessing that Eric Holder gave in February to state-level attorneys general who didn’t want to defend bans on gay marriage. Both invoked racial discrimination in the country’s past, casting bans on same-sex marriage in that context.

Increasingly, opposition to gay marriage is being equated with racism — as indefensible, un-American. “What was once a wedge issue became wrapped in the American flag,” said Jo Becker, a New York Times writer whose sweeping history of the marriage-equality movement, “Forcing the Spring,” will be published this month. Becker mentioned what she called a rebranding of the movement over the last five years, with two important components. First, gay marriage was framed in terms of family values. Second, advocates didn’t shame opponents and instead made sympathetic public acknowledgment of the journey that many Americans needed to complete in order to be comfortable with marriage equality.

There was no such acknowledgment from Mozilla employees and others who took to Twitter to condemn Eich and call for his head. Writing about that wrath in his blog, The DISH, Andrew Sullivan said that it disgusted him, “as it should disgust anyone interested in a tolerant and diverse society.” A leading supporter of gay marriage, Sullivan warned other supporters not to practice “a fanaticism more like the religious right than anyone else.”

I can’t get quite as worked up as he did. For one thing, prominent gay rights groups weren’t part of the Mozilla fray. For another, Mozilla isn’t the first company to make leadership decisions (or reconsiderations) with an eye toward the boss’ cultural mind-meld with the people below him or her. And if you believe that to deny a class of people the right to marry is to deem them less worthy, it’s indeed difficult to chalk up opposition to marriage equality as just another difference of opinion.

But it’s vital to remember how very recently so many of equality’s promoters, like Obama and Clinton, have come around and how relatively new this conversation remains. It’s crucial not to lose sight of how well the movement has been served by the less judgmental posture that Becker pointed out.

Sullivan is right to raise concerns about the public flogging of someone like Eich. Such vilification won’t accelerate the timetable of victory, which is certain. And it doesn’t reflect well on the victors.

Special to The Enterprise

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Thomas Friedman: Sheldon is Iran’s best friend

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April 08, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-FRIEDMAN-COLUMN-NYT/892
Commentary: Sheldon: Iran’s Best Friend
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN

c.2014 New York Times News Service

It occurred to me the other day that the zealously pro-Israel billionaire Sheldon Adelson and Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, actually have one big thing in common. They are both trying to destroy Israel. Adelson is doing it by loving Israel to death and Khamenei by hating Israel to death. And now even Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey inadvertently got drawn into this craziness.

What’s the logic? Very simple. Iran’s leaders want Israel destroyed but have no desire, in my view, to use a nuclear bomb to do it. That would expose them to retaliation and sure death. Their real strategy is more subtle: Do everything possible to ensure that Israel remains in the “occupied territory,” as the U.S. State Department refers to the West Bank, won by Israel in the 1967 war.

By supporting Palestinian militants dedicated to destroying any peace process, Tehran hopes to keep Israel permanently mired in the West Bank and occupying 2.7 million Palestinians, denying them any statehood and preventing the emergence of a Palestinian state that might recognize Israel and live in peace alongside it. The more Israel is stuck there, the more Palestinians and the world will demand a “one-state solution,” with Palestinians given the right to vote. The more Israel resists that, the more isolated it becomes.

Iran and its ally Hamas have plenty of evidence that this strategy is working: Israel’s 47-year-old occupation of the West Bank has led it to build more settlements there and in doing so make itself look like the most active colonial power on the planet today. The 350,000 Israeli settlers in the West Bank reinforce that view by claiming their presence in the West Bank is not about security but a divinely inspired project to reunite the Jewish people with their biblical homeland.

The result is a growing movement on college campuses and in international organizations to isolate and delegitimize the Jewish state because of this occupation. This “BDS movement” — to boycott, divest from and sanction Israel — is gaining adherents not only among non-Jews on U.S. campuses but even within some Hillels, campus Jewish centers.

Iran could not be happier. The more Israel sinks into the West Bank, the more it is delegitimized and isolated, the more the world focuses on Israel’s colonialism rather than Iran’s nuclear enrichment, the more people call for a single democratic state in all of historic Palestine.

And now Iran has an ally: Sheldon Adelson — the foolhardy Las Vegas casino magnate and crude right-wing, pro-Israel extremist. Adelson gave away some $100 million in the last presidential campaign to fund Republican candidates, with several priorities in mind: that they delegitimize the Palestinians and that they avoid any reference to the West Bank as “occupied territories” and any notion that the U.S. should pressure Israel to trade land for peace there. Both Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney took the money and played by Sheldon’s rules.

In case you missed it, the RJC, the Republican Jewish Coalition, held a retreat last weekend at an Adelson casino in Las Vegas. It was dubbed “the Sheldon Primary.” Republicans lined up to compete for Adelson’s blessing and money, or as Politico put it: “Adelson summoned (Jeb) Bush and Govs. Chris Christie of New Jersey, John Kasich of Ohio and Scott Walker of Wisconsin to Las Vegas. … The new big-money political landscape — in which a handful of donors can dramatically alter a campaign with just a check or two — explains both the eagerness of busy governors to make pilgrimages to Las Vegas, and the obsession with divining Adelson’s 2016 leanings.”

Adelson personifies everything that is poisoning our democracy and Israel’s today — swaggering oligarchs, using huge sums of money to try to bend each system to their will.

Christie, in his speech, referred to the West Bank as “occupied territories” — as any knowledgeable U.S. leader would. This, Politico said, “set off murmurs in the crowd.” Some Republican Jews explained to Christie after he finished that he had made a terrible faux pas. (He called something by its true name and in the way the U.S. government always has!) The West Bank should be called “disputed territories” or “Judea and Samaria,” the way hard-line Jews prefer.

So, Politico reported, Christie hastily arranged a meeting with Adelson to explain that he misspoke and that he was a true friend of Israel. “The New Jersey governor apologized in a private meeting in the casino mogul’s Venetian office shortly afterward,” Politico reported. It said Adelson “accepted” Christie’s “explanation” and “quick apology.”

Read that sentence over and contemplate it.

I don’t know if Israel has a Palestinian partner for a secure withdrawal from the West Bank, or ever will. But I know this: If Israel wants to remain a Jewish, democratic state, it should be doing everything it can to nurture such a partner or acting unilaterally to get out. Because I’m certain that when reports about the “Adelson primary” reached the desk of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei in Tehran, a big smile crossed his face and he said to his aides: “May Allah grant Sheldon a long life. Everything is going according to plan.”

Thomas Friedman

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Republican endorsements

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April 08, 2014 | Leave Comment

YOLO COUNTY CALIFORNIA REPUBLICAN ASSEMBLY (CRA) UNIT MAKES ENDORSEMENTS

The Membership of the Yolo County Unit of the California Republican Assembly (CRA) at its Endorsement Convention with presentations by candidates for regional and local elective offices in the upcoming Statewide Primary Election of Tuesday, June 3rd that was recently held on Sunday, April 6th.at the VFW Hall in Esparto made several endorsements in a few regional and local races. The membership voted unanimously to endorse Charlie Schuapp for Member of the State Assembly in the 4th District and Bill Marble for for Member of the Woodland City Council.

Enterprise staff

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elias 4/25 piecemeal immigration changes

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April 08, 2014 | Leave Comment

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: FRIDAY, APRIL 25, 2014, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“A FEW PIECEMEAL IMMIGRATION CHANGES LIKELY”

The grand compromise on immigration passed by the U.S. Senate 10 months ago is now all but history, despite talk from President Obama and other Democrats about “comprehensive reform.”

For comprehensive immigration reform, as it’s understood in Washington, D.C., means granting undocumented immigrants some kind of pathway to citizenship. Only a very few Republicans are willing to allow this, no matter how arduous and long the path would be.

Despite the common GOP rhetoric, this has little to do with humane concerns or fairness, and everything to do with politics. Republicans have seen what the 1986 immigration reform bill signed by then-President Ronald Reagan did to their party in California. Legalizing many previously unauthorized residents combined with a sense of threat engendered by the 1994 Proposition 187’s draconian rules for the undocumented – since thrown out by the courts – made California a Democratic stronghold, where previously it was up for grabs in most elections.

Republicans fear the same kind of thing could happen nationally with any new “amnesty” bill, so as long as they hold a majority in either house of Congress, they won’t let it happen.

But that doesn’t mean they couldn’t do other things. A new “guest worker” program a la the old bracero plan that began in World War II and stretched into the late 1960s is a possibility. Concessions are also possible for undocumented immigrants brought here as small children.

Some family unity measures might be okayed, too, so long as they don’t spawn new citizens.

And despite their current obdurate talk about accepting only comprehensive reforms, it would be unrealistic to expect either Obama or Democrats in the Senate to block these moves.

For one thing, they’re all parts of the wider-ranging Senate bill. For another, each of those measures would improve the lives of at least some of the undocumented, essentially legalizing many even if not allowing them citizenship and voting rights.

Many Latinos who have steadily cast ballots for Democrats and against Republicans principally because of immigration would be mightily offended if Democrats suddenly became purists and rejected measures that may not be wide-ranging or comprehensive, but would nevertheless improve the lives of some immigrants.

It’s possible this picture could change a bit as the primary election season moves along and Republicans in “safe” districts whose biggest worry is a primary challenge from the right get past the point where new opponents can emerge.

“For many members, they’d be more comfortable (with immigration bills) when their primaries are over,” observed Republican Congressman Darrell Issa of north San Diego County.

But those same GOP members of Congress also know conservatives often have demonstrated long memories. If they back anything like amnesty today, they realize they may face challenges from their right in 2016.

As with the Democrats, their principal concern is not with what will do the most for America or be the most humane, but what stands the best chance to preserve them in office.

That’s why, for example, a group of 16 House Republicans including ultraconservatives like Michelle Bachman of Minnesota and Lamar Smith of Texas wrote to Obama in late winter rejecting any bill that “would permanently displace American workers.”

Even though there is no proof any guest worker program or other legalization tactic has ever displaced American workers or decreased wages, belief that immigration changes will do this remains strong in many parts of America.

Meanwhile, other Republicans realize that they’ll have to make adjustments on immigration if they ever hope to make inroads on the Democratic domination among Latinos, the fastest-growing bloc of voters.

Democrats, meanwhile, relish watching the GOP sweat over all this. They know that as long as citizenship is off the table, Republicans won’t threaten Latino loyalty to them. They also know that the less the GOP does, the less happens, the better their own electoral prospects.

Which is why it’s unrealistic to expect immigration changes this year other than a few desultory, half-baked measures improving things for businesses wanting to pay low wages.

-30-
Email Thomas Elias at tdelias@aol.com. His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, visit www.californiafocus.net

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Elias 4/22 ground water fight

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April 08, 2014 | Leave Comment

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405 FOR RELEASE: TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 2014, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“GROUND WATER BECOMING ANOTHER BIG CALIFORNIA FIGHT”

The next front in California’s long-running water wars has already opened, and the reasons for it will sometimes be hard to see – but not always.

That next fight is over ground water, source of about 35 percent of the state’s fresh water in normal years and a much higher percentage in dry ones like 2014. This battle has the potential to become far more bitter than even the quarrels over how to distribute water from the Delta of the Sacramento and San Joaquin river systems.

For it’s all but certain that regulations of some kind will come soon to this only source of California fresh water that currently has virtually none.

“In the coming months, I will be working…on strategies for more effective groundwater management,” wrote Democratic state Sen. Fran Pavley of Calabasas in her latest constituent newsletter. When Pavley broaches a subject like this, no one involved can afford to ignore her. Only last year, she authored the state’s first regulations on hydraulic fracturing (fracking) for oil and natural gas, and back in 2006, she was the force behind the AB32 restrictions on greenhouse gases, progenitor of the state’s ever-controversial cap-and-trade program.

For sure, the long-running drought here is producing conditions that almost demand regulation.

As things get drier, especially for San Joaquin Valley farms now drawing just a small fraction of their normal water entitlements from both the state Water Project and the federal Central Valley Project, many of those farmers are pumping ground water furiously to keep their crops and businesses alive.

The longstanding presumption here has been that if there’s water under your land and you have a well, you can take as much as you want. That has sometimes ignored effects on other nearby property owners and the public.

One of those effects can be land subsidence, which in some Central Valley locales has topped 20 feet and can be spotted by passing motorists who see instruments and wellheads that once were on the surface perched on pipes reaching high above the current ground level.

Subsidence, in turn, can lead to problems moving surface water in canals, something water agencies cannot long tolerate. Over-pumping ground water can also spur intrusions of brackish salt water into fresh water aquifers.

The reality is that some of California’s most significant environmental laws have been the direct results of crises. The Field Act, passed just after the 1933 Long Beach earthquake, changed the way schools all over the state are built. Building standards for other structures changed immensely after the 1971 San Fernando earthquake severely damaged the Olive View Medical Center. The drought of 1975-77 produced major water conservation changes, among them wide government distribution of low-flow toilets and shower heads, now standard in new homes and one reason today’s drought has not yet proved as disastrous as previous ones.

So far, drought has not produced great enthusiasm for Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposed twin tunnels water project to bring Sacramento River water under the Delta to the state’s aqueduct. That’s partly because in return for more than $20 billion, the state would get no more water, even if the tunnels might assure more level supplies from year to year. So far, the main backers are water districts on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley, whose member farmers are prone to major water allocation swings from year to year.

So that project won’t go anywhere for awhile. Which could mean that legislators who want at least to purvey the image of doing something about the drought will become more likely to adopt ground water regulations.

If they try this, expect another loud and large fight to break out, as farmers and water districts with wells of their own can be expected to fight anyone trying to tell them what to do with water they’ve long viewed as their own property.

-30-
Email Thomas Elias at tdelias@aol.com. His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough, The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, visit www.californiafocus.net

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BioConsortia financing

BioConsortia Raises $15M Series B Round from Khosla Ventures and Otter Capital

Additional Capital to Accelerate Product Development and Commercialization

DAVIS, California – April 07, 2014 – BioConsortia, Inc., an agricultural biotechnology company that uses a proprietary method for the selection of beneficial microbial consortia for crop improvement, has raised an additional $15 million in Series B funding. Khosla Ventures and Otter Capital participated equally in the round. This fund-raising round, along with the recent appointment of Marcus Meadows-Smith as the CEO of BioConsortia, accelerates the company’s plans to commercialize the use of microbial consortia as seed treatments and soil additives.

“There is substantial opportunity for BioConsortia to help transform agricultural production around the world,” said Marcus Meadows-Smith, BioConsortia CEO. “It’s gratifying to win the ongoing support of sophisticated investors like Khosla Ventures and Otter Capital.”

BioConsortia has developed a proprietary system that uses accelerated microbial selection and the latest genomic techniques to define products for specific crop improvement traits based on an optimum community of microbes, or consortia, that work together to increase crop yields with no genetic modification required. The system rapidly identifies the right consortia and can apply to both conventional and transgenic crops.

“At Khosla Ventures, we’re investing in companies that can have a systemic impact on food production around the world,” explained Andrew Chung, partner at Khosla Ventures who helped incubate the company out of New Zealand with technical founder Dr. Peter Wigley. “Since providing the seed investment in the BioConsortia technology, we’ve been strong believers in the opportunity to dramatically increase agricultural production with smaller resource requirements. This R&D platform will accelerate innovation in agriculture and enable the industry to operate in even more environmentally sensitive ways.”

“It is a pleasure to invest again in the agricultural microbial industry in support of two former executives of AgraQuest, Marcus Meadows-Smith and Christina Huben,” said John Pasquesi, managing member of Otter Capital LLC and former chairman of the board of AgraQuest. “The combination of a growing industry, BioConsortia’s differentiated technology, and management’s demonstrated record of success make this a compelling opportunity.”

Khosla Ventures and Otter Capital both have strong track records developing leading edge agriculture and food production companies. Khosla Ventures investments include: The Climate Corporation (acquired by Monsanto), big data software platform for agriculture; Blue River Technology, a pioneer in the use of computer vision and robotics in agriculture; Hampton Creek Foods, a food technology company that utilizes plant science to replace egg products; and Granular (formerly known as Solum), a cloud-based farming software and analytics provider. Otter Capital, meanwhile, was an early and consistent investor in AgraQuest, a leading biopesticide company (acquired by Bayer CropScience); and Inguran LLC dba Sexing Technologies, the world’s leading supplier of sexed semen to the dairy and other livestock industries.

In addition to product development and commercialization, BioConsortia will use the funds to invest in the necessary resources to build collaborative partnerships with seed, fertilizer and crop production companies.

About BioConsortia, Inc.
BioConsortia, based in Davis, California, is an agricultural biotechnology company that uses a proprietary method for the selection of beneficial microbial consortia for crop improvement. The company has pipeline products and research projects for: enhanced utilization and substitution of N, P, K and S fertilizers; plant growth improvement including harvestable yield, root mass and accelerated development; other desirable crop traits such as abiotic tolerance, biotic resistance and enhanced metabolite expression. BioConsortia will partner with crop protection, seed and plant breeding companies to bring the benefits of microbial science and biotechnology to sustainable crop production. For more information visit www.bioconsortia.com

About Khosla Ventures
Khosla Ventures offers venture assistance, strategic advice and capital to entrepreneurs. The firm helps entrepreneurs extend the potential of their ideas in breakthrough technologies in clean energy, mobile, IT, cloud, big data, storage, health, food, agriculture and semiconductors. Vinod Khosla founded the firm in 2004 and was formerly a General Partner at Kleiner Perkins and founder of Sun Microsystems. Khosla Ventures is based in Menlo Park, California. More information is available at http://www.khoslaventures.com.

About Otter Capital
Otter Capital is a private equity investment firm based in Palo Alto, California. Otter invests in a wide variety of industries, including agriculture and sustainability. John Pasquesi founded the firm in 2001 and was formerly managing director and member of the executive committee of Hellman & Friedman, a San Francisco based private equity firm.

###

Media Contact: info@bioconsortia.com

Special to The Enterprise

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“Fit for Life” keeps seniors healthy and independent

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April 06, 2014 | Leave Comment

Twenty-five men and women ranging in age from 64 to 98 filed into a brightly lit room at the Davis Senior Center at 7:45am, ready for their workout. Debbie Eernisse, wearing a hands-free microphone, directed the mostly sweatpants-wearing group to lift their legs up and down 12 times.

“You want to be tired by number 8 or 9,” Eernisse told them, before moving to weight lifting exercises, then the balancing, stretching, and core-strengthening movements that make up Fit for Life, a fitness class with a long waiting list and rave reviews from seniors who say that exercise has improved their back pain, arthritis, mobility, and perhaps most importantly, their independence.

Eernisse, an occupational therapy assistant and personal trainer who for nine years has taught the class Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at 7:45, 9:00am, and 3:15pm, said her goal is to keep seniors out of nursing homes and hospitals.

“I would like to keep them independent, and that’s what inspired me,” she said. All those who take Eernisse’s class live independently. “I think that’s the most amazing thing ever.”

“She keeps older people young,” said Polly Welch, a longtime Fit for Life participant who said the class improved her osteoarthritis. “It keeps me going.”

For an hour, Eernisse and her student-turned-assistant Louise Bettner, 72, led the class by marching, shoulder rolling, diagonal steps and reaching, dynamic stretching, breathing, stomping (What does stomping help? “Bones!” the class yelled in unison), pectoral exercises with weights, sitting and standing (crucial “for strength and independence”) and hip revolving, with the class closely imitating the instructors and heeding Eernisse’s voice commands.

But the tightly knit Fit for Life class does more than just exercise—they chat, laugh, and keep an eye out for one another.

When the group noticed that a regular was missing, they shared information, trying to track her down, until Eernisse reassured them that she was ok. “She still participates in the walking group,” Eernisse informed them.

Henni Fetzer and Joyce Blacker are fond of what they call the class’s “camaraderie.” “We care about each other,” said Fetzer, who recently made it into Fit for Life after having to wait in line at 6am to register.

Sometimes 50 people will wait in line for a chance at a spot in Fit for Life, according to Eernise. “That frustrates me,” she admitted, “but we can only have so many people at one time.”

“Debbie is hitting all of the areas of the body,” said Barbara Hartz, echoing many who complimented Eernisse’s teaching, adding that the class reduced her sciatic pain.

“She’s perfect,” Blacker confirmed.

Eernisse, a ‘90 UC Davis alumna with a psychology degree, went on to Sacramento City College to become an occupational therapy assistant. After a stint at UCD Medical Center, she decided to work closer to her home and children in Davis. She sought a job working with older adults, a longtime interest dating back to UCD where she minored in adult development and ageing.

Fit for Life is one of 11 senior fitness classes including tai chi, yoga, zumba, and dance offered by the Senior Center at a reduced cost thanks to subsidization by the city.

“We have hundreds of people who come through our doors on a daily basis,” said Maria Lucchesi, community services supervisor at the Senior Center.

Bettner, the Fit for Life student-assistant and a clinical psychologist, said the class had a tremendous impact on her and her husband’s well-being. The couple joined together 9 years ago, and he now has no arthritis, well-controlled diabetes, and good mobility, Bettner said. “I attribute that directly to this class,” she added.

Bettner nimbly helped Eernisse lead the class by example, stretching, lifting weights, and bouncing around.

“My body feels flexible, it feels mobile,” she said. “It’s a wonderful feeling.”

Perhaps most importantly, Bettner said the class gives seniors the physical strength and agility to continue living independently even into their later years.

“This is not just an exercise class,” she pointed out. “This is the best nursing home insurance there is.”

After an intense session of “floor work”—exercises done while positioned on the ground—the Fit for Life students heard their last instruction for the day.

“Step off your mat, and stand like a superhero!” Eernisse commanded. The class complied, then burst into applause.

Adrian Glass-Moore

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Davis Cruise-In

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April 03, 2014 | Leave Comment

Once a month dozens of owners drive their out-of-the-ordinary vehicles meet with the public at the Marketplace Shopping Center. There is no entry fee, no judging, no trophies. The first gathering, or rather “Cruise-In” of the year will be held Tuesday, April 15, from 5 to 7 p.m. or longer. On average 45 to 80 participants meet on the third Tuesday of the month until October.

Bruce Risley, his wife Marie, and right hand man Ron Vogel, respective owners of a ’36 Chevrolet, a ’50 Studebaker and a ’69 AMC AMX, started the event in 2009.

Among more than 200 Cruise-in participants include Steve Slinkard, Glen and Leslie Byrns, Ron and Ann Arneson, and Steve Garcia and his son Austin.

Slinkard likes the Davis Cruise-In because of its casual nature. “You just come relax and have fun. There’s no expectations, there’s no politics …. anybody’s welcome, just bring your car and have a good time.
Byrns is an English car guy who has a hankering for American Hot Rods. “Every time I go, something drives up that just knocks me out.”

Like French Citroëns. “They’re something out of the ordinary you don’t see very often,” said Garcia.
Garcia takes his ’56 Mercury Montclair to dozens of large car shows around the state. He likes the Cruise-In for its smaller venue. “You get a more personal touch and you get to know more of the people there,” said Garcia.
Arneson goes to the Cruise-In for the nostalgia where drivers get together and swap stories. “I jumped on board and said ‘this is great.’ There’s no entry fee, and no trophy, but who cares!”
The strength of the Cruise-In lies not in the owners or their cars, but the stories that link them.

STEVE SLINKARD
Steve Slinkard may have had one of the best childhoods one could imagine. Growing up in the southern California Hot Rod culture, he spent vacations in the 50’s and early 60’s watching his father Al and older brother Rex race a pair of family cars at San Gabriel, San Fernando and Saugus speedways, as well as the historic Bonneville Salt Flats in Nevada.
One trophy commemorates his father’s victory in the half-mile driving 107 mph at LOCATION SEE PIC OF TROPHY.
Steve even learned to drive in the 1951 Chevrolet Styleline DeLuxe convertible when he was 14 … on the Flats!
He was too young to race, but he did help them install a HydraMatic transmission that helped it stay competitive.
“They became quite the trick thing for race cars.”

Rex became a crew member of the “Freight Train” dual-engine dragster, owned by John Peters with Bob Muraves as the driver. Because of a “family situation” Muraves went by alias “Floyd Lippencotte Jr.” His father told him he wouldn’t inherit the family Maytag business if he was caught racing.
So, after a race, Rex Slinkard and Muraves would switch places behind the wheel when the car was brought back to the grandstands. Rex was photographed with the winning trophy as Muraves stood at his side in one clipping in Slinkard’s album.

“Freight Train” is currently kept at the NHRA Motorsport Museum in Pomona.
After an incident involving sand in the crankcase, the ’51 Chevy was retired from competitive racing. Al Slinkard drove it to work at Jersey Maid Milk until 1978, wearing a crash helmet with the top down.
“You could say he was a little eccentric,” said Steve.
The car was passed on to Rex when Al died. He nearly restored it completely when it was then passed on to Steve, who completed the job.

Steve’s car has served as carrier of marshall former UC Davis Chancellor Larry Vanderheof for the Picnic Day parade recently. “It’s one of the most fun things I’ve done with the car,” Steve recalled.

At age 65, Steve’s childhood may still be ongoing. He takes it for a spin, up F Street as it turns into County Road 101A. The terrifying power of the Cadillac engine and Hydramatic transmission is still evident.

“I drive this car like my dad and brother are right there with me. It’s such a spiritual thing for me. I find myself talking to them when I’m driving, like ‘Hey dad, what do you think?’”
“I’m sure my dad would be thrilled to see the way it is, that I’m keeping it up. He’d be happy.”

GLEN BYRNS
Southern California racing culture was also alive in RAY “BUD” SMITH, the owner of a promising ’59 Austin Healey “Bugeye” Sprite. He wanted to race and needed help. Across the street was a kid, Glen Byrns, who was eager to help and soaked up the knowledge poured out to him.

He went on to buy unwanted English cars dirt cheap, one after another and traded up to a Triumph Spitfire.
“I blew the engine again and again, racing it through high school.”

Then came an 1959 MGA from a junkyard that he repaired and drove through college.

30 years, his marriage to Leslie, and two daughters later, Byrns was riding the Davis Double Century bike ride. As he crested Cantelow Hill he heard a familiar rumble and waited at the top. A man was pleasure driving a ’59 MGA. The pair took a half-hour break to discuss their automotive passion.

Afterwards, Byrns went on and on to Leslie who later fueled his interest with a Father’s Day gift of a coffee table book of British cars. A “Bugeye” Sprite stood out, sparking a question, “What ever happened to Bud?”

With help from home, Byrns tracked down him down.

“I bet I know what you’re calling about.”

“Yeah.”

“Do you want the Sprite?”

“Yeah.”

With a borrowed truck, Byrns became the owner of his first automotive love. He named it “Bugsy.”

Byrns couldn’t leave his wife without a taste of English conveyance. Leslie nodded her liking of a Morris Minor they saw, so he found a right-hand drive Woody Wagon.

It was painted bright persimmon with an “Unkl Fud” vanity plate. It had been stored in an Oakland garage after being towed off the streets of Berkeley in the ’70’s. Speculation regarding its imaginative history ensues.

After Glen restores it, Leslie renames her Winifred, after her mother.

Winston came from nowhere. Byrns built it from “the best bits fro what it needs to be,” from carrying bicycles to bricks to backpacking in the Sierra. It started with a green Morris cabshell and frame, a Datsun transmission, a Sprite engine and brakes, and wheels from Chevy Vega. A mutt with a fifth gear for good highway mileage and modern electronics.

The next project is a red 1962 Morris Mini that he found on ranch property near Redding.

But before that step forward, came three steps back.

Byrns came home from a weeklong backpacking trip, parked Winston and walked in to take a shower. Leslie drove Winifred into the garage next to Bugsy after a shopping trip.

They soon heard pounding noises in the garage.

A transformer than ran the sprinkler timer died after 37 years and overheated, falling into a box of balsa wood. The garage exploded into fire.

“I ran outside in a bathrobe and it was completely involved.”
Byrns lost fishing poles and a hammer with his dad’s name that he had made during the depression, model airplanes, collectible bikes, car parts.

And there was Bugsy and Winifred.

“It was hideously depressing.”

Bugsy’s upholstery was burned away. Anything rubber or chrome was destroyed. The dash and steering wheel were black. Winston’s hood was burnt and blistered.

Byrns didn’t think he’d have to re-restore them. He did, but better.

“I pulled everything off and started sanding, and kept sanding until it wasn’t black, then varnished it.”
Bugsy went from yellow to blue. The Woody is tighter.

“I did everything but sew together the leather seats. Since the engine ran after the fire, I just scrubbed it clean and repainted it.

Byrns doesn’t care that he has a salvage title for his 55-year-old Sprite.

“We call that a badge of honor.”

Byrns opens the hood and it becomes obvious that it’s not exactly stock. There’s giant turbocharger, a custom manifold added by the previous owner, new intake, a different throttle body, modern fuel injection.

“It’s as modified as it could possibly be, but I like it to look stock on the outside to keep it subtle. I’m sure the previous owner would be proud. In his line of thinking I only added more power.”

Yet still, Byrns doesn’t drive it around town much.

“It’s a go out in the country and blow your hair back kind of car.”

And what the heck, it’s time for hair to blow.

We take a short drive out west on Russell Boulevard down the Avenue of Trees. The sound is deep, loud, rumbling, not unpleasant to anyone who has a hankering for this sort of ride.

Byrns isn’t completely happy with the tuning until Bugsy is good and warmed up.
He has been learning the skill of tuning the car with software. There’s a portal under the dash that provides computer linkage.

“Once you get good at the tuning, it should start and pull away from the curb like a Toyota Corolla.”

As if there’s a need to upgrade the experience Byrns mentions the turbocharge option and apologizes.

“I hardly ever light up the turbo anymore. It just costs me pistons and money.”

Back at the garage we look at the next project. He had restored the Mini’s engine when the fire occurred, but that’ll be a do-over too. He is holding back from a common temptation to convert it to a Mini Cooper, keeping the 848 cc engine with its 45 mpg.

He will be done restoring when the Mini is complete.

“That’ll be a nice little set, then I’ll be finished … unless someone gives me a Jag,” Byrns laughs.

Byrns appreciates the effort that Bruce Risley and Co. has put into the Cruise-In.

“I don’t know where the guy finds them, but he gets people to turn up with curious cars that you’re not going to see at the average show. It’s funny what people have hidden in their garages.”

Or their chicken houses.

DON ARNESON
Don was looking for a birthday present for Ann, his wife. He found it. As well as a family of seven rats. She’s probably not a fan of rats.

Arneson, who specializes in restoration and remodeling of pre-1930 structures, was working on a rural house near Williams. It had been built in the early 1900’s by the owner’s father.

The owner, a woman in her 70’s, told him there was extra trim left over in the barn, a chicken coop. As he opened the doors, he spied a different bird altogether. Covered in pigeon dung was a 1960 Ford Thunderbird. The owner stored it there after her son lost interest in driving it.

Arneson had restored a 1955 Thunderbird years ago, sold it, and was looking for another first-generation model at the time. A second-generation would do. The owner wasn’t quite ready to let go.

After haggling for several months, she finally agreed to sell on the condition that he would give her a ride when he got it running.

He squirted oil in the cylinders and worked them until they moved well enough. He added transmission fluid, got the starter to work, and had the carburetor rebuilt. The engine fired right up. That was just the first of it.

“I had to replace everything rubber,” he said. The rats chewed everything up.

Some folks in Arneson’s generation have asked to sit in the T-Bird. After inhaling the aroma they smile.

“They’ll start telling me these fantastic stories …. That’s when you can bring back those memories of fond times,” he said.

When Arneson first got the T-Bird running, a woman in her eighties walked over to ask if she could touch his car.

“‘My husband that I was married to for 50 years,’ she said. ‘He picked me up for our first date in a 1960 Thunderbird. We married and we went on our honeymoon to Florida.’ She was crying and telling me stories.”

Arneson only takes the car to the Davis Cruise-In.

“It is classified as a work in progress. It’s not in that dependable stage where I want to drive it for a long distance.”

Until recently when the Arneson’s built their house and a garage, he hasn’t had a space to restore it.

“I bought it with the idea of being able to completely tear it apart,” he said.

Arneson plans to retro the T-Bird, meaning that he’ll buy a new engine and transmission which will get better gas mileage.

“I’m going to do 90 percent of the work. I’ll take it to have it painted. I’ll do all the body work myself.”
Until recently, when the Arneson’s built their house and a garage, he hasn’t had a space to restore it.

“I bought it with the idea of being able to completely tear it apart.”

“That’s the thing with this. It’ll always be a work in progress. I want to let my grand-babies ride in it without me freaking out. It will never be perfect. It will be … a car,” said Arneson.
“It’s just for fun,” added Ann.
“Some of these cars are just a labor of love. There are the rare exceptions where they are taking them and preserving them. It’s a part of American history that is rapidly disappearing.They are either doing the “Batman” outrageous stuff, or they are being destroyed in massive quantities.
One of the main reasons Arneson brings his barn-find to the Cruise-In is to introduce the next generation to older cars because they are disappearing.
“Our heart, and Bruce’s heart, is getting these kids interested in doing restoration work or just preservation.”
One inspiring example is the relationship between father and son.

STEVE and AUSTIN GARCIA
Steve Garcia story
“Our heart, and Bruce’s heart, is getting these kids interested in doing restoration work or just preservation.”
One inspiring example is the relationship between a father and son, and his son.
Steve and Austin Garcia

Steve Garcia is a man of work and dedicated to helping others. As a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, he organized consecutive car shows to benefit diabetes research. He recruited several Cruise-In cohorts to participate.
His own car, a yellow and white Mercury Montclair, was passed on to him from his father Benedicto, a concrete layer, when Steve was 14. The car needed work. His father said he’d put up half if Steve put up the rest.
“That inspired me to do a lot of lawn jobs,” said Steve.
His school friends refused to believe his claims of owning such a unique car for lack of evidence. He outside Woodland in the farmland of Yolo. He finally made enough progress and had it running during his senior year in 1984.
“I’ve gone through the front and rear suspension, the engine, transmission and interior. I try to do as much as I can. If it’s beyond me, I’ll try to learn how to do it.” He researches the Internet or will ask others to help out.
“The pride of it is that I can say, ‘I did it.’ I am particular about details.”
That “can do” attitude he received from his father is being passed on to his son Austin, who has his own project — Earl.
While growing up Austin’s mother Suzette had a lifelong friend who grew up with her since elementary school by the name of Giselle Morris.
Giselle’s parents, Woody and Charlotte, drove a 1949 Ford F1 pickup, a.k.a. Earl. They all would often cruise the back roads on the lookout for recyclable cans. The girls would throw the cans into the truck bed as they sat on the Earl’s running boards.
Try that today.
Year’s later Austin and Steve meet Earl in the Morris’s garage where it sat parked for 15 years. The bed was full of stuff as high as the cab. The hood and fend were off. It was painted multiple colors.
“It was pretty much complete but it was in parts,” said Steve.
After seeing pictures of the scene, it is apparent that Austin and Steve (mostly Austin) have been working hard to get Earl running.
“A lot of free time is dedicated to helping him learn,” said Steve.
Austin has been going to car shows with his father since he was little. Recently he came to realize that he wanted an old car for himself.
“Everybody I know has them,” he said. The craftsmanship has him sold.
“They actually took the time to form these,” he said, pointing to the wide fenders and articulate grill.
“Someone took the time to design this and think about every little thing. Nowadays they put it on the computer and draft it all up. You don’t see many cars with chrome. I love chrome,” said Austin who is eager to get it on the road.
The Mercury has been put on the back burner while the guys tackle Earl.
The one problem they are facing is an unfamiliar engine with an overheating problem. The 239 flathead engine is basically two engines that function as one, said Steve. “It has two water pumps and two cooling systems.” It runs on a six-volt battery.
“You see a lot of teenagers that don’t make the initiative to do something like this,” Steve says of his son. “For him to be out there, other people see that and say, ‘If he can do that, why can’t I?”
Inspiration travels to and fro.
Steve recalls meeting people the Cruise-In who recall their early experiences with a Mercury.
“It’s kind of good for them, it’s a flashback and makes me feel good that I can bring some of those memories back to them. I do it for the love of the car, I don’t do it for prizes or none of that. I have won prizes, but that’s not my priority.”

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Lawyer-Wainacht engagement

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April 01, 2014 | Leave Comment

Emily Lawyer of Pasadena and Andrew Wainacht are engaged to be married.

The bride-to-be is the daughter of Frances and Arthur Lawyer of Davis. She is a 2005 graduate of Davis High School and received her B.M. in trumpet performance and her B.A. in math from Oberlin College. She also graduated from the University of Southern California with an M.M. in trumpet performance.  She is now employed as the special events coordinator for the Los Angeles Opera.

The groom-to-be is the son of Kim and Drew Wainacht of Killingly, Conn. He also graduated from Oberlin College, with a B.M. in trombone performance. He works as a box office and marketing associate for the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra.

The wedding will take place in the garden of the bride’s parents on June 29, 2014.

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county advisory vacancies

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April 05, 2014 | Leave Comment

Yolo County Advisory Boards Vacancies

(Woodland, CA) – The Yolo County Board of Supervisors believes that effective citizen involvement is essential to good governance, and that a respectful and informed exchange of ideas between the county and citizens will result in the best polices and decisions for Yolo County. To that end, the Board of Supervisors is actively seeking candidates to fill vacancies on the following county advisory bodies. For more information on advisory bodies, specific vacancies, and to submit an application, visit: www.yolocounty.org (go to Residents > Advisory Bodies), call the Clerk of the Board’s office (530) 666-8195 or contact your Yolo County Supervisor.

Board of Supervisors Advisory Committees
Capay Valley General Plan Citizens’ Advisory Board
Childcare & Development Planning Council
Children’s Alliance
Commission on Aging and Adult Services
Community Services Action Board
Dunnigan General Plan Citizens’ Advisory Board
Emergency Medical Care Committee
Esparto General Plan Citizens’ Advisory Board
In-Home Supportive Services Advisory Board
Knights Landing General Plan Citizens’ Advisory Board
Library Advisory Board
Madison General Plan Citizens’ Advisory Board
Maternal, Child & Adolecent Health Advisory Board
Parks, Recreation & Wildlife Advisory Committee
Transportation Advisory Committee
Waste Advisory Committee
Yolo County Housing Commission
Yolo-Zamora General Citizens’ Advisory Board

County Service Areas
North Davis Meadows County Service Area
Snowball County Service Area No. 6
Wild Wings County Service Area
Willowbank County Service Area

Community Service Districts
Esparto Community Service District
Knights Landing Community Service District

Enterprise staff

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Name droppers add

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April 05, 2014 | Leave Comment

——– Original Message ——–
Subject: UC Davis News: Honors for UC Davis faculty, staff
Date: Thu, 03 Apr 2014 15:03:47 -0400
From: UC Davis News Service
To: cgolden@davisenterprise.net

University of California, Davis
April 3, 2014

AWARDS, HONORARY DOCTORATES AND MORE AT UC DAVIS

Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, professor emerita at the University of California, Davis, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, has been selected to receive the academy’s 2014 Award for Scientific Reviewing.

Given this year in the category of human-biosocial interactions, the award recognizes Hrdy, an anthropologist, for “rendering a significant service to science and influencing the course of scientific thought.”

Hrdy’s work epitomizes “the creativity and insight that can generate important syntheses of contemporary research and set research agendas for the future,” the academy declares in the award citation. “At the same time, her writing is marked by a clarity and liveliness that makes path-breaking science accessible to the public.”

The award, to be presented at the academy’s 151st annual meeting, April 26-29, comes with a $10,000 prize.

Hrdy has published a series of books and scholarly reviews that have drawn together data and concepts from across the social and biological sciences to synthesize a new understanding of the ways in which natural selection has shaped women’s lives, mother-infant interactions, and the foundations of human sociality.

Her book “Mothers and Others: The Evolutionary Origins of Mutual Understanding,” published in 2011, brought her the following honors the next year: the J.I. Staley Prize (often called the Pulitzer Prize of anthropology, given by the School for Advanced Research) and the W.W. Howells Book Prize in Biological Anthropology (given by the Biological Anthropology Section of the American Anthropological Association).

She joined the faculty of the Department of Anthropology in 1984 and took emeritus status in 1996. She has been elected not only to the National Academy of Sciences, but the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society and the California Academy of Sciences.

***

The American Physical Society will present its Improving Undergraduate Education Award to the Department of Physics at the University of California, Davis, during the society’s April 5-8 meeting in Savannah, Ga.

According to the citation, the department has created “curriculum opportunities involving specializations and multidisciplinary applied degrees coupled with vibrant research options” that emphasize preparing students for careers in science, technology, engineering and math. With 35 bachelor’s degrees awarded in 2012-13, the number of physics majors at UC Davis has doubled in the past decade.

***

Two faculty members at the University of California, Davis, are recent recipients of honorary doctorates:

* Charles Fadley, distinguished professor of physics at UC Davis and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, honored by the Uppsala University, Sweden. “His work, not least his synchrotron-light-based spectroscopic studies of surfaces, magnetic materials and nanostructures, has inspired researchers around the world and at Uppsala,” the citation states.

* Peter Hall, distinguished professor of statistics at UC Davis and the University of Melbourne, Australia, honored by the University of Cantabria, Spain. Hall is known especially for his work on new methods in statistics, including nonparametric statistics and bootstrap analysis.

***

Professor Eduardo Blumwald of the Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, received two prizes on a recent visit to his native Argentina:

* Raices Prize, or Roots Prize — Recognized by the Argentine government for scientific contributions as an Argentine living and developing science in another country. “To be recognized by the country where you were born is nice,” Blumwald said. “Although I am a proud U.S. citizen, there is always a little bit of Argentina in me.”

* REDBIO International Prize — Given by the Technical Cooperation Network on Plant Biotechnology, or REDBIO (Spanish acronym), serving Latin America and the Caribbean, under the auspices of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. The award ceremony took place at a REDBIO meeting in Mar del Plata.

Blumwald’s research focuses on developing crop plants that can be grown with less irrigation water and on marginal lands, which better equips global agriculture for dealing with limited and variable water supplies.

***

The U.S. Agency for International Development recently honored Elana Peach-Fine of the University of California, Davis, for scientific excellence. She received the award in Washington, D.C., from USAID’s chief administrator, Raj Shah.

The award recognizes her work as a graduate student with the university’s Horticulture Collaborative Research Support Program, or Horticulture CRSP, where, among her other duties, she managed the Trellis Fund, which pairs U.S. graduate students with organizations in developing countries to work on fruit and vegetable projects. Horticulture CRSP has funded 37 Trellis projects in 14 countries, through a process largely run by graduate students.

“Graduate students are not only the project participants, but we are also the project planners and evaluators,” Peach-Fine said upon receiving the USAID award. “These students will carry their experiences into their futures in academia, industry and even international development.”

Since being selected for the award, Peach-Fine received master’s degrees in international agricultural development and plant pathology. Now she’s employed by the UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, working in the International Programs unit as an analyst on agricultural projects in Pakistan, China, Afghanistan and Ecuador.

***

Kevin R. Johnson, dean of the School of Law at the University of California, Davis, is once again ranked among the 25 “Most Influential People in Legal Education,” marking the second year in a row he received the designation from National Jurist magazine.

Johnson, the law school’s Mabie-Apallas Professor of Public Interest Law and Chicana/o Studies, is an internationally recognized scholar in the fields of immigration law and policy, refugee law, and civil rights.

The latest rankings, for 2013, emerged from a process that started with a call for nominations from U.S. law schools. The magazine narrowed the list, then asked deans and others of influence in the legal community to rate the nominees.

In his 2013 citation, Johnson is credited with being a “known leader in Latino civil rights and diversity among students and faculty in legal education.”

***

The Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard University recently awarded a composition commission to Kurt Rohde, professor of music composition and theory at the University of California, Davis, where he also serves as co-director of the Empyrean Ensemble, which specializes in new music.

His is one of 12 commissions to U.S. composers in the 2013 award cycle.

The commissions represent one of the principal ways that the Fromm Music Foundation seeks to “strengthen composition and to bring contemporary concert music closer to the public.” Besides the commissioning awards, the foundation offers subsidies to the ensembles that premiere the commissioned works.

The Fromm foundation is the legacy of Paul Fromm (1906-87), one of the most significant patrons of contemporary art music in the United States in the second half of the 20th century.

Rohde plays with the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble (and formerly served as its artistic director) and the New Century Chamber Orchestra.

About UC Davis

For more than 100 years, UC Davis has been one place where people are bettering humanity and our natural world while seeking solutions to some of our most pressing challenges. Located near the state capital, UC Davis has more than 33,000 students, over 2,500 faculty and more than 21,000 staff, an annual research budget of over $750 million, a comprehensive health system and 13 specialized research centers. The university offers interdisciplinary graduate study and more than 100 undergraduate majors in four colleges — Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Biological Sciences, Engineering, and Letters and Science. It also houses six professional schools — Education, Law, Management, Medicine, Veterinary Medicine and the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing.

Media contact:
* Dave Jones, UC Davis News Service, (530) 752-6556, dljones@ucdavis.edu

See all of our news releases at http://www.news.ucdavis.edu.

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Immigration reform and business

Enclosed is an op-ed on immigration. The author is MaryAnne Howland, President & CEO of Ibis Communications, Inc., a marketing agency based in Nashville, TN and a board member of the American Sustainable Business Council. Please let us know if you are planning on using the piece. A photo of the author is available and credit to American Forum is appreciated.
Thanks!
Denice Zeck
American Forum
——————–

Immigration Reform: Diversity is Good for Business, the Economy

MaryAnne Howland

When thinking of immigration reform, we must ask ourselves what we want for the country. From a business perspective, important goals to aim for are innovation and entrepreneurship. And although there’s no simple recipe for achieving them, one key ingredient is diversity.

Smart business leaders know this. The most successful corporations strive to be the “Employer of Choice,” looking to recruit the best and brightest in a multicultural marketplace. They know they need the best skills and talent to deliver the innovation that leads to the best products and service in an increasingly competitive economy. They also appreciate that in a dynamic market – be it nationally or locally, understanding and capitalizing on trends starts with a diverse workforce.

Immigration reform, done well, can help achieve all this. And it will deliver broad economic benefits and boost local economies. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimated that immigration reform would increase real Gross Domestic Product relative to current law projections by 3.3 percent in 2023 and 5.4 percent in 2033 – an increase of roughly $700 billion in 2023 and $1.4 trillion in 2033 in today’s dollars.

In business terms, immigration reform would increase America’s value proposition. There are more than 52 million Hispanics in the US. That makes us home to the second largest Hispanic population in the world. And it is our country’s fastest growing market. Fortune 100 companies have already seen this opportunity and have begun investing in ways to turn a profit on changing demographics. In addition, the economy will benefit from the launching of thousands of new companies, run by immigrants who bring with them an intense commitment to a free and open market system. The result: thousands upon thousands of new jobs and billions in new sales and income tax revenues.
A.A. Gill, author of America The Marvelous, in his book describes a critical point when Europe ripe with “ideas and discoveries, philosophies and visions” gave way to the creation of the United States. He worries that the U.S. may be at that point “where the ideas that made us great are being stifled by the conventions and hierarchies that govern us.”

Looking at the issue of immigration through a smart business lens can help us to realize the full potential of the rich resource we have created. We can learn from corporations that have implemented best practices when it comes to diversity and inclusion. They are reaping massive rewards in the form of growth and profits. We can do the same as a country.

America’s rich culture of diversity includes generations of families who have come to be a part of the fabric of our country, who have helped to grow businesses, and who have enriched nearly every aspect of our culture. Our children play together and go to school together. We are co-workers at some of the fastest growing companies in the economy. We pray together in churches all around the country. When we have embraced diversity, it has made us happier, stronger and more prosperous.

Moving forward, what makes the best business sense is to find a way to grant citizenship to those who are now a part of the melting pot that the world has voted the “Best Place to Live.”. The business and economic benefits are striking. We would increase our tax base and workforce pool, spur entrepreneurship, enhance our global standing, and fuel the innovation that has been a trademark of “Made in America.”

By granting legal status to members of our communities, neighbors, fellow church members, business owners and co-workers, we will unleash their contributions of hard work and innovation. The benefit is more prosperity for all of us.

————————————————–
Howland is President & CEO of Ibis Communications, Inc., a marketing agency based in Nashville, TN and a board member of the American Sustainable Business Council.

Special to The Enterprise

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Sunday, April 6, 2014

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April 3, 2014 | Leave Comment

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Yolo Food Bank distributes Easter meals

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April 04, 2014 | Leave Comment

What: A spring holiday food distribution for Yolo County residents

Who: Yolo Food Bank

When: Saturday, April 19, 2014, at 8:00 a.m.

Where: 233 Harter Avenue, Woodland CA 95776

Why:
Yolo Food Bank (YFB) is excited to announce that it will be hosting a Spring Holiday Food Distribution this April. In an effort to provide food for the spring holiday season, YFB will distribute 1,300 meals to residents throughout Yolo County. Each meal will include a meat item (ham, turkey, or chicken), an assortment of fresh produce, and a variety of non-perishable goods.

To reach all areas of Yolo County, YFB will be working with four partner agencies to distribute meals at nine sites throughout the county. YFB’s partner agencies for this distribution include Yolo County Children’s Alliance (serving Clarksburg and West Sacramento), Centers for Families (serving Davis, Yolo, and Knights Landing), RISE (serving Esparto and Winters), and Family Action Center of Colusa County (serving Dunnigan). In addition to meals distributed by these agencies, YFB will also pass out 450 meals from its new warehouse in Woodland.

This Spring Holiday Food Distribution would not be possible without the generous support of the California Foundation for Stronger Communities, the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation and continued support from the community, volunteers and local businesses. Through its collaboration with the community, YFB is able to help alleviate hunger in Yolo County this spring.

Media are invited to attend the spring holiday food distribution in Woodland. RSVP directly to Karen Strach, Director of Programs at Yolo Food Bank, at karen@yolofoodbank.org or (530) 668-0690.

Visuals: – Clients in line receiving holiday meals
- Volunteers handing out food and registering participants

Interview: Kevin Sanchez, Executive Director of Yolo Food Bank, will be available to answer questions regarding the Food Bank and this program.

The mission of Yolo Food Bank is to alleviate hunger and malnutrition in Yolo County. Through our programs and partnerships with 60 non-profit partner agencies, approximately 23,000 residents are served each month. In addition, Yolo Food Bank is committed to nutrition and increased access to fresh fruits and vegetables. In 2013, over one-quarter (27.3%) of the food distributed by Yolo Food Bank was fresh produce.

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Talk circle oped and box

Davis Community Men’s Talk Circle March 2014
There is a wonderful allegory that describes the difference between heaven and hell. Both have huge bountiful banquet tables, filled with the most exquisite and divine foods and drinks imaginable. And everyone sitting at these glorious and opulent tables are all challenged, as they have no elbows, their arms are locked in straight open positions. The people in hell starve, while the people in heaven thrive, enjoying the grand assortments of foods in front of them. What makes the difference for the folks in heaven versus in hell? The answer is the people in heaven have learned to be communal as they feed one another, an act, if you will, of being relational.
In many ways this story captures the plight of men and their profound struggles with isolation. We know too well how men starve, not knowing how to be relational, denying their own desires for greater connection, for friendships, leaving their hearts and souls emotionally malnourished.
Three years ago, a pilot project, titled the Davis Community Men’s Talk Circle was started in Davis, California, as a free service to address the profound patterns of male isolation that occur for men of all ages. As a Social Work clinician, I have seen first hand the deleterious effects of isolation in men’s lives. Isolation contributes directly to depression, job dissatisfaction and loss, increase in violence, numbing behaviors, and alienation from loved ones. Moreover, isolation fuels male suicide, which is at an all time high for boys, men and our elder males.
Our Community Men’s Talk Circle project draws from the wisdom of a 25 year on-going annual men’s conference, held in Mendocino. The Elders at this conference structure the talk so men can enter the deep and painful ills and the subsequent judgements of themselves, which they have carried alone. The men attending come to feel a great support, a deep trust, a brotherhood and a safety affording them a way to utilize the communal experience. Their vulnerabilities, now shared by others, deepens the possible that they don’t have to go it alone any more! Here the needed healing from years of exiled pain begins.
This has been our model, in bringing the Talk Circle project to the men of our community. Each month we intentionally create a Sacred space, where our Circle, our container for our talking, welcomes men to talk aloud and discover. Men often surprise themselves, as aspects unbeknownst, are revealed which they did not expect to share. But this soon becomes a known and valued process, affording men a communal unfolding, revealing new feelings, new insights, while clarity is advanced. This work requires that Sacred space must be created, drawing a significant distinction from how men typically relate to one another, as in the masked cautionary jokes, or the blind-eye to dismissive behaviors toward others, or the impulse to-fix another man’s experience; all which are recipes for an unsafe environment, prohibiting any deep and important talk to root.
The Talk Circle is designed as a primer, for men who have never done men’s work before. The Circle is larger in number (17 – 22 attendees), in contrast to a traditional men’s group (smaller, 5 – 8, and with greater expectations to share). The Talk Circle intentionally allows for men to ease their way into their held-back experiences; being invited to talk, only as they feel ready. To further underscore emotional safety, this project holds an open-door policy regarding attendance, furthering to lessen the rigors and demands of the intimacy that usually arise from small and weekly men’s group work. The Talk Circle also fosters the option for men to begin their own support group. Contrary to belief, the inherent deep hunger for men to talk communally, once initiated and structured, is almost unstoppable.
The Talk Circle utilizes a five man committee for planning and sharing the duties with each monthly event. Responsibilities include establishing ground-rules, underscoring confidentiality, calling in the five directions including the inward direction (toward our hearts and our truths), providing some music and some poetry, (the language of the heart) and monitoring the group’s process ensuring that men’s voices of their internal experiences will be both heard, seen and witnessed. As men gain both a new familiarity and an emotional safety in this sharing-aloud, they cultivate skills toward new and potentially meaningful friendships for themselves.
The Talk Circle meets monthly, in donated space (Davis International House), it is open for all men, ages 18 years and older. Two licensed clinicians serve on the committee, helping to monitor and assist in the group’s process.
This project is part of a new paradigm of community men’s work. One that is unique, in its structure to create a culture that is relational and non-competitive; a departure from our current known sense of masculinity. Ours is a community project whose intent is to welcome men to know their interiors, thus promoting a maturing of our masculinity from what is described as our current boy psychology, towards a man psychology. Our hope is to afford men a reclamation in their lives of wholeness, of vitality, of tenderness, and of stewardship. We strive to nurture creativity as integral to the aging process, and embrace the honoring of our Elders, whose resources are currently under utilized and often discarded. The Talk Circle fosters a culture of honoring our differences, as our differences lead us into our humanness and our ability to connect.
Creating such Communities is not only very doable, it is teachable, affordable and would be a significant developmental asset for both boys growing-up, and for men throughout the course of their lives. It is a significant antidote to the stark aloneness, (non-relational pattern), that our male culture has inflicted on itself for generations. Men are too often unaccustomed to being in such groups, and do not know that emotional safety is possible, and that deep sharing can be structured, leading men into support as they find their own healing process. Talk Circles foster experiences that welcome men into greater connection with themselves and then with others while factors contributing to isolation are kept in check.
Our hope is to share this model with other social workers or mental health workers who might choose to begin a Talk Circle in their own community.
The Next Davis Community Men’s Talk Circle will meet on Wednesday, May 14th, from 7:00 – 9:15 pm, at the International House (10 College Park, & Russell Blvd). All men 18 years and older are welcome to these monthly gatherings, and there is no charge to attend. All men are welcome!
More information is available regarding this project by calling: (530) 758-2794.
- P. Gregory Guss, LCSW has a psychotherapy practice in West Davis, is on the planning committee for the Redwood Men’s Annual Conference, and has developed and facilitates the Community Men’s Talk Circle.

Special to The Enterprise

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Cruise-In RAW

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April 02, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cruise In: Glen Byrns workup
Present or past tense?
Q: did he call Ray Smith “Bud”?
What’s the name of Leslie’s dog?

Byrns, 61, a retiree from the UC Davis animal genetics lab, got an education in British car repair when he helped his neighbor Ray “Bud” Smith restore a red Austin-Healey “Bugeye” Sprite during the summer of 1969.

He went on to buy unwanted English cars dirt cheap, one after another and traded up to a Triumph Spitfire.

“I blew the engine again and again, racing it through high school.”

Then came an 1959 MGA from a junkyard that he repaired and drove through college.

30 years, his marriage to Leslie, and two daughters later, Byrns was riding the Davis Double Century bike ride. As he crested Cantelow Hill he heard a familiar rumble and waited at the top. A man was pleasure driving a ’59 MGA. The pair took a half-hour break to discuss their automotive passion.

Afterwards, Byrns went on and on to Leslie who later fueled his interest with a Father’s Day gift of a coffee table book of British cars. The Austin-Healey “Bugeye” Sprite stood out, sparking a question, “What ever happened to Bud?”

With help from home, Byrns tracked down Smith.
“Glen?”
“Yeah.”
“I bet I know what you’re calling about.”
“Yeah.”
“Do you want the Sprite?”
“Yeah.”
With a borrowed truck, Byrns became the owner of his first automotive love.

Byrns opens the forward tilt bonnet and it becomes obvious that it’s not exactly stock. There’s giant turbocharger, a custom manifold added by the previous owner, new intake, a different throttle body, modern fuel injection.
And he gave it a name, “Bugsy.”
“It’s as modified as it could possibly be, but I like it to look stock on the outside to keep it subtle.
I’m sure the previous owner would be proud. In his line of thinking I only added more power.”

But still Byrns doesn’t drive it much around town. It’s not practical.
“It’s a go out in the country and blow your hair back kind of car,” he says. And what the heck, it’s time for hair to blow.

We take a short drive out west on Russell Boulevard down the Avenue of Trees. The sound is deep, loud, rumbling, not unpleasant to anyone who has a hankering for this sort of ride. But Byrns isn’t completely happy with the tuning until Bugsy is good and warmed up.
“Once you get good at the tuning, it should start and pull away from the curb like a Toyota Corolla.”
In theory it’s possible. You really have to get everything tweaked just right. You have to learn the skill of tuning a car with software. I haven’t quite figured the whole thing out.”

As if there’s a need to upgrade the experience Byrns mentions the turbocharge option and apologizes.
“I hardly ever light up the turbo anymore. It just costs me pistons and money. That’s why I built the electronic ignition for it, so I can dial back the timing when I was running the turbo.”

In 2008, Byrns drove the hard-riding roadster to the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri for 50th anniversary of its introduction as a car. As he topped Monarch Pass through the Rockies, he shared a rare meeting with a club of Vespa owners with a collective “Dude!”
He missed making the longest drive by 50 miles to Missouri by a Portland couple.
“They cheated. They drove a later model with roll-up windows.”

Byrns couldn’t leave his wife Leslie without a taste of English conveyance. Leslie nodded her approval of a Morris Minor they saw at Redfield. He found one, a right-hand drive Woody Wagon painted bright persimmon with an “Unkl Fud” vanity plate. It had been stored in an Oakland garage after being towed off the streets of Berkeley in the ’70’s. Speculation regarding its imaginative history ensues.

Glen restores the wagon and Leslie renames her Winifred, after her mother. (The dog, XXX, was named after her dad.)

Winston came from nowhere. Byrns built it from “the best bits fro what it needs to be,” from carrying bicycles to bricks to backpacking in the Sierra. It started with a green Morris cabshell and frame, a Datsun transmission, a Sprite engine and brakes, and wheels from Chevy Vega. A mutt with a fifth gear for good highway mileage and modern electronics.

“I collect from the low end of the food chain where I can still use them to enjoy them.
Either drive them or sell them to somebody that will. That’s my motto. I just love these things.”
The next project is a red 1962 Morris Mini that he found on ranch property near Redding.

But before that step forward, came three steps back.
Byrns came home from a weeklong backpacking trip, parked Winston and walked in to take a shower. Leslie drove Winifred into the garage next to Bugsy after a shopping trip.
They soon heard pounding noises in the garage.
A transformer than ran the sprinkler timer died after 37 years and overheated, falling into a box of balsa wood. The garage exploded into fire.
“I ran outside in a bathrobe and it was completely involved.”

Byrns lost fishing poles and a hammer with his dad’s name that he had made during the depression, model airplanes, collectible bikes, car parts.

And there was Bugsy and Winifred.
“It was hideously depressing.”
Bugsy’s upholstery was burned away. Anything rubber or chrome was destroyed. The dash and steering wheel were black. Winston’s hood was burnt and blistered.
“I didn’t think I’d have to do them over again.”

He did, but better.
“I pulled everything off and started sanding, and kept sanding until it wasn’t black, then varnished it.”
Bugsy went from yellow to blue. The Woody is tighter.
“I did everything but sew together the leather seats. Since the engine ran after the fire, I just scrubbed it clean and repainted it.

“In about two or three weeks I’m going to lose patience and replace the radiator.”
It still reeks of smoke.
“It sets off something like I don’t know what.”

Byrns doesn’t care that he has a salvage title for his 55-year-old Sprite.
“We call that a badge of honor.”

He had restored the Mini’s engine when the fire occurred, but that’ll be a do-over too.
He is holding back from a common temptation to convert it to a Mini Cooper, keeping the 848 cc engine with its 45 mpg.
He will be done restoring when the Mini is complete.
“That’ll be a nice little set, then I’ll be finished … unless someone gives me a Jag,” Byrns laughs.

Byrns likes the Davis Cruise-in because it is a casual setting, there’s no judging going on.
“For me, it’s different from the other guys. I’m an English car guy.”
Byrns only went to the United British Sports Car club in Sacramento before Davis dentist Howard Shempp got Byrns interested in the Cruise-In.
“I just like to see American hot rods that I virtually never see. I’m peeking in a window I don’t get to look in very often. Plus there’s plenty of places to eat over there. You get a nice dinner and sit out on the grass and look at all the cars.”
“Every time I go, something drives up that just knocks me out …. It’s just one thing after another.”

Byrns appreciates the effort that Bruce Risley has put into the Cruise-In.
“I don’t know where the guy finds them, but he gets people to turn up with curious cars that you’re not going to see at the average show. It’s funny what people have hidden in their garages.”

Cruise In: Don Arneson workup

Don Arneson of Woodland was looking for a birthday present for his wife Ann. He found it while on the job. There were seven rats living in it.

Arneson specializes in restoration and remodeling of pre-1930 structures. He was working on a house near Williams that was built by the owner’s father in the 1900’s.

The owner, a woman in her 70’s, told him that there was some extra trim left over from the original construction available in the chicken barn. Arneson opened the barn doors and spied a 1958 Thunderbird covered in pigeon dung. The woman’s son had driven it until he had lost interest.

She held off from selling it to Arneson for several months until he suggested he would give her a ride when he got it running.
Sadly, she died of cancer before he was able to take her for that promised ride.

Arneson only takes the car to the Davis Cruise-In.
“It is classified as a work in progress, most car shows don’t want a work in progress. it’s not in that dependable stage where I want to drive it for a long distance.”
Until recently when the Arneson’s built their house and a garage, he hasn’t had a space to restore it.
“I bought it with the idea of being able to completely tear it apart.”

“The only thing I had to do was to get rid of the rats.”
He put transmission fluid in it, squirted oil in the cylinders, got the starter to work, and had the carburetor rebuilt. It fired right up.
“I had to replace everything rubber. The rats chewed everything up.”
Arneson plans to retro the T-Bird, meaning that he’ll buy a new engine and transmission which will get better gas mileage and be worth more.
“I’m going to do 90 percent of the work. I’ll take it to have it painted. I’ll do all the body work myself.”

Arneson restored a 1955 Thunderbird years ago, sold it, and was looking for another ’55-’57 model.
“They are so tremendously expensive …. worth about $100,000,” said Arneson. “Even in bad shape they are worth $50-60 thousand. They’re almost impossible to find for sale,” he added.

The Cruise-In: It’s Bruce and Ron’s baby
“A lot of reasons we don’t go to shows is there is this elite crowd, they don’t want work in progress, they don’t want this or that, they want entry fees, … It’s a little subculture. It’s what we wanted to get away from.”

“Our heart is to introduce the next generation to these cars because they are disappearing.
“They are either doing the Batman outrageous stuff, or they are being destroyed in massive quantities.”
“My model year 261,000 made in ’60. highest production car up until that time. There’s probably less than a hundred of them that are running that we know of. There’s probably thousands in barns … they’re rusting out in someone’s barn.

“Our heart, and Bruce ’s heart, is getting these kids interested in doing restoration work or just preservation. The cool thing about it … we had a Tesla there this year. It’s just fun! “You just never know what’s going to show up there.”
“Race cars, army trucks, motorcycles, milk trucks, delivery trucks,” adds Ann.
“I jumped on board and said ‘this is great.’ There’s no entry fee, and no trophy, but who cares?”
“Most of them will let you get in their car and take your picture,” said Ann. As opposed to car shows, “there’s, ‘No touch.’”

Arneson goes to the Cruise-In for the nostalgia, “where guys get together and swap stories, and just to really have a place. Some of these cars are just a labor of love. They are the rare exceptions where they are taking them and preserving them. It is a part of American history that is rapidly disappearing.”

“That is their heart, where people could come and not worry what shape is in. We call them ‘drivers’ — unusual or rare cars that people are still driving.”

Some folks in Arneson’s generation will ask to sit in the T-Bird, inhale the aroma and smile.
“Then they’ll start telling me these fantastic stories …. That’s when you can bring back those memories fond times when ‘Uncle Larry used to take me for rides.’”

When Arneson first got the T-Bird running — still dirty with pigeon dung — a woman in her eighties walked over to ask if she could touch his car.
“Of course you can, but you’ll have to wash your hands after you do it,” he said. “She touches the door and starts to cry. ‘My husband that I was married to for 50 years … picked me up for our first date in a 1960 Thunderbird. We married and we went on our honeymoon to Florida.’ She was crying and telling me stories.”

Arneson was once surprised driving alongside a group of young boys on bikes. “They begged me to stop.” He found a safe place for them to fawn over it. “They were texting their friends with pictures of it.”

Arneson gets in and turns the key. It fires right up after sitting in the yard for a couple months. There is a smell of raw gasoline. Everything works except the factory air conditioning, a rare feature. He will have to take apart the vacuum system to fix a leak. Even the windshield wipers are controlled by the system. They feebly cycle across the windshield due to the leak.

“That’s the thing with this. It’ll always be a work in progress. I want to let my grand-babies ride in it without me freaking out. It will never be perfect. It’ll be a … car.”
“It’s just for fun,” adds Ann.

Cruise-In: Slinkard workup

Steve Slinkard, owner of 1951 Chevrolet Styleline DeLuxe convertible with a 1956 365 Cadillac engine.
Steve is officially retired mechanical engineer, though he is now working part-time as a consultant working on the gate hoists at Folsom Dam.
Alfred B. Slinkard, dad, a warehouse manager for Jersey Maid Milk company
Rex Slinkard, brother (12 years older) was a mechanic at a Cadillac dealership, then through a connection at Universal Studios, he became a sound mixer in Hollywood. An internet search revealed a NY Times listed filmography that includes “Fast Times and Ridgemont High” and work with Ed Begley Jr.

His dad, Alfred, and brother, Rex, drag-raced this car at San Gabriel, San Fernando and Saugus in southern California.
He shows off one trophy from 1962 that commemorates his father’s victory in the half-mile driving 107 mph.

He has been in the traveling more than 100 mph at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Nevada. They went every year for several years. The car was raced in D Gas class.

When he was growing up, his brother Rex was friends with drag racing personalities Tony Ivo and Don Prudhomme in the midst of the Southern California culture of drag racing.

Steve was too young to participate but he was there.
He helped them install a Hydramatic transmission in 1959. The company modified them for racing. “They became quite the trick thing for race cars.”

By the time Steve was old enough, other cars were becoming more competitive. In 1962, they were in on another racing vacation at Bonneville. Before leaving for home, another party who thought the Slinkards had cheated during a race dumped sand in the crankcase. When they got to Windover, the engine self-destructed. That was the end of its racing days but not its life. After rebuilding the engine, his father drove the 40 commute in to work in it in LA.
“You could say he was a little eccentric. He wore a crash helmet all the time. The top was never up.”

As other parts including the suspension wore out, he retired the car in 1978.
When he died, Rex got the car and spent 10 years working on it trying to bring it back the way it was. He almost finished it before he died, then Steve took over the final bits of restoration.

“I drive this car like my dad and brother are right there with me. It’s hard to explain. It’s such a spiritual thing for me. It brings back so many memories. It’s been so much part of my life. I learned to drive in this car.”
“The first time I drove it was at Bonneville. It was the safest place to drive it because it was wide open,” though he almost got in a wreck. He was 14.

Rex became a crewmember of the “Freight Train” dragster owned by John Peters. Bob Muraves was the driver. Because of a family situation, Muraves went by alias Floyd Lippencotte Jr. His father owned a Maytag dealership and was told he wouldn’t inherit it if he raced.
So, after a race, Rex and Bob would switch places when they brought the car back from the end of the strip. Rex was often photographed with the winning trophy as Muraves stood at his side.

“There was a group that would street race at Forest Lawn Drive, near Burbank, a nice wide four-lane road. It had starting and finish lines painted on the street. People would come. The cops would come. People would scatter.”
The “Freight Train” crew once went for a test run at Forest Lawn .
“They ran it a few hundred yards then shut it off and coasted to the trailer. They drove off before the cops arrived.”
“Freight Train” is now kept in the NHRA Motorsport Museum at Pomona.

Slinkard likes the Davis Cruise-In because of its casual nature.
“It is kind of unique. There’s no entry fee or anything. You are not competing. You just come relax and have fun. It’s really nice that way, there’s no expectations, there’s no politics.”
At other car shows “these cliques form. It’s amazing how it starts going after a while. People get strong ideas about anything, then they get stubborn and unreasonable, and self righteous. Within the hot rods there’s different groups, the devout chevy guys, the devout ford guys, the really old hot rods from the 30’s.
“It is just a get together with no rules, there are not classes, anybody’s welcome, just bring your car and have a good time, everybody is open to talk about their cars.At other car shows, everybody is a bit cutthroat. It is just a weird atmosphere. It is just a nice size. It has gotten to a critical mass. It has gotten enough to keep it going, but not too much that it’s overwhelming.”

“There is a counter movement called Rat Rods. It has gotten to the point, like at Sacramento Autorama a lot of guys take these kind of cars and spend $100,000-200,000. It’s a just ridiculous amount of money.”
Now there is a backlash. “The young guys say, we can’t get into this, it’s political, it’s all money.”
“It’s back to the basic hot rod. They don’t chrome anything. They just put cars together. They are just concerned about the form of the car.”

“Vacations were usually at the Bonneville Salt Flats. At the Nevada-Utah state line in Wendover, Nev., Dad would gamble with slot machines. Mom would watch him.”
It was kind of a strange location and it was really fun driving there. Dad would take off baffle plates as soon as we’d crossed the border. He never had the top up, rain or shine.”

“It is just funny how the car can be this common thread with my dad and my brother. It held us together for a lot of years.”
“Anytime I go to these shows it’s like my they are riding along with me. I find myself to them when I’m driving, like ‘Hey dad, what do you think?’”
“I’m sure my dad would be thrilled to see the way it is, that I’m keeping it up. He’d be happy.”

As we go for a run north of Davis, I feel the car’s terrifying power in combination with ‘floaty’ suspension. The flat bench seat doesn’t provide much ‘body grab’ like modern bucket seats. One wrong move and I imagine being thrown out. It is like being on a roller coaster without a lap bar.
“It really makes you aware of all the advances in safety we’ve had,” said Slinkard.
“The way this thing shifts — it’s a racing transmission — when you shift, you know it.”

“It’s pretty sedate until you step on it. It was a sleeper. Back in the 50’s it was a fast car.”
“Dad raced it at stop lights. He got a few tickets. You can get away with a lot more back then.”
“My dad didn’t race with me in it, but my brother did. I was lucky my brother really did a lot of good things with me.”
I can just imagine.

Cruise-In: Steve Garcia workup

Steve is the purchasing agent of the Microbiology and Molecular Genetics Dept., College of Biological Sciences, at UC Davis. He lives in Yolo, about five miles north of Woodland on I-5.
People: Steve Garcia; Benedicto Garcia, dad; Benedict “Ben” Garcia, brother; Austin Garcia, son; XXX Garcia, wife
Steve learned to drive in a 1968 Dodge van with a “three on the tree” transmission.

Steve Garcia still own’s his first car, a 1956 white and yellow Mercury Montclair passed down to him from his father (who bought it in 1977).

It needed some work. His dad said he’d put up half. “That inspired me to do a lot of lawn jobs,” said Steve.
His school friends refused to believe he owned a car for lack of evidence. Garcia lived in the country. Four years later Steve had it running on the road during his senior year in high school in 1984. Steve and his brother Ben painted the yellow and white color scheme that year.
“The breaking is a little different. I can make turns with one finger. It is a lot of car to drive. It is a very heavy and solid car.”
“It’s a driver, it’s got dings and scratches, eventually that something I’m going to look into taking care of, Until then I just take it out anHIS CAR
“The breaking is a little different. I can make turns with one finger. It is a lot of car to drive. It is a very heavy and solid car.”
“It’s a driver, it’s got dings and scratches, eventually that something I’m going to look into taking care of, Until then I just take it out and enjoy it like I did this weekend.”

His dad worked in construction as a concrete layer and had other jobs.

Garcia recently took his son Austin to Galvan’s Classic Car Truck Show (at Engelmann Cellars Winery) in Fresno.
“I just meet people and get ideas.” “It was a good experience for him.”

Steve, a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, organized a car show the past two years to benefit diabetes research.

Steve has been going to car shows for more than 30 years, yet he find the Davis Cruise-In has a unique draw.
“I make it a habit to go every month. It’s as short drive for me. I have gotten to know Bruce and that group of guys.”
“What I like about it there, there’s a lot of different types of cars, theres a lot of European cars out there. There’s maybe only one or two . It’s a smaller scale show, but a greater variety of cars.
“ is very simple, there’s no fee. Just drive up and mingle with everybody and see what they brought. Some people that don’t have a car come up and ask questions, wanting to know about the car. It’s not a very well known car.

“You run into a few of the people, especially the elderly who say ‘We had one of these when we were a kid,’ and ‘I remember when my dad bought it brand new,’ or ‘I had one in high school.’
“It’s kind of good for them, it’s a flashback and makes me feel good that I can bring some of those memories back to them. I do it for the love of the car, I don’t do it for prizes or none of that. I have won prizes, but that’s not my priority.”

“Since it a smaller venue, you get a more personal touch and you get to know more of the people there.
“The regulars that are there, you start to build that relationship with them. You get a friendship, but it’s all car related. Some of the people at the Cruise-In also came to support me at my car show.”
“I see a lot of them at other car shows and they’ll shake my hand and say, hi and how are you doing. It’s a car bond. It’s a little brotherhood.”
“At the car show I was at yesterday, there were about 250 owners and I only met two or three. There are just so many people, you can’t get that bond with them.”

“I’ve gone through front and rear suspension, engine, transmission, interior. I try to do as much as I can, if it’s beyond me, I’ll try to learn how to do it … the internet … , or I’ll find someone who can help me out. The pride of it is that I can say “I did it.” I am particular about details, did some of the interior myself.
“The next thing on the list is to repaint the whole car, and take the dings out of chrome. When it’s going to happen? I don’t know.”

“I stick with local smaller shows with 100-200 cars, 10 or more a year.

“It’s a driver, as much as I can.” He once used it for work in winter time. “I’m not afraid to drive it in the rain.”
“It runs good. There’s a little minor tuning that needs to be done. It never left me stranded. The older cars are easier to work on. You look at some of the newer cars and you don’t know what anything is.”

Son’s project truck

1949 Ford F1 pickup with a 239 Flathead engine using a 6-volt battery.

“A lot of free time is dedicated to helping him learn. It has an overheating problem, I may know what it is. It has an engine that I’m not familiar with. It’s a really good engine, but temperamental. It is known for overheating.
“It’s basically two engines that function as one. It has two water pumps in two cooling systems. I’m trying to find others who have these engines and pick their brains.

“This is the one that most of our time is dedicated to now.”
“A water pump is probably bad. Once we get that taken care of, we hope that’ll alleviate the problem.

Austin clear coated the underside of the hood to keep the rusty patina.
“You can see it has come a long ways in a short time.”

It is somewhat “rat rod,” but it still looks stock. It is not going to be an extreme.”

cruise in cars:

I like the little Citroëns. They’re little, they’re different, they’re something out of the ordinary you don’t see very often.

The military style trucks that show up. I’ve always loved trucks, That’s why I help son with his. I’ve always had a feel for trucks.

son Austin, 19

“Earl”, has a horse hood ornament

It was rough when we first got it running. It had an overheating problem. It sat for 15 years. My son has cleaned up a lot of it already. The bed was full of stuff as high as the cab. The hood and fender was off. It was painted multiple colors. He did a lot of this himself. The signs were his idea for floorboard.
It needs a driver’s side window.
“It was pretty much complete but it was in parts. They took apart when they were working on it.
“He’s anxious to get it on the road.”

“You see a lot of teenagers that don’t make the initiative to do something like this.”

A:
“For him to be out there, other people see that and say, ‘If he can do that why can’t I?’”

A: I’ve been going to car shows since I was little, just recently (dad ran car show) … I just wanted an old car. Everybody I know has them. I know at least 20 people that have older vehicles.”

what drives you to an older car
A: “The craftsmanship

“They actually took the time to form these (Points to truck fender and other parts), not just print it out and make a bunch of copies.”

“Someone took the time to design this and think about every little thing. More than nowadays. They put on the computer and draft it all up. You don’t see many cars with chrome. I love chrome.”

The truck belonged to Woody and Charlotte Morris, the parents of XXX’s friends “NAMES”

him and wife, worked out a good deal

“The truck belonged to Woody and Charlotte Morris. My wife was friends with their daughters.They worked out a good deal

She would collect cans with them.
She would ride on the running boards grab cans from road and throw them into the bed.
“There are a lot of good memories for my wife

“When you get it running you need to come and give me a ride,”
“Hopefully soon he’d be able to get that ride.”

Tire change instruction decal underside of trunk:
“You see the way they’re dressed. I depicts the era right there. How many guys nowadays you see a guy dressed in a suit and tie changing a tire?”

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PD 2014: Past themes

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April 03, 2014 | Leave Comment

Every year, the Picnic Day board of directors selects a theme to reflect the mission and vision of that year’s Picnic Day. The theme is incorporated into many of the events at Picnic Day, especially the Picnic Day Parade.

2013 – Snapshot
2012 – Then, Now, Always
2011 – Rewind
2010 – Carpe Davis: Seizing Opportunities
2009 – Reflections: 100 Years of Aggie Legacy
2008 – A Kaleidoscope of Voices
2007 – Making Our Mark
2006 – Celebrate Today
2005 – Live on One Shields Ave.
2004 – Shifting Gears for 90 Years
2003 – Rock The Picnic
2002 – Open Mind, Open Door
2001 – Aggies Shine Together
2000 – Life’s A Picnic
1999 – Moo-ving Into the Future
1998 – Breaking New Ground
1997 – UC Davis Outstanding in It’s Fields
1996 – Carrying the Torch of Tradition
1995 – Down To Earth
1994 – Students Shining Through
1993 – Faces of the Future
1992 – Moovin Ahead
1991 – Catch the Spirit, Building a Better U
1990 – Shaping Our Environment with Diversity, Tradition and Style
1989 – Challenging Our Future Today
1988 – Progress Backed By Tradition
1987 – On The Move
1986 – Reaching New Heights
1985 – Setting The Pace
1984 – Celebrating Excellence: UCD’s Diamond Anniversary
1983 – Meeting the Challenge
1982 -
1981 – ’81 A Vintage Year
1980 – Decade Debut
1979 – Aggie Energy
1978 – Davis Directions
1977 -
1976 – UCDiversity
1975 – Hay Day
1974 – Cycles
1973 – The Farm Mooves
1972 – Remember the First
1971 – Memories of the Past… A Challenge to the Future
1970 – Blowing in the Wind
1969 – Freewheeling & Friendly
1968 – Know Your University and 100 Years Later
1967 – Farm
1966 -
1965 – Aggie Country
1964 – Today’s Aggie Family
1963 – Aggie Jubilee
1962 – Kaleidoscope ’62
1961 – Workshop for the World
1960 – Foundations for the Future
1959 – U-Diversity
1958 – Showcase of Progress
1957 – Campus Cavalcade
1956 – Aggie Milestones
1955 – Future Unlimited
1954 – California Cornucopia
1953 – At Home
1952 – Preview of Progress
1951 – Harvest of Science
1950 – Cavalcade of Agriculture
1949 – Research Makes the Difference
1941 – We Are Still Behind the Plow
1940 – Agriculture, the Nation’s Foundation
1937 – Cal Aggies, Farmer better living, partners in Agricultural progress
1936 – Be entertained
1935 – Agriculture Ahead
1934 – 25 years ago
1933 – A New Day in Agriculture
1930 – Twenty Years Ago in Agriculture
1928 – Look Beneath the Surface
1923 – Follow the Sign

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Davis Resident Wins Scholarship

See Emily Darby

Juniors Emily Darby, Dillon Dong and
Hannah Wyment Steele Win Goldwater Scholarships

Emily Darby, Dillon Dong and Hannah Wyment-Steele, of the Class of 2015, have been awarded Barry M. Goldwater Scholarships, which provide up to $7,500 per year for educational expenses to sophomores and juniors intending to pursue careers in mathematics, natural sciences, or engineering. They were selected from a field of 1,166 students nominated by their colleges.

Emily Darby, a chemistry major with a math minor, has studied atmospheric chemistry with Prof. Frederick Grieman since her sophomore year. She is currently working on an independent research project studying the electronic spectroscopy of molecular ions to better understand the reaction pathways in the atmosphere so that a more comprehensive model of the atmosphere can be developed.

Last summer, Darby conducted solar energy research at Vanderbilt University through a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU). She was the primary researcher and sole undergraduate on a project entitled Photoactive Films of Photosystem I on Transparent Reduced Graphene Oxide Electrodes. The team submitted an article to the journal Langmuir, and, if it is accepted, she will be listed as first author.

In addition to her research, Darby is a mentor with Pomona’s High Achievement Program, a teaching assistant for the organic chemistry lab and a math and chemistry tutor for two to five elementary through high school students each year.

Her future plans include earning a Ph.D. in chemical engineering with an emphasis on alternative energy, then becoming a faculty member at a research university while continuing research in alternative energy that is sustainable and efficient.

Darby is a resident of Davis, Calif, and the daughter of Jeannie Darby. She attributes her early interest in chemistry to her “wonderful high school chemistry teacher, Mr. van Muyden.”

Dillon Dong, a physics and math double major, has conducted astronomy research since the second semester of his freshman year, when he worked with Prof. Phil Choi on the Pomona College Adaptive Optics Instrument. The next summer, with Choi’s help, he became a research assistant at Carnegie Observatories working with Dr. Eric Murphy on the Star Formation in Radio Survey (SFRS).

“My objective,” explains Dong, “was to use Ka band (33GHz) radio data taken with the Very Large Array (VLA) to study star formation in nearby galaxy nuclei and extranuclear HII regions. I presented preliminary results from that work at the American Astronomical Society’s winter conference (Jan. 2013) and at the IPAC/Caltech Gas conference (March 2013).”

This summer he will be working with Murphy characterizing the far-infrared spectral energy distribution of galaxy halos as part of the Herschel Edge on Galaxy Survey (HEDGES). He will also be collaborating with Kristina Nyland, from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, on “a 5GHz observation using the VLA of the likely AGN host galaxy NGC1266 and using that observation along with SFRS data and archival VLA data to make spectral aging, index and curvature maps of NGC1266′s massive molecular outflow.”

For Dong, “Physics is intriguing…because it’s a fundamental bridge between human thought–in the form of physical intuition, abstract mathematical concepts, etc.–and the natural world.”

Post-Pomona, Dong plans to earn a Ph.D. in astrophysics and become a physics/astronomy professor. A resident of San Francisco, he is the son of Allan Dong and Liping Dong. He attended Lowell High School, where he says, his “physics teachers, Mr. Dickerman and Mr. Shapiro, were the first people to really spark my interest in physics. Prof. Phil Choi really helped spark my interest in astronomy in particular.”

Hannah Wayment-Steele, a math and chemistry double major, has been a member of Prof. Mal Johal’s lab since her first year at Pomona, working on projects ranging from biological physics to inorganic materials. She recently submitted a manuscript on dye desorption from semiconductors, “for the purposes of improving the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells,” and is currently using molecular dynamics simulations and the Quartz-Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation instrument (QCM-D) to study the detrimental effects of aluminum ions on lipid membranes.

She has also conducted research with Dr. Sofia Svedhem in the Biological Physics Department of the Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, and will return this summer funded by the Beckman scholarship.

Wayment-Steele credits Johal and Dr. Lewis Johnson, a post-doc in the Johal lab, for providing the rich experiences that made her decide on a research career. “They have been outstanding mentors, providing endless support and helping me gain valuable experience: I’ve given oral presentations on my work at the SPIE Optics & Photonics Conference and the American Vacuum Society National Symposium, traveled internationally to conduct research, and submitted papers on which I am the first author.”

Wayment-Steele plans to earn a Ph.D. in biophysics or materials science. Her ultimate goal is to be a professor with her own research group, using computational techniques to help develop bio-nanomaterials for medical applications. A resident of Flagstaff, Arizona, Wayment-Steele is the daughter of Heidi Wayment and Craig Steele.

# # #

Special to The Enterprise

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Roy Bellhorn

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April 03, 2014 | Leave Comment

obellhorn

Courtesy photo
Roy W. Bellhorn, D.V.M., is the Distinguished Alumnus of the Year Award at Michigan State Veterinary School. He is holding Kermit, clearly a mutual love relationship.

Photo by Margaret Burns
Roy W. Bellhorn, D.V.M. is a Distinguished Alumnus of the Michigan State Veterinary School for his contributions to veterinary medicine.

Photo by Margaret Burns
Roy W. Bellhorn, D.V.M. is the Distinguished Alumnus of the year at Michigan State Veterinary School for his contributions to his profession. He is being wooed by Kermit the Lovable.

Bellhorn receives prestigious veterinary medicine award

By MARGARET BURNS
Staff writer

Roy Bellhorn, a Winters resident for 30 years, and still an “implant” in town, is known locally for his singing in barbershop style (or swing) with Octapella. He can be found delivering meals to seniors, teaching literacy one-on-one, helping out in the Winters Theatre Company kitchen, dining with the Olde Phartz, or chatting up a lovely lady here and there.
He never brags about what he has done professionally, but his college has recognized it this year. He is the Distinguished Alumnus of the Year of the Michigan State Veterinary School.
This award is given to a graduate of the school who is “held in high esteem by his or her colleagues and who has excelled in practice, teaching, research, service and/or organized veterinary medicine.”
Dr. Roy William Bellhorn has done all of that. And more.
He is one of the five founders of the subspecialty of veterinary ophthalmology. He trained in human ophthalmology and has a master’s degree from New York University in human ophthalmology because there were no veterinary ophthalmology courses in the 1960s. He applied his knowledge to animals, usually dogs and cats, but occasionally horses or apes, parrots or dolphins or whales. He was a consultant to the Bronx Zoo for exotic animal eye diseases.
At the UC Davis Veterinary School, where he was recruited in 1984, he won the Norden Teacher of the Year award.
He is known for his research in animal models of human disease, for which he was mentored by his chairman at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, Paul Henkind. Bellhorn held grants from the National Institutes of Health for many years.
He was president of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology, which he helped found; chaired the board defining their residency programs and proficiency examinations.
Bellhorn is still an active member, as an Emeritus, of the Ophthalmology service at UC Davis Veterinary School.
His contributions are so numerous and longstanding, that it is not surprising when one young veterinary ophthalmology resident was introduced to him, she blurted out, “Dr. Bellhorn, I thought you were dead!”
He is not dead and he lives in Winters.

(Disclaimer: This story was written by Maggie Burns, a sometimes collaborator, critic, and his wife.)

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David Brooks: The employer’s creed

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April 03, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-BROOKS-COLUMN-NYT/850
Commentary: The Employer’s Creed
By DAVID BROOKS

c.2014 New York Times News Service

Dear Employers,

You may not realize it, but you have a powerful impact on the culture and the moral ecology of our era. If your human resources bosses decide they want to hire a certain sort of person, then young people begin turning themselves into that sort of person.

Therefore, I’m asking you to think about the following principles, this Employer’s Creed. If you follow these principles in your hiring practices, you’ll be sending a signal about what sort of person gets ahead. You may correct some of the perversities at the upper reaches of our meritocracy. You may even help cultivate deeper, fuller human beings.

Bias hiring decisions against perfectionists. If you work in a white-collar sector that attracts highly educated job applicants, you’ve probably been flooded with résumés from people who are not so much human beings as perfect avatars of success. They got 3.8 grade-point averages in high school and college. They served in the cliché leadership positions on campus. They got all the perfect consultant/investment bank internships. During off-hours they distributed bed nets in Zambia and dug wells in Peru.

When you read these résumés, you have two thoughts. First, this applicant is awesome. Second, there’s something completely flavorless here. This person has followed the cookie-cutter formula for what it means to be successful and you actually have no clue what the person is really like except for a high talent for social conformity. Either they have no desire to chart out an original life course or lack the courage to do so. Shy away from such people.

Bias hiring decisions toward dualists. The people you want to hire should have achieved some measure of conventional success, but they should have also engaged in some desperate lark that made no sense from a career or social status perspective. Maybe a person left a successful banking job to rescue the family dry-cleaning business in Akron. Maybe another had great grades at a fancy East Coast prep school but went off to a Christian college because she wanted a place to explore her values. These peoples have done at least one Deeply Unfashionable Thing. Such people have intrinsic motivation, native curiosity and social courage.

Bias toward truth-tellers. I recently ran into a fellow who hires a lot of people. He said he asks the following question during each interview. “Could you describe a time when you told the truth and it hurt you?” If the interviewee can’t immediately come up with an episode, there may be a problem here.

Don’t mindlessly favor people with high GPAs. Students who get straight A’s have an ability to prudentially master their passions so they can achieve proficiency across a range of subjects. But you probably want employees who are relentlessly dedicated to one subject. In school, those people often got A’s in subjects they were passionate about but got B’s in subjects that did not arouse their imagination.

Reward the ripening virtues, not the blooming virtues. Some virtues bloom forth with youth: being intelligent, energetic, curious and pleasant. Some virtues only ripen over time: other-centeredness, having a sense for how events will flow, being able to discern what’s right in the absence of external affirmation. These virtues usually come with experience, after a person has taken time off to raise children, been fired or learned to cope with having a cruel boss. The blooming virtues are great if you are hiring thousands of consultants to churn out reports. For most other jobs, you want the ripening ones, too.

Reward those who have come by way of sorrow. Job seekers are told to present one linear narrative to the world, one that can easily be read and digested as a series of clean conquests. But if you are stuck in an airport bar with a colleague after a horrible business trip, would you really want to have a drink with a person like that? No, you’d want a real human being, someone who’d experienced setback, suffering and recovery. You’d want someone with obvious holes in his résumé, who has learned the lessons that only suffering teaches, and who got back on track.

Reward cover letter rebels. Job seeking is the second greatest arena of social pretense in modern life — after dating. But some people choose not to spin and exaggerate. They choose not to make each occasion seem more impressive than it really was. You want people who are radically straight, even with superiors.

You could argue that you don’t actually want rich, full personalities for your company. You just want achievement drones who can perform specific tasks. I doubt that’s in your company’s long-term interests. But if you fear leaping out in this way, at least think of the effect you’re having on the deeper sensibilities of the next generation, the kind of souls you are incentivizing and thus fashioning, the legacy you will leave behind.

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A step toward justice in college sports?

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April 03, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-NOCERA-COLUMN-NYT/828
Commentary: A Step Toward Justice in College Sports?
By JOE NOCERA

c.2014 New York Times News Service

If you were going to hold up a school as being exemplary in the way it puts athletics in, as they say, “the proper perspective,” Northwestern University would certainly be one you’d point to. For instance, although it lacks the kind of winning tradition — at least in the big-time sports — that other schools in the Big Ten can boast of, it proudly points to the 97 percent graduation rate of its athletes.

Yet buried in last week’s decision by Peter Sung Ohr, the regional director of the National Labor Relations Board — in which he said that the Northwestern football team had the right to form a union — was this anecdote about Kain Colter, the former Northwestern quarterback who is leading the union effort. In his sophomore year, dreaming of going to medical school someday, Colter “attempted to take a required chemistry course.” However, “his coaches and advisors discouraged him from taking the course because it conflicted with morning football practices.” Eventually, after falling behind other pre-med students, he wound up switching his major to psychology, “which he believed to be less demanding,” according to Ohr.

Ohr’s essential point was that unlike the rest of the student body at Northwestern, football players had little control over their lives. Their schedules were dictated by the needs of the football team. They had bosses in the form of coaches and other university officials who could fire them. They had to abide by a million petty NCAA rules, and they lacked many of the freedoms and rights taken for granted by students who didn’t play sports. They put in up to 50-hours a week at their sport — vastly more than is supposedly allowed under NCAA rules. But then, every school finds ways to evade those rules, whether they have athletics “in perspective” or not.

Anyone who cares about justice had to be encouraged by Ohr’s ruling. In outlining the many ways that Northwestern’s football players were primarily employees of the university, recruited to the campus to generate revenue, Ohr ignored the idyllic myth of the “student-athlete” and dealt in cold, hard facts. (“Student-athlete,” it’s worth remembering, is a phrase invented by the NCAA in the 1950s precisely to avoid having to grant workers’ compensation to injured college football players on the grounds that they fit the classic definition of employees.)

Having said that, it seems to me that both the fans and the critics of Ohr’s decision have been getting a little ahead of themselves. It is only one team at one school, and while I hear reliably that other teams at other schools are investigating the possibility of forming a union, we are years away from knowing whether a union would necessarily mean that players are eventually paid (as proponents hope) or that their scholarships will be taxed (as critics warn). Given the NCAA’s fierce resistance to anything that might dilute its power — or worse, give power to the athletes themselves — it is a certainty that Ohr’s decision will wind up in a federal appeals court.

The buzz over the union effort has also had the effect, at least temporarily, of distracting attention from other efforts that have the potential to upend the system even more radically. One is a class-action lawsuit that has been active for several years now, the O’Bannon case, named for Ed O’Bannon, the former UCLA basketball star. Although ostensibly about the licensing and image rights of former college athletes, it is aimed directly at the heart of “amateurism” that is the central rationale of the NCAA’s refusal to consider paying players anything beyond their scholarships.

Already, I’m told, the legal team driving the case is devising the means to pay players royalties and other compensation, which they will undoubtedly propose to the judge, assuming it goes to trial.

Meanwhile, lawyers on both coasts have recently filed straightforward antitrust class-action suits against the NCAA, arguing that universities and the NCAA simply lack the legal right to cap players’ compensation. When I asked Jeffrey Kessler, a New York lawyer who has spent years representing professional athletes, why he had taken on this case, he replied, “Our sense is that the world has changed so radically in college sports that even the most casual observers recognize that this is not amateurism. This is a gigantic business.”

Maybe that is what the Ohr decision really represents: a government acknowledgment that college sports is not what it once was and that no amount of NCAA propaganda can hide the money-soaked reality anymore. If judges come to these upcoming cases with the same lack of blinders that Ohr showed last week — if they view the cases strictly through the prism of the law rather than the gauzy sheen of amateurism — well, then, a union will be the least of the NCAA’s worries.

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Thomas Friedman: Follow the money

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April 03, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-FRIEDMAN-COLUMN-NYT/877
Commentary: Follow the Money
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN

c.2014 New York Times News Service

If you follow the debates about Ukraine, you can see three trends: those who use the crisis for humor, those who use it to reinforce preconceived views and those trying to figure out if it’s telling us something new about today’s world.

For humor, I like Seth Meyers’ line: “Despite the fact that the Ukraine has been all over the news for the past few weeks, a survey found that 64 percent of U.S. students still couldn’t find Ukraine on a map. Said Vladimir Putin, ‘Soon nobody will.’”

For self-reinforcement, the op-ed pages are full of the argument that Putin’s seizure of Crimea signals a return of either traditional 19th-century power politics or the Cold War — and anyone who thought globalization had trumped such geopolitics is naïve.

For new thinking, I’m intrigued by an argument made by Masha Gessen, a Russian-American journalist, and Nader Mousavizadeh, a geopolitical consultant and Reuters columnist, in different ways: That Putin represents a new hybrid — leaders who are using the tools, and profits, from globalization to promote, as Mousavizadeh put it, “strategic choices in direct opposition” to Western “values and interests.” Or as Gessen said in The Washington Post: “Russia is remaking itself as the leader of the anti-Western world. … This is exactly how Russians see the events in Ukraine: The West is literally taking over, and only Russian troops can stand between the Slavic country’s unsuspecting citizens and the homosexuals marching in from Brussels.”

My own view is that today’s global economic and technological interdependence can’t, of course, make war obsolete — human beings will always surprise you — but globalization does impose real restraints that shape geopolitics today more than you think. The Associated Press reported from Moscow last week that “recent figures suggest that Russia suffered roughly $70 billion of capital outflow in the first three months of the year, which is more than in all of 2013.” Putin didn’t miss that.

For reinforcement, I’d point to the very original take on this story offered by Michael Mandelbaum, the Johns Hopkins foreign policy expert whose new book, “The Road to Global Prosperity,” argues that while global economics does not eliminate geopolitics, i t does indeed trump global geopolitics today. It’s the key to trumping Putin, too.

As Mandelbaum (my co-author on a previous work) explains in his book, it is not either-or. Geopolitics never went away, even as globalization has become more important. For globalization to thrive, it needs a marketplace stabilized by power. Britain provided that in the 19th century. America does so today and will have to continue to do so even if Putin becomes a vegetarian pacifist.

But get a grip, Mandelbaum said in an interview: “Putin is not some strange creature from the past. He is as much a product of globalization as Davos Man.”

Putin runs a petro state. If it were not for the growth in the global market that globalization created and the energy revenues that it produces for Russia, Putin and the oligarchs who form his power base would be living off exports of vodka and caviar. Putin can’t survive without the revenues globalization provides him to buy off his people and former Soviet republics.

And that tells us how to “end Putinism,” says Mandelbaum, “which would be good not only for the world, but also, and especially, for Russia. The tools are primarily economic: denying Russian oligarchs access to the Western financial system and reducing the energy revenues flowing into Putin’s coffers.”

It is a new kind of containment. When containment was primarily military in the Cold War, America bore a disproportionate share of the Western burden. Now that it’s economic, “the Europeans will have to contribute much more,” argues Mandelbaum. “The Germans will have to be willing to forgo their sales of machine tools and cars to Russia, the French will have to cut back or give up arms sales to the Putin regime, and the British will have to stop the Russian oligarchs from using London as a playground and money-laundering site. Most importantly, the Europeans will have to wean themselves from Russian gas.”

As for Americans, we’ll need to pay higher energy taxes to promote conservation, and safely expand natural gas and renewable energy, which together will lower the demand for oil worldwide and reduce the money Putin has to play with. We can deflate this guy tomorrow without firing a shot if we’re all ready to do something rather than asking the 1 percent in the military to do everything. That is what Putin thinks we don’t have the guts to do.

“In the age of globalization, when the tools of geopolitics are more economic, everyone needs to sacrifice a little — rather than just a few of us giving up a lot — to sustain a global order where our values predominate,” said Mandelbaum. Crimea is not a test of whether globalization is still enormously powerful in shaping today’s world, he added, “that is already clear. It is a test of the West and whether we will use this system to shape events our way.”

Thomas Friedman

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PD 2014 Campus Rec events (from online newsletter)

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April 02, 2014 | Leave Comment

PICNIC DAY CENTENNIAL
The 100th Picnic Day is right around the corner on April 12, and Campus Recreation and Unions is ready to celebrate! Here’s a sneak peak at what our units have planned.
Activities and Recreation Center (ARC): Open house, 11 a.m.–4 p.m.
Cal Aggie Marching Band: CAMB will strut their stuff in the Picnic Day parade, 8–10 a.m. Catch them again at the Arboretum during Battle of the Bands, 2–10 p.m.
Craft Center: Open house, noon–3 p.m.
Equestrian Center: Open house, noon–3 p.m.
Games Area: Arcade open 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Bowling and billiards available 5–11 p.m.
Outdoor Adventures: Open house, 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Check out the new facility and learn about the exciting activities and classes offered in spring.
Sport Clubs: Sport Clubs will host the Men’s Waterpolo Alumni Game, 9–10 a.m., and the Women’s Waterpolo Alumni Game, 10–11 a.m., at Hickey Pool.

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Using the arts to teach how to prepare for climate crisis

By Richard Pérez-Peña

EUGENE, Ore. — University courses on global warming have become common, and Prof. Stephanie LeMenager’s new class here at the University of Oregon has all the expected, alarming elements: rising oceans, displaced populations, political conflict, endangered animals.

The goal of this class, however, is not to marshal evidence for climate change as a human-caused crisis, or to measure its effects — the reality and severity of it are taken as given — but how to think about it, prepare for it and respond to it. Instead of scientific texts, the class, “The Cultures of Climate Change,” focuses on films, poetry, photography, essays and a heavy dose of the mushrooming subgenre of speculative fiction known as climate fiction, or cli-fi, novels like “Odds Against Tomorrow,” by Nathaniel Rich, and “Solar,” by Ian McEwan.

“Speculative fiction allows a kind of scenario-imagining, not only about the unfolding crisis but also about adaptations and survival strategies,” Professor LeMenager said. “The time isn’t to reflect on the end of the world, but on how to meet it. We want to apply our humanities skills pragmatically to this problem.”

The class reflects a push by universities to meld traditionally separate disciplines; Professor LeMenager joined the university last year to teach both literature and environmental studies.

Her course also shows how broadly most of academia and a younger generation have moved beyond debating global warming to accepting it as one of society’s central challenges. That is especially true in places like Eugene, a verdant and damp city, friendly to the cyclist and inconvenient to the motorist, where ordering coffee in a disposable cup can elicit disapproving looks. Oregon was a pioneer of environmental studies, and Professor LeMenager’s students tend to share her activist bent, eagerly discussing in a recent session the role that the arts and education can play in galvanizing people around an issue.

To some extent, the course is feeding off a larger literary trend. Novels set against a backdrop of ruinous climate change have rapidly gained in number, popularity and critical acclaim over the last few years, works like “The Windup Girl,” by Paolo Bacigalupi; “Finitude,” by Hamish MacDonald; “From Here,” by Daniel Kramb; and “The Carbon Diaries 2015,” by Saci Lloyd. Well-known writers have joined the trend, including Barbara Kingsolver, with “Flight Behavior,” and Mr. McEwan.

And with remarkable speed — Ms. Kingsolver’s and Mr. Rich’s books were published less than a year ago — those works have landed on syllabuses at colleges. They have turned up in courses on literature and on environmental issues, like the one here, or in a similar but broader class, “The Political Ecology of Imagination,” part of a master’s degree program in liberal studies at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

For now, Professor LeMenager’s class is open only to graduate students, with some working on degrees in environmental studies, others in English and one in geography, and it can have the rarefied feel of a literature seminar. Fueled by readings from Susan Sontag and Jacques Derrida, the students discuss the meaning of terms like “spectacle” and “witness,” and debate the drawbacks of cultural media that approach climate change from the developed world’s perspective.

Climate novels fit into a long tradition of speculative fiction that pictures the future after assorted catastrophes. First came external forces like aliens or geological upheaval, and then, in the postwar period, came disasters of our own making.

Novels like “On the Beach,” by Nevil Shute, and “A Canticle for Leibowitz,” by Walter M. Miller Jr., and films like “The Book of Eli,” offered a world after nuclear war. Stephen King’s “The Stand,” Margaret Atwood’s “Oryx and Crake” and “The Year of the Flood,” and films like “12 Monkeys” and “I Am Legend” imagined the aftermath of biological tampering gone horribly wrong.

“You can argue that that is a dominant theme of postwar fiction, trying to grapple with the fragility of our existence, where the world can end at any time,” Mr. Rich said. Before long, most colleges will “have a course on the contemporary novel and the environment,” he said. “It surprises me that even more writers aren’t engaging with it.”

The climate-change canon dates back at least as far as “The Drowned World,” a 1962 novel by J. G. Ballard with a small but ardent following. “The Population Bomb,” Paul Ehrlich’s 1968 nonfiction best seller, mentions the potential dangers of the greenhouse effect, and the 1973 film “Soylent Green,” best remembered for its grisly vision of a world with too many people and too little food, is set in a hotter future.

The recent climate fiction has characters whose concerns extend well beyond the climate, some of it is set in a present or near future when disaster still seems remote, and it can be deeply satirical in tone. In other words, if the authors are aiming for political consciousness-raising, the effort is more veiled than in novels of earlier times like “The Jungle” or “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.”

Professor LeMenager’s syllabus includes extensive nonfiction writing and film, alongside the fiction, and she said she had little interest in truly apocalyptic scenarios or those that are scientifically dubious. She does not, for example, show her students “The Day After Tomorrow,” the 2004 film about an ice age caused by global warming that was a huge hit despite being panned by critics and scientists alike, though she says everyone asks her about it. Stephen Siperstein, one of her students, recalled showing the documentary “Chasing Ice,” about disappearing glaciers, to a class of undergraduates, leaving several of them in tears. Em Jackson talked of leading groups on glacier tours, and the profound effect they had on people. Another student, Shane Hall, noted that people experience the weather, while the notion of climate is a more abstract concept that can often be communicated only through media — from photography to sober scientific articles to futuristic fiction.

“In this sense,” he said, “climate change itself is a form of story we have to tell.”

New York Times News Service

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elias 4/18 time to fix a law the courts have mucked up

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April 01, 2014 | Leave Comment

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 2014, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“TIME TO FIX A LAW THE COURTS HAVE MUCKED UP”

Talk to corporate executives and they’ll often say California is a difficult place to do business, in part because consumers can file class action lawsuits willy-nilly, even when their companies haven’t screwed up.

But it ain’t necessarily so. Yes, the Consumers Legal Remedies Act, a 44-year-old law, lets customers sue for damages even after a warranty has expired and even when there’s been no risk to health or safety. They’re supposed to be able to do this if the maker of a product knows it has a major defect but does not reveal it to prospective or existing buyers.

Consumers could sue under those conditions, that is, until a pair of court decisions seriously limited the law and its intentions. For now, state and federal appeals courts have decided, product buyers can only sue manufacturers for post-warranty problems if their health or safety was at risk.

That’s why consumers might benefit from passage of a new bill being carried in the Legislature by Democratic state Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson of Santa Barbara which aims to restore the 1970s-era law to its original broad coverage.

“Consumers have a right to expect a product to last a reasonable length of time, even after a warranty has expired,” says Kristen Law Sagafi, a partner in the San Francisco law firm Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein. “Without it, we return to a caveat emptor (let the buyer beware) marketplace.”

Expect restoration of any rights consumers have lost to be contested strongly by industry lobbyists. “Current California law allows suing during the warranty period of a product if a manufacturer won’t fix it,” said Kimberly Stone, president of the Civil Justice Association of California, an industry lobby representing companies ranging from Allstate and Apple to Chevron, Toyota, Intel, Oracle and many more. “The courts have said people can also sue after a warranty over safety and health. Our fear is that if this is expanded, we will see many more class action lawsuits and that plaintiff lawyers will hold manufacturers to unreasonable time standards.”

In fact, the original law prohibited that. Said Sagafi, who helped craft the Senate proposal, “It would be up to the judge in each case to determine how long is reasonable. You would expect that the time a product can reasonably be expected to last after a warranty expires will be longer for a high-end product that a cheaper one. If someone has defrauded you, your right to sue should not expire with the warranty.”

Under current law, established by courts and not by elected lawmakers, a company could theoretically design products from computers to cars and dishwashers that would fail deliberately the day after their warranty expires. Unless the failure is dangerous – involving risk of accident, injury or fire – consumers would have no recourse if that happened.

“The best industry actors make a fix available to customers when a product is defective,” said Sagafi. “But if they hide a defect and fraud is demonstrated, consumers should be able to ask for punitive damages, just as the original law provided” before the courts emasculated it.

Consumer lawyers still would have a difficult time proving that a company deliberately hid a known defect, unless handed internal documents by a whistleblower. “It’s an incredibly high hurdle,” said Sagafi. “But the only concealed facts we can act on now involve safety, which is not what the law says.”

All of which raises the question of exactly what disclosure or repair obligation a company has when it gets numerous complaints about a single problem. “We have no answer to that question,” said Stone. “But our organization believes California already has too many class-action lawsuits, and this will just make them easier. We have a bunch of crazy class-action lawyers here. Class actions should exist to right tremendous wrongs. If there’s no fruit in Froot Loops or no raisins in raisin bran, that’s just not a tremendous wrong.”

That sort of corporate belittling of class actions doesn’t help, as one example, someone whose cellphone becomes just a paperweight soon after its warranty expires.

Corporations may not like it, but what’s wrong with preventing them from knowingly building products that won’t outlast their warranties?

-30-
Email Thomas Elias at tdelias@aol.com. His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, go to www.californiafocus.net

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Davis Senior Housing grant

March 25, 2014

Fr: Davis Senior Housing Communities, Inc. (DSHC)
RE: Award of another $5.6 million to DSHC
Contact: David Thompson, NP, LLC 530-757-2233

Davis Senior Housing Communities (DSHC) awarded $5.6 million to expand senior housing

Davis Senior Housing Communities, a Davis based senior nonprofit received another boost in March. What started as Eleanor Roosevelt Circle at 675 Cantrill Drive has attracted a lot of attention due to its model of having an on site social services coordinator with numerous services and social activities. A few years ago, a delegation of seniors from the City of Dixon heard about ERC and came to Davis to visit the senior community.

In very quick succession, five acres of land in Dixon (Heritage Commons) was provided to DSHC to replicate ERC. On behalf of Heritage Commons, DSHC won a $1 grant from the Federal Home Loan Bank through First Northern Bank of Dixon. That was soon followed by DSHC winning an award of $6 from the State of California. Heritage Commons Phase 1 (60 units) was opened in July, 2013 and is already 100% occupied.

This March, the 60 unit Phase 2 of Heritage Commons was awarded $5.6 million by the Director of the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development. The application was written by Neighborhood Partners (NP) and submitted by the City of Dixon to the HOME Investments Partnership Program.

From the statewide competition, only five projects were funded. Heritage Commons Phase 2 received one million more dollars than any other project.

Heritage Commons Phase 2 has already received a $1.5 million grant from the Federal Home Loan Bank through First Northern Bank. This is the largest FHLB grant so far in the Sacramento Region.

Heritage Commons Phase 1 & 2 is a partnership of Davis Senior Housing Communities, Neighborhood Partners, LLC and the John Stewart Company.

This is the third time that an NP application to the HOME Investments Partnership Program has won an award. With one project in Woodland and two in Dixon, three out of three winning applications is an excellent record. www.npllc.org/blog
________________________________________________________________________
Additional Information
Occupancy of Heritage Commons Phase 2 should occur in late 2015 or early 2016. If you are in the 30-40% of median income category this is the time to get on the waiting list by calling 707-676-5660.

When finished, the 120 apartments will occupy a five acre senior campus all at one attractive location in Dixon. Within the two senior communities will be two community buildings, meeting rooms with kitchens, laundry rooms, a community shop, a therapy pool, outdoor patios, and extensive community gardens with raised beds, walking trails, and other amenities. Heritage Commons has many solar panels.

Heritage Commons Phase 1 and 2 is a partnership of Davis Senior Housing Communities, Inc, Neighborhood Partners, LLC, and The John Stewart Company.

You can get information about Heritage Commons at 707-676-5660 or about Eleanor Roosevelt Circle at 530-753-3400 or for either by visiting www.npllc.org/projects.

With completion of Phase 2 of Heritage Commons, DSHC will be operating 180 units of independent senior living in Solano and Yolo counties and be home to over 200 seniors.

The John Stewart Company is management agent for all of the DSHC communities.

Special to The Enterprise

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Julio Gayton, Jesse Tapia photos

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March 29, 2014 | Leave Comment

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Peterson is Woman of the Year

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March 30, 2014 | Leave Comment

Attached photo features (from left to right) Senator Wolk, Dorothy Peterson and her husband, Mr. Peterson.
Photo credit: Compliments of State Senate.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 28, 2014 Contact: Melissa Jones, (916) 651-4003

Senator Wolk honors Dorothy Peterson of Davis as Woman of the Year
Peterson honored for service to Davis and Yolo County

VACAVILLE–Senator Lois Wolk (D-Davis) honored Dorothy Peterson of Davis as one of the Third Senate District’s Women of the Year in a small private ceremony today.

“For nearly four decades, Dorothy Peterson has served Davis and Yolo County as a committed educator and community leader. She taught generations of students in Davis what it takes to grow the fresh produce we put on our dinner tables, and continues to play a vital role in the region’s Farm to Fork movement. She also created a recycling and waste management program that has succeeded in diverting and recycling over half of Davis Joint Unified School District’s waste from landfills,” said Wolk. “I’m proud to honor her as a 2014 Woman of the Year.”

During her 37 year career with the Davis Joint Unified School District, Peterson taught special education as well as the 2nd and 3rd grades—coordinating the implementation of one of the first pilot special education programs in California. She incorporated garden-based learning techniques into her teaching, and encouraged students to cook with their families.

After retiring, Peterson continued to serve the school district by assisting in the establishment of new gardens in schools. She also created and funded Artisan Baking on Wheels to raise funds to support the Davis Farm to School nutrition program.

“I took all the things I loved about teaching with me—gardening, nutrition, and waste management,” Peterson said. “I don’t feel like I’m all used up.”

Since 1999, Peterson has served on multiple boards and committees, including the Farm to School Connection Steering Committee, Davis Educational Foundation, Yolo Farm to Fork program, Cool Davis Steering Committee, Central Park Gardens Steering Committee, California School Garden Network Sustainability Committee, and Yolo County Waste Advisory Committee. She created and implemented the DavisRISE waste management program in 9 elementary schools and 2 junior high schools, diverting and recycling more than half of the school waste from landfills and saving DJUSD thousands of dollars in garbage fees. She also served as DJUSD’s School Garden and DavisRISE Recycle Coordinator and opened My Other Teacher, a private consulting business.

Every March, the Senate celebrates Women’s History Month by honoring women whose contributions improve lives in their communities, a tradition dating back to 1987. This year, Wolk also honored Courtney Williams Kett, Dana Williams Martin, and Melissa Williams Taylor of Solano County.
###

Melissa Jones-Ferguson
Senator Lois Wolk
California State Senate – 3rd District
(916)651-4003
(916)323-2304 (Fax)

Enterprise staff

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Dodd holds money lead in Assembly race

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March 29, 2014 | Leave Comment

Napa County Supervisor Bill Dodd

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
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PD 2014: Parade marshals from UCD website

Hal & Carol Sconyers
The centennial Picnic Day Board of Directors is pleased to introduce this year’s parade marshals – Hal & Carol Sconyers and Sandy Holman. We believe that these individuals exemplify what it means to have Aggie Pride and spirit through their pivotal contributions and roles on the UC Davis campus. These individuals have helped make Davis what it is today.

For their part, Hal & Carol Sconyers have proven that that they both are true Aggies. Having both graduated from Davis, the Sconyerses now reside at the University Retirement Community just a mile from campus. Hal graduated from UC Davis in 1952 with a degree in Agronomy from the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He initially enrolled at Davis as a veteran using the G.I. Bill to pay for his tuition. When Hal first came to Davis in 1948, he registered as a pre vet major; this was the same year that UC Davis’ School of Veterinary Medicine opened. Carol began her time at Davis in 1951 as a Home Economics major. While at Davis, Hal was a part of the Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity. Hal and his then new wife, Carol, were both on the Alpha Gamma Rho float as a part of the 1952 Picnic Day parade.

Through his studies in agronomy at UC Davis, Hal was able to gain experience in making farm loans at a major bank in Sacramento, which started him on a long career in financial services. This would lead him to becoming the founding CEO and President of the Modesto Banking Company (MBC). After spending many years in the banking industry in Modesto, the Sconyerses made their return back to Davis in 1994. It was at his desk in the the MBC bank that Hal received a call from a UC Davis development officer asking for his financial support of the Alpha Gamma Rho room in the soon-to-be built Walter A. Buehler Alumni Center; it was the building of the Walter A. Buehler Alumni Center that catalyzed his & Carol’s return.

It was during this return that the Sconyerses both fell in love with the Davis community and campus for a second time. Hal was on the California Aggie Alumni Association board for four years, from 1991 to 1995. He also served on the UC Davis Foundation board from 1995 to 2001. It was through such contributions that started the now successful CAAA. The Sconyerses were also very great friends with the fifth chancellor of UC Davis, Larry Vanderhoef. When Chancellor Vanderhoef initially started his tenure, one of his goals included a campaign to create a performing arts center on campus. The goal was to bring world-class performers to Davis students and surrounding communities. After hearing his plans, the Sconyerses became very instrumental in bringing the idea into fruition. They were on the early steering committee and helped raise the initial seed money for what is now the Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts. When the facility was being built, they were able to participate in hardhat tours and were present on the opening night and very first performance at the Mondavi Center. Carol took a particularly large role at the Mondavi Center. She was the President of “Friends of UC Davis Presents” for a year before it became the “Friends of the Mondavi Center,” which she led for 2 years. To this day, the Sconyers continue to take an active role in the arts. They volunteer as ushers at matinee shows at the Mondavi Center.

In addition to their aforementioned contributions, the Sconyerses have contributed to UC Davis’ Intercollegiate Athletics, the Cal Aggie Marching Band, UC Davis Medical Center, Graduate School of Management, as well as both CAAA and CA&ES scholarship programs. Hal & Carol also still attend UC Davis sport games on a daily basis – always cheering for their favorite Aggie team! It is through such contributions and reasons that the 100th Picnic Day Board of Directors is excited to have them as this year’s parade marshals. Through this nomination, the board feels we are celebrating the Sconyerses for their many contributions to UC Davis as a great institution.

Sandy Holman
Sandy Holman has also proven to display Aggie pride through her admirable work. She graduated from UC Davis in 1987 as a Psychology major. With her degree, Sandy was able to work with the two things that she loved in life – people and writing. All of her experiences would eventually lead to her starting the Culture Co-Op. While at Davis, Sandy took an active role on campus through her multiple jobs, including a job at the Tape Lab, where students could rent out tapes of lectures, as well as was on the volleyball team. While at Davis, Sandy was also able to meet her husband, who is also a fellow Aggie alumnus. Next year, they will have been married for 25 years!

After graduation, Sandy began to write on the side, which eventually culminated to her publishing many books that have been nationally and internationally circulated. She found a great interest in the interactions between people and how that is sometimes manifested through prejudices and biases. It was her goal to fight such prevalent social injustices through her work, which was aided by her experience in dealing with different groups of people. It is Sandy’s goal to counteract these social injustices, which would result in people realizing their fullest potential.

After working several jobs, which included interacting with children, Sandy started the Culture Co-Op in 1991 as a way to fight against hate. It is her hope that she leaves a legacy that “encourage[s] people to love themselves and others and to share power and resources in the world.” In addition to spearheading the Culture Co-Op, Sandy also served on the board at the International House for 3 years. While on the board, Sandy collaborated on the International Festival, which brought three thousand people in its first year. The focus of the festival is to bring different cultures of many countries to the people of Davis for a day as an educational experience.

Through her work in fostering diversity and community at Davis, the 100th Picnic Day Board is very proud to nominate Sandy Holman as the other parade marshal for this centennial celebration. It is our belief that through Sandy’s continued and past work, such feelings of unity are felt throughout the UC Davis campus and in the city of Davis.

Special to The Enterprise

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Nicholas Kristof: A nation of takers?

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March 29, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-KRISTOF-COLUMN-NYT/836
Commentary: A Nation of Takers?
By NICHOLAS KRISTOF

c.2014 New York Times News Service

In the debate about poverty, critics argue that government assistance saps initiative and is unaffordable. After exploring the issue, I must concede that the critics have a point. Here are five public welfare programs that are wasteful and turning us into a nation of “takers.”

First, welfare subsidies for private planes. The United States offers three kinds of subsidies to tycoons with private jets: accelerated tax write-offs, avoidance of personal taxes on the benefit by claiming that private aircraft are for security, and use of air traffic control paid for by chumps flying commercial.

As the leftists in the George W. Bush administration put it when they tried unsuccessfully to end this last boondoggle: “The family of four taking a budget vacation is subsidizing the CEOs flying on a corporate jet.”

I worry about those tycoons sponging off government. Won’t our pampering damage their character? Won’t they become addicted to the entitlement culture, demanding subsidies even for their yachts? Oh, wait …

Second, welfare subsidies for yachts. The mortgage-interest deduction was meant to encourage a home-owning middle class. But it has been extended to provide subsidies for beach homes and even yachts.

In the meantime, money was slashed last year from the public housing program for America’s neediest. Hmm. How about if we house the homeless in these publicly supported yachts?

Third, welfare subsidies for hedge funds and private equity. The single most outrageous tax loophole in the United States is for “carried interest,” allowing people with the highest earnings to pay paltry taxes. They can magically reclassify their earned income as capital gains, because that carries a lower tax rate (a maximum of 23.8 percent this year, compared with a maximum of 39.6 percent for earned income).

Let’s just tax capital gains at earned income rates, as we did under President Ronald Reagan, that notorious scourge of capitalism.

Fourth, welfare subsidies for America’s biggest banks. The too-big-to-fail banks in the United States borrow money unusually cheaply because of an implicit government promise to rescue them. Bloomberg View calculated last year that this amounts to a taxpayer subsidy of $83 billion to our 10 biggest banks annually.

President Barack Obama has proposed a bank tax to curb this subsidy, and this year a top Republican lawmaker, Dave Camp, endorsed the idea as well. Big banks are lobbying like crazy to keep their subsidy.

Fifth, large welfare subsidies for American corporations from cities, counties and states. A bit more than a year ago, Louise Story of The New York Times tallied more than $80 billion a year in subsidies to companies, mostly as incentives to operate locally. (Conflict alert: The New York Times Co. is among those that have received millions of dollars from city and state authorities.)

You see where I’m going. We talk about the unsustainability of government benefit programs and the deleterious effects these can have on human behavior, and these are real issues. Well-meaning programs for supporting single moms can create perverse incentives not to marry, or aid meant for a needy child may be misused to buy drugs. Let’s acknowledge that helping people is a complex, uncertain and imperfect struggle.

But, perhaps because we now have the wealthiest Congress in history, the first in which a majority of members are millionaires, we have a one-sided discussion demanding cuts only in public assistance to the poor, while ignoring public assistance to the rich. And a one-sided discussion leads to a one-sided and myopic policy.

We’re cutting one kind of subsidized food — food stamps — at a time when Gallup finds that almost one-fifth of American families struggled in 2013 to afford food. Meanwhile, we ignore more than $12 billion annually in tax subsidies for corporate meals and entertainment.

Sure, food stamps are occasionally misused, but anyone familiar with business knows that the abuse of food subsidies is far greater in the corporate suite. Every time an executive wines and dines a hot date on the corporate dime, the average taxpayer helps foot the bill.

So let’s get real. To stem abuses, the first target shouldn’t be those avaricious infants in nutrition programs but tycoons in their subsidized Gulfstreams.

However imperfectly, subsidies for the poor do actually reduce hunger, ease suffering and create opportunity, while subsidies for the rich result in more private jets and yachts. Would we rather subsidize opportunity or yachts? Which kind of subsidies deserve more scrutiny?

Some conservatives get this, including Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla. He has urged “scaling back ludicrous handouts to millionaires that expose an entitlement system and tax code that desperately need to be reformed.”

After all, quite apart from the waste, we don’t want to coddle zillionaires and thereby sap their initiative!

Contact Kristof at Facebook.com/Kristof, Twitter.com/NickKristof or by mail at The New York Times, 620 Eighth Ave., New York, NY 10018.

Nicholas Kristof

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David Brooks: The republic of fear

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March 29, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-BROOKS-COLUMN-NYT/833
Commentary: The Republic of Fear
By DAVID BROOKS

c.2014 New York Times News Service

If you’re reading this, you are probably not buffeted by daily waves of physical terror. You may fear job loss or emotional loss, but you probably don’t fear that somebody is going to slash your throat or that a gang will invade your house come dinnertime, carrying away your kin and property. We take a basic level of order for granted.

But billions of people live in a different emotional landscape, enveloped by hidden terror. Many of these people live in the developing world.

When we send young people out to help these regions, we tell them they are there to tackle “poverty,” using the sort of economic designation we’re comfortable with. We usually assume that scarcity is the big challenge to be faced. We send them to dig wells or bring bed nets or distribute food or money, and, of course, that’s wonderful work.

But as Gary A. Haugen and Victor Boutros point out in their gripping and perspective-altering book, “The Locust Effect,” these places are not just grappling with poverty. They are marked by disorder, violence and man-inflicted suffering.

“The relentless threat of violence is part of the core subtext of their lives, but we are unlikely to see it, and they are unlikely to tell us about it. We would be wise, however, to not be fooled — because, like grief, the thing we cannot see may be the deepest part of their day.”

People in many parts of the world simply live beyond the apparatus of law and order. The District of Columbia spends about $850 per person per year on police. In Bangladesh, the government spends less than $1.50 per person per year on police. The cops are just not there.

In the United States, there is one prosecutor for every 12,000 citizens. In Malawi, there is one prosecutor for every 1.5 million citizens. The prosecutors are just not there.

Even when there is some legal system in place, it’s not designed to impose law and order for the people. It is there to protect the regime from the people. The well-connected want a legal system that can be bought and sold.

Haugen and Boutros tell the story of an 8-year-old Peruvian girl named Yuri whose body was found in the street one morning, her skull crushed in, her legs wrapped in cables and her underwear at her ankles. The evidence pointed to a member of one of the richer families in the town, so the police and prosecutors destroyed the evidence. Her clothing went missing. A sperm sample that could have identified the perpetrator was thrown out. A bloody mattress was sliced down by a third, so that the blood stained spot could be discarded.

Yuri’s family wanted to find the killer, but they couldn’t afford to pay the prosecutor, so nothing was done. The family sold all their livestock to hire lawyers, who took the money but abandoned the case. These sorts of events are utterly typical — the products of legal systems that range from the arbitrary to the Kafkaesque.

We in the affluent world live on one side of a great global threshold. Our fundamental security was established by our ancestors. We tend to assume that the primary problems of politics are economic and that the injustices of the world can be addressed with economic levers. When empires like the Soviet Union collapse, we send in economists with privatization plans instead of cops to help create rule of law. When thuggish autocracies invade their neighbors we impose economic sanctions.

But people without our inherited institutions live on the other side of the threshold and have a different reality. They live within a contagion of chaos. They live where the primary realities include violence, theft and radical uncertainty. Their world is governed less by long-term economic incentives and more by raw fear. In a world without functioning institutions, predatory behavior and the passions of domination and submission blot out economic logic.

The primary problem of politics is not creating growth. It’s creating order. Until that is largely achieved, life can be nasty, brutish and short.

Haugen is president of a human rights organization called the International Justice Mission, which tries to help people around the world build the institutions of law. One virtue of his group is that it stares evil in the eyes and helps local people confront the large and petty thugs who inflict such predatory cruelty on those around them. Not every aid organization is equipped to do this, to confront elemental human behavior when it exists unrestrained by effective law. It’s easier to avoid this reality, to have come-together moments in daytime.

Police training might be less uplifting than some of the other stories that attract donor dollars. But, in every society, order has to be wrung out of exploitation. Unless cruelty is tamed, poverty will persist.

Copyright The New York Times News Service.

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Thomas Friedman: Putin and the laws of gravity

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March 29, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-FRIEDMAN-COLUMN-NYT/906
COMMENTARY: Putin and the Laws of Gravity
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN

c.2014 New York Times News Service

One thing I learned covering the Middle East for many years is that there is “the morning after” and there is “the morning after the morning after.” Never confuse the two.

The morning after a big event is when fools rush in and declare that someone’s victory or defeat in a single battle has “changed everything forever.” The morning after the morning after, the laws of gravity start to apply themselves; things often don’t look as good or as bad as you thought. And that brings me to Vladimir Putin’s annexation of Crimea.

The morning after, he was the hero of Russia. Some moronic commentators here even expressed the wish that we had such a “decisive” leader. Well, let’s see what Putin looks like the morning after the morning after, say, in six months. I make no predictions, but I will point out this. Putin is challenging three of the most powerful forces on the planet all at once: human nature, Mother Nature and Moore’s Law. Good luck with that.

Putin’s seizure of Crimea certainly underscores the enduring power of geography in geopolitics. Russia is a continental country, stretching across a huge landmass, with few natural barriers to protect it. Every Kremlin leader — from the czars to the commissars to the crooks — has been obsessed about protecting Russia’s periphery from would-be invaders. Russia has legitimate security interests, but this episode is not about them.

This recent Ukraine drama did not start with geography — with an outside power trying to get into Russia, as much as Putin wants to pretend that it did. This story started with people inside Russia’s orbit trying to get out. A large number of Ukrainians wanted to hitch their economic future to the European Union and not to Putin’s Potemkin Eurasian Union. This story, at its core, was ignited and propelled by human nature — the enduring quest by people to realize a better future for themselves and their kids — not by geopolitics, or even that much nationalism. This is not an “invasion” story. This is an “Exodus” story.

And no wonder. A recent article in Bloomberg Businessweek noted that, in 2012, GDP per person in Ukraine was $6,394 — some 25 percent below its level of nearly a quarter-century earlier. But if you compare Ukraine with four of its former Communist neighbors to the west who joined the EU — Poland, Slovakia, Hungary and Romania — “the average GDP per person in those nations is around $17,000.” Can you blame Ukrainians for wanting to join a different club?

But Putin is also counting on the world doing nothing about Mother Nature, and Mother Nature taking that in stride. Some 70 percent of Russia’s exports are oil and gas, and they make up half of all state revenue. (When was the last time you bought something that was labeled “Made in Russia”?) Putin has basically bet his country’s economic present and future on hydrocarbons at a time when the chief economist of the International Energy Agency has declared that “about two-thirds of all proven reserves of oil, gas and coal will have to be left undeveloped if the world is to achieve the goal of limiting global warming at 2 degrees Celsius” since the Industrial Revolution. Crossing that 2-degrees line, say climate scientists, will dramatically increase the likelihood of melting the Arctic, dangerous sea level rises, more disruptive superstorms and unmanageable climate change.

The former Saudi oil minister, Sheik Ahmed Zaki Yamani, once warned his OPEC colleagues something Putin should remember: “The Stone Age didn’t end because we ran out of stones.” It ended because we invented bronze tools, which were more productive. The hydrocarbon age will also have to end with a lot of oil, coal and gas left in the ground, replaced by cleaner forms of power generation, or Mother Nature will have her way with us. Putin is betting otherwise.

How do you say Moore’s Law in Russian? That’s the theorem posited by Gordon Moore, an Intel co-founder, that the processing power of microchips will double roughly every two years. Anyone following the clean power industry today can tell you that there is something of a Moore’s Law now at work around solar power, the price of which is falling so fast that more and more homes and even utilities are finding it as cheap to install as natural gas. Wind is on a similar trajectory, as is energy efficiency. China alone is on a track to be getting 15 percent of its total electricity production by 2020 from renewables, and it’s not stopping there. It can’t or its people can’t breathe.

If America and Europe were to give even just a little more policy push now to renewables to reduce Putin’s oil income, these actions could pay dividends much sooner and bigger than people realize.

The legitimacy of China’s leaders today depends, in part, on their ability to make their country’s power system greener so their people can breathe. Putin’s legitimacy depends on keeping Russia and the world addicted to oil and gas. Whom do you want to bet on?

So, before we crown Putin the Time Person of the Year again, let’s wait and see how the morning after the morning after plays out.

Thomas Friedman

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America’s taxation tradition

BobDunning2W

Mather steelheadW

Kevin Mather shows off a steelhead caught on the Zymoetz River. Courtesy photo

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March 30, 2014 | Leave Comment

As inequality has become an increasingly prominent issue in American discourse, there has been furious pushback from the right. Some conservatives argue that focusing on inequality is unwise, that taxing high incomes will cripple economic growth. Some argue that it’s unfair, that people should be allowed to keep what they earn. And some argue that it’s un-American — that we’ve always celebrated those who achieve wealth, and that it violates our national tradition to suggest that some people control too large a share of the wealth.

And they’re right. No true American would say this: “The absence of effective state, and, especially, national, restraint upon unfair money-getting has tended to create a small class of enormously wealthy and economically powerful men, whose chief object is to hold and increase their power,” and follow that statement with a call for “a graduated inheritance tax on big fortunes … increasing rapidly in amount with the size of the estate.”

Who was this left-winger? Theodore Roosevelt, in his famous 1910 New Nationalism speech.

The truth is that, in the early 20th century, many leading Americans warned about the dangers of extreme wealth concentration and urged that tax policy be used to limit the growth of great fortunes. Here’s another example: In 1919, the great economist Irving Fisher — whose theory of “debt deflation,” by the way, is essential in understanding our current economic troubles — devoted his presidential address to the American Economic Association largely to warning against the effects of “an undemocratic distribution of wealth.” And he spoke favorably of proposals to limit inherited wealth through heavy taxation of estates.

Nor was the notion of limiting the concentration of wealth, especially inherited wealth, just talk. In his landmark book, “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” the economist Thomas Piketty points out that America, which introduced an income tax in 1913 and an inheritance tax in 1916, led the way in the rise of progressive taxation, that it was “far out in front” of Europe. Piketty goes so far as to say that “confiscatory taxation of excessive incomes” — that is, taxation whose goal was to reduce income and wealth disparities, rather than to raise money — was an “American invention.”

And this invention had deep historical roots in the Jeffersonian vision of an egalitarian society of small farmers. Back when Teddy Roosevelt gave his speech, many thoughtful Americans realized not just that extreme inequality was making nonsense of that vision, but that America was in danger of turning into a society dominated by hereditary wealth — that the New World was at risk of turning into Old Europe. And they were forthright in arguing that public policy should seek to limit inequality for political as well as economic reasons, that great wealth posed a danger to democracy.

So how did such views not only get pushed out of the mainstream but come to be considered illegitimate?

Consider how inequality and taxes on top incomes were treated in the 2012 election. Republicans pushed the line that President Barack Obama was hostile to the rich. “If one’s priority is to punish highly successful people, then vote for the Democrats,” Mitt Romney said. Democrats vehemently (and truthfully) denied the charge. Yet Romney was in effect accusing Obama of thinking like Teddy Roosevelt. How did that become an unforgivable political sin?

You sometimes hear the argument that concentrated wealth is no longer an important issue, because the big winners in today’s economy are self-made men who owe their position at the top of the ladder to earned income, not inheritance. But that view is a generation out of date. New work by the economists Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman finds that the share of wealth held at the very top — the richest 0.1 percent of the population — has doubled since the 1980s and is now as high as it was when Teddy Roosevelt and Irving Fisher issued their warnings.

We don’t know how much of that wealth is inherited. But it’s interesting to look at the Forbes list of the wealthiest Americans. By my rough count, about a third of the top 50 inherited large fortunes. Another third are 65 or older, so they will probably be leaving large fortunes to their heirs. We aren’t yet a society with a hereditary aristocracy of wealth, but, if nothing changes, we’ll become that kind of society over the next couple of decades.

In short, the demonization of anyone who talks about the dangers of concentrated wealth is based on a misreading of both the past and the present. Such talk isn’t un-American; it’s very much in the American tradition. And it’s not at all irrelevant to the modern world. So who will be this generation’s Teddy Roosevelt?

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March 28, 2014 | Leave Comment

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March 27, 2014 | Leave Comment

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New laws emerge as technology impacts cars and driving 

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March 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

From Brandpoint

Have you ever felt that new technologies, from smartphones to Internet apps, are moving so fast that it’s hard to keep up?

You’re not alone. Many Americans feel overwhelmed by new technology. One-third of adults in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia and China said they felt overwhelmed by technology in a 2011 study conducted by the University of Cambridge.

As it relates to public policy, lawmakers may also be feeling overwhelmed as they try to keep up with researching, writing and passing legislation to regulate new technologies to maintain public safety or prevent the invasion of privacy. According to the WestlawNext, the leading online legal research service, more than 100,000 new or changed statutes, 160,000 new or modified regulations and 285,000 new judicial opinions were incorporated into the U.S. legal system in 2013.

“New technology can create a debate,” says Rachel Utter, manager of Legal Editorial Operations at Thomson Reuters. “As regulators come to understand the impact of a new technology on our day-to-day lives, they may be challenged with balancing the benefits of a new technology with public safety concerns. In some cases, such as fuel mileage mandates, government regulation can force the development of new technology, such as hybrid engines and electric cars.”

Among the new wave of enacted or proposed legislation involving technology and cars conducted via WestlawNext through Jan. 30, some of the most prominent include:

Texting and driving – Forty-one states and the District of Columbia ban texting with smartphones and cellphones for all drivers – and all but four have primary enforcement, allowing law enforcement in those four states to only ticket someone for texting while driving if they were stopped for another reason such as speeding.

Wearable technology – With the recent introduction of Google Glass and other evolving wearable technology such as the smart watches and smart contact lenses, lawmakers may need to develop new laws about the use of these technologies while a person operates a motor vehicle. Ten states – Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Tennessee, West Virginia and Wyoming – have enacted or have proposed legislation prohibiting the use of wearable computers with a head-mounted display while driving. In October 2013, a California woman may have been the first person in the United States to receive a citation for operating a motor vehicle while wearing Google Glass. The citation was later thrown out of court.

Black boxes – Nearly all recently manufactured U.S. cars and trucks are equipped with an Event Data Recorder (EDR), also known as a black box. In September 2014, this piece of computing technology will become mandatory in all new U.S. vehicles. The EDR monitors a vehicle’s electrical systems, which includes speed, braking, driving patterns and even location at any given time. A number of legal questions have emerged about black boxes, such as: “Who owns the data that a vehicle’s black box is gathering? If a car owner is involved in a crash, do police and insurance companies have the right to review the data in the vehicle’s EDR? Can marketers buy the data to deliver ads through the vehicle’s entertainment system?” These questions are at the heart of a recent bill introduced by senators John Hoeven (R-ND) and Amy Klobuchar (D-MN).

Driverless cars – Imagine a day when people travel by car, but don’t actually drive the car. They simply type in their destination and go. Several states have passed laws allowing automated cars. California, Florida, Nevada and the District of Columbia allow autonomous vehicles to be driven on public roads. Washington D.C. may have the least restrictive provisions: the vehicle must have a manual override feature, a driver must be in the control seat with the ability to take over operation of the vehicle, and the vehicle must be capable of operating in compliance with the District’s traffic and motor vehicle laws.

“Technology, whether implemented into how automobiles are designed or operated, has made significant contributions in making vehicles safer,” says Utter. “And as new technology is integrated, there will be questions, concerns and debate driving new regulation and legislation.”

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Field to Fork

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March 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

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Honda Smart House

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March 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

MAK Design+Build is proud to announce the opening of the Honda Smart Home US, a showcase for environmental innovation on the UC Davis campus in the West Village net-zero neighborhood. This demonstration home is a showcase for cutting edge green living and transportation technologies.

MAK designed the interior spaces and provided sustainability consulting for interior details including fixtures, appliances, furniture and finishes. All furnishings and finishes were selected to maintain the highest levels of indoor air quality and minimize environmental impact. Efficient plumbing, lighting, and appliance selections will reduce the consumption load for the life of the house. Beautiful finishes and furnishings ensure that the home is as enjoyable as it is healthy and responsible.

Other local businesses involved with the project include Davis Energy Group, Monley Cronin, Cunningham Engineering, and the California Lighting and Technology Center.

The Honda Smart Home US is located at 299 Sage Street in the West Village area of campus and will be open for public tours on March 25 from 12 pm to 4 pm. The house will be open again Friday, March 28, Saturday March 29, and Sunday March 30 from 11 am to 4 pm. More information is available at http://www.hondasmarthome.com/.

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SAFE

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March 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

When Davis police arrested burglary suspect Joseph Hernandez of x back in December, investigators cleared not one but 32 open burglary cases — the crime that has most plagued the community over the past year.
Hernandez’s arrest was the result of a newly created unit at the Davis Police Department — the Special Assignment and Focused Enforcement (SAFE) team, whose officers supervise local parolees and probationers with the goal of identifying the sources behind the troubling crime trend.
“We’re trying to figure out what the underlying problems are, who the people are that are significant contributors to our crime rate, and trying to find solutions,” Lt. Paul Doroshov said of the team, which comprises a sergeant, three investigators, a crime analyst and crime prevention specialist.
According to a crime statistics report delivered to the Davis City Council last week, local residents reported 1,797 property crimes during the year 2013, of which 876 were burglaries — residential, vehicle and commercial.
Home burglaries saw the largest increase from 2012 — up 70 percent from the previous year, compared to 32 percent for car break-ins and 29 percent for commercial burglaries.
Police Chief Landy Black said he believes the increase is due in part to the 2011 enactment of AB 109, the prison realignment measure under which felons convicted of nonviolent, nonsexual and nonserious offenses serve their time in county jails or through community supervision, rather than in state prison.
“We have seen an increase in the number of property crimes that might be associated with the thousands of offenders … who are no longer being held accountable in the same way they were before,” Black told the council.
AB 109 contributed to the formation of the SAFE team, which works hand-in-hand with the Yolo County Probation Department in what Black calls “intelligence-led policing” — gathering information on criminal behavior and analyzing crime patterns to determine who is behind the activity.
“What it tries to do is be a little bit more proactive, rather than responsive, to crimes,” Black said.
Doroshov said the SAFE team’s work has led to x arrests so far, including the disruption of a significant burglary ring, the busts of three alleged drug houses operating in residential neighborhoods, and the arrests of drug offenders suspected of dealing to minors.
Black said officers have discovered a “strong linkage” between drug offenses and property crimes, with drug arrests leading to the recovery of stolen belongings “almost without fail.”
While the upward trend in burglaries has continued in 2014, “it’s not as steep as it was for the 2012-2013 crime rate,” Black told the City Council.
Black said police have ramped up their efforts to inform the community about crime-prevention tactics, and the tragic homicides of Oliver “Chip” Northup and his wife, Claudia Maupin, in their South Davis residence last April may also have played a role.
“I think we saw a lot of people take better precautions around their homes in South Davis,” Black said.
— Reach Lauren Keene at lkeene@davisenterprise.net or 530-747-8048. Follow her on Twitter at @laurenkeene

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Nicholas Kristof: To end the abuse, she grabbed a knife

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March 13, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-KRISTOF-COLUMN-NYT/1138
Commentary: To End the Abuse, She Grabbed a Knife
By NICHOLAS KRISTOF

c.2014 New York Times News Service

ATLANTA — What strikes 1 American woman in 4 and claims a life in the United States every six hours?

This scourge can be more unsettling to talk about than colonoscopies, and it is so stigmatizing that most victims never seek help.

Paula Denize Lewis, an executive assistant here in Atlanta, was among those who kept quiet about domestic violence, for that’s what I’m talking about. She tried to cover up the black eyes and bruises when she went to work, and when she showed up with her arm in a sling she claimed that she had fallen down the stairs.

Then one evening, she says, her alcoholic boyfriend was again beating her, throwing beer cans at her and threatening to kill her. She ran for a telephone in the kitchen to call 911, but he reached it first and began clubbing her on the head with it.

Lewis reached frantically into a kitchen drawer for something to defend herself with. “I grabbed what I could,” she said.

What she had grabbed turned out to be a paring knife. She stabbed her boyfriend once. He died.

Lewis was jailed and charged with murder. With the help of the Women’s Resource Center to End Domestic Violence, the charge was reduced to involuntary manslaughter and she was sentenced to probation.

That episode underscores the way our silence and squeamishness about domestic violence hurts everyone. If there had been earlier intervention, Lewis might have avoided years of abuse and a felony conviction — and her boyfriend might still be alive.

Domestic violence deserves far more attention and resources, and far more police understanding of the complexities involved. This is not a fringe concern. It is vast, it is outrageous, and it should be a national priority.

Women worldwide ages 15 to 44 are more likely to die or be maimed as a result of male violence than as a consequence of war, cancer, malaria and traffic accidents combined. Far more Americans, mostly women, have been killed in the last dozen years at the hands of their partners than in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

American women are twice as likely to suffer domestic violence as breast cancer, and the abuse is particularly shattering because it comes from those we have loved.

“He’s the only person I’ve ever loved,” Ta’Farian, 24, said of her husband, whom she met when she was an 18-year-old college student. He gradually became violent, she says, beating her, locking her up in a closet and destroying property.

“My family was like, ‘He’s your husband. You can’t leave him. How would you support yourself?’”

Still, she says, it became too much, and she called 911. Police arrested him. But she says that the day before the trial, her husband called and threatened to kill her if she testified against him, so she says that out of a mix of fear and love she refused to repeat in court what had happened. Her husband was let off, and she was convicted of false reporting of a crime.

Ta’Farian is now in hiding, fearful of her husband as well as of the courts; she dissolved into tears as she was telling her story, partly out of fear that her conviction could cost her the custody of her son.

Ayonna Johnson, who works for the Women’s Resource Center, comforted her, saying: “You should not have gotten punished for trying to stay alive.”

Domestic violence is infinitely complex in part because women sometimes love the men who beat them: they don’t want the man jailed; they don’t want to end the relationship; they just want the beatings to end.

Women can obtain temporary protective orders to keep violent boyfriends or husbands away, but these are just pieces of paper unless they’re rigorously enforced. Sometimes the orders even trigger a retaliatory attack on the woman, and police officers around the country don’t always make such a case a priority — until it becomes a murder investigation.

One way of addressing that conundrum is mandated classes for abusers, like one run by the group Men Stopping Violence. One session I sat in on was a little like Alcoholics Anonymous in its confessional, frank tone, but it focused on domestic abuse. The men were encouraged to be brutally honest in examining their shortcomings in relationships; it’s surely more effective than sending abusers to jail to seethe at their wives and wallow in self-pity.

Sometimes there’s a perception that domestic violence is insoluble, because it’s such a complex, messy problem with women who are culprits as well as victims. Yet, in fact, this is an area where the United States has seen enormous progress.

Based on victimization surveys, it seems that violence by men against their intimate partners has fallen by almost two-thirds since 1993. Attitudes have changed as well. In 1987, only half of Americans said that it was always wrong for a man to beat his wife with a belt or stick; a decade later, 86 percent said that it was always wrong.

A generation ago, police didn’t typically get involved.

“We would say, ‘Don’t make us come back, or you’re both going to jail,’” recalled Capt. Leonard Dreyer of the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office. In contrast, sheriff’s officers now routinely arrest the aggressor.

Three steps are still needed.

First, we must end the silence.

Second, we must ensure that police departments everywhere take the issue seriously before a victim becomes a corpse.

Third, offenders should be required to attend training programs like the one run by Men Stopping Violence.

A young mom named Antonya Lewis reflects the challenges. She stayed with a violent boyfriend for years, she said, because he was the father of her daughters and was always so apologetic afterward — and also because that was what she had been told was a woman’s lot in life.

“My mom always told me to suck it up,” she said. But then her boyfriend beat her up so badly that he broke a bone near her eye and put her in the hospital. She told him that she was done with him, and when he continued to stalk her and threaten to kill her, she called the police — repeatedly — with little effect. Now she has moved to a new city and is starting over.

“I didn’t want my daughters to see him beat me,” she said. “I didn’t want them to think this is what a man can do to a woman.”

That, too, is progress.

Contact Kristof at Facebook.com/Kristof, Twitter.com/NickKristof or by mail at The New York Times, 620 Eighth Ave., New York, NY 10018.

Nicholas Kristof

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Fracking exposes rift between Jerry Brown, Democrats

By David R. Baker
Fracking has opened vast oil and natural gas deposits across the country, creating legions of fans and foes alike. Now the technology has exposed a rift between Gov. Jerry Brown and a very vocal part of his Democratic base.

Brown has come under increasing fire from the state’s powerful environmental lobby for his support of hydraulic fracturing, the drilling technique that has revolutionized America’s oil and gas industry.

The split erupted into public view when fracking opponents heckled Brown throughout his speech at the recent California Democratic Party convention. While some delegates shouted “Ban fracking!” others held aloft signs proclaiming “Another Democrat Against Fracking.” The state party’s platform now calls for a fracking moratorium – an idea Brown rejects.

Fracking foes also debuted a fake online commercial for “Frack Water, a fragrance by Jerry Brown.” Modeled after a 2004 Stetson cologne ad, it shows a Brown stand-in relaxing in the arms of a woman wearing an oil company’s hard hat.

For months, opponents have hounded Brown at public appearances across the state, with some nicknaming the governor Big Oil Brown.

‘It’s rattling him’
“We know it’s rattling him,” said David Turnbull, campaigns director for Oil Change International, the environmental group behind the fragrance spoof. “We know he’s paying attention and he’s hearing it. And we’re hopeful that he’s going to change. He does care about his legacy – that’s pretty clear.”

Turnbull’s group has also made a point of publicizing the oil industry’s financial contributions to Brown’s past campaigns. According to Oil Change, fossil fuel companies have given more than $2 million since 2006 to Brown and his pet causes. Those causes include two charter schools he helped create in Oakland, as well as his 2012 statewide ballot initiative to raise funding for education.

A 4th term
The fracking issue threatens to split Democrats just as Brown, who’s seeking a fourth term in office, wants to craft a legacy that balances environmental protection with economic growth. Brown has long counted environmentalists as his strongest supporters, and he has made global warming a key priority of his administration.

The governor, however, also sees fracking as a potential source of money and jobs in a state whose economy is still recovering. Fracking, oil companies say, could help unlock the estimated 15.4 billion barrels of petroleum trapped in an immense shale formation under the Central Valley.

Green-minded Democrats, however, view the technique – which uses a high-pressure blend of water, sand and chemicals to crack underground rocks – as an environmental catastrophe in the making.

They argue that fracking chemicals could taint groundwater supplies, although California oil regulators say there’s no evidence that has ever happened in the state. In addition, many environmentalists don’t want California’s massive shale formation, the Monterey Shale, developed at all. Opponents also say that producing more oil will only make climate change worse, the same argument they make against the Keystone XL Pipeline.

Whether opponents can sway Brown is an open question.

Brown has not hesitated to engage fracking protesters in public. Because most of them aren’t likely to vote Republican, the governor may decide he can safely ignore their demands, said Thad Kousser, a political-science professor at UC San Diego.

“They need to have somewhere to run, if they want to run away from Jerry Brown,” Kousser said. “So Jerry Brown’s free to fend off these attacks on the left. And in fact, the more he fends off attacks from the left, the more he looks like a centrist.”

The divide
The rift emerged last year when Brown supported a bill from Sen. Fran Pavley, D-Agoura Hills (Los Angeles County), that allowed fracking to continue while the state launched a study of its environmental risks. Pavley authored California’s landmark 2006 climate change law, AB32, and many environmentalists consider her a legislative hero. But her fracking bill, SB4, provoked a fierce backlash that quickly focused on Brown.

Fracking opponents want a statewide ban on the practice – or at least a moratorium. (Pavley’s bill initially included a moratorium, but she removed it after concluding the bill couldn’t pass otherwise.) Until last fall, many hoped Brown would side with them.

Some still think he can be persuaded.

“Gov. Brown is one of the smartest politicians there is,” said Kassie Siegel, senior counsel with the Center for Biological Diversity. “Ending fracking is the right thing to do. I think we’re at a pivotal moment, and I think he just needs a little more time to get beyond the smoke-and-mirror arguments from the oil industry.”

Study time
Brown, however, insists critics should give the state time to study whether fracking poses a threat to water supplies. And although the state is moving to reduce its dependence on oil, Brown says dropping fossil fuels entirely can’t happen overnight.

“You can be sure, everything that needs to be done to fight climate change that we can accomplish, we’ll do it,” Brown told the protesters Saturday.

David R. Baker is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. E-mail: dbaker@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @DavidBakerSF

San Francisco Chronicle

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Regina Rocha

d. March 3, 2014

Regina Rocha, 75, of Oceano passed away quietly in Winters surrounded by family on March 3, 2014. Regina was born in Glendale and lived in Baldwin Park.
Regina grew up in Burbank and had two sisters, Eldridge and Elizabeth, and one brother, John. Regina gave birth to five children and raised two more. She was a total firecracker. Regina was one of the original cadets in the Civil Air Patrol. As a senior sales representative for International Playtex she received numerous awards for sales excellence. As a mom, she was the ultimate “mama bear”: always first in line to protect her children from anything, anywhere, anytime. She once punched a neighbors’ mom in the face because the woman complained about her sons “loud” drumming. After her time in sales, Regina started her own successful tour business and an antiques store. She loved to go to yard sales and swapmeets to find treasures. Regina loved her time in Oceano and liked to walk her dogs around the ponds there. She was a high-energy person, who was not afraid to try anything. This gift she imparted to all her children. Regina spent the last year of her life in Winters and loved the people, and especially the breakfasts at Putah Creek Café.
Regina is survived by her children Jesse Loren, Ray Rocha, Rex Cowan, Luciano Rocha, Dora Rocha Arias and Nina Goodrich; grandchildren Crystal Foster, Jarrett Lowery, Caitlin Flaws, Jessica O’Connor, Finley Rocha, Tonya Thrash, Katrina Gillespie, Kathryn Beyer, Jacqulyn Regina Cowan, Rex Cowan, Dominic Cowan, Margo Cordova, Andrea Gutierrez, Heather Mulholland and Jen Mulholland; great-grandchildren Franklin Foster, Faith Givan, Ethan O’Connor, Joseph O’Connor, Mark Thrash, Alia Thrash, Tianna Trash, Allyson Gillespie, Skyler Gillespie, Cassandra Cordova, Machaela Cordova, Dalia Gutierrez and Rafael Gutierrez; and in-laws Brian Bellamy, Josh Foster, Damian O’Connor, Dawn Cowan, Erik Gillespie, Carlos Arias, Michael Cordova, Joshua Gutierrez and Lindsay Mulholland. Regina was preceded in death by her husband Ernest Rocha and daughter Cecilia Denise Rocha.
A Celebration of Life will be held in Oceano on June 21. Please contact Ray Rocha at rayondrums@charter.net for more information.

Special to The Enterprise

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March 07, 2014 | Leave Comment

By Cory Golden

Lincoln Journal Star

WAHOO — Inside the white house with the black shutters, none of Ken Smith’s things have moved, not his after-shave, not the collection of toy farm machinery, not the green blanket on his chair.

In the garage, the oldies station on his radio still plays.

Sitting on the patio, rain rapping its little roof, his widow drinks coffee in the gray cold.

“Everything is going to stay where he left it,” Roma Smith says. “His clothes will stay in the closet. I still feel like maybe he’ll come back, that he’ll need his stuff, even though I know he won’t.”

An allegedly drunk driver hit Ken, who was filling potholes May 15 for the city of Lincoln. Less than three hours later, Roma stood over her husband, dead at 52 from massive internal injuries, a rubber sheet pulled to his chin.

With her fingers, she brushed the hair of his mustache and the hair on his head, parted to one side, turned dark black to gray-tinged, always a touch too long.

Married for 30 years, they’d made it through the Vietnam War, through political campaigns, through building and closing a business, through her battles with multiple sclerosis, through raising a song and scraping to get by.

Now it ended like this. Goodbye, so soon.

###

They met when he smeared catfish bait in her mouth. She got sick; he apologized; she accepted.

He was a quiet senior, the middle child of a farm family, a runner who drove too fast in his ’59 Ford. She was the talkative only child of the county’s register of deeds. They went to the movies, played pinball, ate burgers at the teen center.

“It was like it was meant to be,” she says.

It was 1965.

After graduation he loaded pens at the sale barn and delivered lumber until 1968, when he enlisted in the Army. He spent a year in Germany, where he had a portrait of her painted from a senior photo. Then he shipped out to Vietnam.

The young couple scribbled letters. She worried he’d get bee stings, to which he was badly allergic.

He came home in May 1970. They didn’t talk about the war; instead, they planned a wedding.

In 1975 he began farming near Wahoo, working his parents’ 160 acres, which the couple moved onto, and another 340 owned by her parents. They bought Mr. J’s Drive-In, which they ran until 1978, when Roma decided the couple couldn’t raise her baby, little Heath, working 12 to 14 hour days in a fast-food joint.

Active in the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars, Ken took a stab at politics in 1980. Selling insurance and running the restaurant had brought him out of his shell, and the campaign was successful. He served one term as a county supervisor.

In 1982, convinced the state needed a new generation of leaders, he ran for lieutenant governor and lost in the Republican primary.

A member of the Saunders County Historical Society, Ken bough a century-old gran elevator in Ithaca his grandfather once ran. His wife thought he was nuts. In February, the elevator was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

In 1986, a doctor diagnosed Roma with multiple sclerosis. For a six-month stretch, she lost her sight. To boost her spirits, Ken bought her a keyboard, but she couldn’t see the sheet music. So he bought her a baby goat instead.

He led her by the arm, read to Heath because she couldn’t.

Later, she campaigned for school board, walking neighborhoods with a cane. Ken made her signs. She won and remains on the board 13 years later.

Heath grew into a state champion runner, his dad always cheering him from the backstretch, even if it meant climbing a barbed wire fence to get to the spot where he could make eye contact with his son.

When Heath chose Nebraska Wesleyan over schools that offered athletic scholarships, Ken took another job to make it happen, working 45 hours each week at a seed corn plant.

A friend suggested he apply with the Lincoln Public Works Department. He quit the plant to work 4 p.m.-midnight plowing streets or fixing potholes.

The Smiths settled into a routine after 1993, buying the little house in Wahoo so she wouldn’t have to struggle climbing stairs.

Early each morning, Roma would hear the comforting sound of Ken’s pickup pulling up in the drive at 10 minutes before 1. He’d come in, make a tuna sandwich, watch a movie on TV.

###

In early April, Roma decided to write the couples’ obituaries. It was a family custom. They were tucked away in a Bible, ready when the time came. She read Ken his one morning while he was in the bathroom, and he laughed.

It was about six weeks later, around 9:45 p.m. on a weeknight, when Ken called using his cell phone. He wore a western shirt, as usual, jeans and an old pair of Heath’s track shoes.

“What’s wrong?” Roma asked.

“Oh, nothing,” he said. “I’ve just got to go to 56th and O Street to fill a pothole. I just wanted to say I love you.” He was like that, Roma says. A pad of paper is filled with notes: Gone to the farm. Love you, Me.

About 90 minutes later, he was loading shovels into a truck when another truck driving 45 to 50 mph hit Ken, witnesses said. The driver, Robert E. Lee, a 31-year-old with three previous convictions for driving under the influence, is scheduled for a June 23 preliminary hearing in Lancaster County Court on manslaughter charges.

“I don’t believe in an eye-for-an-eye, a tooth-for-a-tooth,” Roma says, “but people like that have to be stopped before they hurt another family.”

###

Heath missed his college graduation to go to his dad’s funeral. He helps out on his grandfather’s farm now. The sheep will be sold off, along with other animals.

He says he finds himself sitting at the farm for hours at a time, just thinking. On Wednesday, he stood in an antique store, trying to see things as his dad saw them.

He used to dream of running in the Olympics. That dream is over. Now he thinks about his father’s hands, so rough and hard that a friend once asked what was the matter with them.

“I said he worked hard,” Heath says. “How can you tell someone that those hands showed how much he loved us.”

Heath works part-time at Kmart and mows lawns for money. At 23, he faces $30,000 in school loans and taking care of his mother, who still suffers from double vision, and grandmother and the farm and a little daughter of his own, 2-year-old Abigail.

“I’ll work 80, 90, 100 hours a week or more. I just want to keep what my dad built together,” Heath says. “I don’t worry about myself, just my family. I’ll never ask for help. We’ll get by somehow, but it’ll be hard.”

When Ken’s girlfriend got pregnant, others were unsure how to handle it. But Ken supported his son openly, was happy without hesitation, even beating Heath to the hospital on the day little Abby was to be born.

“Hopefully I can be as good to her as my dad was to me,” Heath says.

###

Sixty bouquets brightened the church for Ken’s funeral. Roma wore a black suit she’d bought just weeks before, so new she hadn’t taken it out of the bag. Cards flooded in, so many it took her and six friends nine hours to write thank-you notes.

Roma sees other friends at the store, catching them out of the corner of her eye as they slink off, unsure what to say. Others drip by with food or a hug.

“When you hurt in a little town, everyone hurts with you,” she says. “They don’t know your pain, but they share your sorrow.”

Roma sits with her mother each day, sits and talks, sits and waits for any of it to make sense, sits and waits for Lee’s trial to begin.

“I have not really sat down and bawled,” Roma says. “When someone is buried in the ground, for most people it’s the end. But this is only beginning.”

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
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Frazz

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March 6, 2014 | Leave Comment

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Fifth Street Corridor

BobDunning2W

Mather steelheadW

Kevin Mather shows off a steelhead caught on the Zymoetz River. Courtesy photo

Vocal Art Ensemble 2014W

The Vocal Art Ensemble will be performing twice in Davis. Courtesy photo

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a1

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a_b.ai

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March 06, 2014 | Leave Comment

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Ross Douthat: The terms of our surrender

BC-DOUTHAT-COLUMN-NYT/828
The Terms of Our Surrender
By ROSS DOUTHAT

c.2014 New York Times News Service

It now seems certain that before too many years elapse, the Supreme Court will be forced to acknowledge the logic of its own jurisprudence on same-sex marriage and redefine marriage to include gay couples in all 50 states.

Once this happens, the national debate essentially will be finished, but the country will remain divided, with a substantial minority of Americans, most of them religious, still committed to the older view of marriage.

So what then? One possibility is that this division will recede into the cultural background, with marriage joining the long list of topics on which Americans disagree without making a political issue out of it.

In this scenario, religious conservatives would essentially be left to promote their view of wedlock within their own institutions, as a kind of dissenting subculture emphasizing gender differences and procreation, while the wider culture declares that love and commitment are enough to make a marriage. And where conflicts arise — in a case where, say, a Mormon caterer or a Catholic photographer objected to working at a same-sex wedding — gay rights supporters would heed the advice of gay marriage’s intellectual progenitor, Andrew Sullivan, and let the dissenters opt out “in the name of their freedom — and ours.”

But there’s another possibility, in which the oft-invoked analogy between opposition to gay marriage and support for segregation in the 1960s South is pushed to its logical public-policy conclusion. In this scenario, the unwilling photographer or caterer would be treated like the proprietor of a segregated lunch counter and face fines or lose his business — which is the intent of recent legal actions against a wedding photographer in New Mexico, a florist in Washington state and a baker in Colorado.

Meanwhile, pressure would be brought to bear wherever the religious subculture brushed up against state power. Religious-affiliated adoption agencies would be closed if they declined to place children with same-sex couples. (This has happened in Massachusetts and Illinois.) Organizations and businesses that promoted the older definition of marriage would face constant procedural harassment, along the lines suggested by the mayors who battled with Chick-fil-A. And, eventually, religious schools and colleges would receive the same treatment as racist holdouts like Bob Jones University, losing access to public funds and seeing their tax-exempt status revoked.

In the past, this constant-pressure scenario has seemed the less-likely one, since Americans are better at agreeing to disagree than the culture war would suggest. But it feels a little bit more likely after last week’s “debate” in Arizona, over a bill that was designed to clarify whether existing religious freedom protections can be invoked by defendants like the florist or the photographer.

If you don’t recognize my description of the bill, then you probably followed the press coverage, which was mendacious and hysterical — evincing no familiarity with the legal issues, and endlessly parroting the line that the bill would institute “Jim Crow” for gays. (Never mind that in Arizona it is currently legal to discriminate based on sexual orientation — and mass discrimination isn’t exactly breaking out.) Allegedly sensible centrists compared the bill’s supporters to segregationist politicians, liberals invoked the Bob Jones precedent to dismiss religious-liberty concerns, and Republican politicians behaved as though the law had been written by David Duke.

What makes this response particularly instructive is that such bills have been seen, in the past, as a way for religious conservatives to negotiate surrender — to accept same-sex marriage’s inevitability while carving out protections for dissent. But now, apparently, the official line is that you bigots don’t get to negotiate anymore.

Which has a certain bracing logic. If your only goal is ensuring that support for traditional marriage diminishes as rapidly as possible, applying constant pressure to religious individuals and institutions will probably do the job. Already, my fellow Christians are divided over these issues, and we’ll be more divided the more pressure we face. The conjugal, male-female view of marriage is too theologically rooted to disappear, but its remaining adherents can be marginalized, set against one other, and encouraged to conform.

I am being descriptive here, rather than self-pitying. Christians had plenty of opportunities — thousands of years’ worth — to treat gay people with real charity, and far too often chose intolerance. (And still do, in many instances and places.) So being marginalized, being sued, losing tax-exempt status — this will be uncomfortable, but we should keep perspective and remember our sins, and nobody should call it persecution.

But it’s still important for the winning side to recognize its power. We are not really having an argument about same-sex marriage anymore, and on the evidence of Arizona, we’re not having a negotiation. Instead, all that’s left is the timing of the final victory — and for the defeated to find out what settlement the victors will impose.

New York Times News Service

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Mah Jongg 3/18

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February 28, 2014 | Leave Comment

Mah Jongg for Everyone – Come join the Fun

In 2010 AARP called American Mah Jongg the “fastest growing game among Seniors.” If you are interested in observing, and then learning to play American Mah Jongg you are invited to the March Mah Jongg tutorial at the Davis Senior Center.

Every Monday, from noon until 4:30 pm, Mah Jongg is played in the Games Room of the Senior Center. During the month of March, you are invited to observe these Monday games. Players will provide brief explanations of how the game is progressing, and the objectives of the play. If you remember playing Mah Jongg in your youth, come learn the challenges as an adult. If you have never played, this is your time to discover the fascination with the game.

Tutorial days will follow. On Tuesday, March 18, Tuesday, March 25, and Thursday, March 27, from 1 to 4 pm, the Mah Jongg Group will provide student centered tutorials for any one who is interested. These tutorials will lead students through the intricacies of the distribution of tiles, strategies to build Mah Jongg hands, and the general play of the game.

The 2014 Mah Jongg year will begin on April 1 and graduates of the tutorials, as well as any experienced players, will be welcome to join the group in Monday play.

If you are interested, you need only show up at any of the Monday Mah Jongg games, or at any of the tutorials, and you will be welcomed into this most pleasant addiction.

For additional information, call Janice Bridge at 753-6802 or email Janice.bridge@gmail.com

Enterprise staff

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Online scheduling

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February 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

Same-Day Online Appointment Scheduling NOW available at Woodland Healthcare

Woodland, CA, February 20, 2014 – Woodland Healthcare is pleased to announce that through our partnership with InQuicker, we are now offering our patients a new online appointment scheduling feature for Same-Day Care services at our Woodland Medical Office.

This new service allows our patients a new, convenient way to schedule an appointment with a doctor – for the same day. Our Same-Day Care services are available for your non-life threatening needs such as cough, cold, flu symptoms, sprains and strains, and minor lacerations.

For medical needs that are of serious concern or life-threatening, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, stroke, severe pain or bleeding, please call 911 or seek immediate medical attention as soon as possible, Woodland Healthcare’s Emergency Department is available 24 hours a day.

To schedule a Same-Day Care online appointment with InQuicker, patients must visit dignityhealth.org/woodland and click on the Same-Day Care InQuicker spotlight on the homepage. Patients will then choose an available appointment date and time; complete a required online patient information form; and will receive a confirmation e-mail that their appointment is scheduled.

At this time, InQuicker online appointment scheduling services are ONLY available Monday – Friday for Same-Day Care services at our Woodland Medical Office. Appointments cannot be schedule for other departments such as Pediatrics, OB/GYN, or specialty care services.

For more information, visit our web site at dignityhealth.org/woodland or call 530.668.2600.

Please note: Press Release is attached as well. Please run within your publication. Thank you.

_______________________________________________

Gennie James, MPA
Communications Specialist

Woodland Healthcare | 1207 Fairchild Court, Railsback Building (Lower Level) | Woodland, CA 95695
gennie.james@dignityhealth.org | 530.669.5387 (Phone) | 530.669.5694 (Fax)

Enterprise staff

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Ski camp notes

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December 01, 2013 | Leave Comment

As part of the Davis High School ski team for three seasons, junior Davis Perez has regularly heard coach Bob Brewer say at the last meeting of the year, “If you really want to improve your skiing, consider going to race camp this summer.”

So Davis, his younger brother, Tate, and five of their friends took Brewer’s advice to heart and booked spots at Timberline Summer Snow Race Camp at Mt. Hood, Ore.

(Details about ski camp)
So what can one expect at summer ski camp?

Timberline Summer Snow Race Camp (http://www.timberlinesnowcamps.com/)

So who else attended ski camp?

Ski team kids as well as kids who want to be on the DHS team getting a head start. Besides then-seventh-graders Tate Perez and Kyle Powell, two of this year’s freshman racers, Josh Lovell and Jackson Lutzker attended last summer.

National license plates from many of the 50 states; but international skiers … heard Russian, Japanese, and kids skied beside members of the Canadian Olympic team.

2,100 lift tickets sold on Monday (looks far less crowded)

32 stayed with Timberline that we used….Major benefit is it’s the only race camp with lift line-cutting privileges.

You can stay at the Timberline Lodge, recognizable as the exterior of “The Overlook Hotel” from The Shining, or rent a place. Talk about our place and how the kids loved it.
Kids who stayed at camp did afternoon activities…Mt. Hood Adventure Park, rafting on XXX river,

Can demo skis in Govt. Camp

Daily videoing gets done, and at the end of the ski day, students sit with their instructors to go over the day’s footage…instructor analyzes footage with skiers. Send a DVD home at the end of the camp.

From Timberline website:

Quality coaching from our experienced and dedicated staff provides participants with an optimal training experience. Our emphasis during Performance Camps is on gate training for Giant Slalom and Slalom. This camp is ideal for both the beginner racer and the very experienced competitor. Summer race camp is the perfect opportunity to focus on fundamentals and make changes that will make you faster for the coming season. Groups are divided based on age and ability.

Details about the cabin/recreation in the area

Entertainment in the area…Alpine Slide (name of that park?), Portland not too far (look this up) and a jet boat along the Willamette River. Huckleberry milkshakes!

(move this lower)
My husband, Steve, and I assumed we’d have the week off to do whatever we wanted while the kids were at camp, but our older son approached us and asked if we’d consider renting a place near ski camp for the group of friends (with Steve and I as chaperones). Long story short, we opted for that rather than having the kids lodge at Timberline.

Once we got to Mt. Hood, we knew several other Davis students who attended camp and stayed at the lodge, and those we talked to reported enjoying it. But our guys were very happy having the cabin as a home base.

The lodge, it should be said, is the famous Timberline Lodge, recognizable as the exterior of “The Overlook Hotel” from Stephen King’s horror movie, “The Shining.”

Tyler Powell:

3. The conditions were very icy in the morning, then got to a good condition of snow after an hour of skiing. The rest of the day was slushy!

4. My coach was very awesome! They went to the personal level, learning your name and wanting to help you ski better.

Tyler Powell
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Joel Almeida:

6. The best part was probably the alpine slide, that was crazy. We originally had planned to spend some of the day there and most at the other part of the amusement park but we ended up going back to it because it was so fun. It probably never would have been allowed in California; there were no safety regulations like helmets, which made it way cooler. I almost fell out a couple of times, but I never did, so the risk just made it better. Getting air on it was also awesome.
5. I would do absolutely do it again, no question about it. I don’t know if I would do it if I wasn’t gonna be in the cabin with my friends, though. That was the best part, because while our coach, Ben, was great, the conditions of the mountain weren’t. While it was nice to be skiing in the summer, it wasn’t very good skiing. There were no trees, no powder, just the icy, salty, steep race course. However, being with friends and getting to go do crazy awesome things like the alpine slide and riverboat tour was super cool, and it was good to get the practice in for the next season. (That sorta answered some of the other questions too I guess)
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