Thursday, April 24, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Boxing has passed me by; the Sweet Science is lacking

BruceGallaudetW

What do David Haye, Francesco Damiani, Herbie Hide, Oliver McCall and Bruce Seldon have in common?

Nope. Not on the Cooking Channel. They don’t sell Davis real estate. None are running for our City Council.

Give up?

Each has owned a recent piece of boxing’s alphabet-soup heavyweight title. Seriously.

Looking back over those names made the Jersey Boy in me shudder.

Having been born in Jersey City, I’m a little goofy to begin with. Pinball, pool, horse racing, boxing. They’re in our East Coast DNA.

I even have some Old School mob in my family. In 1970 when I borrowed my Uncle Bob’s car to drive to Asbury Park, he had these words of advice for me: “Bruce, take the Volkswagen, They know the Cadillac.”

I always meant to ask my uncle who “They” were.

But I digress. It’s been 30 years since I followed what some misinformed corner man dubbed the Sweet Science.

I remember — even as a 10-year-old — the regal placement of the sport in America’s psyche.

Heavyweight champions were American heroes. Role models. Joe Louis, Jersey Joe Walcott, Rocky Marciano …

Marciano’s 56-0 record, his retirement in 1956 and unfortunate death in a plane crash are vivid memories, almost 60 years later.

As an eighth-grader, I took the No. 5 bus from Hawthorne to the Olympic Auditorium in L.A. to watch Saturday night fights. (anyone remember Windmill Ray White?)

I was at the Los Angeles Coliseum for a Dodger game in June of 1960 when Floyd Patterson lost the title to Ingemar Johansson. The mix of Vin Scully on the Dodger broadcast and Don Dunphy’s call of the title fight blew out my crystal radio that memorable evening.

A big Patterson fan, I was a happy teenager when Floyd beat Johansson in the rematch. Saddened when Sonny Liston next beat down Patterson, I then rejoiced when Cassius Clay came on the scene, stopping “the big, ugly bear” twice.

For me, boxing maintained its intrigue throughout the ’60s and ’70s.

The Muhammed Ali-Joe Frazier series stands among the great rivalries in sports history.

Buoyed by Ali and Sugar Ray Leonard, Schoolboy Bobby Chacon, George Foreman and Irish Frankie Crawford and the Quarry Brothers, I stuck with the sport until the WBC, NYSAC, WBA, IBF, WBO and all the warring boxing acronyms made a mockery of the titles.

When Leon Spinks beat an aging Ali in 1978 — and the World Boxing Council vacated its version of the crown because Spinks didn’t fight “mandatory challenger” Ken Norton — the sport lost me.

But boxing’s rich history — something I began studying as a fourth-grader — has never left me.

So  the other day, when I heard that Wladimir Klitschko will defend his versions (IBF, WBO and WBA) of the crown against Alex Leapai this Saturday, I shrugged.

First off, I didn’t know this Klitschko wasn’t the other Klitscho (Vitali, the leader of the Ukranian Alliance for Democratic Reform and former something-or-other boxing champ).

Then, I discovered only Joe Louis held a heavyweight title (an undisputed championship) longer than Klitschko has (the Ukranian won two versions of the crown in 2008).

Another shrug.

I’ve never seen the Ukranian throw a punch. I don’t know who his challenger is. I don’t know who he’s fought and no longer care anyway.

Even with the current saga of his Ukranian homeland in the background, how can any storyline top something like the life-long relationship of ring rivals Louis and Max Schmeling? Few tales play out the way Schmeling fought Louis in dramatic 1930s politically-tinged bouts with the Third Reich’s image on display, then resisted Hitler and later in life aided the stricken and struggling Louis.

I used to pride myself on boxing knowledge. My dad tells me I went toe-to-toe in the late 1950s with Dr. Joyce Brothers on the $64,000 Challenge. Brothers had dazzled the TV game show with her boxing knowledge, winning the top prize in both 1957 and again in 1959. Pops says: “You weren’t far behind. A champion in our living room.”

I still occasionally puff out when Jeopardy! has a boxing category.

“Who was Ezzard Charles, Alex?”

But boxing in 2014 leaves me cold.

The one thing our family takes away from this Klitschko guy is his relationship with actress Hayden Panettiere. Apparently the two are getting married, and since my wife likes the “Nashville” television show that features Panettiere, I guess we’re rooting for Wladimir this weekend.

— Bruce Gallaudet is a staff writer for The Davis Enterprise. Reach him at bgallaudet@davisenterprise.net or 530-320-4456.

Bruce Gallaudet

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Final Aggie spring football scrimmage open to public on Saturday

BruceGallaudetW

0425ManzanaresW

UCD running back Gabe Manzanares is coming off of a huge first season for the Aggies, who will showcase their spring growth with an open scrimmage on Saturday at Aggie Stadium. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

Aggie football fans will get a little taste of what to expect from their 2014 team when UC Davis conducted its final spring scrimmage on Saturday at Aggie Stadium.

In full uniform, the Aggies will square off in the intrasquad session at 11 a.m. Admission is free.

So what’s in store for those in attendance?

“Fans will see a very proud team,” says second-year head coach Ron Gould. “(They will see) a disciplined team that has another opportunity Saturday to get better.”

UCD  finished last season 5-7. It went 5-3 in Big Sky Conference play after losing its first four outings.

This year, UCD opens its 11-game schedule Aug. 30 at nationally ranked Stanford. Then comes the home opener against Fort Lewis (Colorado) on Sept. 6 and trip to Colorado State (Sept. 13).

Conference play gets underway Sept. 27 when Big Sky champion Eastern Washington comes to town.

Another 0-4 start for the Aggies?

“No way,” UCD running back Gabe Manzanares told The Enterprise Thursday. “We’re going to be ready to go.”

Manzanares gained 1,285 yards as a junior. The City College of San Francisco transfer scored 11 touchdowns and earned Big Sky Newcomer of the Year honors.

“The schedule is a great opportunity for us to showcase what we can do,” continues the 5-foot-10, 195-pounder. “No doubt it’s going to be challenging, but we look forward to it.”

Manazanares (toe) could miss Saturday’s exhibition, but Aggie Nation should get a full plate of his talented backfield brother Manusamoa Luuga.

The to-be sophomore RB, by way of Long Beach Poly High, has been tearing it up this spring.

“Manu has done an unbelievable job this spring — I mean unbelievable,” says an enthusiastic Gould. “He’s made some runs and cuts, some that have been quite sensational. He’s learned how to pass protect. He just grown leaps and bounds.

“It’s been a treat to see this young man come out of his shell.”

New to UCD camp this spring are quarterback Turner Baty (Bay-tee) and linebacker Travon Brooks.

Baty, like Manzanares, is a CCSF product (although neither played together there). The junior is expected to add mobility and downfield range in taking over for departed four-year starter Randy Wright.

Brooks — an imposing 6-2, 245-pound MLB — comes from Contra Costa College and joins to an already talented group of linebackers.

As solid as guys like Brooks, Baty and Manzanares are, Gould cautions nothing is guaranteed come next fall.

“Everybody has to earn the right to say they’re a starter, then keep competing for that spot,” explains the former Cal assistant. “If you were a starter last year, that has no bearing on this year.”

With that said, it comes as no surprise when Gould says keen competition is going on at virtually every position.

“(Saturday) should be fun for fans to come out and see the steps that we’re taking,” Gould continues. “Our last (spring) opportunity to get better … I see the players coming out to seize the opportunity. (Fans) will see the discipline and the enthusiasm. They’ll see great effort.”

Associate Athletic Director Mike Robles says makeshift rosters will be provided to those attending Saturday. The scoreboard will be working and the voice of the Aggies, Larry Swanson, is expected to man the public-address system.

Notes: Season tickets are on sale now. Call 530-752-AGS1 or visit www.ucdavisaggies.com to purchase now. … Gould likes what he’s seen over the past month of spring workouts: “Overall, I’ve been really pleased with the effort and how hard and fast our defense is playing.” About the offense: “We’ve got a lot of offense in. Going into this final week, we just wanted to see guys continue to improve and continue to tighten things up.” Fans can judge Saturday if their Aggies have improved from their 2013 season-ending 34-7 demolition of Sacramento State.

— Reach Bruce Gallaudet at bgallaudet@davisenterprise.net or 530-320-4456.

Bruce Gallaudet

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

DYSA roundup: TigerCats go 4-0 in youth softball action

BruceGallaudetW

0425ManzanaresW

UCD running back Gabe Manzanares is coming off of a huge first season for the Aggies, who will showcase their spring growth with an open scrimmage on Saturday at Aggie Stadium. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

SONY DSC

Powerful Panda Kayltin LeBar-Triebke takes a big cut during a recent Davis Youth Softball Association 6U contest. Courtesy photo

The Team Lawton 14U TigerCats of the Davis Youth Softball Association won four straight games last week — including a pair of exciting come-from-behind victories on Saturday.

In beating the Dixon Extreme, 10-9, in the first game, Catherine Bernhardt pitched a scoreless third inning and added an RBI double.

But it was Brianna Lavergne’s game-tying double that set the stage for Shekinah Prewett’s RBI walk that forced in the winning run. Pitcher Hallie Tobia picked up the win.

In the nightcap, Dixon Pirate House fell by a run in a game that was highlighted by Davis shortstop Maya Lawton’s unassisted triple play. With bases loaded and nobody out in the second, Lawton caught a line drive, ran to second for a force out, then tagged an in-coming runner for the rare fielding gem.

Juliana Moore was 1-for-2 with three RBIs and Carissa Hernandez, Alina Nelson and Prewett each drew RBI walks.

With Pirate House leading by one into the final inning, Lawton swiped home and, two walks later, Tobia’s free pass forced home Nelson with the winning run.

Katrina Toups tossed a scoreless second inning and Lavergne emerged with the pitching win.

In Lincoln last Friday, the TigerCats rolled to a 13-9 win over the Attitude.

Sienna Dwyer belted two doubles and walked while five pitchers combined in the circle with Shauna Wallace picking up her first win.

On Wednesday, Davis topped the Dixon Lady Pirates, 14-13. With the TigerCats collecting eight hits as a team, Emily Bonnel, Wallace and Lavergne each had two.

Moore turned in the fielding play of the game on a nice running catch in left field. Chloe Bolanos was solid behind the plate as hurler Wallace again picked up the decision.

12U division

Tracker Jackers 11, Giants 9 — Tracker Jackers Lauren Limburg (double) and Shay Thompson (single) both drove in two runs as Isabell Rubalcaba pitched three strong innings — striking out three and getting assists on all three third-inning putouts.

Lauren Wilcox smacked a deep double to right.

Caroline Korinke made two sterling plays afield and Courtney Rutherford added a web gem.

For the Giants, Lizzy Jones, Cate Scheuring and Gracie Hartsough each had two hits with Mimie LaValle, Maya Welss, Sophie Purves and Miya Johnston adding singles. Gabriella Lester, Maya Nunez and Mei McConnell all played well defensively.

Giants 11, Blue Blizzards 7 — The Giants collected nine hits — two each by Gracie Hartsough and Cate Scheuring — as the winners jumped out to a 9-0 lead after two innings.

Brooke Martin and Maya Wells contributed singles.

Mimie LaValle, Sophie Purves, Miya Johnston, Lizzy Jones and Gabriella Lester shined on defense.

Tracker Jackers 14, Dixon Allgood Ink 5 — On a chilly Friday night in Dixon, Caroline Korinke’s first-inning, three-run double started the Jackers on the right foot.

Lauren Wilcox got a Dixon runner out on a dropped third strike while Shay Thompson had an RBI double and Layla Finch fanned two batters in the second frame. Wilcox ended the inning by tagging a runner out at the plate, then hit an RBI double.

Olivia Cooper pitched well, Courtney Rutherford was tough behind the plate and Noa Lipson contributed a web gem.

10U division

Pink Piece Signs 14, Siberian Tigers 13 — Bella Hyder and Emma Catacutan went 2-for-3 with three RBIs each for the winners.

Elise Wyman and Sanne Dequine collected singles with Wyman’s driving in another run.

Georgia Nichols made a nice catch in left and second baseman Piper Brandy and first baseman Dequine combined for two dazzling outs in the field.

Catacutan, Alana Turner, Hyder and Cate Fehrenbacher pitched well.

For the Tigers, Heather Breckner slammed two doubles, scored twice and had two unassisted putouts.

Kristine Schmitz went 3-for-3 and scored twice, while Katianna Higgins and Olivia Tomasello both were 2-for-3 with three runs scored.

Tara Reddy and Erika Wenner added singles (and Wenner scored). Stevie Spencer (five strikeouts in three innings) and Wenner shared the circle duties.

Ninja Monkeys 10, Mad Hatters 10 — There was no monkeying around for Halle Gabriel, who struck out six batters in two innings for the Ninjas. Lindsay Taylor had a strikeout in her two innings worked.

Alexandra Zurborg, Taylor and Gabriel had important fielding plays.

Green Chili Peppers 12, Hot Tamales 8 — Lily Gieschen pitched two strong Chili Pepper innings and spanked two singles for the winners.

Anna Harrison and Grace Scheuring contributed offensively, while La’Siya Earnest and Paige Jenness flashed slick leather in the field.

Coaches reported it was solid defense game with great base running by all the Green Chili Peppers.

Ninja Monkeys 11, Green Chili Peppers 9 — Sarah Griffiths scored twice and drove home a run with a hit for the Ninja Monkeys.

Sarah Lagattuta and Olivia Johnson both tallied twice and Gainna Cacciatore singled and scored.

In rallying from a four-run deficit, the Monkeys used terrific pitching efforts from Lindsay Taylor and Griffiths.

Web gems came in the form of plays by Lagattuta, Cacciatore, Johnson and Taylor.

6U division

Powerful Pandas vs. Pinkalicious — Maya Gagnon hit three home runs in this well-played matchup.

Kaytlin LeBar-Triebke also had a big day with the bat as did Aubrey McLin and Kaylie Adams, who were strong on the bases as well.

Runs were batted in by Adelina Whener, Anna Coleman and Ella Ackerman.

Notes: Thanks to Carson Wilcox for collecting and submitting this week’s recaps. The DYSA Page appears each Friday in The Davis Enterprise. If you don’t see your favorite team’s game summarized, talk to that squad’s scorekeeper or coach.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Probable sell-out, familiar face to highlight Republic FC home opener

BruceGallaudetW

0425ManzanaresW

UCD running back Gabe Manzanares is coming off of a huge first season for the Aggies, who will showcase their spring growth with an open scrimmage on Saturday at Aggie Stadium. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

SONY DSC

Powerful Panda Kayltin LeBar-Triebke takes a big cut during a recent Davis Youth Softball Association 6U contest. Courtesy photo

0425sacW

Republic FC’s Ivan Mirković dribbles past Mexican legend Adolfo “Bofo” Bautista in a 3-1 victory over Chivas USA Reserves earlier this season. Sacramento's home opener is Saturday at Hughes Stadium. Courtesy photo

By
From page B1 | April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

After nearly 17 months of waiting since the expansion announcement, local soccer fans will finally be able to watch a professional game when Sacramento Republic FC plays its inaugural USL Pro home match against the Harrisburg City Islanders on Saturday at Hughes Stadium.

According to team officials, Republic FC expects to sell-out the 20,311-capacity Hughes Stadium in the first of three games that they play there before they move to the 8,000-capacity Bonney Field on the Cal Expo Fairgrounds.

Kick-off is scheduled for 7:30 p.m.

“For our staff and for our team, it’s very exciting to open our doors and show the people of Sacramento the experience we’re trying to create,” Republic FC owner Warren Smith told The Enterprise. “I think we’ve done a pretty good job in developing a plan and a business model that will eventually work and to see our first match at home for the group of people in Sacramento to enjoy the sport at a pretty high level, we think is pretty cool.”

The former River Cats executive vice president added: “I’ve been waiting for this day for a long time and look forward to the outcome. Win or lose, we ultimately hope to create a special entertainment opportunity for the people of Sacramento and hopefully they’ll have a few smiles on their faces when they leave Hughes Stadium on Saturday night.”

Coming into the game with a 2-1-2 record, Sacramento has exceeded all expectations from their opening road trip. WILL WRITE THE REST OF THIS GRAPH AFTER THE HARRISBURG GAME.

“We’re playing pretty well for a new team,” Smith said. “It would have been great to have those two losses as victories, but to go on the road for the first five matches and to have the record of 2-1-2, is actually pretty darn good.”

Playing in the third division of American soccer will put Republic FC players and staff through some tough situations such as the two-games-in-two-days road trip they had last weekend, which resulted in injuries to star players Justin Braun, Michael Fucito and Jake Gleeson.

The status for all three players is in question for Saturday, but one player who will be available is Adam Jahn, who is from Davis and played at Jesuit High.

As first reported by The Enterprise on Wednesday, Jahn has been sent on loan from the San Jose Earthquakes for an undisclosed amount of time thanks to an affiliation agreement that allows Sacramento to act as a pseudo minor league club for the Earthquakes.

“I think it’s going to be amazing,” Jahn said of the opener. “I mean, it’s perfect timing, the first home game for the team. I’m blessed enough to be a part of it. I’m really excited to play in front of a lot of old friends.”

Jahn, 23, was drafted by the Earthquakes last year after a standout career at Stanford. He scored four goals in 22 appearances, but fell out of favor after coach Frank Yallop and the Earthquakes mutually agreed to part ways and some of the older players returned from injury.

“I came in and got opportunities right off the bat,” Jahn said. “I think I made the most out of them. Eventually, the older guys, the veteran guys on the team, got healthy. They were very integral to the team. They stepped up and had a really strong second half of the year. I didn’t play as much, but I still kept learning from them. It was challenging.”

He has played just three minutes in MLS this year, receiving a red card against Colorado last weekend.

“It’s all about getting games, getting experience as a player and the only way to do that is to play full games, realistic games and not just train all the time,” Jahn added. “The Republic is just a few hours down the road (from San Jose) and a very competitive team. I’m really glad that it’s working out this way.”

As for Jahn’s dream scenario Saturday night:

“The team wins and we achieve the things that we’ve been working on in practice and get better as a team,” said the hulking striker. “It’s all about results. The fan support is there. They’re going to love it. We really want to deliver a win and kick off the soccer here in Sacramento on a good note. We’re very exciting to be playing, and hopefully we can come out with a W.”

INTRODUCE COACH AND A COUPLE OTHER PLAYERS HERE

“We don’t pretend to know everything,” Smith said. “We’re doing our best to create a special opportunity. We’re hopeful that people will give us feedback and we can learn from that feedback to make our product better for the next game.”

— Reach Evan Ream at eream@davisenterprise.net or follow him on Twitter @EvanReam

Evan Ream

Evan Ream graduated with a B.A. in journalism from Southern Oregon in Ashland, Ore. He loves soccer more than any person rationally should. "Some people think football is a matter of life and death. I don't like that attitude. I can assure them it is much more serious than that." - Bill Shankly
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Locals fundraise for victims of Chile fire

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

Twisted metal and little else greeted residents of the Cerro Merced neighborhood following the fire in Valparaiso, Chile that began on April 12 and has affected at least 10,000 residents.

“Its nothing now,” said Jorge Loyola, a landscape contractor in Davis and Valparaiso native. “The neighborhood where I grew up: Everything is gone.”

Loyola and his wife Darlene, a longtime teacher at Cesar Chavez Elementary School, have joined the Davis Chilean community in rallying support to help the victims of the Valparaiso fire.

The Chilean Student Association at UC Davis (ChileUCD) and the Chilean Cultural Association of Davis (ChileCAD) have teamed up and are accepting donations at www.gofundme.com/8dlekk or by check made out to “ChileCAD” to 2707 Henri Ct., Davis, 95618, with all proceeds going to relief efforts in Valparaiso’s devastated Cerro Merced neighborhood.

In one of the worst catastrophes to have hit Valparaiso, a culturally important port city near Chile’s capital Santiago, a fire spread in the hills and completely burned over 2,000 homes, killing 15 people.

The Loyolas’ daughter Daniela, who grew up in Davis and attended Cesar Chavez, lives in Valparaiso and was at work when the fire spread to her hillside home. Her husband had just the “time to get the dog and the computer” before the blaze destroyed their house, Jorge Loyola said.

The Chilean community is stepping up to raise money to be sent to the Neighbors Association of Cerro Merced, a low-income area ravaged by the fire.

“It just started spreading,” Darlene Loyola said. “This was the perfect storm for a fire” that reached 1000 degrees Fahrenheit.

“It’s close to 3,000 homes that were completely burned down,” said Francisco Moran, President of ChileCAD, who was born in Santiago and moved to Davis in 1989. “We need to help.”

Moran worked with ChileUCD to coordinate the fundraising effort and the latter created the gofundme.com campaign.

“We felt that we have to do something,” said Valerie Weinborn, President of ChileUCD.

Weinborn added that ChileUCD is working with the International Agriculture and Development program at UC Davis on a Valparaiso benefit to take place on May 17th.

For residents of Cerro Merced, remaining away from their homes after the fire subsided was not a safe option. Many have returned in order to prevent squatters from claiming their property.

Not only was the fire devastating, but “on top of that, it’s really poor people” that were affected, Moran said. “They don’t have large families” to support them, they “don’t have anything.”

The Loyolas said that they were fortunate enough to be able to help their daughter, but that other Cerro Merced residents were not so lucky.

“We’re not worried about us,” Daniela Loyola said. The fundraising is for the whole neighborhood and those who “haven’t got anybody to help.”

Adrian Glass-Moore

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Adrian Glass-Moore

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Rash of tire slashings investigated in Woodland

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

Woodland police are seeking information about a rash of tire slashings in the city’s south area this week. 

Sgt. Brett Hancock said officers took 20 reports at 18 homes Thursday in which at least two tires on each car were cut. Most incidents occurred along El Dorado Drive between Cottonwood and College streets, but residents on Hacienda Lane, Redwood Drive, Abbey Place, Monte Vista Drive, Spruce Drive, McKinley Avenue and West Street also were affected.

Police have no suspect information at this time and are asking residents in those areas with exterior video surveillance systems to review their footage for possible clues. Anyone with information is asked to contact investigators at 530-666-2411.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Scholarship Fundraiser Dinner

Saturday, May 17, 6 p.m., at the Holy Rosary Community Center, 575 California St., Woodland; the Yolo Cabrillo Civic Club #26, will host a new scholarship fundraiser dinner featuring steak, multiple tasty side dishes and sweet bread and rice puddings. There will be live music and dancing with Roadhouse 5 and the Big Cash Reverse Raffle drawing. Tickets are $35 for dinner, and both dinner and Big Cash Reverse Raffle tickets are available from Arlene at 908-8019 or Mike at 383-7126. Need not be present to win raffle prizes.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Lecture on the Origins of Chinese Food

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Join the Confucius Institute at UC Davis for a free lecture and reception.
Lecture given by Prof. E.N. Anderson, Department of Anthropology, UC Riverside

Chinese food today is the product of thousands of years of development, involving, among other things, borrowing hundreds of crops from western Asia, India, Southeast Asia, and most recently the New World. Even things like Maya cactus fruit have appeared on the Chinese market. But before all this, there was a long period of development, involving the independent invention of agriculture, the domestication of millets and rice, the coming of ancient Near Eastern crops, and the development of an agrarian civilization based on highly innovative Chinese technology. Many important new findings on this early period have appeared recently. This talk will cover the rise of China’s agriculture before the coming of New World crops.

May 22, 2014
Lecture: 5-6pm
Reception: 6-7pm
Location: Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, UC Davis

Registration requested: confucius.ucdavis.edu/lecture


Deprecated: mysql_escape_string(): This function is deprecated; use mysql_real_escape_string() instead. in /www/newspaperfoundation.org/html/wp-content/plugins/user-photo/user-photo.php on line 103

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Cabrillo May meeting

Monday, May 5, 6:30 p.m. The Yolo Cabrillo Civic Club No. 26 will hold its monthly meeting at Holy Rosary Pastoral Center, 503 California St, Woodland. The agenda includes discussion on the April 12 and 13 Portuguese bake sale at Tumulty Hall and the May 3 All Sports Pedro Hospice Fundraiser in the Holy Cross Room at the Holy Rosary Community Center; and the results of the scholarships given will be announced. Final preparations for the May 17 Scholarship Steak Dinner will take place; as will planning for the June 1 Portuguese Linguica and Sweetbread Breakfast, the June 20 All-Sports BUNCO and the June 29 Scholarship Family Picnic. The meeting is open to all those interested. For further information, call President Elizabeth Kemper, 666-4059.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

New Opportunities for Davis Athletes of all Ages

Pacific Coast Magic acquires Aerials All-Stars, a competitive cheerleading gym located in Vacaville, CA.
Pacific Coast Magic, a leader in competitive cheerleading in Southern California, has Aerials All-Stars acquired, a local gym, paving the way for many local athletes to pursue their dreams of getting sports scholarships for top colleges and universities, as well as competing every season in competitions all over the state and across the country. Aerials All-Stars, previously owned and operated by Elizabeth Lopez, m has operated in Vacaville for over a decade and has led to the development and oversight of one of the largest and most successful gyms in Northern California. Elizabeth will continue to run the new PCM facility located at 3777-A Vaca Valley Pkwy., Vacaville, CA 95688.
“This is our opportunity to expand the depth of services we offer to our customers and supply the best coaching to the athletes of Northern California,” Lopez. “Our first years have been a great success, but we can’t wait to get started on this new chapter in the gyms history.”
Pacific Coast Magic specializes in competitive cheerleading for those athletes that want something more than the rah-rah of the sideline, as well as training local high school and recreational teams. The owner, Kellie Elliott and program head Elizabeth Lopez, both have backgrounds in teaching as well as experience coaching all levels and ages of athletes.
“Expanding our brand to include Northern California locations is a move we considered only if the right opportunity came along,” says Kellie Elliott, co-owner of Pacific Coast Magic. “In Elizabeth (Lopez) we have a strong force at our new location in Vacaville and combined with the PCM brand, we are confident that we can offer the athletes up there the best and most competitive program in the region.”
Pacific Coast Magic is also a family-owned and operated business practicing sustainable life-coaching to each of their athletes, focusing on the importance of values and work ethic above medals and individual glory. With six locations now located in Murrieta, Corona, Anaheim, High Desert, Irvine and Scottsdale, Arizona, Pacific Coast Magic serves most of Orange County and the Inland Empire. PCM brings competitive cheer to a growing market. With six other locations, 40 highly trained instructors and almost 1,200 athletes, PCM is the leader in competitive cheerleading in California. Pacific Coast Magic has been around for over a decade and won multiple regional, state and national titles, as well as multiple top 5 finishes at the World Championships in Orlando, FL.
Davis boys and girls are encouraged to participate, since form Davis high school grad Sean Evans is one of the new owners. Tryouts will be held May 8th, 9th and 10th at the gym, located at 3777-A Vaca Valley Pkwy., Vacaville. Specific information will be available on the website as well as all social media outlets. For more information, visit http://www.pacificcoastmagic.com.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

International Film Series to screen ‘Queen to Play’

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

“Queen to Play,” a 2011 French film directed by Caroline Bottaro, will be screened Friday as part of the International Film Series
The series is co-sponsored by the United Nations Association of Davis and International House. Doors at I-House, 10 College Park, open at 7:30 p.m. and the film begins promptly at 8 p.m.
There is no charge, but donations are accepted with gratitude to help cover the cost of DVD rental, facilities use and refreshments.
Hélène (Sandrine Bonnaire) works as a chambermaid at a hotel in Corsica and as part-time housecleaner for a retired and widowed American doctor, Dr. Krôger (Kevin Kline, in an entirely French-speaking role).
A casual observation of a chess game gets her interested and gradually obsessed with the game that she teaches herself on an electronic chess set that she had bought for her dockworker husband Ange (Francis Renaud) who is not interested. She persuades Krôger to teach her more; they develop a fascinating relationship over the chessboard. Hélène turns out to have great talent and wins her first tournament. Her new confidence and the recognition from family (including her teenage daughter), friends and strangers fundamentally changes her life.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Hear Buddy Wakefield at the Spoken Word

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

Buddy Wakefield will bring his Riled Up and Wasted On Light tour to Davis at 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 7, in the Technocultural Studies building on the UC Davis Campus as part of Spoken Word night.
The three-time spoken word champion is back from a two-and-a-half year hiatus where he took time to lay roots in the Northwest and write a book, “Henhouse.” (based on “Penthouse,” but for chickens and their lovers).
In 2004, Wakefield won the Individual World Poetry Slam Finals, then successfully defended that title at the International Poetry Festival in Rotterdam, Netherlands, against the national champions of seven European countries.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Edgy chamber group yMusic to present intimate concert with audience seated on Jackson Hall stage

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

The six musicians who make up the group yMusic — performing music that falls somewhere between classical and indie pop — will bring contemporary music for string trio, flute, clarinet and trumpet to the Mondavi Center on Saturday (May 17) at 8 p.m., for a student-oriented concert that is being promoted by the Aggie Arts Intern program.

The band — or should we call them a chamber group? — will be performing on the Jackson Hall stage, and the audience will be up on the stage as well, in bleacher-style seating for up to 310 people. The idea is to present the music in a more informal setting, along the lines of a warehouse theater in an urban community.

yMusic’s debut album “Beautiful Mechanical” came out in 2011; Time Out New York picked the album as their Classical Record of the Year, and subbed the members of yMusic “six hip virtuosi.” The group expects to release a second album later this year. The members of yMusic include:

–Rob Moose, violin and guitar. Moose is a member of the popular indie folk group Bon Iver, which performed at Freeborn Hall in 2012, which led to discussions about yMusic coming to the Mondavi Center for a concert. In addition to his work as performer and arranger with Bon Iver, Moose has been involved as a recording artist with pop groups like Vampire Weekend and Arcade Fire, as well classical artists like Joshua Bell. Moose plays a duet with mandolinist Chris Thile on the soon-to-be-released album “Red Hot + Bach” (due in June from Sony Music Masterworks) — earlier this spring, Thile gave a well-received concert featuring Bach transcriptions at the Mondavi Center.

–CJ Camerieri, trumpet, french horn, keyboard. Also a member of Bon Iver, Camerieri will be playing in Paul Simon’s touring band this year. Camerieri trained at Juilliard in classical trumpet, he and Moose were founders of yMusic in 2008.

–Clarice Jensen, cello. Jensen earned a bachelor’s degree and a Master’s degree at Juilliard, and has performed with symphony orchestras and recorded with Hauschka (an innovative pianist who performed at the Mondavi Center a few years ago), as well as the pop band Arcade Fire and composer/performer Nico Muhly.

–Alex Sopp, flute. Another Juilliard grad (bachelor’s and Master’s), Sopp has performed with the New York Philharmonic, and has also performed at the BBC Proms and other festivals. She has commissioned, premiered and recorded works by figures as divers as Björk and Philip Glass.

–Hideaki Aomori, clarinet. Another Julliard alum, Aomori has performed with artists ranging from Tito Puente  to the Moscow Chamber Orchestra to Emmylou Harris and the late Lou Reed. Aomori has also toured with composer/songwriter Duncan Sheik (a creator of the musical “Spring Awakening”).

–Nadia Sirota, viola. Yet another Juilliard alum, Sirota has played with Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble and Alarm Will Sound (both ensembles have performed at the Mondavi Center in the past). Her 2009 debut album “First Things First” was well reviewed by the New York Times, and her second album “Baroque” came out in 2013.

Sara Phelps, a second-year student at UC Davis (majoring in human development and Spanish) is one of the Aggie Arts Interns working on the concert. Phelps said she’s impressed that each member of the yMusic collaborative manages to maintain an individual career as a composer/performer, in addition to their role in the group.

UC Davis student Andrea Hasson (a nutrition major who will soon graduate) said the concert at the Mondavi Center will include a bulletin board titled “Why Music?” — those in the audience will be invited to write a note expressing their response to this open-ended question, and post it.

Hasson and Phelps said they’re getting word about the concert to students through email, Facebook, paper flyers distributed around the campus, and even chalk messages written on sidewalks.

It’s no secret that one goal of the event is to get busy college students into the Mondavi Center, with the hope that they’ll hear something they like, and return. Hasson said “I came into this internship knowing thing about classical music. And I went to one concert and fell in love — it was the Bahia Youth Orchestra (a Brazilian group that performed in Jackson Hall earlier this year). “Hopefully we can encourage people to come out and experience yMusic,” Hasson said.

Tickets are $25 general, $12.50 UC Davis students, www.mondaviarts.org or (530) 754-2787.

 

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Yes on P oped

NEW WATER RATES NEED A DO-OVER

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES TO PAY OVER 40% MORE

Sue Greenwald

Mark Siegler

Homeowners and tenants of single-family homes will soon be paying 40% more for EACH GALLON of water than other residential users under the new water rates adopted by the Council. Not only is this unfair, it will ultimately result in higher costs for most ratepayers and lead to adverse unintended consequences.

We all agree that if you use twice as much water, you should pay twice as much — but not the almost three times as much (or more). Yet that is what single-family homes will be paying under the new water rate structure. Voting Yes on Measure P will repeal this rate structure and send a strong message to Council to implement a rate structure that is fair to all.

Single Family Homes Charged 40% More

Residents of single-family homes will pay 40% more per gallon than other residential users, and far more than commercial users, for two reasons: (1) reliance on summer-month peak use to determine two-thirds of the bill year round, and (2) using meter size to determine a portion of the bill.

The new rate structure is untested. While there is nothing intrinsically wrong with an experimental rate system, it is incumbent upon first adopters to assess the distributional implications to assure it is both fair to individual users and fair across user classes.

Fair rates become increasingly important as our water costs escalate astronomically. The costs of new surface water and wastewater treatment plants will result in our municipal utility bills being among the highest statewide.

False Peak Use Analysis

Mayor Krovoza and the Council claim that it is fair to charge the median homeowner 40% more for each gallon of water used because they say that the cost of the surface water project is dictated by “peak” summer use. Similarly, they argue that it is fair to charge one household less per gallon than its neighbor year round if that household can afford an extended summer vacation. This “peak use” argument is based on false assumptions.

First, the City claimed that we needed the surface water project for reasons that have NOTHING to do with peak use, such as “securing river water rights”, “improving water quality”, and “complying with new salinity and selenium standards”. In fact, city consultants proved that we could have achieved all necessary current goals — including meeting peak capacity — without the project. And Council acknowledged that further downsizing of the treatment plant would not significantly decrease total project costs.

There is simply no justification for shifting the costs of this massive project disproportionately to any category of user.

Cost Penalty Won’t Enhance Conservation

Given the extraordinary water costs that we will soon be paying under any rate system, there will be huge incentive for water conservation without this massive extra penalty. And since everyone will adjust to the high water costs by conserving, conservation won’t bring significant savings to ratepayers because rates will have to rise to pay for the fixed costs.

Ratepayers Will Pay More

The City Council has made the incorrect claim that 2/3 of people will be paying less under this new system (when compared to the equally unfair Bartle-Wells rates). This false claim relies on the assumption that big summer irrigators like the City, school district, and some large-lot neighborhoods will pay massively more. Council knows, however, that these users are planning to opt out of irrigation by digging their own wells, further shifting the costs back to remaining ratepayers. Thus, most people will actually be paying far more since this opting out has not been calculated into the current rate estimates.

The City’s calculations also assume substantial future growth, and assume that the future subdivisions will use the same amount of summer water as existing homes. But because of this new rate structure, new subdivisions are also likely to opt out of irrigation by digging their own wells.

So by using the summer-based rate system, the city is virtually forcing our largest ratepayers, which include some large lot neighborhoods, the City itself and future new subdivisions, to dig expensive private wells for irrigation. This will leave existing residential users and existing businesses to subsidize the indoor water of those who opt out. Yes — existing ratepayers will probably end up subsidizing indoor water use of new subdivisions.

Rate Structure’s Unintended Consequences

The Council has claimed that it is environmentally preferable for large irrigators to opt out and kick the costs back to the remaining ratepayers because “potable water should not be used for irrigation”. But shallow wells are salty wells, so irrigating with these wells causes more saline run-off polluting our streams and rivers. And according to City-hired consultants, shallow wells are the ones that cause subsidence (not the deep wells the City has been using). Yet salinity pollution and subsidence risk were two main reasons given by Council for undertaking the extraordinarily expensive surface water project in the first place! Economically and environmentally, it is crucial not to price our major irrigators out of the market.

Project Cost Reductions Overstated

We expect no major water cost relief from the touted water project cost reductions. The reductions are exaggerated; some, like the low interest State loans, are not likely to materialize because the City Council chose to privatize the operations, and some involve sleight of hand, i.e., shifting capital costs over to operations and maintenance.

The Councils’ last minute 8% rate reduction does nothing to address the fact that single family homes are paying 40% more, and that major irrigators are being forced out of the system. And it is just an optimistic guess; if the cost of providing service is higher, rates will have to rise to cover costs.

Finally, no dire consequences will result from the passage of Measure P, as claimed by Council and staff. This is the usual scare tactics. The only thing that will result from a very short delay is a fairer rate structure.

Whether or not you believe that there were less expensive ways to responsibly manage our water needs (full disclosure: we do), the Council has chosen this course, and it is incumbent upon our City Council and the Council alone to come up with rates that don’t unfairly penalize ANY user group.

Please vote Yes on Measure P.

Sue Greenwald is a former Mayor of Davis and served on the City Council for twelve years

Mark Siegler served as Vice Chair of the City of Davis Water Advisory Committee and he is a Professor of Economics at Sacramento State

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Name Droppers MASTER FILE

By
December 20, 2013 | Leave Comment

Two UC Davis students have received scholarships as part of the Merck Animal Health Veterinary Student Scholarship Program. A total of $100,000 is being awarded to 20 students.

Through a partnership with the American Veterinary Medical Foundation, the program recognizes outstanding second- and third-year students who are pursuing careers in large animal and companion animal medicine.

UCD’s winners are:

Tracy Huang, from Bangkok, Thailand, is a third-year student. Following graduation in June 2015, she plans to pursue a career in animal welfare advocacy in rural and low-income communities.

She holds a bachelor of science in biochemistry/cell biology from UC San Diego, and master of science in vision science from UC Berkeley. She is co-president of the International Veterinary Outreach, a nonprofit organization that provides veterinary care to rural communities in Nicaragua.

Eric Nickerson, from Anaheim, is a second-year student. Following graduation in May 2016, he plans to pursue an internship and residency in small animal cardiology.

During undergraduate studies, Nickerson worked as a veterinary technician at the Veterinary Specialty Hospital in San Diego and a research assistant in respiratory physiology at UC San Diego. He also participated in ecological field studies research at the University of Queensland, Australia.

He holds a bachelor of science in ecology, behavior and evolution from UC San Diego. He represents UCD as the student American Veterinary Medical Association delegate and is the student representative for the Sacramento Valley Veterinary Medical Association.

“These students are our future visionaries and will become the backbone of the veterinary profession,” said Norman Stewart, D.V.M., livestock technical services manager for Merck Animal Health. “Through this program, we are reinforcing our long-standing commitment to education, personal development and the science of healthier animals. It also allows us to help support the cost of veterinary education, as well as recognize and celebrate, the next generation of leaders.”

More than 800 students from 13 veterinary schools accredited through the AVMA applied for the scholarships. Award recipients were selected based on academic excellence, financial need, leadership and area of interest within the profession.

————

Patrick Henning of West Sacramento was appointed director of the California Employment Development Department.

Henning has been chief deputy appointments secretary in the Office of Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. since 2011.

He was a legislative advocate for the California State Council of Laborers from 2004 to 2011, assistant secretary for legislation and intergovernmental affairs at the California Labor and Workforce Development Agency from 2003 to 2004 and deputy director for legislation at the California Department of Industrial Relations from 2000 to 2003.

Henning was a member of the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission from 2005 to 2011, a member of the California Career Technical Education Standards and Framework Advisory Group in 2003 and a member of the California State Assembly Speaker’s Commission on Labor Education from 2001 to 2010.

This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $150,112.

————

Emily Darby, Dillon Dong and Hannah Wyment-Steele, of the Class of 2015, have been awarded Barry M. Goldwater Scholarships, which provide up to $7,500 per year for educational expenses to sophomores and juniors intending to pursue careers in mathematics, natural sciences or engineering. They were selected from a field of 1,166 students nominated by their colleges.

Emily Darby, a chemistry major with a math minor, has studied atmospheric chemistry with Prof. Frederick Grieman since her sophomore year. She is currently working on an independent research project studying the electronic spectroscopy of molecular ions to better understand the reaction pathways in the atmosphere so that a more comprehensive model of the atmosphere can be developed.

Last summer, Darby conducted solar energy research at Vanderbilt University through a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU). She was the primary researcher and sole undergraduate on a project entitled Photoactive Films of Photosystem I on Transparent Reduced Graphene Oxide Electrodes. The team submitted an article to the journal Langmuir, and, if it is accepted, she will be listed as first author.

In addition to her research, Darby is a mentor with Pomona’s High Achievement Program, a teaching assistant for the organic chemistry lab and a math and chemistry tutor for two to five elementary through high school students each year.

Her future plans include earning a Ph.D. in chemical engineering with an emphasis on alternative energy, then becoming a faculty member at a research university while continuing research in alternative energy that is sustainable and efficient.

Darby is a resident of Davis, Calif, and the daughter of Jeannie Darby. She attributes her early interest in chemistry to her “wonderful high school chemistry teacher, Mr. van Muyden.”

Dillon Dong, a physics and math double major, has conducted astronomy research since the second semester of his freshman year, when he worked with Prof. Phil Choi on the Pomona College Adaptive Optics Instrument. The next summer, with Choi’s help, he became a research assistant at Carnegie Observatories working with Dr. Eric Murphy on the Star Formation in Radio Survey (SFRS).

This summer he will be working with Murphy characterizing the far-infrared spectral energy distribution of galaxy halos as part of the Herschel Edge on Galaxy Survey (HEDGES). He will also be collaborating with Kristina Nyland, from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, on “a 5GHz observation using the VLA of the likely AGN host galaxy NGC1266 and using that observation along with SFRS data and archival VLA data to make spectral aging, index and curvature maps of NGC1266′s massive molecular outflow.”

Post-Pomona, Dong plans to earn a Ph.D. in astrophysics and become a physics/astronomy professor. A resident of San Francisco, he is the son of Allan Dong and Liping Dong. He attended Lowell High School, where he says, his “physics teachers, Mr. Dickerman and Mr. Shapiro, were the first people to really spark my interest in physics. Prof. Phil Choi really helped spark my interest in astronomy in particular.”

Hannah Wayment-Steele, a math and chemistry double major, has been a member of Prof. Mal Johal’s lab since her first year at Pomona, working on projects ranging from biological physics to inorganic materials. She recently submitted a manuscript on dye desorption from semiconductors, “for the purposes of improving the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells,” and is currently using molecular dynamics simulations and the Quartz-Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation instrument (QCM-D) to study the detrimental effects of aluminum ions on lipid membranes.

She has also conducted research with Dr. Sofia Svedhem in the Biological Physics Department of the Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, and will return this summer funded by the Beckman scholarship.

Wayment-Steele credits Johal and Dr. Lewis Johnson, a post-doc in the Johal lab, for providing the rich experiences that made her decide on a research career. “They have been outstanding mentors, providing endless support and helping me gain valuable experience: I’ve given oral presentations on my work at the SPIE Optics & Photonics Conference and the American Vacuum Society National Symposium, traveled internationally to conduct research, and submitted papers on which I am the first author.”

Wayment-Steele plans to earn a Ph.D. in biophysics or materials science. Her ultimate goal is to be a professor with her own research group, using computational techniques to help develop bio-nanomaterials for medical applications. A resident of Flagstaff, Arizona, Wayment-Steele is the daughter of Heidi Wayment and Craig Steele.

————

Kurt Snipes, PhD was appointed by the California Division of the American Cancer Society to be its President of the Board of Directors for 2014.

Dr. Snipes is a graduate of the University of California, Irvine and received his master’s and doctorate degrees from the University of California, Davis.

Dr. Snipes will help guide objectives that assist the Society’s more than 300,000 California volunteers in creating a world with less cancer and more birthdays by helping people stay well, get well, by finding cures and by fighting back.

Dr. Snipes has been a volunteer leader with the Society in California for over 12 years. He is currently chief of the Cancer Surveillance and Research Branch for the California Department of Public Health.

————

Sophomores Alexandra R. Barbaria and Erin C. Leary and junior William M. Young made the Scholastic Honor Roll Winter term at Oregon State University.

To be on the Honor Roll, students must carry at least 12 graded hours of course work and receive a grade point average of 3.5 or better.

 ————
Shannon Booth, a 1979 graduate of Davis High School, was named instructor of the year at Castle School in Newbury, U.K.
Castle School is solely a school for special needs students, where Booth is an Assistant Head.
 ————

The UC Davis Donald A. Strauss Foundation awarded Anna Peare a $10,000 public service scholarship to carry out project in her junior year.

The Strauss scholarships fund public-service projects that the students have proposed and will carry out during their junior or senior year. Peare, who hails from Lafayette, will be running the Amigos de las Américas: Backyard Program, a project that aims to give youth of all backgrounds the opportunity to become catalysts for positive development and change in their own community.

 ————

Twyla Thompson of Woodland is one of four Northern California women who have been selected as recipients of the 2014 Common Threads Award. They will be honored during a luncheon and awards ceremony Thursday, April 24, at the UC Davis.

All of the honorees have past or present roots in agriculture and have shown outstanding involvement in the agricultural industry for many years. They also have made positive impacts by actively giving back to their communities and participating in philanthropic endeavors.

The luncheon and awards ceremony will be held in the Activities and Recreation Center Ballroom of the UC Davis campus from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Registration for the event will begin at 11 a.m.

Tickets cost $49 each for advance registration or $60 each at the door.  To register in advance, contact the Butte Agriculture Foundation at (530) 370-3879 or colleen@buttefarmbureau.com

  ————
The Woodland Healthcare Foundation Board of Trustees has named two new members: retired Woodland Clinic physician Jim McGibbon, MD, and Woodland realtor Jan Whittle. McGibbon joined the board in February; Whittle joined in March.

McGibbon spent his entire career as an obstetrics and gynecology physician with Woodland Clinic, retiring twelve years ago after twenty-eight years of service. In addition to his involvement with the board of trustees, McGibbon is actively involved with the Woodland Rotary and Holy Rosary Church, as well as volunteering with the UC Davis School of Medicine, interviewing applicants for admission.

Whittle, has co-owned Whittle & Associates Property management with her husband, Mahlon, since 1998. In addition to her new role as a Trustee, Whittle has served on the Board of Directors for Woodland United Way, where she is a past president and 1999’s Volunteer of the Year, and on the board of Court Appointed Special Advocates.

  ————

Cherie Schroeder, program director at Woodland Community College’s Foster Kinship Care & Education program was honored with First 5 Yolo’s High 5 Award for Excellence at the commission meeting Wednesday, April 9.

The First 5 Yolo Children and Families Commission gives this special award when an individual or funded provider has created exceptional outcomes for young children and their families in Yolo County.

Under Schroeder’s direction, the WCC FKCE has become recognized as a statewide leader with measurable results in increasing the quality and quantity of licensed foster and kinship homes in Yolo County.

————

Katherine A. Rauen, professor in the Department of Pediatrics and a physician-scientist affiliated with the UC Davis MIND Institute and UC Davis Children’s Hospital, on April 15 received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) at a ceremony in Washington, D.C.

White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Director John Holdren was the keynote speaker for the event, held in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Jefferson Auditorium. Agency officials, friends and relatives of the 102 award recipients attended the event. Afterward the recipients were greeted at the White House by President Barack Obama, who thanked them for their outstanding achievements.

PECASE award recipients are selected from among individuals who either are funded or employed by federal departments and agencies. The National Institutes of Health honored Rauen for her studies on the role of germline mutations in the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway on skeletal myogenesis. She is one of 35 awardees acknowledged through their association with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and one of the 20 National Institutes of Health honorees. She is one of only eight recipients in the University of California system.

Rauen is an internationally respected leader in the study of the Ras/MAPK pathway genetic syndromes, and coined the term “RASopathies.” Ras/MAPK regulates cell growth, which is critical for normal fetal development and, when dysregulated, can cause cancer. She earned her master’s degree in human physiology and her doctorate in genetics at UC Davis. She earned her medical degree at UC Irvine and completed residency training in pediatrics and a fellowship in medical genetics at UC San Francisco.

 ————

Robin Harlan, Winters resident and business owner, joined the Yolo Farm to Fork board of directors.

The nonprofit is dedicated to bringing locally grown farm-fresh food to school lunches, reducing solid waste through recycling and composting programs, supporting school and community gardens and helping Yolo County residents get to know where their food comes from and the farmers who grow it.

Today, Harlan and her husband Henry, who is a beekeeper, own Henry’s Bullfrog Bees and PURE All Natural Honey, producing and bottling raw all natural honey from bees they have placed throughout Yolo, Sacramento, Solano, Colusa, Petaluma, Bodega Bay, and the San Francisco Delta.

————

Professor James R. Carey of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, is the 2014 recipient of the C. W. Woodworth Award from the Pacific Branch of the Entomological Society of America for his accomplishments in entomology spanning four decades.

Carey, a member of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology faculty since 1980, focuses his work on research, publications, teaching, public service, editorial service, committee work and video innovations.
Carey is the ninth UC Davis recipient of the award since 1978. He chaired the systemwide UC Committee on Research Policy, served on the system-wide UC Academic Council and is a former vice chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology.

————

Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor of entomology received the 2014 Distinguished Award for Systematics, Evolution, and Biodiversity at the 98th annual PBESA meeting, held recently in Tucson, Ariz.

Kimsey received her doctorate in entomology in 1979 from UC Davis and joined the entomology faculty in 1989. Known by her colleagues as “The Wasp Woman,” Kimsey is one of only a few scientists in the world who can identify chrysidid or tiphiid wasps to species.

Her primary research focuses on resolving global patterns of evolution in the wasp family Tiphiidae, which includes eight subfamilies. A second project is to understand the insect diversity of California and how it fits into local and global patterns of biodiversity. In 2001 Kimsey brought the California Insect Survey (CIS) to UC Davis, and is now editor of the Bulletin of the California Insect Survey.

Kimsey built the Bohart Museum of Entomology into a world-class museum; today it houses a global collection of nearly eight million insect specimens in its quarters in 1124 Academic Surge on Crocker Lane, UC Davis campus. It is the seventh largest insect museum in North America and the home of the California Insect Survey.

Kimsey, former vice chair and interim chair of the Department of Entomology, serves as the executive director of the Bohart Museum Society, a community support group for the museum; founder and director of the Center for Biosystematics at UC Davis; and head of informal campus groups, the Association of Biological Collections and Biodiversity Consortium.

————

Diane Ullman of the UC Davis  is the recipient of the 2014 Distinguished Award in Teaching from the Pacific Branch, Entomological Society of America.

Ullman, a UC Davis professor of entomology is the associate dean for undergraduate academic programs, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and co-founder and co-director of the UC Davis Art/Science Fusion Program.

Pacific Branch will now advance her as its candidate for the ESA’s international Distinguished Teaching Award. ESA will select the recipient from one of six branches—Pacific, Eastern, North Central, Southeastern, Southwestern and International—and present the award at its Nov. 16-19 meeting in Portland, Ore.

Ullman excels at developing new courses, programs and teaching methods, using traditional and non-traditional means. She employs a unique multidisciplinary approach to teaching.

One example of her type of teaching is The Art/Science Fusion Program, developed initially in the Department of Entomology and Nematology, is an innovative teaching program that crosses college boundaries and uses experiential learning to enhance scientific literary for students from all disciplines.

The Art/Science Fusion Program drew praise for its robust collaboration with the UC Davis Arboretum and its work with the GATEways (Gardens, Art and the Environment) Project, a campuswide project aimed at increased accessibility to UC Davis and its academic enterprise. One of her most visible and “wow!” projects is the 2,500 pound mosaic art, Nature’s Gallery, showcasing the interaction of insects and plants. A product of her ENT 001 class and community outreach, it was displayed at the U.S. Botanical Garden in Washington D.C. and at the California State Fair and is now permanently installed in the UC Davis Arboretum.

————

Air Force Airman 1st Class Brendan D. Tarbett graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas.

The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills.

Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

Tarbett is the son of Doug Tarbett of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and June Taylor of Dixon, California.

————

Three UC Davis faculty members working in diverse fields were elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Margaret W. Ferguson, professor of English, Robert Huckfeldt, professor of political science, and John C. Wingfield, professor and endowed chair in physiology, joined the academy, one of the nation’s oldest academic societies and independent policy research centers. Their election was announced Wednesday, April 23.

Ferguson has published extensively in the areas of Renaissance literature, literacy studies and feminist theory and is president of the Modern Language Association. At UC Davis since 2007, she has won fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and American Council of Learned Societies.

A member of the National Council of Teachers of English, she is particularly interested in how the Common Core Standards implemented by most states will impact writing and reading education.

Huckfeldt focuses on political participation and decision-making among citizens within networks of social and political communication. With support from the National Science Foundation, he has carried out studies of urban neighborhoods, national and cross-national election studies, experimental studies and agent based simulations of political processes. At UC Davis since 2003, he is a former chair of the Department of Political Science and former director of both the UC Center Sacramento and Institute of Governmental Affairs.

Wingfield’s research examines neural pathways in birds to understand the effects of seasonality and environmental stress. His work provides insights into conservation biology and how animals deal with global climate change and endocrine disruption. He has been at UC Davis since 2007 and serves as assistant director for biological sciences at the National Science Foundation.

UC Davis is now represented in the American Academy by 27 current and emeritus faculty.

Members contribute to academy publications and studies of science and technology policy, energy and global security, social policy and American institutions, and the humanities, arts and education.

————

Tyler Benjamin Finley is a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from the US Air Force Academy and a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Air Force on May 28, 2014.  He has been selected for pilot training at Laughlin Air Force Base in Del Rio, Texas.  Tyler graduated from Davis High School in 2010 and is the son of Bruce and Debbie Finley.

————

Laura Ferris, a master of fine arts student in creative writing at the University of Iowa, will pursue a project abroad thanks in part to a $2,500 Stanley Award for International Research.

Ferris, originally from Davis, CA, will travel to Paris, France, and Zürich, Switzerland, to find missing text in order to recreate a lost Lucia Joyce novel.

Funded by the Stanley-University of Iowa Foundation Support Organization, the Stanley Awards send UI undergraduate and graduate students to locations around the world. Student spend at least four weeks abroad pursuing projects they couldn’t conduct on campus.

This year, 24 students received the awards.

————

— Do you know of someone who has won an award or accomplished something noteworthy? Send it, preferably by email, to newsroom@davisenterprise.net, or to Name Droppers, The Davis Enterprise, P.O. Box 1470, Davis, CA 9561

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Martineau oped

By Belinda Martineau
Senate Bill 1381 affirms the right of California consumers to make informed purchasing decisions

I have great respect for the science that Kent Bradford and many other plant scientists at UC Davis have dedicated their lives to, including use of the tool of genetic engineering in efforts to understand and improve crop plants. Genetic engineering is a very powerful biotechnology that is being used to further our understanding of how genes and biochemical pathways work and how plants and other creatures develop and respond to their environments. We still have much to learn about these processes and I support utilizing genetic engineering to help us do so.
Not only a supporter of genetic engineering for research, I was also an early adopter of commercially available genetically engineered (GE) foods. I fed GE Flavr SavrTM tomatoes to my child back when they first hit the market in May of 1994. I and other early adopters purchased so many of those tomatoes, despite (because of?) the fact that they were clearly labeled “GROWN FROM GENETICALLY MODIFIED SEEDS,” that the company producing them—Davis’ own Calgene, Inc.— couldn’t keep up with demand.
But not everybody is an early adopter. And some people just don’t like the idea of eating the insecticides produced in some GE foods, no matter how safe they may be for humans. Other people don’t like the fact that vastly more glyphosate is being sprayed on vastly more (tens of millions of acres) of this country because some GE crops—and now many “super” weeds—are impervious to it; nor do they like the ag biotech industry’s solution to this superweed problem…engineering crops to be impervious to additional pesticides that are more noxious than glyphosate. Still others, for their various other reasons, are simply not as enthusiastic about GE foods as scientists like Dr. Bradford who are using genetic engineering in their own labs.
And this is America. Shouldn’t we all have the right to make our own decisions, based on whatever information we find compelling, about the food we purchase in grocery stores to feed to our families?
I think we should. That’s why I support SB 1381, the bill introduced by Senator Noreen Evans (D-Santa Rosa) which states that “California consumers have the right to know through labeling, whether the foods they purchase were produced with genetic engineering, so they can make informed purchasing decisions.”
What SB 1381 addresses is the downright un-American status quo that denies American citizens the choice to decide for themselves whether to purchase foods produced using a new, powerful but imperfect technology. Consumers in 64 other countries can already make that decision; the food industries in those countries (and in the U.S. when preparing foods for export) already handle the logistics required to label GE foods; doing the same for foods sold in the good ‘ole U. S. of A., should be a slam dunk.
SB 1381 calls for foods sold in California retail stores to carry simple labels, “Genetically Engineered” or “Produced Using Genetic Engineering” or “Partially Produced Using Genetic Engineering”—not very different from the one used on Flavr Savr tomatoes, starting in 2016. There is absolutely nothing “misleading” about such labels; and just as the label on Calgene’s GE tomato wasn’t “scary-sounding” or a “de facto warning” these need not be either.
SB 1381 does not call for “forcing products to be repackaged or remade with higher priced ingredients” as suggested by Dr. Bradford and, therefore, the purported increase to the yearly food bill of the average California family is an obfuscation of this issue (just as it was with regard to Proposition 37 in 2012).
Nor is “scientific justification” a prerequisite for food labeling in this country. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration currently requires food producers to include “water” among the ingredients on a food label if water was, in fact, added to the food. Science is also not the issue with Country Of Origin Labels (COOL) now in use in the United States. These labels provide information, not scientific justification, and the labels required by SB 1381 would do the same.
SB 1381 is simply about giving California consumers more information about their potential food purchases and, as Senator Lois Wolk said about this bill at the State Senate Health Committee meeting last month, there is “nothing wrong with labelling.” Senator Wolk went on to make it clear that she does not support “incentives” that could lead to “mischief” (frivolous lawsuits) and has discussed with Senator Evans ways to limit anyone taking advantage of SB 1381 to cause such mischief. When it came time to vote on the bill, Senator Wolk commended the language that limits incentives (e.g. “The court shall not award monetary damages” only “reasonable attorneys’ fees and costs” to a prevailing plaintiff) and provides an opportunity for “cure” prior to a lawsuit being filed in the first place; thus reassured, Senator Wolk voted “aye” on SB 1381. I’m therefore confident that any putative litigious “mischief” associated with this labeling law is being duly anticipated and mitigated by our fine state senators.
The fact that Dr. Bradford defends genetic engineering is certainly understandable. He has dedicated his “entire career to agricultural biotechnology and plant science….” But his defense is misplaced. The evidence does not support his claim that mandating labels on GE foods “would greatly impede the cutting-edge research [he and others] are conducting here at UC Davis….” Cutting-edge research using genetic engineering, like that being done at UC Davis, is still being carried out in many (I dare say most) of those 64 countries that now require GE foods to be labeled.
And Calgene’s Flavr Savr tomato, the only example we have of a GE food labeled as such in the U.S., doesn’t support Dr. Bradford’s claim that “SB 1381 would effectively ban the sale” of GE foods either. Those tomatoes sold like hotcakes; Bert Gee, the owner of Davis’ State Market, resorted to limiting customers to the purchase of two Flavr Savr tomatoes per day back in 1994.
Perhaps most inventors and scientists are early adopters. But that doesn’t give them the right to force the rest of us to buy their inventions. This is America. The market, comprised of individual consumers, is supposed to decide whether a new product is successful or not. In poll after poll, a majority of American consumers indicates they want GE foods labeled, they want to have a choice about whether to purchase these new inventions or not.
Kudos to Senator Evans for introducing SB 1381 so that Californians might, after the nearly two decades since the GE Flavr Savr tomato was first introduced into commerce, again have that choice.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Pediatrician at CommuniCare

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

i Debbie,
I hope you are enjoying the wonderful Spring weather! I sure am (when I get a chance to get away from my desk)!

I am hoping you might find a use for the following article about our new pediatrician. I have also attached a photo to accompany the article.
Thanks as always for your support and the support of the Enterprise. It continues to be valued and appreciated greatly!

CommuniCare Health Centers Welcomes New Pediatrician

April 24, 2014 —
CommuniCare Health Centers has welcomed pediatrician Dr. Sharon Sevilla-Bodine to its staff. Dr. Sevilla-Bodine will be providing pediatric care for patients at CommuniCare’s Davis Community Clinic and the new Hansen Family Health Center in Woodland.
Dr. Sevilla-Bodine received her medical degree from the Faculty of Medicine and Surgery at the University of Santo Tomas in Manila, Philippines and did her post-graduate internship at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at New York Medical College, Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla, New York. Dr. Sevilla-Bodine is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics.
“As a pediatrician, I focus not only in treating sick infants and children, but in providing preventive care
to ensure that our children will have a healthy start in life,” says Dr. Sevilla-Bodine. “I look at every encounter as an opportunity to make a small difference in a child’s life”
Prior to joining CommuniCare Health Centers, Dr. Sevilla-Bodine provided care at Community Health Centers of the Central Coast in Santa Maria, California and at Wakefield Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine in Raleigh, North Carolina. Dr. Sevilla-Bodine is also fluent in Tagalog and Spanish. “CommuniCare’s goal of maintaining long term healing relationships with their patients resonated well with me,” says Dr. Sevilla-Bodine of joining the staff at CommuniCare. “One of the unique qualities that the CommuniCare organization has is their commitment to offer comprehensive health care services regardless of one’s ability to pay,” she says of joining CommuniCare’s staff. “This allows providers such as me to be able to focus on providing the best care possible to the people that we serve.”
About CommuniCare Health Centers: CommuniCare Health Centers is a Federally Qualified Health Center providing health care to those in need since 1972. CommuniCare offers comprehensive primary medical and dental services, perinatal services, behavioral health services, substance abuse treatment, health education and outreach services to the culturally diverse, low-income, uninsured and underinsured residents of the Yolo County area, including migrant and seasonal farm workers and their families. CommuniCare’s services are offered through our clinic sites in Davis, Woodland, West Sacramento, and Esparto. More information is available on the web at www.communicarehc.org.
###

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

A fair judge

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

I have not met commissioner Beronio in person. So, my endorsement for her is based only on my experience in her court room. I had a driving citation contested before commissioner Janene Beronio, long time ago.  Regardless of an exhausting long list of cases before my turn, she was very fair, pleasant and courteous. She is a fair Judge.

Hamza El-Nakhal
Davis

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Classical Guitar series continues with composer/guitarist Ross Thomson

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

The Davis Arts Center’s Classical Guitar series continues on Friday (May 16) at 8 p.m. with a concert by English-born composer and guitarist Ross Thompson.

Thompson, who teaches at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, has performed internationally as a soloist and has been invited by a number of festivals and schools to perform and teach including the International Festival of Contemporary Classical Music (Lima, Peru FIMCCL), Leo Kestenberg Musickschule Berlin Tempelhof-Schoneberg (Germany), Mozarteum of Uruguay (Montevideo), Seoul National University (South Korea), National Conservatory of Music (Patagonia, Argentina), Peruvian North American Cultural Institute (ICPNA), San Francisco Performances (USA) and the national Conservatory of Peru.  Thompson is also a first prizewinner of the American String Teachers Association National Competition.  His print music catalog includes over 500 pages of original compositions and a discography of 5 recordings.  During his student days, Thompson completed his postgraduate work at the Royal College of Music in London. For more information about Thompson, visit rossthompson.com.

The concert is “family friendly” and tickets are $15 general, $10 students/seniors, $5 children 12 and under, available at the door starting at 7:30 p.m. or online at davisartscenter.org. The Davis Arts Center is located at 1919 F St.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Ads are for real: Buick gets double takes

By
From page A9 | April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

The television ads where neighbors, friends and family can’t identify a new car as a Buick are true to life.

The attractive styling on a 2014 Buick Regal test car so stumped admirers, many could not believe it was a Buick. The common question was, “What kind of car is that?” — even as they stared at the Buick and Regal badges.

Still others couldn’t believe the 2014 Regal only has four-cylinder engines. In fact, a newly improved, direct injected, turbocharged four cylinder is offered on every trim level for 2014 and delivers a commendable 259 horsepower and 295 foot-pounds of torque.

2014 Buick Regal GS AWD

Base price: $29,690 for base Regal FWD; $31,560 for Premium I FWD; $31,865 for base Regal AWD; $33,735 for Premium I AWD; $33,760 for Premium II FWD; $35,935 for Premium II AWD; $36,905 for GS FWD; $39,270 for GS AWD

Price as tested: $44,275

Type: Front-engine, all-wheel drive, five-passenger, mid-size sedan

Engine: 2-liter, turbocharged/intercooled, double overhead cam, direct injection, inline four cylinder

Mileage: 19 mpg (city), 27 mpg (highway)

Length: 190.2 inches

Wheelbase: 107.8 inches

Curb weight: 3,981 pounds

Built at: Oshawa, Ontario, Canada

Options: Driver confidence package #2 (includes adaptive cruise control, automatic collision preparation) $1,695; power moonroof $1,000; driver confidence package No. 1 (includes forward collision alert, rear cross traffic alert, lane departure warning, memory settings for front seats and outside mirrors) $890; Crystal Red tintcoat exterior paint $495

Destination charge: $925

Subtly restyled with new light-emitting diode headlights and infotainment display for 2014, the Regal can come with front- or all-wheel drive. New safety features, such as cross traffic alert when the vehicle is backing up out of a parking space, are added to the equipment offerings. Plus, every Regal includes two years/24,000 miles of free scheduled maintenance.

Best of all, the 2014 Regal earned top, five out of five stars overall in federal government crash testing.

It’s also a recommended buy of Consumer Reports magazine where predicted reliability is average.

Starting manufacturer’s suggested retail price, including destination charge, is $30,615 for a base, front-wheel drive, 2014 Regal with 259-horsepower, turbo four cylinder and six-speed automatic. The lowest starting price for a 2014 Regal with all-wheel drive is $32,790, or $2,175 more. And the top, Regal GS has a starting retail price of $40,195 for 2014. But it does not include a power moonroof. That’s $1,000 extra.

Competitors include other premium, front-wheel drive sedans with four-cylinder engines.

As an example, the 2014 Acura TSX sedan has a starting MSRP, including destination charge, of $31,620 with 201-horsepower four cylinder and automatic transmission. The TSX, however, is not available with all-wheel drive.

Meantime, the front-wheel drive, 2014 Volvo S60 with 240-horsepower, turbocharged four cylinder and automatic transmission has a starting retail price of $34,225. The lowest starting MSRP, including destination charge, for a 2014 S60 with all-wheel drive is $35,725.

The Regal tester, a top-of-the-line GS AWD model with six-speed automatic, looked good in its tasteful Crystal Red Tintcoat paint and 19-inch alloy wheels. The car had a rich appearance and was visually interesting even on the sides, where door panels have an attractive sculpting line.

Fit and finish on the test car was excellent, too, with gaps between exterior metal body panels small in size and well aligned.

The car impressed with its quiet passenger compartment and overall handling, no matter which of three drive control modes it was in.

In standard drive control, the ride was the most compliant for daily commutes or leisurely weekend drives. It was definitely not harsh but still felt well-controlled.

The GS mode setting — activated by a button near the top of the dashboard — made the throttle more responsive, stiffened the ride and increased the steering effort needed. This setting worked well to manage body lean of the car as it traveled twisty mountain roads. The increased steering effort fit well, too, with the well-sized and tactilely pleasing steering wheel.

In between standard and GS drive settings is a sport mode with its own button on the dashboard. But in the test car, it wasn’t easy to notice much change in this middle setting, and the test car spent much of its time in standard or GS.

The Regal’s 2-liter, direct injected turbocharged four cylinder engine worked so smoothly, some passengers didn’t recognize a turbo was under the hood. Power was strong and steady, with just a hint of a lag as maximum torque of 295 foot-pounds hit by 2,500 rpm. The peppy, yet refined performance is good, considering the Regal GS AWD weighs nearly 4,000 pounds. Buick reports this model has a 6.8-second time from 0 to 60 miles per hour.

The 2014 Regal GS FWD with six-speed manual transmission — yes, Buick offers a manual on the Regal — is fastest, with a 6.2-second time.

Fuel economy isn’t as high as might be expected in this mid-size sedan. The federal government rates a 2014 Regal GS AWD model with automatic at just 19 miles per gallon in city driving and 27 mpg on the highway. The test car averaged 18 mpg in city driving and not quite 24 mpg on the highway with a lot of spirited driving.

Premium fuel is suggested but not required, and the Regal’s 18-gallon fuel tank — which can provide a combined city/highway range of less than 400 miles — can cost nearly $70 to fill with mid-range gasoline at today’s prices.

At less than 16 feet long from bumper to bumper, the Regal feels right sized, and the tester was agile and easy to park.

The back seat, with 37.3 inches of legroom and 36.8 inches of headroom, looks smaller than it is. Smaller stature adults at the outboard seat positions back there found decent space for feet and legs if front seats were moved up a bit on their tracks. The middle spot, however, is tight when three adults are back there. And the middle person has to contend with a sizable hump in the floor.

Trunk space in the Regal is 14.2 cubic feet, just a tad more than the 14 cubic feet in the TSX.

The 2014 Regal with automatic transmission is among the General Motors Co. vehicles recalled this month because a cable in the transmission may disengage from the shift lever. If this occurs, the driver may be unable to put the Regal into “park,” creating the risk the car could roll away.

 

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

After a series of scandals that led to the suspensions of three Democratic senators, and what Krovoza sees as “a general malaise about the effectiveness of government,” he says that voters want “ a smart, functioning government that puts policy and the people over politics.”

One way to do that, he says, is make decisions rooted in facts, not politics.

“My day job, what I’ve been doing for the last 17 years, has been working with faculty and graduate students on clean transportation and energy policy. Our goal is to transfer kind of right thinking policies to the legislature. I want to do that in spades.

“The University of California, not just Davis, is the research arm of the state of California, so we need to make sure that there are more mechanisms for getting good analysis and good policy recommendations out of UC and into the state of California.”

Krovoza said that he talks to voters about making tough choices during the recession. The city reduced staffing by 23 percent over six years, but has maintained and in some cases increased service, he says.

On education, Krovoza touts his 17 years at UCD, his service on the California Student Aid Commission, his time as a community college student trustee.

Krovoza said that there needs to be protections on the UC and California State University budget, similar to the way that Prop. 98 guarantees a portion will go to K-14 education.

“When times get tight, then, K-14 is protected but higher education — UC, CSU — are not,” he said. “This is part of what’s causing high student fees. When you’ve got to cut UC and CSU, the only place they can go for money is student fees and that’s reducing accessibility.”

Krovoza said he gets “a little nervous” about locking in a percentage of the budget, however. “I don’t know exactly how we’d do it,” he said.

Krovoza said that at the K-12 level, he’d seek additional funding for technical education to provide options for students who aren’t necessarily college bound and to incentivize group-based learning.

He would oppose “teaching to the test” and seek to move away from No Child Left Behind, testing to evaluate teachers and funding formulas based on test scores.

“We’re now using testing as something that we’re hanging over teachers and students in this world of teacher evaluation and such,” he said. “I support testing to help us learn how we should tweak our system, where administrators and teachers are collaborative.”

Krovoza, who has attracted Sierra Club and League of Conservation Voters endorsements, said that he would “defend staunchly” AB 32: the state’s landmark climate change law, which set the state’s goal of returning to 1990 greenhouse gas emission levels by 2020, and continue the push for increased energy from renewables.

He’d also bring a local perspective on addressing environmental issues. More than 200 cities in the state have climate action plans with little or no money to implement them.

“I’ve been part of something called the Transportation Coalition for Livable Cities,” he said. “That group is working to make sure cap and trade revenue, which is going to be enormous for the state, is pushed to the highest percent possible to local communities who can prove that their local actions will be carbon reducing. I think that that’s very powerful, and I want to continue that work in the Assembly.”

Likewise, Krovoza said that cities need help with water management.

“A community like Davis, with all of our talent and relatively good funding, still has a hard time making these assessments of exactly what’s the most effective, efficient, low-cost system,” he said.

“As I’ve travelled around the fourth Assembly district, you have cities of 5,000 people with no experts, barely a city council, and they’re supposed to figure out how to do water management? How do they hire the consultants, how do they characterize their groundwater basin, how do they do a big bidding process to get a good firm to come in? The challenges of these problems are completely swamping small communities.”

Krovoza opposes the Delta tunnels plan, supporting instead off-river storage north and south of the Delta, rather than damming rivers, and increased conservation. He is also a backer of high-speed rail.

During his tenure the city has “really reasserted our leadership” on environmental issues, including a new bike plan and transportation element for its general plan, he said.

“The water project is a spectacularly creative environmental advancement to get us off of our groundwater, to go into conjunctive use, to use low-quality well water for our parks and to buffer ourselves against all the minerals in the ground that we otherwise had to treat for,” he said.

Krovoza also cites: the city’s effort to divert 75 percent of its solid waste, conservation-oriented water rates, high efficiency standards for both the water supply and waste water treatment plants, the plastic bag bag and an anti-rodenticide resolution.

“Joe has a tremendous record that distinguishes him from public servants all over the state,” says Nicholas Josefowitz, founder of the advocacy group Leadership for a Clean Economy, which picked two Assembly candidates statewide to support (the other: Councilwoman Suja Lowenthal, D-Long Beach) in races for an open seat. “We picked people who would move the agenda forward — who would not just vote the right way but be the authors of the next great climate change legislation.”

Dodd and Schaupp have questioned whether Krovoza’s environmentalism would come before all else, including infill development and economic growth.

Dodd cites Krovoza’s vote against the Cannery, which Krovoza defends as an attempt to improve bike connectivity and increase safety by asking developers for a second grade-separated crossing.

“My environmentalism is performance-based environmentalism — it’s not command-and-control,” he says. “And so, in clean-vehicle regulations, in clean-fuel regulations, in land-use planning, what I believe in is setting up these financial incentives where we tell people, this is where we want to go, and we think you can move in that direction.”

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Tiger Scouts make a difference for the hungry

By
April 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

Special to the Enterprise

One Sunday in March, a group of Tiger Cub Scouts from Pack #496 descended on the Wildhorse neighborhood to distribute flyers to homes in an attempt to secure donations to the STEAC food bank that supports the needy in our community. The effort was part of an overall larger effort, with combined Cub, Boy, and Girl Scouts, that covered the entire city of Davis.

The following weekend, another group of the Tiger Cub Scouts, together with parents, returned to the area to collect food donations that had been left out by residents for pickup.

At the Tiger Cub Den’s recent monthly meeting, the scouts learned that the food collection was a huge success, resulting in the collection of an estimated 10,000 pounds of quality food for those in need. Just another example of the role scouts play in the community and the generosity of Davis residents.

And now Boy Scout Pack #496 is seeking new recruits for its Tiger Cub Pack next year, as the current Tiger Den will be moving up to Wolf Pack. First graders are welcome to join and experience everything scouts have to offer. This year the Tiger Cubs learned about fire, road and community safety, as well as emergency 911 dispatch procedures during visits to the UC Davis Fire Department, Safetyville in Sacramento and the Davis Police Station. They also enjoyed rock climbing, bowling, picnics, camping and hiking and the annual Pinewood Derby race car competition.

Anyone interest in participating should contact Carsonwilcox@gmail.com

Anne Ternus-Bellamy

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Students of the month

By
April 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

The Sunrise Rotary Club of Davis recently honored XX Davis, Da Vinci and King high school students as Students of the Month for May. They are:

Cathrine Deulloa is the King high student of the month for April. Catherine was nominated by several King high staff members. Cathrine was a student at King last year, she had moved to another state, only to return mid-year. This could have been a recipe for disaster, but Cathrine handled all the changes, and she is being recognized for her growth and commitment to her education.
Cathrine has a laser focus on graduation; she is working hard to complete all the requirements and is also preparing for Senior Prom. She is serious, helpful to others, and always has a smile to share.

————

There are three Rotary clubs in Davis, which meet at noon Mondays, 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays and 7 a.m. Fridays. Members provide service to their community and internationally. For more information about Rotary, contact Dennis Lindsay of the Sunrise club at dlindsay@pacbell.net, Samer Alassaad of the noon club at sameraldds@yahoo.com or Steve Boschken of the Sunset club at steve@boschken.com.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Once again, the month of May is all about bikes

By
April 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

It wouldn’t be much of a stretch to say that every month is bike month in Davis.

This is Davis after all.

But there is most certainly something about May, especially if you’re a kid.

From the annual Loopalooza, which introduces families to the Davis bike loop with activity stations and prizes, to Bike to School parades and contests, there is much fun to be had during May is Bike Month activities.

And new this year: kids who regularly bike to school may emerge from class to find bike fairies have visited the bike racks, tying special prizes to their bikes as a reward for properly locking their bicycles to the bike racks.

Even parents can look forward to special treats for encouraging their children to bike to school.

The fun kicks off on Thursday, May 1, and continues all month long.

Loopalooza is the first big event, taking place Sunday, May 4, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and once again organizers expect hundreds of Davis children and their parents to participate in a day of fun and exercise.

Stations set up along the city’s 12-mile bike loop and staffed by various community and school organizations will feature snacks, drinks, games, activities, bike safety checks, helmet fittings and much more.

Organizers note that the bike loop provides a safe route to seven of the city’s nine elementary schools and cycling the loop with parents will give children an opportunity to learn how to safely navigate getting to school on the loop.

The Davis Bicycles! schools committee has been organizing Loopalooza every May since 2010. That inaugural event attracted 173 young cyclists and their families and 61 of those youths completed the entire 12-mile loop that day. The numbers have grown ever since.

To learn more about Loopalooza, “Like” the Facebook page at: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Davis-Bicycles-Kids/437619076316712 or visit http://www.davisbicycles.org.

A few days later comes Bike to School Day, on Wednesday, May 7.

A nationwide event, Bike to School Day is organized by the National Center for Safe Routes to School, in partnership with the League of American Bicyclists, with the goal of getting communities across the country to ditch their cars and bike to school on the same day.

In Davis, a root beer float party sponsored by Whole Foods on Wednesday, May 28, awaits the school with the highest participation. All schools that use the Active4.me scan-and-notify system will be entered in the contest, with total number of kids scanning in on May 7 determining which school wins the party.

The Active4.me system allows children to scan a barcoded tag when they arrive at school each day. A computer tallies the scans and miles logged and an email or text message is sent to parents alerting them their child has arrived at school.

Currently Birch Lane, Cesar Chavez, Montgomery, North Davis, Patwin and Willett elementary schools participate in the Active4.me program. Schools not yet participating that want to, should contact Tim Starback at tim@active4.me.
Learn more about the system at http://www.active4.me.

Schools that don’t participate in Active4.me won’t be left out of the fun on May 7. A separate contest, now in its third year, will involve counting bikes in the bike racks at all schools. The elementary school and junior high school with the highest percentage of riders, including both students and staff, will receive the golden wheel trophy. Patwin and Holmes Junior High School have taken home the trophy each of the last two years.

Meanwhile, all month long the May is Bike Month “Bike Fairies” will be visiting schools, secretly leaving goodies on bikes that are properly locked up while their owners are in class. Responsible students will emerge to find Yoloberry gift cards, bike lights, bike bells, t-shirts, reflectors, and more, attached to their bikes.

And parents won’t be left out of the fun either.

Since student behavior is most likely to be modified with the support of parents and caregivers, incentives and encouragement rewards will be given to parent volunteers who run the scanning programs at local schools and prizes will be awarded to new and continuing families.

Here’s how it will work:

All new families registering to participate in the Active4.me scanning program for May is Bike Month will be eligible to win a $50 Davis Downtown gift card.

All participants riding and scanning in using Active4.me during the month of May will be entered (once for every scan) into a drawing each week to win a $25 Davis Downtown gift card. That’s one prize each week at all participating schools.

Finally, the last week in May, two families will be randomly selected as the winners of the grand prize and each will receive a $100 Davis Downtown gift card.

But families must be registered with Active4.me and scan in at school to be entered into the drawing. The more you ride and scan in, the better your chances of winning.

Other activities that will take place throughout the month include helmet fittings and decorating at all schools, as well as bike rodeos at some sites and smart cycling classes at Birch Lane and Montgomery that are open to all students.

The smart cycling classes, sponsored by the city of Davis, are for third- through sixth-graders and include instruction on smart and safe cycling techniques and etiquette. Participants will use their new knowledge to explore Davis via the city’s extensive bike trails and residential streets.

The four-week program will be offered on Tuesdays beginning May 6 at Birch Lane Elementary School, 1600 Birch Lane, and on Thursdays beginning May 8 at Montgomery Elementary School, 1441 Danbury St. The classes run from 3:15 to 4:45 p.m. and cost $40. Participants need to provide their own bike and helmet.

For more information or to sign up, visit http://www.cityofdavis.org and search winter/spring recreation guide or call 530-757-5626. Registration is also taken in person at the city’s Community Services Department at 600 A St., Suite C.

Finally, the entire community is encouraged to look at the Safe Routes to School Walk and Bike Audit results and draft maps, available at http://www.saferoutesdavis.org.

And adults looking to participate in May is Bike Month actives should check out the calendar of public events at http://bicycles.cityofdavis.org/may-is-bike-month.

Reach Anne Ternus-Bellamy at aternus@davisenterprise.net or 530-747-8051. Follow her on Twitter at @ATernusBellamy.

Anne Ternus-Bellamy

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Comics: Friday, April 25, 2014

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Faith gives hope for change from climate change

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

Woodland is a city which supports some 46 churches plus, if we are consistent with a 2013 Gallup poll, up to 35% of our 56,000 people would say they are spiritual but not religious (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiritual_but_not_religious). Add those together and it is clear, we are a people of faith. How does our faith lead us to respond to the most recent reports of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) , which warn us that we have perhaps 15 years in which to make significant reductions in our fossil fuel use if we are to keep our planet within the 2 degree Celsius temperature rise which is deemed manageable? Does faith in God mean we have to deny the science of climate change?
Katherine Hayhoe doesn’t think so. Dr. Hayhoe, on Time magazine’s 2014 list of 100 Most Influential People (http://time.com/70881/katharine-hayhoe-2014-time-100/), is a climate scientist and evangelical Christian. She has published over 100 peer-reviewed scientific papers on atmospheric science. And with her husband, who is an evangelical minister, she has written A Climate for Change: Global Warming Facts for Faith-Based Decisions.
If we think much about climate change, we can easily feel overwhelmed and disempowered. Maybe that’s why we tend to hide behind the Alcoholics Anonymous saying “Let go and let God,” then avoid thinking about it. But, Dr. Hayhoe says, God has created us with minds to make choices with. And faith gives us the hope and courage to act. She sees no conflict between being a person of faith and working to move the nation away from wasteful overconsumption and dependence on fossil fuel. We can all learn from her, as we repeat that other AA staple, Reinhold Niebuhr’s Serenity Prayer: “God, Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.”

Elisabeth Robbins
150 Freeman Street
Woodland, CA 95695
319-981-6555

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

High Speed Transportation

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

High Speed Smart Road vs California High Speed Rail Authority

The ongoing debate re: the CHSRA’s proposed fixed rail system, a nineteenth century idea, which by design, will burden all California taxpayers in perpetuity. The governors’ office has already guaranteed operational subsides that will cost the California taxpayer dearly. The now questionable federal support, the always litigious, acquisition of rights of way, combined with unpredictable future ridership, add up to a colossal and costly boondoggle, and all before the first rail is laid. I propose a public/private partnership combining the likes of Google, Apple, Tesla, etc. to redevelop SR99 into a High Speed Smart Road. The 2013 Dutch smart road experiments, video available on You Tube, demonstrate light and temperature sensitive paint design, road surfaces that can power a moving electric vehicle, while capturing airflow from passing vehicles to power lighting and signal systems. Revitalizing SR99 utilizing existing Solar and Wind Power, GPS, Cell, and UAV technologies to provide electric power, navigation, telnet communications, and security. Coupled to the smart car that drives itself, a high speed, hands free travel solution is staring us in the face. A SR99 California Smart Road Project would be a long-term job creator, benefiting all the major California cities. The road exists, the technology exists all that is required is the will. Lets move forward with a 21st century solution. This kind of innovation is California’s destiny. It’s time to think outside the box.

Jerry Coakley,
Davis, California

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Our Sunday best: ‘Experience the joy’ of Challenger Little League

By
From page A1 | April 27, 2014 | Leave Comment

Take in a game
Next game: Saturday at Vacaville
Age range: 6-17
Number of Davis players: 13
Practice: Mondays at Davis Little League
Number of Davis teams: 1 (hope to expand to 4)

As the sun began to set on a Friday night, turning the sky into various shades of orange, red and blue, the lights at the Davis Little League Complex came on, accompanied by their barely audible, but incessant buzz.

The sights and sounds at DLL were typical: the sharp ping of a bat, the cheers and words of encouragement from the crowd, the soft pop of a ball hitting a glove. And of course, there were the genuine smiles that only the game of baseball could bring.

But these sights and sounds weren’t from any ordinary Little League competition; they came from the first-ever Challenger League game at DLL.

The Challenger League was put in place for the 2014 Little League season, allowing kids with physical and/or developmental disabilities to play baseball. There’s no keeping score or competition; everybody involved is truly in it for the fun and the love of the game.

The Challenger Red Sox, the 13-person roster from Davis, travels around to neighboring Woodland, Dixon and Vacaville to play other Challenger teams. Practices are at the DLL complex every Monday. The team members’ ages range from 6-17.

“It’s awesome, it’s low-key baseball and I hit awesome,” Red Sox player Corin Shields said following the April 18 game. “Everyone is nice to everyone and it makes kids with disabilities be able to play sports like baseball.”

John Shields, Corin’s father, echoed his son’s sentiments.

“It’s been tremendous. It’s a lot of fun, everybody has a great time,” the elder Shields said. “It’s really nice that all of the kids can be out here and experience the fun and joy of baseball without any of the stress.”

The idea to begin the Challenger League came up at a District 64 board meeting a few years ago, but DLL president Paul Hasson couldn’t get enough players to field a team. He went to doctors’ offices, physical therapists and plenty of other places to recruit players, but Hasson got no response.

That all changed thanks to the work of Martha Ozonoff. As the “team mom,” who also serves on the board of Team Davis — a non-profit organization to enrich the lives of people with cognitive or physical disabilities — Ozonoff helped recruit the necessary amount of players.

“All I did was send maybe two emails to our listserv that said, ‘Hey, we need school-aged kids to play baseball,’ and we got them all pretty quickly,” Ozonoff said.

DLL president Hasson made it a priority to put the Challenger League into place this season.

“Having watched some other teams play in Vacaville and Dixon, you realize what a special program the Challenger division (is),” Hasson said. “You see the smiles on these kids faces, and I thought that Davis need(s) this.”

Hasson admits “It was kind of embarrassing that we didn’t have it here in Davis,” which motivated the DLL board to take action.

Ultimately, the Challenger League was put into place with the best interest of the players in mind.

“The goal for the entire Challenger program is for these kids. The first practice that we had, I don’t think I could hold the tears back,” an emotional Hasson said. “The kids expressed so much joy in just hitting a ball, throwing a ball, and playing baseball like the major leaguers in a uniform.”

But the Challenger Red Sox players aren’t the only people who benefit from the new league.

All Challenger Leaguers are paired with one or two buddies, current Little Leaguers who assist the players with fielding, running the bases and directing throws. During the games, buddies are all about positivity: high fives, “Great job!” and “That was awesome!” are commonly seen and heard from the buddies.

According to Hasson, there is a group of about 25-30 players who consistently help with Challenger League practices and games. Many of the buddies have had great experiences with the program so far.

“It’s great to see that (the Challenger League) is a whole organized thing,” buddy Sean O’Hara said. “Kids can play the sport that they want to play, and I’m glad that they’re having fun, because I’m having fun with them.”

Fellow buddy Brandon Folb added: “I feel fortunate for being able to help people. And I feel better as a person, knowing that I’m helping kids to be able to play baseball.”

As this is the first year of the Challenger program, Hasson hopes it will continue to grow from here. The goal for DLL in the coming years is to field at least four Challenger teams.

And as the program continues to grow, Hasson hopes that support from the Davis community will continue to grow as well.

“Anyone who enjoys baseball would love to see these kids to be out there having a good time, because that’s really what its all about,” Hasson said.

— Reach Thomas Oide at toide@davisenterprise.net. Follow him on Twitter @ReporterThomas

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Cello rock band Break of Reality to give concert at Davis High

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

The cello rock band Break of Reality will perform at Davis High School on Wednesday (May 7) at 7 p.m., appearing with the Davis High School Chamber Orchestra. There is no charge for tickets (though a $5 donation at the door is suggested, with all proceeds benefiting the Davis High music program). But you must RSVP online in order to reserve seats at http://breakofreality.com/tour

Break of Reality features three cellos and percussion, the group formed when the original members were freshmen at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. The group is now based in New York, and is known for their recording of the “Game of Thrones Theme,” which has generated more than 2.5 million views online. Break of Reality is currently on tour, visiting ten high schools around the country (including Davis High) to give workshops and promote music education. The group recently released a new album titled “Ten,” which has gotten over 20 million plays on the Pandora radio online service.

Ian Trevino, a founding member of Break of Reality, said the group is making the tour to support the kind of music programs that gave the group’s members their start. “We learned to play our instruments through public school music programs. If it weren’t for these music programs, I don’t think Break of Reality would exist today,” Trevino said.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

At the Pond: Davis after South America

BruceGallaudetW

0425ManzanaresW

UCD running back Gabe Manzanares is coming off of a huge first season for the Aggies, who will showcase their spring growth with an open scrimmage on Saturday at Aggie Stadium. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

SONY DSC

Powerful Panda Kayltin LeBar-Triebke takes a big cut during a recent Davis Youth Softball Association 6U contest. Courtesy photo

0425sacW

Republic FC’s Ivan Mirković dribbles past Mexican legend Adolfo “Bofo” Bautista in a 3-1 victory over Chivas USA Reserves earlier this season. Sacramento's home opener is Saturday at Hughes Stadium. Courtesy photo

JeanJackmanW

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

I’ve been far away on our big Pacific pond — off on a South American adventure.

Imagine standing next to two almost-3-foot-tall birds with bright blue feet doing a mating dance. And those birds seem oblivious to you. The male blue-footed booby struts, slowly lifting his big, blue webbed feet — one then the other. The brighter the blue, the sexier he is, and healthier, to the eye of the larger female.

He gives her a small stick then points his beak and tail and wings to the sky and whistles. And slowly marches his big, blue feet. Like everything you are curious about, you can watch it on you tube. They are rare visitors in California but half of the blue-footed boobies are found on the Galapagos Islands, which is where I enjoyed them.

The great frigate bird was another spectacular bird I observed at close range. The black, long-winged birds are commonly seen around the sea world. Both the male and the female have a bright red gular throat sac. The male displays by puffing it up like a big red, vulnerable balloon while vibrating outstretched wings. And if the pair bonds, they will lay one egg and spend two years raising that chick. They spend a longer time of post-fledging care than other birds.

I was surprised to find myself suddenly swimming with Galapagos penguins. They are small, about 19 inches and the only penguin that lives north of the equator in the wild. They come to curiously look and shoot in front of you like a rocket so they are hard to photograph.

I visited Peru and Ecuador plus the Galapagos Islands and engaged in a smorgasbord of activities: fished for piranhas in the rain forest and ate them; held a baby sloth and a juvenile toucan at a shelter, hiked at 12,000 feet where we visited a weaving community; ate cuy, the Peruvian guinea pig dish in a family home and helped prepare it; hiked above Machu Picchu, the most beautiful city I have ever seen and an Incan construction and hydrological wonder and more.

So how did it feel to return to Davis? Delicious. Delightful to come home to a greener Davis with puffy clouds, leafed out trees, sweet smelling air and mating birds in breeding plumage. Has the air ever been more aromatic?

The first morning back I was out at 8 a.m. for the first-ever-official Friends of North Ponds monthly bird stroll led by Ed Whisler and Ken Ealy. An amazing 37 bird species were observed and two red-eared sliders (turtles). There were two surprise birds. A California quail ran across Anderson Road before flying into the Julie Partansky Pond and a male great-tailed grackle was singing on the Northstar Park Pond island. The great-tailed grackle is pretty noisy with rattles of kikikiki, sliding whistles, and a low chuk, chuk.

You can join the next monthly bird stroll from 8 to 9:30 a.m. Saturday, May 3, at the North Ponds. Meet in the parking lot next to 3500 Anderson Road and bring binoculars if you have them. The stroll will be co-led by Chris Dunford and Ken Ealy, both expert birders. I must admit I seldom spot more than a dozen on my own short visits. We have much to learn from our generous volunteer monthly guides. Check out the activities of the new group. Google Facebook Friends of North Davis Ponds. You can view it even if you are not on Facebook.

Several people have reported siting’s of our state bird, the California quail in new Davis locations. Janet and Randy Brendia have enjoyed quail in their backyard on Quail Avenue. One posed for Janet on the fence. Once you hear their call of Chi-ca-go, Chi-ca-go, you won’t forget it. Google to hear it online. Then next time you hear it, you will look for them. It’s usually them, as they like to travel in a covey of quail.

The 23rd Annual Pence Garden Tour, from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, May 4, will include plein art painting in six rural gardens plus a weaving demonstration, homemade refreshments, a silent auction and proceeds will support the Pence Gallery, a non-profit organization. I’m especially excited to see Warren Roberts and Rich Z. Naval’s garden, since Warren is the former longtime superintendent of the UC Davis Arboretum. He is also a sixth-generation Californian. You can get tickets online at Pence Gallery.org or at the gallery, Newsbeat or Redwood Barn.

I regularly do a 1-hour bike ride almost exactly following the Pence Garden tour map and end up at the North Ponds. Along the way, watch for hawks, usually on the same poles and wires and at this time, male red-winged blackbirds are along the fields. Listen for their rusty whistle, terr-eeee and watch for the display of red shoulder patches. Not quite as dramatic as the frigatebird, but still spectacular.

Tara Watt, designer, and Roger Madison, metal artist, invite you to visit their lawnless East Davis garden in all of its spring glory, from noon to 5 p.m on May 3 and 4 at 116 Dartmouth Place. Admission is free. It’s a busy weekend; May 3 is also the free open house for the California Raptor Center from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. A hawk walk begins at 8 a.m.

Enjoy our glorious spring and kiss each day.

— Jean Jackman is a Davis resident. Her column appears monthly. Got a question, comment or correction? Contact her a JeanJackman@gmail.com.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Wilderness Act turns 50 – May 9

By Sara Husby-Good
Please find attached (and below) the front page article for the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act is discussed. We’ve attached several photos, to allow you to choose which ones you’d like to include with the article. Let us know if you need anything else.

Thank you!

————-
Press Release

April 23, 2014

Contact: Sara Husby-Good

(530) 350-2599, sdhusby@tuleyome.org

Wilderness Act Turns 50!

This year celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act of 1964, a law that revolutionized wilderness protections, and created a way for Americans to protect their most pristine wild lands for future generations. To commemorate this important legislation, Tuleyome, a regional nonprofit conservation organization based in Woodland, CA and other conservation-focused organizations all around the country are organizing events open to the public.

Howard Zahniser of The Wilderness Society created the first draft of the Wilderness Act in 1956. It took nine years and 65 rewrites before the Wilderness Act was finally passed in 1964. The Wilderness Act was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 and established for the first time designated “Wilderness Areas”. While working on the legislation Zahniser commented that it is not just the law that protects Wilderness but the community of supporters who come together to steward these lands into the future that truly protects these special places.

When the Wilderness Act was passed in 1964, 54 areas (9.1 million acres) in 13 states were designated as wilderness. Since then the National Wilderness Preservation System has grown almost every year and now includes 758 areas (109,504,348 acres) in 44 states and Puerto Rico. Wilderness areas are managed by four federal land management agencies: the National Park Service, the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Bureau of Land Management.

The term wilderness is defined as: “an area where the earth and community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain” and “an area of undeveloped Federal land retaining its primeval character and influence, without permanent improvements or human habitation, which is protected and managed so as to preserve its natural conditions.”

This Act made it possible for local wilderness areas — such as those in the Berryessa Snow Mountain region, including Cache Creek Wilderness, Cedar Roughs Wilderness, and Snow Mountain Wilderness – to exist. Why is wilderness so important? Wilderness is our American legacy; wilderness provides places for people to enjoy, habitat for native plants and wildlife, and it’s a great source of economic activity through eco-tourism.

Tuleyome’s Executive Director, Sara Husby-Good, was named the Chairperson for the celebration on the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act in California. She has dedicated 2014 as Tuleyome’s year of “Celebrating Our Public Lands” in commemoration of both the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act and the 150th Anniversary of the California State Park System.

At Tuleyome the board and staff believe that “everyone deserves access to the outdoors”. Tuleyome’s nationally award winning program, Home Place Adventures, encourages people of all ages to become more connected to and involved with the natural world that surrounds us. The program provides not only engaging outdoor experiences and service projects which encourage local youth to become leaders in conservation, sustainability and land stewardship, it also offers the public free guided hikes and outings. Tuleyome’s goal is to educate and empower the community to care for and help protect the land and resources that we enjoy and on which we depend.

To that end, the nonprofit regularly leads hikes for the public in and around the Cache Creek Wilderness area (except in the very hot summer months), and in May 2014 will be hosting a camping trip to the Snow Mountain Wilderness. (Reservations required.)

Furthermore, Tuleyome’s new lecture series, “Nature and You: Thursday Talks at the Library”, starts in June with a kick-off lecture on the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act. Piggy-backing on President Obama’s STEM program – which seeks to encourage young women to enter the educational fields of science, technology, engineering and math – the lecture series, produced in partnership with the Yolo County Library system, will feature female speakers, “Women in Science”, who will speak on topics about nature and the earth sciences, ecology, climate change, clean watersheds, and the special wild landscapes within the surrounding region. All lectures, which run through June of 2015, are free to the public and will be held at the Mary L. Stephens Davis Branch Library in Davis, CA.

Other Tuleyome-hosted outdoor events include:

· “A Sunflower Story”: May 9th, 3:30-5:00 pm at Kids Space inside the Whole Earth Festival in Davis, CA.

· “Kids in the Garden”: Thursdays starting May 15 through June 6, at the Hannah and Herbert Community Garden in Woodland, CA. Free and open to the public with sign-up.

· “Summer Survival Camp”: a four-day experience in July, learning about wilderness survival skills, search and rescue, and a family campout. Sites for the adventure include the Cache Creek Nature Preserve, Conaway Ranch and an overnight stay at Lake Solano

· “Talk Trash” a summer excursion to the Yolo County Landfill to learn about recycling and sustainability.

· “A Day by the Lake”: Fun for all ages, and fitness levels. Tuleyome will host a BBQ potluck, hiking, and family friendly activities on October 4th at Lake Solano.

For more information on how to join Tuleyome’s Wilderness Act inspired celebrations and to RSVP for the lectures, outings and events, see the Tuleyome website at www.Tuleyome.org or the Tuleyome Meet Up site at: http://www.meetup.com/Tuleyome-Home-Place-Adventures/
###

SIDE BAR

“…[I]t is hereby declared to be the policy of the Congress to secure for the American people of present and future generations the benefits of an enduring resource of wilderness…”Wilderness Act 1964

Mary Hanson
Executive Assistant
Membership, Volunteer and Lecture Series Coordinator

Tuleyome – Deep Home Place
607 North Street, Woodland, CA 95695
Email: mhanson@tuleyome.org
Phone: 530-350-2599
On the web: www.tuleyome.org
Remember to “Like” us on Facebook!
My normal office hours are 8:00 am to 2:30 pm, Monday through Friday
You Can Donate to Tuleyome By Clicking Here!

(Let me know if you would like to stop receiving emails from this address.)

Mary Hanson
Executive Assistant
Membership, Volunteer and Lecture Series Coordinator

Tuleyome – Deep Home Place
607 North Street, Woodland, CA 95695
Email: mhanson@tuleyome.org
Phone: 530-350-2599
On the web: www.tuleyome.org
Remember to “Like” us on Facebook!
My normal office hours are 8:00 am to 2:30 pm, Monday through Friday
You Can Donate to Tuleyome By Clicking Here!

(Let me know if you would like to stop receiving emails from this address.)

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Greg Phister

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

Davis Entrepreneur Greg Phister Honored and Named Premier Agency for 2014
Allstate agency owner earns prestigious service designation

(Davis, CA) – As a business leader and involved citizen in the Davis area, Allstate exclusive agency owner Greg Phister has been designated an Allstate Premier Agency for 2014. This designation is being presented to Greg Phister for outstanding business performance and commitment to putting customers at the center of his agency’s work.

“The Premier Agency designation is not just about Greg’s successful business results,” said John Stolte, regional sales leader for Allstate Insurance Company in California. “The honor also demonstrates Greg’s commitment in being accessible to customers and using knowledge to help ensure customers have the insurance products they need to protect themselves and their family.”

Greg Phister’s agency is located at 437 F Street in Davis and can be reached at (530) 756-9211 or http://agents.allstate.com/greg-phister-davis-ca.html.

The Allstate Corporation (NYSE: ALL) is the nation’s largest publicly held personal lines insurer, serving approximately 16 million households through its Allstate, Encompass, Esurance and Answer Financial brand names and Allstate Financial business segment. Allstate branded insurance products (auto, home, life and retirement) and services are offered through Allstate agencies, independent agencies, and Allstate exclusive financial representatives, as well as via www.allstate.com, www.allstate.com/financial and 1-800 Allstate®, and are widely known through the slogan “You’re In Good Hands With Allstate®.” In 2013, $29 million was given by The Allstate Foundation, Allstate, its employees and agency owners to support local communities. Allstate employees and agency owners donated 200,000 hours of service across the country.

# # #

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Novozymes

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

Sales of enzymes to the bioenergy industry increase by 34% as Strong Q1 sales for Novozymes Bioenergyembrace new technology.

Sales of enzymes to the bioenergy industry increase by 34% as customers embrace new technology.
Three enzymes that promise to improve profits for producers of corn ethanol are behind the strong growth in Novozymes’ first quarter bioenergy sales. Avantec®, Spirizyme® Achieve and Olexa® enable producers to squeeze up to 5% more ethanol out of corn while saving on energy and chemicals.

Proven technology
“The enzymes give our customers a choice,” says Niels Miles Frandsen, Marketing Director for Bioenergy at Novozymes, “They can look at corn and ethanol prices, and then decide to buy less corn, but still maintain the same ethanol output, or they can increase throughput without increasing input costs. They are achieving the yield benefits we promised.”

Avantec was introduced to the market in October 2012, while Spirizyme Achieve was launched in June 2013 along with Olexa, a solution that works by freeing up oil bound in the corn germ. In addition to increasing ethanol yield, the three enzymes can improve corn oil extraction by 13%, while saving 8% energy. This helps ethanol producers to improve profit margins and efficiency, and reduce their environmental footprint.

Making solutions work
Novozymes’ tech service team has played a big part in getting the new products quickly introduced in the ethanol industry. Using data analysis and advanced statistics, the team works with customers at their plants to implement the technology and adjust their processes to ensure the enzyme benefits are fully realized.

“Our tech service team act as trusted advisors to our customers, and share the best practises they have developed for these products,” says Niels Miles Frandsen, “They help our customers see through the noise and track their yield increase. Our success in bioenergy is not just a result of the innovative enzymes we’re offering, but also due to this talented team who ensure our customers get an entire solution that meets their needs.”

Innovation to replace fossil fuels
The U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates that U.S. fuel ethanol production grew by 11% in the first quarter of 2014 compared with the same period last year. The U.S. remains the world’s biggest biofuels producer, and with ethanol accounting for approximately 10% of gasoline consumption in the U.S. today, the continuous development of such a renewable fuel aids the battle against climate change.

“The biofuel industry is continuing to develop and our journey to increase yields is not yet done,” says Niels Miles Frandsen, “We will continue to provide our customers with new technology that improves their business.”

About Novozymes
Novozymes is the world leader in bioinnovation. Together with customers across a broad array of industries we create tomorrow’s industrial biosolutions, improving our customers’ business and the use of our planet’s resources. With over 700 products used in 130 countries, Novozymes’ bioinnovations improve industrial performance and safeguard the world’s resources by offering superior and sustainable solutions for tomorrow’s ever-changing marketplace. Read more at www.novozymes.com.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

poetry 5/1

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

Poetry Reading on May 1st at the John Natsoulas Gallery: William O’Daly, with a special poetry opening at 7 PM by the students of The Peregrine School

On Thursday, May 1st, at 8 PM at the John Natsoulas Gallery (521 First Street, Davis), the Poetry Night Reading Series is pleased to welcome the poet William O’Daly.

William O’Daly is a poet, essayist, novelist, professor, editor, translator, and instructional designer whose work has been widely published and honored. His novel, This Earthly Life, was selected as a finalist in Narrative magazine’s 2009 Fall Story Contest. William O’Daly was also selected as a finalist for the 2006 Quill Award in Poetry. His other published works include the poetry chapbook The Whale in the Web and eight books of the late-career and posthumous poetry of Pablo Neruda.

This edition of the Poetry Night Reading Series will begin early with a reading by students of the Peregrine School in Davis. Starting at 7 PM, Chris Erickson’s students will delight us with their imaginative original works.

The Open Mic will begin around 9 PM, and the after-party will begin around 10 PM. You are encouraged to arrive early to secure a seat, and to sign up for a spot on the Open Mic List.

The Poetry Night Reading Series—coordinated and hosted by Dr. Andy Jones, produced by Lane Berger, and with the creative assistance of Carly Voris— takes place at the John Natsoulas Gallery on the first and third Thursday of every month. Poetry Night at the John Natsoulas Gallery is an entirely volunteer-run affair.

What: The Poetry Night Reading Series hosts William O’Daly
When: Thursday, May 1st at 8 PM
Where: The John Natsoulas Gallery (521 First Street, Davis)
Media Contact: Lane Berger
laneberger@gmail.com
The John Natsoulas Gallery – (530) 756-3938

http://www.poetryindavis.com/

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Veretski Pass to play at Village Homes

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

Veretski Pass will perform at 7 p.m. Sunday, May 18, at Village Homes Community Center, 2661 Portage Bay East.
Tickets are $13 in advance and $15 at the door. For more information and reservations, call 530-867-1032 or visit www.timnatalmusic.com.
Veretski Pass offers a unique and exciting combination of virtuosic musicianship and raw energy that has excited concertgoers across the world. The trio plays music from the old country with origins in the Ottoman Empire, once fabled as the borderlands of the East and the West. In a true collage of Carpathian, Jewish, Rumanian and Ottoman styles, typical suites contain dances from Moldavia and Bessarabia; Jewish melodies from Poland and Rumania; Hutzul wedding music from Carpathian-Ruthenia; and haunting Rebetic aires from Smyrna, seamlessly integrated with original compositions.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Veretski Pass photo

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

From left, Joshua Horowitz, button accordion and tsimbal; Stuart Brotman, bass and percussion; and Cookie Segelstein, violin and viola. Courtesy photo

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Gen Events MASTER

By
August 16, 2012 | Leave Comment

Ongoing
* Be a part of the excitement, glitz and glam that is Grad Night 2014! Volunteers have planned an amazing event for the graduating seniors from all Davis high schools; to bring this dream to fruition, help is needed. Even if you are not a parent of a high school senior, Grad Night organizers appreciate help from everyone. Openings are available for decorators, check-in helpers, event monitors, poker and black jack dealers, raffle team workers, café workers and security assistants. Choose a shift(s) for Thursday, Friday or Saturday (June 12-14). For more information and to sign up, see http://www.davisgradnight.org/volunteers

* Davis High School’s Blue Devil basketball camp will run from June 16-19 in the gym, 315 W. 14th St. Camp for fourth- and fifth-graders is 8 a.m. to noon; camp for sixth- through eighth-graders is noon to 4 p.m. The camp is designed to have young basketball players learn the fundamentals of the game through drills as well as team and individual competitions. Future Blue Devil basketball players will learn what is necessary for competitive basketball at the next level, while getting to know the program and staff. The registration fee is $100. Go to www.dhsbluedevils.com to download a camp flyer.

April 28-May 2
Birch Lane Elementary School will sell plants and vegetables grown by students in the school garden next week. Lots of heirloom tomatoes and Baker Creek heirloom plants will be available, with all funds benefiting the school’s garden program. Hours are 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday and 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. The school is at 1600 Birch Lane. For more information, visit http://birchlanegardens.blogspot.com or https://www.facebook.com/birchlane.gardens.

May 2-4
Come support Yolo County’s 4-H members who will be showing off their projects at the annual Spring Show at the Yolo County fairgrounds. Youths ages 5 to 19 will be presenting the animals they’ve raised as well as other projects including photography, baking, engineering, rocketry, archery and more.

Saturday, May 3
Support Yolo County’s Center for Families by participating in “Cycle de Mayo,” a benefit bike ride that begins at 8 a.m. in either Davis or Woodland with Plainfield Station serving as a rest stop/party location in between, complete with music and wild bikes on display. Woodland riders depart from Woodland High School, 21 N West St., and Davis riders depart from Davis High School, 315 W 14th St. Advance tickets are $25 for adults, $10 for children over age 12, students and seniors. Children under 12 are free. Order tickets online at http://cycledemayo.brownpapertickets.com. Tickets are $35 and $15 the day of the ride and registration begins at 7:30 a.m. For more information, contact Maria Contreras at 530-753-1125. All participants will receive a Cycle de Mayo backpack and entry to the Plainfield Station party.

Sunday, May 4

The Willett Elemantary School Challenge Club invites the whole Davis community to the school’s annual fun run beginning at 8 a.m. at 1207 Sycamore Lane. There are three distances to choose from, a quarter-mile, a 1-mile and a 5K, with the longer runs going over the pedestrian overpass and through Arroyo Park. Fun activities, food and drinks will be available at the school after the races. Race-day registration fees are $25 for the 5K and $15 for the quarter-mile and 1-mile races. For more information and to see the race routes, visit www.eventbrite.com/e/willett-elementary-family-fun-run-tickets-10984971345.

Friday, May 9
Kids between the ages of 1 and 12 are invited to Friday Night Live from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the city of Davis Gymnastics and Dance Center.  For a $5 fee, children can work on gymnastics skills, jump on the trampoline and more. Gymnastics and dance staff will be available for coaching questions, supervision and fun. Children under 4 must be supervised on the gym floor by a parent or guardian. For more information, call 530-757-5626.

A photo booth and a live D.J. are two treats awaiting registered Davis Girl Scouts who attend the “Island Paradise” Father-Daughter Dance on Friday. Tickets are selling fast. For more information, contact Jenny Kobold  at attoufrmus@comcast.net or at 530-758-6178.

Friday, May 30
Kids between the ages of 1 and 12 are invited to Friday Night Live from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the city of Davis Gymnastics and Dance Center.  For a $5 fee, children can work on gymnastics skills, jump on the trampoline and more. Gymnastics and dance staff will be available for coaching questions, supervision and fun. Children under 4 must be supervised on the gym floor by a parent or guardian. For more information, call 530-757-5626.

Friday, June 6
Kids between the ages of 1 and 12 are invited to Friday Night Live from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the city of Davis Gymnastics and Dance Center.  For a $5 fee, children can work on gymnastics skills, jump on the trampoline and more. Gymnastics and dance staff will be available for coaching questions, supervision and fun. Children under 4 must be supervised on the gym floor by a parent or guardian. For more information, call 530-757-5626.

Anne Ternus-Bellamy

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Edward Jones award

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

We just received this latest accolade. Thank you for your consideration.

Edward Jones News Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Michael Clark
April 23, 2014 (530) 753-3917

Edward Jones Receives Outstanding Performance in Investment Services Award

The financial-services firm Edward Jones won the 2014 TNS Choice Award for outstanding performance in investment services, according to TNS, a global research consultancy.

The TNS Choice Awards recognize financial-services firms and banks that outperform their competitors in acquiring, retaining and developing clients.

The selection of Edward Jones was based on data provided by more than 6,900 U.S. households with $100,000 or more in investable assets who participated in TNS’ Affluent Market Research Program. The analysis considered several measures of client acquisition, retention, satisfaction, and client loyalty across a comprehensive set of competing firms to identify top performers. Study results are based on experiences and perceptions of consumers surveyed. Your experience may vary. Rating may not be indicative of future performance and may not be representative of any one client’s experience.

The global research consultancy states that Edward Jones’ superior client experience is based on strong advisor relationships and an extensive branch network of 13,000 financial advisors. The firm earns high client satisfaction scores, which is rewarded with remarkably strong client retention, according to TNS.

TNS advises clients on specific growth strategies around new market entry, innovation, brand switching and stakeholder management, based on long-established expertise and market-leading solutions. With a presence in over 80 countries, TNS has more conversations with the world’s consumers than anyone else and understands individual human behaviors and attitudes across every cultural, economic and political region of the world.

TNS is part of Kantar, one of the world’s largest insight, information and consultancy groups.
Please visit www.tnsglobal.com for more information.

The 5 Davis area financial advisors are Michael Clark 753-3917, Manny Provedor 753-9244, Carolyn Stiver 747-2002, Nicole Davis 753-1957, and Matt Uno 753-3917.

Edward Jones provides financial services for individual investors in the United States and, through its affiliate, in Canada. Every aspect of the firm’s business, from the types of investment options offered to the location of branch offices, is designed to cater to individual investors in the communities in which they live and work. The firm’s 12,000-plus financial advisors work directly with nearly 7 million clients to understand their personal goals — from college savings to retirement — and create long-term investment solutions that emphasize a well-balanced portfolio and a buy-and-hold strategy. Edward Jones embraces the importance of building long-term, face-to-face relationships with clients, helping them to understand and make sense of the investment options available today.

Headquartered in St. Louis, Edward Jones ranked No. 4 overall in FORTUNE magazine’s 2014 100 Best Companies to Work For ranking. Visit our website at www.edwardjones.com and our recruiting website at www.careers.edwardjones.com. Follow us on Twitter @EdwardJones. Member SIPC. FORTUNE and Time Inc. are not affiliated with and do not endorse Edward Jones products or services.

###
Susie Evans
Senior Branch Office Administrator
Edward Jones
429 F Street Suite 1
Davis, CA 95616
(530) 753-3917
susie.evans@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com

If you are not the intended recipient of this message (including attachments) or if you have received this message in error, immediately notify us and delete it as well as any attachments.

If you do not wish to receive any email messages from us, excluding administrative communications, please email this request to messages@edwardjones.com along with the email address you wish to unsubscribe.

For important additional information related to this email, visit www.edwardjones.com/US_email_disclosure. Edward D. Jones & Co., L.P. d/b/a Edward Jones, 12555 Manchester Road, St. Louis, MO 63131 © Edward Jones. All rights reserved.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Anne Ternus-Bellamy

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Farm Fresh to You 5/3

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Press contact:

Barbara Archer
barbara@farmfreshtoyou.com
530-848-5053

CELEBRATE CINCO DE MAYO AT THE FARM FRESH TO YOU FARM WITH LIVE MUSIC BY THA DIRT FEELIN’ AND KATIE COLE, AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD,
TOMATO PLANTING AND SWEET PEA AND STRAWBERRY HARVESTING

Proceeds Benefit the Kathleen Barsotti Non-Profit for Sustainable Agriculture; Visitors Can Camp on the Farm Overnight

Capay, Calif., April 23, 2014 ─ Farm Fresh To You (www.farmfreshtoyou.com), a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and home delivery service that provides fresh, local, organic produce to consumers’ doorsteps invites the public to its farm, Capay Organic, for its third annual Cinco de Mayo celebration on Saturday, May 3, 2014, from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. The farm address is: 23800 State Highway 16, Capay, Calif., 95607.

“This is a Cinco de Mayo celebration for the whole family, and we are excited to host an evening of local food, music and fun at our farm,” said Thaddeus Barsotti, farmer and co-owner of Farm Fresh To You. “We encourage visitors to make a weekend out of this event and camp overnight at the farm in our orchards and take in the beauty of the land that grows their food.”

Cinco de Mayo event activities include tractor-tram farm tours, kids’ arts and crafts with The California Food Literacy Center, tomato planting, sweet pea flower and strawberry harvesting, soccer games and dancing to the music Tha Dirt Feelin and Katie Cole. Tha Dirt Feelin will take the stage at 5:15 p.m. and Katie Cole, a folk/rock singer, will go on at 7:30 p.m.

Elote corn, food from the Sacatomatoes food truck and authentic Mexican cuisine will be sold on site. Ruhstaller beer, wine and margaritas will also be available for purchase. Seka Hills will be offering olive oil tastings. Farm fruits and veggies, and other healthy snacks will also be available for purchase at the market stand. Visitors may also bring their own food and picnic.

Tickets are available at: capaycincodemayo2014.eventbrite.com.

Tickets prices are $15 per person through Friday, May 2, or $20 per person at the farm on event day. Kids 12 and under get free admission.

Visitors can camp overnight at the farm in our fruit orchards. Reserve a campsite through the Eventbrite website for $35 through Friday, May 2, or for $40 on event day. Camp sites are first-come, first-served. Campers may stay on the farm until 1 p.m. on Sunday, May 4. One car is allowed per 15-foot wide site extending the length of the orchard row.

All event proceeds benefit The Kathleen Barsotti Non-Profit for Sustainable Agriculture. The foundation gives an annual scholarship to a high school senior planning on pursuing a sustainable agriculture career. It also donates backpacks and school supplies to farmworkers’ families in the Capay Valley.

Directions:
The farm is located 90 miles northeast of San Francisco and 30 minutes northwest of Sacramento. For more event details, go to the Farm Fresh To You Facebook page events tab. (http://www.facebook.com/farmfreshtoyou).

From the Bay Area:
Take Interstate 80 East to Interstate 505 North. Go approximately 20 miles; exit on Highway 16/Esparto, turn left at the light. Follow Highway 16 through Esparto and Capay. The farm is a 1/4 mile past the town of Capay on the right. Look for the Farm Fresh To You metal sign and turn onto the gravel road that leads to the parking area.

From Sacramento:
Take Interstate 5 North through Woodland to the Highway 16 W/Esparto exit. Take the exit and turn left; then travel three miles to the second stoplight. Turn right onto Highway 16. Follow Highway 16 through Esparto and Capay. The farm is a 1/4 mile past the town of Capay on the right. Look for the Farm Fresh To You metal sign and turn onto the gravel road that leads to the parking area.

About Farm Fresh To You
Farm Fresh To You is a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and home and office delivery service that provides fresh, local, organic produce to consumers’ doorsteps. Farming since 1976, this second-generation organic farm pioneered the organic food movement and is owned by brothers Noah Barnes and Thaddeus and Freeman Barsotti. The company is connecting communities and sustainable farms through a transparent food system that enables consumers to know their farmer and where their food is grown.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Mansouri letter

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

The Annual Father-Daughter Dance was held at El Macero Country Club on April 5th, 2014. It was a wonderful night of dinner, dancing and fun for fathers and daughters of all ages while at the same time raising money for a great cause, the leukemia/lymphoma society. This year, the donations were given to Brooke Beaubier, a 9-year-old local girl who was recently diagnosed with leukemia. We wanted to honor Brooke and her family with a small financial token to help ease some of their burden. We are wishing Brooke much good health and powerful thoughts and prayers for a speedy recovery. We hope Brooke and all of her friends, and of course their dads, can join us next year at the dance.
Laura Mansouri
Davis

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Dementia talk 5/8

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Tuesday, April 15 2014

YOUR AGING GENES: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT YOUR RISK FOR DEMENTIA

Lecture by UC Davis Alzheimer’s Disease Center Director Charles DeCarli

UC Davis Alzheimer’s Disease Center Director Charles DeCarli will discuss “Your aging genes: What you need to know about your risk for dementia” during the Community Discovery Lecture Series on Thursday, May 8 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the UC Davis MIND Institute, 2825 50th St., Sacramento.

Genetic causes and genetic risk of brain aging can be complicated. DeCarli’s presentation will introduce the audience to some simple genetic concepts and how they might help understand how genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease is determined.

DeCarli holds the Victor and Genvieve Orsi Chair in Alzheimer’s Research. He is a behavioral neurologist whose research is focused on using advanced brain imaging to study dementia and the role of genetics, cerebrovascular and Alzheimer’s diseases on the aging brain.

The Community Lecture Series is supported by Eskaton, Norwood Pines Alzheimer’s Care Center, Sunrise Senior Living and Primrose.

The event is free and open to the public. For further information or to RSVP, please contact Jayne LaGrande, 916-734-5728, or visit the the UC Davis Alzheimer’s Disease Center on Facebook.

The UC Davis Alzheimer’s Disease Center is one of only 27 research centers designated by the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Aging. The center’s goal is to translate research advances into improved diagnosis and treatment for patients while focusing on the long-term goal of finding a way to prevent or cure Alzheimer’s disease. Also funded by the state of California, the center allows researchers to study the effects of the disease on a uniquely diverse population. For more information, visit alzheimer.ucdavis.edu

- – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - -

Media Contact:
Phyllis Brown, Health News Office: 916-734-9023
E-mail: phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu

- – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - -

Public Affairs
UC Davis Health System
4900 Broadway, Suite 1200
Sacramento, CA 95820
Phone: (916) 734-9040
FAX: (916) 734-9066
E-mail: publicaffairs@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
Web address: http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/newsroom/

______________________
If you would rather not receive future communications from UC Davis Health System, please go to http://UCDavis.pr-optout.com/OptOut.aspx?290x330x64330x1x1092477x24000x6&Email=ddavis%40davisenterprise.net.
UC Davis Health System, 2315 Stockton Blvd, Sacramento, CA 95817 United States

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Ride of Silence May 21

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

For inclusion as a public service announcement. If it’s possible to run this announcement twice before the event, I would appreciate it. Thank you!

The Davis Bike Club invites cyclists of all ages and cycling experience to join the 2014 Ride of Silence on Wednesday, May 21. This free, silent ride will leave the Veterans Memorial Center at 203 East 14th Street in Davis at precisely 7 pm. This silent procession is to remember and honor all cyclists who have been killed or injured while sharing the public roadways with motorized vehicles. It will follow an 8-mile route throughout the City of Davis, traveling at no more than 12 mph. The procession will end at the US Bicycling Hall of Fame. Helmets are required, as are lights for those who will be pedaling home after the event. Riders of all ages and abilities are welcome. For more information check the Facebook page at Ride of Silence-Davis, or call 530-902-8633.

Sent from my iPhone

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Rob White oped — justifying economic development

By Rob White

I have been asked by several community members over the last few weeks to give a detailed reporting on what is being done in Economic Development by the City of Davis. More specifically, I have been asked to enumerate what have been the tangible results of the work of the Chief Innovation Officer over the past year and what are the goals over the coming year.

I will start by noting that City staff are actually in the process of delivering a more detailed report on this information to City Council. The report was scheduled to be heard by Council on April 22nd, but the meeting ran long and Council asked staff to move the report to the next Council meeting (May 13th).

Though the information still needs to be heard by City Council and finalized, the proposed final Innovation and Economic Vitality Work Program and the companion Action Plan that details the specific actions, desired outcomes, and measures is available on the City website here: : http://city-council.cityofdavis.org/Media/Default/Documents/PDF/CityCouncil/CouncilMeetings/Agendas/20140422/09-Innovation-and-Economic-Vitality-2014-2016-Work-Program.pdf

A summary of the information that was cursorily presented by staff on April 22nd can be found in the presentation linked here: http://city-council.cityofdavis.org/Media/Default/Documents/PDF/CityCouncil/CouncilMeetings/Agendas/20140422/09-Innovation-and-Economic-Vitality-2014-2016-Work-Program-Presentation.pdf

And if you are interested in gaining more information about the proposed activities or providing comment to the City Council, you are invited to attend the Council meeting on May 13th at 6:30 pm in the Community Chambers (which is also broadcast on community access television and live webcast).

To focus more specifically on the proposed final Innovation and Economic Vitality Work Program, staff has asked Council to direct city efforts in to five Focus Areas. These are:

Focus Area 1 – Facilitate Technology and Business Development
Focus Area 2 – Increased University Engagement
Focus Area 3 – Expand Support Network for Local Business
Focus Area 4 – Strategic Branding and Marketing
Focus Area 5 – Leadership

Though I won’t go in to detail of each Focus Area in this article, your own review of the documents linked above will hopefully demonstrate that these five areas are specifically meant to work cohesively together. Each one is dependent on the other and is intended to create a holistic approach to developing the innovation economy in Davis. And though parts of the economy have been developing due to others efforts (such as the university and local technology companies), it is through coordinated and consistent efforts that a complete economic system will emerge for Davis.

All of the materials and the reports have been prepared by staff at City Hall. To be more specific, the work referenced above (including the proposed final Work Program and Action Plan) were not created by a consultant or other external support, but instead by staff of the Office of Innovation and Economic Vitality (which is part of the City Manager’s Office) and consists of the Chief Innovation Officer (me) and Deputy Innovation Officer (Sarah Worley).

I note this because one answer to the question of what has been going on in Economic Development over the last year is to gather information from the community, read through previous reports, assimilate the information, and then produce an effective and clear Work Program and Action Plan for the next two years (Fiscal Years 2014-2016).

Having worked for other local governments and previously as a Board member on the California Association for Local Economic Development (CALED), I can say with some confidence that this work alone typically takes a year or longer and usually involves at least a few consultants assisting staff. And though the Work Program and Action Plan are living documents and can always benefit from revision and addition over time, they represent a significant and detailed reorientation for the City as we turn traditional economic development activities in to activities that build an innovation economy and embrace our largest asset, the University of California Davis and its resultant research and development.

What you will hopefully also surmise through your review of the documents, from the weekly articles and discussions on this blog and from past interaction by staff with the community is that this is not the only work product from the last year. We have also been assisting businesses one on one, helping to build the local technology business ecosystem, working with several property owners to bring forward a proposal on an innovation center, establishing stronger links with the university, working to increase the regional brand of Davis, outreaching to potential investment and businesses in the region and globally and assisting other city departments with large projects and programs (like the hotel conference center, the Cannery housing development, open space and conservation, sustainability and budget and fiscal analysis).

Innovation and Economic Vitality staff have also facilitated and been involved in regional efforts like the Yolo Rail Realignment discussions, Yolo Broadband assessment (including preparing and now executing a Davis-centric request for expressions of interest, which was approved by City Council on April 22nd) and active support for innovation in the regional Next Economy Plan. Based on my 12 years of working in local economic development and over 20 years of experience in branding and marketing, it has been clear to me over and over that the best way to attract investment and gain interest of new companies is to support and provide leadership in the regional efforts.

Davis is most certainly one of few communities who has been blessed with a university that is vital to solving the world’s food and health issues. And as the host community, we have an opportunity to help facilitate that research and development and work to bring regional, national and global attention to our city. This translates in to investment in our quality of life, ecotourism of our cherished open space and conservation attributes and global recognition as a preeminent location for modern examples of sustainability, agriculture, arts, technology, community values and holistic systems.

In all of this discussion, one thing should recognized. Previous efforts to bring economic development forward as an important activity to the community have helped to pave the way to where we are now. The City’s efforts through the City Council, the Business and Economic Development Commission and staff; the Chamber’s efforts through their Board, Economic Development Committee and DSIDE; the Downtown Business Association’s efforts in areas like ‘shop local’, community events and parking solutions; the Yolo Convention and Visitors Bureau for their efforts in tourism and arts; and techDAVIS for supporting the City’s economic development program with a substantive public-private partnership that provides needed funding for this effort. There are of course many other groups that can be named and it is the consistent efforts of these groups and the community that have helped pave the way for the City’s current efforts to gain traction.

I trust that this gives you some insight in to our year long journey of evolving the City’s efforts. There is much more to do and many challenges along the way. And there are many people actively supporting this current effort to help us achieve success. Please join me in thanking them and I encourage you to get involved and provide your insights so that we can truly craft a community-based program that will achieve our objectives.

Thanks for considering these thoughts. I look forward to your comments and questions. My email is rwhite@cityofdavis.org if you choose to email me directly.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Robb Davis for Davis City Council

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

I am supporting Robb Davis’ candidacy for Davis City Council.

I became familiar with Robb through his writings regarding his volunteer work with the Neighborhood Court- a program set up by the District Attorney’s office that seeks to address nonviolent and low-level crimes through community-based solutions.

I was impressed with his collaborative approach to problem solving and conflict resolution.

As I learned more about him I realized that his dedication and involvement in our community extended well beyond this program. Including, but not limited to, his work with the Davis Community Meals H Street transitional housing shelter, his coordination of Bike Rodeo’s at elementary schools, which teach kids about bike safety, and his volunteer work on city commissions and task forces.

Robb’s dedication to our community, his integrity, his compassion for others, his willingness to listen and compromise on issues, but not on his core values, are among the many reasons I will be voting Davis for Davis this June. I hope you will join me.

Michelle Millet

Davis

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Irias letter

By
April 25, 2014 | Leave Comment

Daniel Burnett’s eloquent plea on behalf of the humanities (“A Plea on the Bard’s birthday,” April 23) gets off to an odd start: “Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou, Romeo? Sorry, Juliet. He’s hard to find on many college campuses.”

Mr. Burnett reproduces two common errors: adding a comma after “thou” to Juliet’s second speech in Act II, Scene 2 and reading “wherefore” as “where.” That makes her seem to be wondering where her beloved is. But “wherefore” means “why,” not “where” (hence the pleonastic “Can you see the why or wherefore” in “Show Boat”). Juliet is not wondering where Romeo is. She’s wondering why his name has to be Romeo (more to the point, Romeo Montague). The context makes that quite clear:

O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love
And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.

It all anticipates the Hatfields and the McCoys, and anyone who knows the play is aware of that. Surely Mr. Burnett is. So he must be checking to see if we’re paying attention, or he’s just having himself a little joke. But I fear that at least a few readers may not realize he’s just messin’ wid us.

Julian Irias
332 W. 8th St.
Davis
753-7519

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 23, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Cheerleading gym

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Sean Evans, Davis High School graduate 1998, franchise owner

/PCMPressRelease/ – VACAVILLE, CA, April 21st, 2014 – Pacific Coast Magic announces acquisition of Aerials All-Stars, a competitive cheerleading gym located in Vacaville, CA.
Pacific Coast Magic is the leader in competitive cheerleading in California, paving the way for many athletes to pursue their dreams of getting a sports scholarship in college and competing every season against the best in the World. Aerials All-Stars is owned and operated by Elizabeth Lopez. Elizabeth’s career in all-star cheerleading spans more than a decade and has led to the development and oversight of one of the largest and most successful gyms in Northern California. Elizabeth will continue to run the new PCM facility located at 3777-A Vaca Valley Pkwy., Vacaville, CA 95688.
“This is our opportunity to expand the depth of services we offer to our customers and supply the best coaching to the athletes of Northern California,” says Elizabeth Lopez, who runs the Vacaville location for Pacific Coast Magic. “Our first years have been a great success, but we can’t wait to get started on this new chapter in the gyms history.”
Pacific Coast Magic specializes in competitive cheerleading for those athletes that want something more than the rah- rah of the sideline, as well as training local high school and recreational teams. The owner, Kellie Elliott and program head Elizabeth Lopez, both have backgrounds in teaching as well as experience coaching all levels and ages of athletes.
“Expanding our brand to include Northern California locations is a move we considered only if the right opportunity came along,” says Kellie Elliott, co-owner of Pacific Coast Magic. “In Elizabeth (Lopez) we have a strong force at our new location in Vacaville and combined with the PCM brand, we are confident that we can offer the athletes up there the best and most competitive program in the region.”
Tryouts will be held May 8th, 9th and 10th. Specific information will be available on the website as well as all social media outlets. For more information, visit http://www.pacificcoastmagic.com.
About Pacific Coast Magic: Pacific Coast Magic is also a family-owned and operated business practicing sustainable life-coaching to each of their athletes, focusing on the importance of values and work ethic above medals and individual glory. With six locations now located in Murrieta, Corona, Anaheim, High Desert, Irvine and Scottsdale, Arizona, Pacific Coast Magic serves most of Orange County and the Inland Empire.
Located at 3777-A Vaca Valley Pkwy, Vacaville, CA, PCM brings competitive cheer to a growing market. With six other locations, 40 highly trained instructors and almost 1,200 athletes, PCM is the leader in competitive cheerleading in California. Pacific Coast Magic has been around for over a decade and won multiple regional, state and national titles, as well as multiple top 5 finishes at the World Championships in Orlando, FL.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 23, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Lara Downes to premiere Billie Holiday program at Mondavi, album to follow next year

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

When pianist Lara Downes was a seven-year-old girl, she took classes on Saturdays at the San Francisco Conservatory. And on Saturday afternoons after class, the young Lara and her sisters would dress up in their mom’s party dresses, pick out a few albums from their parents’ collection, and dance around the living room. “We excavated the Beatles records, the Sinatra albums, Charles Aznavour, Barbara Streisand, Nat King Cole…. and Billie Holiday. And I fell in love with her dark eyes shaded by the white gardenia, with her wonderful, world-worn voice, and with what I knew — even then — to be the totally, startlingly distinctive qualities of mood and phrasing, line and color that she brought to even the simplest tune.”

And now, years later, Downes will premiere a Billie Holiday-inspired “concert project” at the Mondavi Center on Saturday (May 17) at 8 p.m., and Sunday (May 18) at 2 p.m.

Titled “But Beautiful,” the program is “a cycle of solo piano concert transcriptions by my brilliant friend and colleague Jed Distler,” drawing on “the songs most strongly associated with Lady Day (as Holiday was known): “God Bless The Child” (which she wrote herself), “Good Morning Heartache,” “What a Little Moonlight Can Do,” “Violets for My Furs,” and Downes’ childhood favorite, “I Cover the Waterfront.”

“I’m playing sad songs, and bittersweet songs,” Downes said. “And powerful songs like ‘Strange Fruit,’ that most wrenching, most sorrowful, most audacious protest song — a condemnation of the lynching of African Americans that was part of the violent racism that pervaded 1930s America.”

“Many of these songs have been sung by dozens of great singers, from Sinatra to Aretha Franklin, but we best remember Billie Holiday’s inimitable versions,” said Downes, who has made her home in Davis for a decade or so. “She brought to them her one-of-a-kind inflection and intention, a certain bold imprint that is audacious, unexpected and unbelievably strong.”

“Jed and I were hearing Billie sing as we translated these songs for the piano, using the range and cholor of the instrument to orchestrate the echo of her voice and its magic. To reinterpret these songs is a tremendous privilege, and also a challenge to memorialize without imitating, to transform while preserving, to bring different musical traditions together.”

Downes’ project is timed to coincide with the upcoming 100th anniversary of Billie Holiday’s birth (she was born on April 7, 2015). Downes has recorded the Holiday material for release on an album on the Steinway label (also titled “But Beautiful”) in early 2015.

The project is also personally important to Downes because of her family heritage. “On my bedside table I have two studio photographs form the 1930s. They’re of my grandmothers,” Downes said.

“My grandmother Fay, one of seven sisters born to Jewish immigrants from the Ukraine, grew up in Buffalo (New York state), and then came out to California with my mother. And my Jamaican grandmother Ivy moved as a young woman to Harlem and died when my father was very small — her story is lost to family history and memory, except for the equation of hose and cheekbones that I see whenever I look in the mirror,” Downes said.

Billie Holiday moved to Harlem in the 1930s as a young teen, and started singing in night clubs at an age when many teens were high school students. She eventually became a vocalist with bands led by Count Basie and Artie Shaw. In the 1940s, she recorded many of the tunes for which she is now best remembered. But she was arrested several times for drug possession in the late 1940s and 1950s, her health declined, and she died in 1959 at age 44.

“Looking back 100 years at Billie Holiday’s short and troubled life, lived within the landscape of early 20th Century American racial realities, I realize that I can’t begin to understand the scope of her personal and artistic struggles,” Downes said. “But I know that what happiness and luck she did find, she found through her music. And finding your joy, your strength, your power in music is something I do know about. And I know, too, about commanding a room as a woman in a satin dress, pulling the audience in, making a listener fall in love with a piece of music the way I fell in love with Billie Holiday’s songs when I was eight years old.”

Tickets for these concerts are in short supply, $46 general, $19 UC Davis student, www.mondaviarts.org or (530) 754-2787. Downes will hold a question and answer session with the audience after both performances.

 

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 23, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Bill Frisell photo

Bill Frisell will perform interpretations of John Lennon tunes at Mondavi on May 14. Jimmy Katz/Courtesy photo

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Jazz guitarist Bill Frisell brings interpretations of John Lennon tunes to Mondavi

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Guitarist and composer Bill Frisell came of age in the early 1960s — and like many young teens at the time, he was captivated by the look, sound and attitude of The Beatles, and John Lennon in particular. Frisell grew up and became a highly influential jazz artist — recording numerous albums for ECM, Nonesuch and other labels. But Frisell was drawn back to Lennon’s music during a European tour in 2005, when he and vocalist Jenny Scheinman and guitarist Greg Leisz got a request to adapt some Lennon tunes for a concert in Paris. “It felt so good that we decided to play this (Lennon-related) material for the rest of the tour,” Frisell recalled. “We never announced or advertised that we would be doing this. We never told the audience. It was far out checking out their reaction when after two or three songs, they started realizing what was happening.” Frisell turned to Lennon’s music again when he played Yoshi’s in the Bay Area in 2010, and the following yearFrisell and his musical partners recorded “All We Are Saying,” an album on the Savoy label composed of adapted Lennon material. Frisell and four others who were played on that album will perform an album featuring much of this material on Wednesday (May 14) at 8 p.m. at the Mondavi Center. Tickets start at $25 general, $12.50 UC Davis student, www.mondaviarts.org or (530) 754-2787. Frisell’s concert will be preceded by a free outdoor concert at 6:30 p.m. in the Mondavi Center’s Corin Courtyard by guitarist Ross Hammond and his quartet.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

‘Thoroughly Modern Millie’ Opens at the Woodland Opera House on Friday, May 2

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

The Woodland Opera House will present “Thoroughly Modern Millie” opening Friday, May 2, and running at 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through May 25. There will be an additional matinee at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 17.

Not only is “Thoroughly Modern Millie” a zany romantic spoof of the Roaring ’20s, it won an Oscar for Best Original Music Score for the motion picture starring Julie Andrews, and the Tony Award for Best Musical for the stage version.

Taking place in New York City in 1922, “Thoroughly Modern Millie” tells the story of young Millie Dillmount (Amy Jacques-Jones) an innocent country girl who comes to the big city in search of a husband. Along the way she becomes the secretary of the rich and famous Trevor Graydon (Horacio Gonzales), befriends the sweet Miss Dorothy (Petra Favorite), fights off a dragon-lady audiences will love to hate (Eva Sarry), and hooks up with a lively paper clip salesman, Jimmy (Seth Rogers). In the end it takes a rich nutty “jazz baby” like Muzzy (Deborah Hammond) to unravel all these complications, give a great party, and match up lovers. Filled with frisky flappers, tap dancing secretaries, dashing leading men, and an upbeat score, “Thoroughly Modern Millie” provides mad-cap merriment for the whole family.

The show is underwritten by Tony and Trish Marshall. The show is directed and choreographed by Staci Arriags, with music direction by James Glica-Hernandez.

Tickets are available at 530-666-9617 or www.woodlandoperahouse.org.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Thoroughly Modern Millie photos

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Millie_2:
The evil Mrs. Meers (Eva Sarry) intends to give Miss Dorothy (Petra Favorite) a poison apple in a scene from “Thoroughly Modern Millie.” Amy Shuman Photography/Courtesy photo
Millie_4:
Millie (Amy Jacques-Jones) finds a job in New York City and meets the man of her dreams, paper clip salesman, Jimmy (Seth Rogers). Amy Shuman Photography/Courtesy photo

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 23, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Lara Downes Billie Holiday photo

Lara Downes brings her Billie Holiday jazz tribute to Davis with concerts at Mondavi on May 17-18. Adrian Mendoza/Courtesy photo

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Keyboard Festival to trace evolution from harpsichord through fortepiano to modern Steinway

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Keyboard instruments have changed a lot over the past few centuries, and the UC Davis Music Department’s upcoming Keyboard Festival — with five events at the Mondavi Center between May 1 and May 5 — will feature harpsichords (chamber instruments of the sort that were common during the early 1700s, when J.S. Bach was composing) to the fortepiano (the instrument of choice during the career of Mozart in the late 1700s, and Beethoven in the early 1800s) to the larger, louder modern piano (created in the late 1800s, and sturdy enough to withstand the onslaught of a performance by a powerful virtuoso like Franz Liszt, with a sound big enough to fill a concert hall with over 1,000 seats).

It will be a somewhat larger festival than the music department has put on in the past for other instruments. As faculty composer (and violist) Kurt Rohde put it, “Two years ago we talked about doing a Keyboard Festival, and it’s a little more involved than doing a Viola or Flute Festival, because there’s so much keyboard music, over so many decades. So it’s a more substantial series, over four days, with more artists.”

The series will start on Thursday (May 1) with a free noontime concert in Jackson Hall, featuring members of the UC Davis Baroque Ensemble and members of the Davis High School Baroque Ensemble performing concertos for two harpsichords and four harpsichords by J.S. Bach.

The series continues on Friday (May 2) at 7 p.m. with more chamber music, with UC Davis faculty harpsichordist Phebe Craig and Mills College fortepianist Belle Bulwinkle and early keyboard specialist Katherine Westine performing works by German Baroque composers J.S. Bach and his son W.F. Bach, French Baroque composers Francois Couperin and Jean-Philippe Rameau, and Classical era composers associated with Vienna like W.A. Mozart (a sonata for piano and violin), Josef Haydn (a fantasia), and Ludwig van Beethoven. This program will give listeners to compare the plucked-string sound of Italian-style harpsichord (“full of pizzazz,” as Craig put it) with the “smoother” French instruments, including the smaller-style harpsichord that existed in Couperin’s time, and the larger instrument that came later during Rameau’s day. The fortepiano (which had hammers that hit the strings) created a new realm of musical possibilities that were explored by Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven. (Tickets are $12-$17 general, $8 students).

Then on Saturday (May 3) at 7 p.m., the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra will premiere a new piano concerto by Swedish-born composer Mika Pelo (a member of the UCD music faculty) in Jackson Hall, performed by Bay Area pianist Eric Zivian. Although not formally part of the Keyboard Festival, this concert certainly complements the festival theme. (Tickets are $12-$17 general, $8 students)..

On Sunday (May 4) at noon, Professor and musicologist Carol Hess will be joined by Belle Bulwinkle and Phebe Craig in a discussion of “the great evolution of keyboard instruments” that took place in the 18th Century, as the fortepiano developed into an instrument that could play both loud and soft, and the “significant changes in keyboard technique” that resulted. After the discussion, you can inspect (and even gently play a few notes) on several harpsichords, a clavichord and a fortepiano that will be on display. “It will be like the family tree of keyboard instruments,” said Craig. “But even though the instruments may look somewhat similar, there is a gulf between them.” This is a free event.

At 3 p.m. on Sunday (May 4), there will be a free recital in the Vanderhoef Studio Theater featuring faculty pianists Lois Brandwynne, Michael Seth Orland and Marilyn Swan, who will take turns performing a variety of works by Beethoven, Brahms, Debussy, Messiaen, Rachmaninoff, and more, which were composed with the more modern versions of the piano in mind.

Then the festival will conclude on Sunday (May 4) at 7 p.m. with a recital on fortepiano and piano by Eric Zivian. The program includes several short works composed for fortepiano by Muzio Clementi, W.A. Mozart and Ludwig van Beethoven (the Sonata in C Major No. 2, with Zivian and cellist Tanya Tomkins), performed on a copy of a 1795 instrument. Then Zivian will move to a modern Steinway, and perform short works by UC Davis faculty composers Christian Baldini and Kurt Rohde, works by French Impressionist composers Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel, and other works. (Tickets are $12-$17 general, $8 students).

 

 

 

 

 

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Gallery 625 to exhibit Royal Chicano Air Force work

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Gallery 625 will be hosting a group exhibition featuring the artwork of the Royal Chicano Air Force in a show called “RCAF and Beyond.”

The Royal Chicano Air Force, originally named the Rebel Chicano Art Front, was founded in 1969 to express the goals of the Chicano civil rights and labor organizing movement of the United Farm Workers. Founded by Esteban Villa and the late Jose Montoya, the movement was one of the most important collective artist group movements in California in the 1970s and 80s and worked to make available to the Chicano community a bilingual and bicultural arts center where artists could come together, exchange ideas, provide mutual support and make available to the public artistic, cultural, and educational programs and events.

“RCAF and Beyond” will feature the work of 12 artists including the silkscreen posters of Montoya, Villa, Ricardo Favela and Rudy Cuellar. These posters are on loan from the Sacramento State collection. Regional artists influenced by, or participating in, the RCAF and featured in the exhibition include D. Gonzalez, Xico Gonzalez, Carlos Jackson, Jaime Montiel, Maceo Montoya and Malaquias Montoya. Paintings by Omarte Jimenez and Ruby Chacon will be included as well. Chacon is the co-founder of the Mestizo Institute of Culture and Art, and Mestizo Arts and Activism in partnership with the University of Utah. The show runs through June 3.

Many of the exhibiting artists will be attending the opening reception from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday, May 2. The gallery is at 625 Court St. in Woodland, in Yolo County’s Erwin Maier Administration building. For more information contact YoloArts at 530-406-4844.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Royal Chicano Air Force exhibit photos

“Campesino y también fan de los Pumas,” a silkscreen print, was designed by artist Maceo Montoya in 2007. Courtesy photo
“Announcement Poster for Jose Montoya’s Pachuco” is a 1978 screenprint by Jose Montoya, Rodolfo “Rudy” Cuellar and Louie “The Foot” Gonzalez. Courtesy photo

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Tour date set for Clips Beer and Film Tour

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

New Belgium Brewing announced its national schedule Wednesday for Clips Beer & Film Tour — the beer-toting, film-traveling, nonprofit-benefitting show that will stop in 21 cities this year. From May to November, the tour will criss-cross America, including a stop in Davis on Aug. 1.

Clips is a free event, with all proceeds from beer sales going to local nonprofits. Since its inception in 2010, Clips Beer & Film Tour has raised nearly $370,000 for nonprofits nationwide.

Clips offers a venue where guests can try New Belgium’s more esoteric beer offerings, while watching short films created by New Belgium fans. Up to 18 beer varieties will be on tap, including some of the more hard-to-come-by beers from the Lips of Faith sereis, as well as brewery classics.

New Belgium beers will be available in 3-ounce samples or a 12-ounce pour. Served up by local beneficiary volunteers, there’s plenty of fun to be had alongside a host of traveling tricks and contests. Food from local vendors will also be available.

New Belgium selects approximately 20 short films for the tour each season from an online film competition. During each stop, New Belgium tries to leave as little of an environmental footprint as possible. Since its inception, Clips has diverted 85 percent of event waste from landfills, and partners with local organizations in each city to keep the events clean and green.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Mika Pelo photo

Mika Pelo will perform at UC Davis on May 3. Courtesy photo

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Who wants to be Randy Quaid?

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Remember the movie “Independence Day”? The people of the earth were facing a common enemy threatening to destroy them, so they put their differences aside and together they defeated the invading space aliens! Noble indeed!

As if!

We are now facing a terrible threat to our existence in climate change. Scientists are alarmed that their conservative dire predictions are coming true a lot worse and faster than they predicted! We need action, and we need it now!

Instead we are fighting jihads, and wars and make oil baron’s profits a priority and so on.

There are a few cosmetic changes, reminding me of the enormously obese person super-sizing the hamburgers and fries, and then getting the diet soda.

In the meantime nary a single Republican senator acknowledges that climate change exists and that there is anything we can do about it. This is theor “opinion” that they believe they are entitled to. Please throw them all out!

In the meantime Mother Nature or God is saying, “What do I have to do to get these fools’ attention? Floods, hurricanes, droughts, heat and cold waves, nothings seems to phase them!”

Finally it should be said that industrial hemp may be a major part of the solution.

Gabe Lewin
Davis

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

UC Davis Symphony Orchestra to perform Mahler’s “Titan,” Pelo’s new piano concerto

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

The UC Davis Symphony Orchestra will perform a popular classic — Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 1 (“Titan”) — and the premiere of a new piano concerto by Swedish-born faculty composer Mika Pelo in a concert at the Mondavi Center on Saturday (May 3) at 7 p.m.

Conductor Christian Baldini said “I am extremely happy to be presenting the piano concerto by Mika Pelo. Mika is an outstanding composer, who has had his music performed by great organizations like the Swedish Radio Orchestra. He wrote this concerto especially for our orchestra, and for our marvelous soloist Eric Zivian (who performed the Ravel Piano Concerto in G with our orchestra at my inaugural concert here in 2009).

Pianist Eric Zivian was born in Michigan and grew up in Toronto, Canada, where he attended the Royal Conservatory of Music. After receiving a diploma there, he left home at age fifteen to attend the Curtis Institute of Music, where he received a Bachelor of Music degree. He went on to receive graduate degrees from the Juilliard School and the Yale School of Music. He studied piano with Gary Graffman and Peter Serkin and composition. He attended the Tanglewood Music Center both as a performer and as a composer. Zivian now lives in the Bay Area and has performed at UC Davis several times.

Pelo said his 20-minute has three movements, performed without a break. “All of the music is based on the first three measures of a 1907 piano concerto by the Swedish composer Wilhelm Stenhammar,” who Pelo acknowledges is not a household name in this country nowadays. But Stenhammar mixed with the high and mighty during his lifetime: “Stenhammar performed his first piano concerto himself under the direction of Richard Strauss in Berlin, and conductor Arthur Nikisch performed several of Stenhammar’s orchestral works with the Berlin Philharmonic. One of Stenhammar’s close friends was composer Jean Sibelius… Luckily, conductors like the New York Philharmonic’s Alan Gilbert have recently reintroduced some of Stenhammar’s music, and one can only hope that this is the beginning of a revival of his music.”

Pelo’s concerto includes a fairly prominent role for electronics in the third movement, as well as an amplified bass clarinet solo. The piece is dedicated to Christian Baldini, pianist Eric Zivian, and the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra.

The Mahler symphony dates was composed between 1885 and 1888, and premiered in Budapest with the composer conductding. Mahler revised the piece in 1906. Scored for a large orchestra, and running around 50 minutes long, it is a big undertaking.

Baldini observed that “while composers like Brahms and Bruckner were over 40″ when they finished their first symphonies, “Mahler was still in his 20s” when he conducted the premiere of his symphony nicknamed “Titan.”

“Even though he was such a young man, the maturity of his First Symphony is simply incredible,” Baldini said. “The work condenses such a level of emotion, power, expression and structure that it is hard to compare it with anything that existed before. Mahler’s extremely original use of folk material, and the way in which it is incorporated in the musical discourse is unprecedented. Mahler was really the father of 20th Century modernisism. This is an outstanding musical work for both our orchestra and our audience to enjoy.

Opening the concert will be Carl Maria von Weber’s Overture to “Der Freischütz,” a popular concert piece taken from Weber’s best known opera.

Tickets are $12-$17 general, $8 students, www.mondaviarts.org or (530) 754-2787.

 

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Courtyard Health Care

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Media Contact:

Lisa Catalano, Regional Marketing Director

Covenant Care

949-680-0311

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sixteen Covenant Care Facilities Make US News Best Nursing Home List

Each Exceeding All Nine 5-Star Clinical Quality Measures

ALISO VIEJO, Calif. (April 23, 2014) — Each year, U.S. News and World Report designates the “Best Nursing Home” award to facilities that have earned an overall Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) rating of five stars — the highest rating awarded by CMS. These advancements in nursing care are continually monitored by the CMS, and each year, state survey teams conduct health inspections. This 5-star rating system is based off a facilities dedication to inspection standards, staffing and quality measures, and must be ranked 5-star in all categories. Covenant Care achieves exceptional results because of its focus on measurable quality.

“This recognition is a well deserved honor for our facilities. Covenant Care is dedicated to providing high quality care through clinical excellence for those we serve. Last year, more than 57 percent of our patients were discharged back to their home and community, exceeding the national average. I am extremely proud of the clinical care our facilities provide,” said Dava Ashley, chief operating officer of Covenant Care.

Covenant Care is pleased to announce the following facilities as one of the Best Nursing Homes in America:

Encinitas Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, Encinitas, CA

La Jolla Nursing & Rehabilitation, La Jolla, CA

Carson Nursing & Rehabilitation, Carson City, NV

Courtyard Healthcare Center, Davis, CA

Silver Hills Health Care Center, Las Vegas, NV

Pacific Gardens, Fresno, CA

Turlock Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, Turlock, CA

Vintage Faire Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, Modesto, CA

Shoreline Care Center, Oxnard, CA

Palo Alto Sub-Acute and Rehabilitation Center, Palo Alto, CA

Grant Cuesta Sub-acute and Rehabilitation Center, Mountain View, CA

Pacific Coast Manor, Capitola, CA

Friendship Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, Carlinville, IL

McCormick’s Creek Rehabilitation & Skilled Nursing, Spencer, IN

Edgewood Manor Nursing Center, Port Clinton, Ohio

Villa Springfield, Springfield, Ohio

About Covenant Care

“We are family serving families” — Founded in 1994, Covenant Care has grown to include more than 8,000 health care professionals in 57 health care and rehabilitation centers. With locations throughout the United States, Covenant Care provides quality, 24/7 care ranging from short-term rehabilitation therapy, to skilled nursing care. Measuring success one patient at a time, our goal is to provide compassionate and comprehensive care in a comfortable and safe environment.

###


VICTORIA ADAM | MULTI MARKETING CORP | 559.454.9400 x220 | 2033 N. Fine Ave, Fresno, CA 93727 www.multimarketingcorp.com

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 23, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 23, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 23, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 23, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 23, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

garden tour 5/3

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

Visit this lawn-less and water-wise, Davis garden in all its spring glory.
Landscape designer, Tara Watt, and metal artisan, Roger Madison, will open their Davis garden for public viewing on Saturday, May 3rd, and Sunday, May 4th from 12 – 5 p.m. Visitors are invited to wander the paths and explore the outdoor living spaces to see how this couple has utilized their tree canopy, plant knowledge and creativity to create a dynamic and water-savvy yard.
While most visitors will delight in the colorful display of blooming perennials and enjoy the many seating areas, knowledgeable gardeners will realize that the dynamic plantings and natural stonework have been created not only for aesthetic purposes, but particularly, to capitalize on plant watering regimens and shade requirements as well as to allow natural re-capture of rain and run off water. Visitors will also see how Watt’s whimsical ceramics and Madison’s custom metal are used throughout the yard to provide more focal points — a key strategy for adding interest to lawn-free landscapes. There is no charge for this event. Garden Show address is: 1116 Dartmouth Place, Davis. Street parking only, consideration of residents is appreciated. For Map & Information,
visit www.tarawattdesign.com.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 23, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Wineaux: Sorting out the chill factor

BruceGallaudetW

0425ManzanaresW

UCD running back Gabe Manzanares is coming off of a huge first season for the Aggies, who will showcase their spring growth with an open scrimmage on Saturday at Aggie Stadium. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

SONY DSC

Powerful Panda Kayltin LeBar-Triebke takes a big cut during a recent Davis Youth Softball Association 6U contest. Courtesy photo

0425sacW

Republic FC’s Ivan Mirković dribbles past Mexican legend Adolfo “Bofo” Bautista in a 3-1 victory over Chivas USA Reserves earlier this season. Sacramento's home opener is Saturday at Hughes Stadium. Courtesy photo

JeanJackmanW

SusanLeonardiWineauxW

By
May 01, 2014 | Leave Comment

I usually say no to the offer of a wine bucket. In part because restaurants typically keep their whites quite chilled, and they need a few minutes to come to a good temperature. But mostly because I enjoy the experience of a good white wine as it gradually warms.

Most of us just put whites in the refrigerator and take them out at serving — and keep reds on a shelf in the pantry so they’ll be at “room temperature.” But the typical temperature of a refrigerator is 35-38 degrees, which is too cold even for white wine, and many folks keep their rooms at about 70 (different from European “room temperature” — more in the range of 65), which is too warm even for bold reds. In the summer, my own thermostat tends to hover around 80, which is much too warm.

You can easily get more precise advice — more precise than “chilled” or “room temperature — on the “proper” temperature at which to serve wine.

Usually it goes something like this: 40-50 degrees for light whites, rosés and sparkling wines; 50-60 for full-bodied whites and light reds; 60-65 for full-bodied reds. Alternatively, you might be advised to take the wines in that first group out of the refrigerator for 15 minutes before serving and the second group 30 minutes; the third group you’ll want to put in the refrigerator for 15-30 minutes before serving. Sometimes charts offer even more precision — they might tell you, for example, to chill a pinot noir for 25 minutes and a cabernet for 15.

Of course, as soon as you pour the wine into the glass it will begin to warm, and if you touch the bowl of the glass with your hand, it will warm even faster. Which is why most wine glasses have stems.

The reason for all this concern is that if a wine is too cold, you won’t get much range of flavor; if it’s too warm, the alcohol will dominate the taste. That said, though, there’s a great deal of wiggle room here. And paying attention to your wine as it gradually warms is a good way to discover the point at which it seems to you at its flavorful peak, which may or may not be what the chart advises.

A really good wine will reveal its layers as it changes temperature (of course, it will also be opening up and changing as it interacts with whatever you’re eating), so rather than just one peak, it may have many. And even a relatively simple wine often has a hidden personality that will never emerge if you keep it too cold.

A case in point is the La Poggio Trebbiano that I mentioned in the last column. It’s not a complicated wine, but it manages to hold my interest even as the bottle approaches room temperature, as it does by the end of my dinner. If I’d kept it completely chilled, I would have thought it simply a pleasant, peachy quaffer, and I wouldn’t have discovered the core of stone fruit and mineral that makes it so appealing — and such a good bargain ($8 at Valley Wine company).

I’ve always thought the exception to my little “rule” was sparkling wine, which I like cold and crisp. I usually keep it refrigerated while I’m eating, so that it doesn’t warm up on me. One night, though, I decided to experiment. We had been saving for a special occasion a bottle of Champagne that some lovely friends gave us as a gift. On Easter Sunday (and thus the end of our non-ranting Lent) as I was roasting a pound of Fiddler’s Green asparagus for asparagus-lemon zest-pine nut linguine, I decided that this was indeed just the special occasion.

The bottle? Champagne J. Lassalle Brut. Imported by Kermit Lynch — in fact one of the oldest wines in his portfolio — it comes from small-production, family-owned vineyards, all premier cru. All three permitted Champagne grapes, pinot meunier, pinot noir and chardonnay, go into this wine — in proprietary proportions, probably about 60/20/20 in the current release, though it changes year by year. Angéline Templier, granddaughter of the founder, is the winemaker. Kermit remarks, “Their 28-year tradition of “une femme, un esprit, un style” (one woman, one spirit, one style) holds true today more than ever.”

The “tough, hardworking” (Kermit’s description) women who continue to make this Champagne use the same methods as the house’s founder, Jules Lassalle, even using the same wooden basket press he installed more than 50 years ago. Enormous care goes into each bottle — they allow it, unlike most champagnes, to complete its malolactic fermentation. And the bottled wine is extensively aged.

The result is a lovely, elegant, layered wine with flavors of pear, peach, fig and ginger — and warm buttery yeasty biscuits. The most repeated comment at our dinner table was an awed “This just keeps getting better and better.” And the most surprising thing was the persistence and liveliness of the bubbles that just seemed to increase as the wine warmed. Had I kept it in the refrigerator with a spoon (someone once told me a spoon would help retain the bubbles — I have no idea if that’s true but I persist in doing it), I wouldn’t have experienced that — or the increasing richness of the flavors. And it certainly didn’t need a spoon to keep up that steady stream of bubbles.

My only criticism is that we reached the bottom of the bottle all too soon — but I’m saving my pennies (dimes? quarters?) in order to acquire another as soon as possible. Fortunately it’s not one of those $150 extravagances. At $35 it’s an entirely do-able splurge. And a great bargain for true premier cru Champagne. I can’t find it anywhere in Davis, but a spring trip to Berkeley sounds delightful. Kermit Lynch, where you’ll undoubtedly find a hundred other bottles you want to try, is on the corner of San Pablo and Cedar, handily next door to Acme Bakery where you can pick up the wonderful Edible Schoolyard Loaf.
The next special occasion is, I’m sure, just around the bend.

You won’t, though, need to bring a bottle for this special occasion: The Davis High Baroque Orchestra continues its fundraising efforts from 5 to 8 p.m. May 10 at the Good Life Garden (Mondavi Institute for Food and Wine Science). More than 20 wineries will be pouring, the students will be playing, appetizers will abound. There will also be a silent auction. Tickets are $50 — get them at Watermelon Music or online at Brown Paper Tickets. Support these dedicated musicians!

— Reach Susan Leonardi at vinosusana@gmail.com. Comment on this column at www.davisenterprise.com

Susan Leonardi

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Striving for Zero Waste

By
April 24, 2014 | Leave Comment

I was pleased to see Michelle Millet’s forum piece on reducing the waste stream by bringing coffee mugs, shopping bags and utensils. This required some self sacrifice and discipline. I’d like to add that there is another way to reduce waste, but it’s more like a treasure hunt.
Consider upcycling. Most people have no idea that one damaged dresser can become a set of shelves, a rabbit hutch, a bathroom vanity chest, and the drawers can be used for raised bed planters. Second hand clothes can be refashioned for less money than buying fabric. Furthermore, it’s fun. If you don’t believe me take a look at ideas I have collected at the following websites: http://www.pinterest.com/sallyozma/refashioned/

http://www.pinterest.com/sallyozma/upcycled/

On June 1st, the Square Tomatoes Crafts Fair will hold an Invention and Upcycling Contest. (Our upcoming fair on May 4th is “Moms, Mayans and Mexico” a celebration of mothers and folk art.) The Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring the Invention and Upcycling Contest and we are looking for second hand stores, hardware and art supply stores, nonprofits, and city agencies to join us. When people, upcycle everyone wins. We are also looking for furniture redo wizards, maverick stylists, tinkers, and makers to join our Invention and Upcycling contest for a $50 prize. Contestants bring their display their entries fair day in Central Park. Couches or inventions too big to bring can be displayed by a photo.
Keep looking at our Square Tomatoes Crafts website or email me at SquareTCrafts@gmail.com.

Sally Parker

Davis

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Rose weekend 5/3

California Center for Urban Horticulture, University of California, Davis
4.18.2014

Annual Event Celebrating Beautiful Roses

UC Davis is hosting its 7th annual Rose Weekend Event, sponsored by the California Center for Urban Horticulture (CCUH) and Foundation Plant Services on May 3rd and 4th. The event is free and open to the public and both days include tours, information booths and a rose sale. Saturday will feature special guest speakers for a rose program.
Bus tours held from 12:30-3:30 showcase eight acres of Foundation Plant Services roses open to the public just for this event on both Saturday and Sunday. Spend time in the rose field up close with roses, and don’t forget to bring your camera!
Information booths include a UC Master Gardener booth to answer questions about roses on both days. On Saturday, a booth sponsored by Foundation Plant Services will feature displays and information about the use of tissue culture for elimination of viruses and roses.
Also on Saturday at 10 a.m., Peter Boyd, noted Rosarian from England will give a talk entitled, “An Introduction to the History of Garden Roses with Special Attention Given to Scots Roses.” At 11 a.m., Christian Bedard, rose breeder from Weeks Roses, will speak on, “Breeding and Selecting Roses for the 21st Century.”

The rose sale will have 38 rose varieties to choose from, including hybrid teas, grandifloras, floribundas and English-style roses. Numerous fragrant roses and roses that are perfect for cutting are available, as well as several roses new for 2014 including ‘Good as Gold,’ ‘Happy Go Lucky,’ and ‘Coretta Scott King.’ Free mini floribunda roses will be given to attendees on both days, while supplies last. Sweet potato plants will also be available for sale. May is a perfect time to plant this easy-to-grow crop that is harvested in the fall.
How to Get There

Rose Weekend takes place at Foundation Plant Services, 455 Hopkins Road on the UCD campus. (There will be signs/balloons showing where to turn). To reach the site, take Hutchison Drive west of Highway 113, then veer right around the first traffic circle and then left around the second traffic circle to continue onto Hutchison Drive. Drive about a mile down the road until you reach a second line of olive trees, that will be Hopkins Road. Turn left and continue until you reach Foundation Plant Services on the right hand side (a pink and purple building with roses in the front). Parking is free. If you reach the UCD Airport, you’ve gone too far.
Roses and the Drought
Rose plants can be tougher than we give them credit for and can be used in a low-water landscape although it will change their growth and bloom. In the Central Valley with a “normal” rainy winter roses won’t need irrigation until the onset of warm weather in April and May. In times of drought, the water-conscious gardener may be willing to accept spring and fall bloom only with a slowing of growth and cessation of bloom in the warmest summer months. The American Rose Society has an excellent online reference to use for learning how much to water at shttp://www.ars.org/about-roses/rose-care-articles/how-often-should-i-water-my-roses/. Like all plants roses will tolerate heat and infrequent water if watered deeply to encourage roots to grow into a greater volume of soil.

Media Contact: Anne Schellman, California Center for Urban Horticulture, (530) 752-6642, aschellman@ucdavis.edu

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

By
April 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

Officers with the Union Pacific Police Department and Amtrak said the adult female was walking in the middle of the westbound tracks when she was hit by the train, which was headed from Sacramento to Oakland. The incident occurred at about 7:20 a.m.

 

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 21, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Tuleyome Tales — great horned owls

*** PRESS RELEASE *** PRESS RELEASE *** PRESS RELEASE***

Tuleyome Tales

Whooooo? The Great Horned Owls

by Mary K. Hanson

I was walking with my dog through a stretch of riparian (river side) habitat in the region, and was suddenly attracted to the sound of a group of Acorn Woodpeckers, high up in the trees, having a squawking fit over something, so I went to see what the problem was.

At first, all I saw was the woodpeckers themselves. They were in quite a tizzy, shouting their loud rasping calls as they jumped from branch to branch, flashing their wings. I couldn’t see anything in the tree that might have been the cause of such a ruckus, however, so I looked around a bit more. And then I spotted it.

In another tree just a few feet away was a huge Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus).

Basking in the early morning sun, he swiveled his large head around, looked at me with sleepy amber-gold eyes and then proceeded to completely ignore me. I couldn’t ignore him, though. In fact, I think I stood there for about 20 minutes or so just watching him and taking photographs. Great Horned Owls are one of the most easily recognizable owls in the country, but I’d never seen one this close up before. I was mesmerized.

Sometimes called “Cat Owls” because of their ear-like tufts, Great Horned Owls occupy a wide variety of habitats in California including riparian forests, cliff sides, deserts and even residential areas. And they’re not particular about where they nest either. These owls may take over the treetop nests of other large birds, or move into an abandoned squirrel’s nest, occupy stumps, ledges, barns and “owl boxes” or other manmade structures.

Nesting season is generally between December and July – so we’re right in the middle of it, now. Although they only use a nesting site once in a season and don’t return to it the next year, the owls are good tenants with both parents looking after their young nestlings and one another. Female Great Horned Owls usually lay 2 or 3 eggs in a clutch and then both parents take turns incubating them, with the male leaving the nest only to hunt down food for his mate.

Great Horned Owls have a somewhat broad diet which can sometimes include other birds (which explains why the Acorn Woodpeckers were so upset that the owl was so nearby) and prey larger than themselves, but they most often stick to mice, rabbits, squirrels and other small mammals, including skunks. Like all owls, the Great Horned Owls tend to swallow their meals whole, and then regurgitate up the indigestible parts like bones and fur in “pellet” form. (It’s not uncommon to find complete mouse skulls in these pellets.)

Once the owlets arrive, both parents remain to care for them until they’re about 9 weeks old and ready to fly off on their own. Even after the owlets are airborne, their parents may still look after them for a few more months. In fact, Great Horned Owls are exceedingly protective of their young; they’d have no qualms about attacking a human that got to close to their youngsters. So, if you see a nest or owlets, it’s best to give them a wide berth.

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been able to spot several of these large handsome birds in the local area – including a female in her nest above an outcropping of mistletoe — so keep an eye out for them, especially if you’re walking just before dusk when they’re heading out to hunt or just after dawn when they’re heading back to their daytime resting sites. And remember to take lots of photos!

Tuleyome Tales is a monthly publication of Tuleyome, conservation organization with offices in Woodland and Napa, CA. Mary K. Hanson is an amateur naturalist and photographer who is the author of “The Chubby Woman’s Walkabout” blog. For more information about Tuleyome, go to www.tuleyome.org.

Mary Hanson
Executive Assistant
Membership, Volunteer and Lecture Series Coordinator

Tuleyome – Deep Home Place
607 North Street, Woodland, CA 95695
Email: mhanson@tuleyome.org
Phone: 530-350-2599
On the web: www.tuleyome.org
Remember to “Like” us on Facebook!
My normal office hours are 8:00 am to 2:30 pm, Monday through Friday
You Can Donate to Tuleyome By Clicking Here!

(Let me know if you would like to stop receiving emails from this address.)

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 21, 2014 | Leave Comment

Elizabeth Case

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Mercury expert to speak on human health impacts, May 2 in State Capitol

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 21st, 2014

Mercury expert to speak on human health impacts, May 2 in State Capitol

Jane Hightower, MD, author of the exposé Diagnosis: Mercury, will be the keynote speaker at an event highlighting the ongoing human health impacts of mercury in California’s environment.

Dr. Hightower, a national expert on mercury, will speak about her research into the health impacts of consuming mercury-contaminated fish, with a special focus on the irreversible neurological impacts of this exposure to children during pregnancy and childhood.

The event “Mercury and Human Health: An informational summit on the impacts of mercury exposure through fish consumption” will be held in the California State Capitol hearing room 2040 on May 2, 2014 from 1:00 – 3:00 pm. It will feature a presentation by Dr. Hightower, other guest speakers, and a question session.

The event is hosted by nonprofit The Sierra Fund, with co-sponsors Senator Fran Pavley, Physicians for Social Responsibility/Sacramento, Sierra Health Foundation, California Indian Environmental Alliance and California State University, Chico.

“The state recognizes mercury as a serious environmental toxin,” says Senator Pavley. “This forum brings expert information about this urgent public health problem into the Capitol to make this information accessible to the public, policy makers and health professionals.”

The Sierra Fund has been working since 2006 to raise awareness about mercury in locally caught fish, which originates primarily with historic gold mining activities. State-issued fish consumption advisories due to mercury are in effect for all lakes and reservoirs in California, while surveys of anglers have confirmed that in spite of the advisories, some people are eating fish that expose them to dangerous levels of the toxic metal.

“We have learned that most people do not have clear information about mercury in fish, and do not understand that making good choices about the kind of fish they eat will help them avoid dangerous exposures,” says Elizabeth Martin, CEO of The Sierra Fund. “For the last year, we have been conducting outreach to doctors, public health officials and residents in rural Sierra communities, and are now pleased to bring one of the stars of this issue to the State Capitol.”

“We are very excited to co-host Dr. Hightower for this event, a first of its kind in the State Capitol,” says Dr. Harry Wang, President of Physicians for Social Responsibility/Sacramento. “As a child psychiatrist, I am concerned about the increasing numbers of children diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism and ADHD. Mercury is a known neurotoxin and early exposures are associated with these conditions.”

Dr. Jane Hightower is a Board Certified specialist in internal medicine. She is affiliated with multiple hospitals in the Bay Area, including California Pacific Medical Center and St. Mary’s Medical Center. She has conducted medical board certified workshops for medical professionals as well as publishing results of her original research on public exposure to mercury through consuming fish.

The Sierra Fund is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the communities and environment of the Sierra Nevada region. Since 2006, The Sierra Fund’s primary program has focused on raising awareness about the ongoing effects of historic mining in California, including high mercury in fish. For more information visit www.sierrafund.org or www.reclaimingthesierra.org.

Event Details:

Mercury & Human Health
An Informational Summit on the Impacts of Mercury Exposure through Fish Consumption
California State Capitol Hearing Room 2040
Friday, May 2, 2014
1:00 – 3:00 pm

For more information or to set up an interview, contact:
Amber Taxiera, The Sierra Fund Outreach Coordinator
(530) 265-8454 x216

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 21, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 21, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 21, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 21, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Whole Hog Spring Dinner 5/18

By
April 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

Capay Valley Vision presents: Whole Hog Spring Dinner. Celebrate spring with a gourmet, locally-sourced dinner under the stars in beautiful Rumsey at the north end of Capay Valley. Enjoy pit-roasted whole hog as the main entree, seasonal side dishes, and decadent dessert expertly prepared by local Chef Casey Willard. Passed appetizers, wine, and beer will kick off the evening while live music enhances the beautiful ambiance. Dinner will be served family style in an open-air barn. Come casual and enjoy this special night. Proceeds from the dinner support Capay Valley Vision in its mission to preserve the Capay Valley’s rural character, agriculture, history, natural environment, and vital local economy.

Whole Hog Dinner
Sunday May 18, 2014
4 pm to 8 pm
Rumsey Hall
14380 Manzanita Avenue and State Route 16
Rumsey, CA 95627
Tickets: $75 per person
Seating is limited.
To reserve tickets contact:
Capay Valley Vision Executive Director Nancy Pennebaker
nancy.pennebaker@gmail.com
916-475-6408
Mail payment to:
Capay Valley Vision
PO Box 799
Esparto, CA 95627

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

elias 5/9 San Diego politics

By
April 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: FRIDAY, MAY 9, 2014 OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“SAN DIEGO SHOWS SOME THINGS DON’T CHANGE IN POLITICS”

It’s all the rage these days to say that politics has been changed enormously by the combination of the “top two” primary election system and voters’ increasing reluctance to declare allegiance to either major political party.

While it’s true these phenomena have made some changes, it’s also true that some of the basics remain.

Among thechanges: In districts where either Democrats or Republicans have very large voter registration margins, top two can and has produced interesting intra-party matchups. The presence of the minority party’s voters – whichever party is in the minority in a given district – causes November winners to conduct themselves in a more moderate manner than they otherwise might.

But some things remain just as they were, and that has never been better demonstrated than in the February San Diego special election making former City Councilman Kevin Faulconer, a Republican, mayor of a city carried by Democrat Barack Obama by a 25 percent margin in the last presidential election.

A post-election analysis conducted for the non-profit Voice of San Diego news site by Ohio State University political scientist Vladimir Kogan, a former staffer at that site, indicates this happened because of a seemingly ancient phenomenon: Republicans turn out much more heavily than Democrats, especially in special elections.

Faulconer, a Republican now trying to govern as a moderate, managed to win in a city where Democrats have a 13 percent voter registration advantage.

Kogan’s analysis showed that only 36 percent of voters who went for Obama in 2012 went for Democrat David Alvarez for mayor, while 63.5 percent did not cast ballots in the mayoral election.

By contrast, 76 percent of those who voted two years ago for Republican Mitt Romney for president chose Faulconer, while only 23 percent did not vote in the special mayoral election.

Some other statistics Kogan mined from the February vote demonstrate what political professionals have long known: Democrats turn out in far greater numbers for regularly scheduled runoffs than they do for either primaries or special elections.

That’s one big reason some Democrat-dominated cities have lately rescheduled their municipal elections to coincide with the November vote and it’s also why the Democratic-controlled state Legislature voted to move all initiatives that quality for a ballot via voter signatures into November. They figure the causes they favor stand a far better chance at that time.

The San Diego result also reinforces the reality that a disgraced politician can hurt whoever from his own party tries to succeed him. Alvarez, for example, has never been associated with wrongdoing, but was trying to hold onto the seat won in 2012 by fellow Democrat Bob Filner, chased from office in a groping and sexual harassment scandal.

Only 44 percent of the people who voted for Filner went for Alvarez this year, while 55.5 percent didn’t cast ballots. Meanwhile, 65 percent of those who picked 2012 loser Carl DeMaio (now running for a San Diego seat in Congress) voted for Faulconer and just 31.5 percent of DeMaio voters did not participate.

No one can say for sure that had the February vote somehow been delayed nine months until November, things would have gone differently. But for sure, Democrats would have had a better chance.

For there will be other candidates, other causes on the ballot then that they care about. But even with a big push from labor unions, Democrats never generated much enthusiasm in February.

Meanwhile, Republicans salivated over the opportunity to recapture a mayor’s office that had been almost exclusively theirs for decades.

Does all this mean anything elsewhere, where voters are not as accustomed to Republican success as they have been in San Diego? Maybe. For sure, Democrats long have wanted to avoid contesting anything important anytime other than November, so they clearly knew the danger to them in a situation like what San Diego saw in February.

It all goes to show that, as humorist Finley Peter Dunne’s comic character Mr. Dooley pointed out more than a century ago, “The more things change, the more they stays the same.”

-30-
Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” now available in an updated third edition. His email address is tdelias@aol.com. For more Elias columns, go to www.californiafocus.net

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

elias 5/6 fracking

By
April 22, 2014 | Leave Comment

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: TUESDAY, MAY 6, 2014, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“FRACKING: FIND AN INDISPUTABLY CLEAN METHOD”

When a city like Carson, home to one large oil refinery and next-door neighbor to another, hard by the junction of two major freeways and site of both a Cal State campus and a Major League Soccer stadium, slaps a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing because of environmental questions, you know fracking of California’s vast oil and gas reserves is no sure thing.

Carson’s current city fathers and mothers, not around when most of those land-use decisions were made, are essentially saying “basta,” Italian for enough. It’s one thing to be oil-rich, as Carson is, and another to have unsafe drinking water, which many in the city feel they’d get if Occidental Petroleum goes ahead with a large fracking project in an oil field long considered mostly depleted.

Carson is not alone. Los Angeles, another city with a long and storied history of oil drilling, is drafting an anti-fracking ordinance. So are others.

This activity comes because environmentalists don’t believe Gov. Jerry Brown and the state Legislature went nearly far enough last year, when they okayed the nation’s toughest set of fracking regulations.

The stakes in all this are enormous for all of California. The Monterey Shale geologic formation extending almost 200 miles south from near San Juan Bautista to Bakersfield and Ventura, and nearly 50 miles wide, is said by some to contain as much as two-thirds of America’s petroleum reserves.

All this should make it a major public priority to find a fracking method of unquestionable safety.

Oil, of course, has been drilled in the Central Valley part of the Monterey Shale for more than a century. The Elk Hills federal petroleum reserve near Taft is part of this history. Coalinga, about 100 miles north, is home to the state’s most significant oil industry museum, recognizing oil’s historic role in that area.

The oil drawn from those fields helped propel companies like Union Oil, Occidental and Chevron to international significance, but could be dwarfed by what lurks in underground shale.

Yet, the Central Valley’s long history of soil subsidence and chemical pollution of once-fertile farmland provides a cautionary note, even if a USC study last year concluded all-out fracking of the Monterey Shale could produce hundreds of thousands of new jobs.

Environmentalists like to counter that report with a 2012 study of several Pennsylvania counties where fracking is common and has created few jobs. They also note a spate of small Ohio earthquakes now linked by many to fracking. But there’s also North Dakota, once a place of high unemployment and now a fracking boom state with the lowest unemployment rate in America.

Until former Treasury Dept. official Neel Kashkari and current Assemblyman Tim Donnelly emerged as the two apparent Republican frontrunners to oppose Brown, it appeared he might be hurt by his 2013 fracking compromise. But now anti-frackers have nowhere else to turn other than Brown. Donnelly evinces no interest in environmental issues, while Kashkari advocates fracking the state to the hilt.

Doing that, he says, could produce up to 2.8 million new jobs (far more optimistic than USC’s estimate) and $24.6 billion in new state and local tax revenues.

The best thing about the new state fracking regulations may be that no one likes them. Environmentalists gripe the rules didn’t stop the practice, while pro-fracking oil industry spokesman Tupper Hull of the Western States Petroleum Assn. says, “We don’t like them.”

But where Hull went on to say, “We can live with” the new rules, environmentalists don’t make that concession. They worry that water pollution could occur even though oil companies must now apply for permits before fracking and disclose where it will occur, two things they’ve never done in 60 years of fracking, mostly in older oil wells.

The new rules aren’t permanent, though. The state will report near the end of this year on what further restrictions should be part of permanent rules, and the Democratic-dominated Legislature will most likely okay them.

But there has to be a way to have at least have half a loaf, perhaps by using careful limits on where fracking can occur in order to do it without fouling ground water. That might allow enough activity to ease the existing severe unemployment in areas most likely to be fracked until an entirely safe method is found.

-30-
Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” now available in an updated third edition. His email address is tdelias@aol.com

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 20, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Breakfast with Bunny letter

By
April 20, 2014 | Leave Comment

Dear Editor,

The Davis Odd Fellows Lodge just held it’s third annual Breakfast with the Bunny, and a very successful even it was! Over 150 children and their parents/grandparents/guardians attended, and I heard only favorable comments about the event and about the Davis Odd Fellows. The attendees enjoyed a Continental breakfast, followed by a short walk to a park for a real egg hunt, and concluding with the “Eggstravaganza” featuring a carnival, arts and crafts tables, face painting and caricatures.

Barb Geisler and I co-chaired this event and we had some GREAT volunteers. Zita Demaree ran the very popular carnival and Margie and Mike Cabral (and their daughter) headed up the egg hunt. Both the carnival and the egg hunt were new features this year – so thank you Zita, Margie and Mike. Thank you also to hard-working volunteers: JuDee Archuleta, Joyce Trujillo, Dave Rosenberg, Jessica Sneeden, Joel Mandel, Findlay McIntosh, and Jeff Oblinger. Also, thanks to Jeannie Pytel and her son, Eric, who was “the Bunny” for the second year in a row. Zita also arranged for a couple dozen sorority and fraternity kids who came to the Lodge to help out in all aspects. Noble Grand Bob Schelen came by for moral support.

Special thanks to the Davis Food Coop which, once again, donated the food for the breakfast, PurRoast coffee which donated the coffee, Nugget Markets which donated the sugar cookies for the cookie decorating table, Debbie Davis and the Davis Enterprise for all their stories about the event, Davis Community Church for donating a park on their property for the egg hunt, and Avid Reader Active and Common Grounds which sold tickets for us.

Folks left the event talking about attending our Breakfast with Santa in December!

F – L – T

Lea Rosenberg
Vice Grand of the Davis Odd Fellows and
Co-chair Breakfast with the Bunny Committee

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Northstar Pond oped

Managing Northstar Pond

By Andy Bale

Warm weather is coming and algae mats have begun to grow on Northstar pond again. Parks management and experienced staff know that the industrial-style aerators in place in Northstar pond do nothing to improve the pond’s overall water quality or control algae. They have told me so. However, the Parks Department will be under pressure to run their aerators in the pond all day long as they have in summers passed. They should resist this pressure and, instead, look for an effective solution to the pond’s water quality problems and neighborhood concerns.

It likely costs the City about $10,000 a year to run the aerators and, over the years, total costs are likely more than $100,000 – a huge waste of money and resources. Unfortunately, a small group of citizens insists that the aerators control algae in the pond, and they are very vocal. So, Parks continues to run the aerators because, as one manager told me, it is cheaper and easier than dealing with the many calls of complaint that these citizens generate. Rewarding this kind of harassment doesn’t seem like either a fiscally or socially responsible approach.

While aerators have a place in water quality management, they are inappropriate and ineffective in Northstar Pond. In deeper ponds, aerators can provide oxygen to bottom water that is cut off from the atmosphere. They can create circulation. And, they can break up algae mats. But Northstar Pond is very shallow and broad, with no horizontal circulation. Here, the aerators simply churn water and do nothing to control algae or odors in the greater pond. As shown in photos accompanying this editorial, algae cover the pond right up to the edge of the aerators despite their continuous operation. The photos were taken in September, after a summer of running the aerators all day, seven days a week. Over 90% of the pond is unaffected by the aerators.

Nearly seven years ago, I was asked by a neighbor to help her negotiate with Parks about the aerator schedule. She lived right on the pond and, for her, the sound of the aerators all day long was unbearable. As anyone knows who has been near them when they start or stop, the aerators really are loud. Over these many years of talking she and I have come to agreements with Parks and seen them broken without explanation. Nothing’s been resolved for long, but I have come to understand the issues well. There are two: the aesthetics of “fountains, “ and seasonal warm-weather growth of algae mats (or, pond scum). As a start, Parks should clearly separate these two issues because fountains in this pond have nothing to do with algae growth.

Some people, not everyone by any means, want to see a water feature in the pond. Personally, I prefer the pond natural and quiet. But if there is a strong desire for a water feature, and there are funds to purchase and run it, I’d support a pleasant well-designed fountain.

Controlling algae is a more complicated problem to resolve. And, it’s not clear that everyone would want seasonal growth of algae controlled. Many people may be fine with a naturally eutrophic pond that grows algae in the summer and is clear in the winter. Any effective approach to managing algae in the pond is likely to be costly and will require significant commitment of time and funds.

Basically, to control algae in the pond, Parks needs either to kill them, remove them, or inhibit their growth. There are many approaches. Based on discussions with neighbors and colleagues, here is a list of ideas that Parks might consider:

1. Rake and remove surface algae regularly.
2. Drain the pond, dry its sediments and scrape the bottom to remove nutrients that have built up over the last 20 years.
3. Treat the pond to increase color and reduce light penetration.
4. Treat the pond to kill algae.
5. Create an outlet and periodically fill and drain the pond to remove suspended nutrients. This outlet could also be used to skim off and break up surface algae as studies in UC Davis arboretum have shown.
6. Create an attractive waterfall with a natural rock filter on the island in the pond.
7. Install a sprinkler system or moving fountain that could break up surface algae throughout the pond.
8. Design habitat to filter pond water.  Originally, the pond was designed so that pond water was used to irrigate surrounding vegetation. Reinstate this design and create habitat on the pond perimeter as a natural filter system to remove organic matter.

Parks would be well served to focus its limited resources on establishing a long-term plan for the pond. With community involvement, Parks should determine what kind of pond the City wants, and can afford, to maintain.

A good management plan will require work, and its effectiveness will depend on Parks’ commitment. But I believe that Parks can find an approach that will resolve every reasonable concern about water quality, aesthetics and noise in Northstar pond. Parks should take serious steps in that direction.

— Andy Bale has lived in the Northstar neighborhood for the last seven years. He holds a PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering from UC Davis and has specialized in surface water quality and numerical simulation for over 25 years.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Lewin letter

By
April 20, 2014 | Leave Comment

I know, but we deserve an explanation of why they took 99 hours! Sounds like padding!

From: “Newsroom”
To: gabelewin@comcast.net
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 2:29:28 PM
Subject: Re: Letter to Editor

Hello Gabe:
We have reported the facts about the billing — 99 hours total, divided among several attorneys.
Debbie Davis
Editor/Assistant Publisher

On Apr 18, 2014, at 6:44 PM, gabelewin@comcast.net wrote:

Gabe lewin 1111 Drexel Drive Davis CA 95616.
Sir/Madam
I never used to take much interest l in the school board elections. I thought it may be important to the people running, but for the rest of us, “who cares?!”
I think I was not alone and we have learned the hard way that we need to pay attention!
I am referring, of course, to the volleyball-gate of Davis. There is one important question that, to my mind, has not been answered. Exactly how did the law firm come to bill us in excess of $23,000 to look into an issue where a parent was objecting to a kid being dropped from a volley ball team? How complex is this? How many hours did they spend, and doing what exactly? I think I can smell a dead rodent! And we do not even get to see the report!
If this is legitimate, then obviously, I am in the wrong business!

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

Evan Ream

Evan Ream graduated with a B.A. in journalism from Southern Oregon in Ashland, Ore. He loves soccer more than any person rationally should. "Some people think football is a matter of life and death. I don't like that attitude. I can assure them it is much more serious than that." - Bill Shankly
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 19, 2014 | Leave Comment

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Criminal Defense Lawyers group supports Beronio

By
April 16, 2014 | Leave Comment

Debbie: Here’s a short press release for you. Please note that there are number of local attorneys from the office of the public defender who support Janene. However, they are not permitted to use their titles as “deputy public defender” in their endorsements. So please simply refer to them (as I have done below) as criminal defense lawyers. Thank you! Dave

*************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

The Beronio for Judge Campaign announced today that a number of local criminal defense attorneys have formed a group called “Criminal Defense Lawyers for Beronio” to support her campaign for election as Yolo Superior Court Judge. Campaign Senior Adviser and spokesman Judge Dave Rosenberg said, “Janene’s campaign has been endorsed by a large number of local prosecuting attorneys as well as local defense attorneys. It’s really a remarkable thing to receive such levels of support from both sides of the aisle – at bottom, it’s a testament to Janene Beronio’s record of fairness and equal treatment.”

Yolo Superior Court Commissioner Janene Beronio is a candidate for election to the Yolo Superior Court. The election is June 3. Beronio has served as a Superior Court Commissioner for Yolo County for the past 25 years, and is supported by all the Yolo Judges, both active and retired, and a wide spectrum of practicing attorneys and citizens throughout the county.

Head of the Yolo County Conflict Defense Panel J Toney will co-chair the Criminal Defense Lawyers for Beronio, and said today, “It’s hard to imagine anyone better qualified to be a Superior Court Judge. Commissioner Beronio is meticulous and compassionate. She is extremely fair to both sides. Her experience as a former deputy district attorney and long-time Court Commissioner will allow her to be an effective Judge from her first day on the Bench.”

Also co-chairing Criminal Defense Lawyers for Beronio is long-time local criminal defense attorney Martha Sequeira who said, “Lawyers who defend people accused of crime simply want Judges who know the law, who listen, who are courteous and calm on the Bench, and who will give fair and equal treatment to all sides. Janene Beronio has done that as a Commissioner and will do that as a Judge.”

Co-chair Rodney Beede, another long-time local criminal defense attorney will also co-chair. Mr. Beede added the following, “In my 35 years of criminal defense I have come to trust Commissioner Beronio to give a fair, thorough review to my clients. I look forward to relying on her wisdom and experience as a great addition to the Yolo Superior Court Bench.”

Other members of the steering committee for Criminal Defense Lawyers for Beronio are criminal defense lawyers Amber Posten, Chuck Pacheco, and Jenny Stoneburner.

A seventh major Yolo County law enforcement organization has endorsed Yolo Superior Court Commissioner Janene Beronio in her election for Yolo Superior Court Judge, her campaign announced today. “This is an unprecedented clean sweep of every local law enforcement association in Yolo County,” said campaign spokesman Judge Dave Rosenberg.

The new endorsement comes from the UC Davis Police Officer Association. In a letter to Commissioner Beronio, Association President Rob Sotelo said, “It is with my expressed delight that I share with you that you have the full support of the UC Davis Police Officer Association as you run for the judicial seat for the Yolo County Superior Court.”

Yolo Superior Court Commissioner Beronio now has the endorsement and support of the following seven local law enforcement associations:

Davis Police Officers Association
UC Davis Police Officer Association
West Sacramento Police Officers’ Association
Winters Police Officers Association
Woodland Professional Police Employees Association
Woodland Squad Club of the California Highway Patrol
Yolo Deputy Sheriffs Association

Commissioner Beronio has also received the endorsement of the Davis Professional Firefighters Local #3494, a public safety association, as well as Yolo County Sheriff Ed Prieto and Yolo County District Attorney Jeff Reisig.

“Getting the support of public safety employees from every city in this county, plus UCD and the sheriff’s deputies is gratifying and appreciated,” said Commissioner Beronio. These men and women work in the criminal justice system every day, and are often in court. I welcome their support.”

Yolo Superior Court Commissioner Janene Beronio is a candidate for election to the Yolo Superior Court. She has worked as a Yolo Superior Court Commissioner – a judicial officer position – for the past 25 years, and has garnered the support and endorsement of every Yolo County Superior Court Judge, both active and retired, in her campaign for election.

# # # # #

Family law practitioners in Yolo County have formed a support group on behalf of judicial candidate Janene Beronio, her campaign committee announced today. The new group is called “Family Law Attorneys for Beronio” and will be co-chaired by long-time local family law lawyers Alexandra Fullerton and Bill Kopper.

“Family law attorneys throughout Yolo County support Yolo Court Commissioner Janene Beronio for election as our next Yolo Superior Court Judge. There is so much emotion and turmoil in the family law arena, and we who practice in that area every day know that Janene Beronio brings the calm demeanor, the steady hand, the agile mind, and the kind heart that is needed for a family law Judge,” said Ms. Fullerton.

“No other candidate for Judge brings such a lengthy, broad and deep level of service and experience to this campaign,” said Mr. Kopper. “Family law attorneys in this county are not looking for an advocate on the Bench. We are looking for an experienced neutral. There is no better choice than Commissioner Janene Beronio.”

Other family law attorneys on the steering committee of Family Law Attorneys for Beronio include: Raquel Silva, Yasmin Spiegel, Brian Pakpour, Sarah Orr and Chuck Jensen.

Due to the announced retirement of Yolo Superior Court Judge Steve Mock, there will be an election for Judge on June 3. Yolo Superior Court Commissioner Janene Beronio is a candidate for election to this judicial position. She has over 25 years’ experience as a Court Commissioner, all for the Yolo Superior Court. In addition to Commissioner Beronio, three attorneys have also announced that they are running for the position of Yolo Superior Court Judge.

# # # #

# # # # #

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Kids learn the Davis Way

By Walter Sadler
The Davis School District’s latest fiascos regarding the firing and then rehiring of Coach Crawford provided further evidence of the inability of the Board to provide leadership. Issues surrounding the Coach Selection process, are not the only issue whereby the Board, over the years, has demonstrated their disdain for providing oversight and leadership for the District; this lack of concern or caring is engrained and embodied in their process for selecting personnel. It isn’t their money, why should they care?
At the 2011 High School graduation ceremony, a local politician gave a speech titled the “Davis Way”. With the Women’s Varsity Basketball Coaching melodrama and the cold pathetic actions of the Board and their hand selected administration and Superintendent fresh on the minds of the Graduating Class, what a “Life Lesson!” Is this what was meant by the Davis Way?
My daughter was on Mr. Christian’s Women’s Varsity Basketball team and witnessed the events that unfolded, including expletives, etc. Statements and actions taken, much to the Board and Superintendent’s chagrin are not privileged as they were stated in public, irrespective of the local media stating “what happens in the locker room stays in the locker room.” Correspondence between Mr. Christian’s and the Districts’ attorneys, provided the Board with ample access to the facts, that is, if they wanted to show the leadership to inquire.
During the course of events, the team was treated to witnessing the manipulative efforts of two team members and their mother, sound familiar, together with the unwillingness of the Superintendent to enforce District Policy and the Educational Code. Lack of action or involvement by the Board was obviously elating to the local political community, as the Board succeeded in making the issue go away. This core gang of four (Board Members) now adds insult to injury with a similar situation regarding the Varsity Volleyball Team, once again teaching the “Children” as Mr. Roberson calls these young adults, by example that “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others!” Now one of those selected elites wants to represent you on the City Council based on her “proven record of active leadership.” Is this the Davis Way, no accountability of past actions?
Discrimination is an ugly characteristic, but to the District it appears to be a District Value. Whether you define it as not allowing the same benefit to all for some reason other than individual merit or on the flip side, preferential treatment for a selected few; either way, this Value is continually reinforced by the Board and their management staff, both subtly and blatantly. The most blatant example of discrimination occurred with Mr. Christian’s firing. For the righteous and politically correct citizens of Davis and more specifically the Political Machine behind Ms. Allen, Mr. Christian was painted by the brush of someone pulling the color card on him; the Superintendent took the bait and fired Mr. Christian within 24 hours without ever talking to Mr. Christian. Smells, looks, and has the bitter taste of discrimination! The Board wasn’t naïve, just didn’t want to exercise leadership by asking those hard questions, which might lead to having to make a decision. Is this the Davis Way?
Where was KCRA’s correspondent of color, who was at Mr. Christian’s door immediately after the Superintendent fired Mr. Christian? One wonders who called him! The Peterson drama went on for months if not years, with no KCRA presence! However, to his credit, the Superintendent is consistent in his actions, no respect for any form of formalized management structure. Once again, the Athletic Director, Dennis Foster, gets thrown under the bus, and the Board keeps asking you to just move on, they have. You may wonder how much the District spent on investigating the merits of this complaint, Zero would be an accurate amount. But then guilt is an amazing motivator. Kudos to Mr. Christian as he suffers from a moral compass pointed in the correct direction, unlike the Board; he selected not to put the team members in the middle, something the “caring” Board didn’t have a problem with then and now.
Having grown up in Davis, I am not surprised that the Administration and Board are obsessed with the issue of, “which college did you attend?” or “who do you know?” rather than the core issue of “are you qualified”? I remember when individuals ran for the School Board on meaningful issues such as financial stability and leadership, not the current trend of political self-justification so that they can appease the political structure and move up! This was not the Davis Way I knew.
Knowingly employing individuals that have questionable if not non-existent experience for their District position, such as the Superintendent, HR Director, Elementary Principals, and California Credentialed positions is a management strategy. This strategy ensures that the Board and the administrative staff will have obedient staff who will protect the status quo; however, this also requires a bonus system. Don’t worry it is only public money. PhD anyone? Deferred compensation, health insurance. If you were hand selected, the District will help you. This management concept is embodied in the following principles:
Promoting selected members of staff into management positions ensures obedience and a cohesive team to protect the Bureaucratic higher order that ensures stability for the Board without regard for the District’s mandated educational objectives.
Do not expect administrators that have no previous experience in the position they have been promoted to, to do anything other than go with the flow as it ensures higher pay (retirement).
Administrators promoted into a position they are inexperienced in makes them dependent on lower staff and thus reinforces loyalty to the existing Bureaucratic structure; some call this the Secretary Syndrome.
Hiring employees that do not have the minimum requested qualifications provides for employees that are obedient and can be groomed to go with the flow and thus not question anything.
Qualifications and experience may be the reason some individuals are not selected as they might question the educational, and management objectives of the system.
Without leadership, Staff at all levels will fill the power void and set (unwritten) policy that benefits them, regardless of the fiscal impact to the District.
If you are one of the selected few, the District will grant you a leave of absence to try a position at another District, if you aren’t hired or want to come back, they are obligated to rehire you; don’t worry no written policy and the Board will approve it.
Keeping the public (voter) off balance with crisis to crisis management and/or development of meaningless policies such as a Conflict of Interest Policy for Board Members is essential to giving the illusion of active leadership and concern for the public trust. Why not a Policy on qualification based hiring, cronyism, or gift of public funds?
Stonewalling the public for one or two meetings under the guise of “confidentiality” is a proven technique of making the public “move on.”
I have observed some of this behavior in the “adult” world, and history is replete with examples; however, the District is amazing in their ability to continually deny events and fool the public as they move on. Now the District wants to hire a Public Information Officer; someone who can frame these management concepts and actions as being beneficial to the District and more particularly the students. Will this help Sheila’s campaign?
As stated by a former State Politician in a Davis Enterprise article titled, Council, show some leadership, “A leader … fosters policies that promote friendly communities …., encourage safety, honesty and fairness between and among its citizens. Such leaders are open, just, patient, honest and encouraging of good policies and good practices …” I don’t see those qualifications being exhibited by any member of the Board, particularly Sheila Allen who wants your support for City Council. Perhaps the author of that statement regarding what makes a leader, Delaine Eastin, who is openly supporting Ms. Allen, can help those of us outside the political circle understand what elements of the Board’s and Ms. Allen’s actions, recent and historical, are examples of this leadership and “caring” concern for the students.
Amazing what the Women’s Varsity Basketball and Volleyball team members learned before they even graduated, they won’t forget the lessons, and it wasn’t “It’s time to move on” more likely it was “silence is concurrence” or more obviously the Davis Way, “some animals are more equal than others.”
Walter Sadler is a Davis Resident and the father of two daughters that were members of Varsity Teams at Davis High School.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Auto Draft

By
April 17, 2014 | Leave Comment

Wendy Weitzel

Wendy Weitzel

Wendy Weitzel is a longtime journalist and Davis resident. She is a former managing editor of The Davis Enterprise, working there from 1998-2008. She has written her Comings & Goings business column since 2001. Today, she does freelance writing, editing, marketing and design.
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Transparency, set in stone

By
April 11, 2014 | Leave Comment

The issue: No more loopholes, no more questions; local government must be accountable

California voters will have an opportunity in June to strengthen laws requiring local governments and agencies to provide access to documents and meetings.

THOUGHT THE laws were strong enough? The Public Records Act and the Ralph M. Brown Act on open meetings sure seem like clear declarations of transparency, but when it comes to money, nothing is certain.

The key point is that under current legislation, the state must reimburse local government for the cost of complying with these laws. During the fiscal crisis, the state sought to trim the budget deficit by suspending these payments, creating confusion about which parts of the laws are still in force. Local agencies were left in limbo, not entirely sure how to proceed. But clearly, transparency can be guaranteed only as long as there is will in Sacramento to pay for it.

Proposition 42 will change all that. It creates an unambiguous constitutional requirement for local government to keep its records, documents and meetings open to the public. This is no trivial issue, it’s a critical part of a working democracy.

As the Yes on 42 committee put it, “Without Prop. 42, Californians will never fully know what’s happening in their local  governments and agencies. And after all the scandals we’ve had in California cities like Bell, where there was widespread abuse and mismanagement of taxpayer dollars, it’s clear that citizens need to have access to public meetings and records.”

Never mind Bell; what if the Davis City Council didn’t have to disclose the cost of the regional water project? Or the latest employment contract with the firefighters’ union?

TO BE SURE, this could end up costing local governments, and they will lead the resistance to Prop. 42. In the past, whenever they were caught out of compliance, they could simply bill the state to make up for it. With Prop. 42, they will own their mistakes.

Now, every lost document or overlooked financial statement would be their responsibility. Ideally, this will give cities, counties and special districts an incentive to be open at all times, rather than after the fact. If not, the extra expense will be on them.

Openness should not depend on the state’s financial condition; transparency should be built in to the government’s DNA. Voting yes on Proposition 42 on June 3 will accomplish just that.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Thank you

By
April 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

Davis School Arts Foundation has just wrapped up another successful Elementary Art Show and Young at Art! Festival. We would like to extend a special thank you to all of those who helped pull it off. Davis Arts Center generously donated their facility for our Elementary Art Show, 2nd Friday Art About and Young at Art! Festival. Woodstock’s Pizza donated several pizzas that we were able to sell by the slice with all proceeds going to DSAF. Nugget Market donated amazing cheese and vegetable trays for our 2nd Friday Art About reception. The success of our event depends on volunteers and we are very grateful to Alpha Phi Omega, a co-ed community service fraternity at UCD, and to the DHS National Honor Society for providing volunteers to help us hang art and to lead the arts and crafts tables at the YAA Festival. Many thanks go to the choruses and music ensembles that performed at the Young at Art! Festival: Willett Elementary Chorus, Montgomery Elementary Chorus, Emerson/Harper Intermediate Orchestra, Divertimentalists, Mariachi Puente, Ginkyo Music Studio strings students, and Hattie Craven. Many of these groups have directly received, or have benefitted from, Davis School Arts Foundation grants. It was a very fun day filled with excellent musical talent from around Davis. DSAF would also like to extend its gratitude to all of the Davis elementary school students and their teachers who provided art for the Elementary Art Show. There are some truly amazing young artists in our town! Please thank our sponsors when you come across them. The generosity of our sponsors and volunteers enables Davis School Arts Foundation to bring music and arts into the classrooms of all Davis public schools.
Sincerely,
Davis School Arts Foundation Board of Directors
Rebecca Breitbard, Tara Diel, Julie Cuetera, Eva Jakab, Brian Miller, and DeKristie Adams

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Dutch Bros. 5/2

By
April 18, 2014 | Leave Comment

Dutch Bros. Coffee Annual “Drink One for Dane” Day
to Donate Proceeds to Muscular Dystrophy Association

GRANTS PASS, Ore., April 17, 2014 — Friday, May 2, is `Drink One for Dane’ Day, when more than 215 Dutch Bros. Coffee locations in seven states will donate proceeds to the Muscular Dystrophy Association , the world leader in fighting Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

The event kicks off ALS Awareness Month and is held annually in honor of company co-founder, Dane Boersma, who was diagnosed with ALS in 2005 and passed away in late 2009.

Dane’s memory continues to inspire everyone within the company to give their all every day. On Drink One for Dane Day, all employees and loved ones proudly wear and proclaim the event slogan, “Drink One for Dane.”

“We are eternal optimists and believe one day there will be a cure for ALS,” said Travis Boersma, Dane’s brother and Dutch Bros. Coffee Co-Founder. “The services provided to families facing this disease are so vital, and we are pleased to support those families.”

Last year, Dutch Bros. contributed a record-breaking $271,500 to MDA for research and family services funding. Since becoming involved with MDA in 2007 Dutch Bros. has donated over $896,500.

“MDA is immensely grateful to have Dutch Bros. as a partner in helping fund research for ALS and providing services for those served by MDA,” said MDA Area Director Arlene Wedsted. “To see the outpouring of love and support for Dane, and the thousands of others living with ALS, during the annual ‘Drink one for Dane’ campaign is truly special and we thank everyone who visits Dutch Bros. on May 2 to support the fight against this devastating disease.”

ALS is a disease that affects the parts of the nervous system that control voluntary muscle movement. There is no cure for ALS, and most people with ALS die within three to five years. To learn more about the MDA and ALS, visit mda.org.

To find the location nearest you, visit www.dutchbros.com/locations.

About MDA
The Muscular Dystrophy Association is the world’s leading nonprofit health agency dedicated to saving and improving the lives of anyone with muscle disease, including muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neuromuscular diseases. It does so by funding worldwide research to find treatments and cures; by providing comprehensive health care services and support to MDA families nationwide; and by rallying communities to fight back through advocacy, fundraising and local engagement. Visit mda.org and follow us at facebook.com/MDAnational and @MDAnews. Learn more about MDA’s mission by watching this video.

- MDA -

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Joe Nocera: CEO pay goes up, up and away!

BC-NOCERA-COLUMN-NYT/837
Commentary: CEO Pay Goes Up, Up and Away!
By JOE NOCERA

c.2014 New York Times News Service

At 79, Graef “Bud” Crystal is the grand old man of executive compensation critics. Once a top compensation consultant, he switched sides in the 1980s, becoming a fierce critic of many of the practices he helped institutionalize, and analyzing executive pay for other media like Fortune and, most recently, Bloomberg News. He’s been known to call his second career “atoning for my sins.”

The other day, Crystal was recalling what it used to be like trying to cobble together pay information about a chief executive based on reading the disclosure documents required by the Securities and Exchange Commission. There was no rhyme or reason to the way the numbers were put together, and shareholders were often left scratching their heads.

“I remember writing an article for Fortune in the late 1980s, using Goizueta’s pay at Coca-Cola,” Crystal told me. (Roberto Goizueta was the chief executive of Coke from 1981 until his death in 1997.) The proxy statement showed that he made $800,000 that year in salary. But about 15 pages later, it showed that he had received an additional $56 million in stock options. Except that, instead of being written numerically, the option grant was spelled out, thus easy to overlook. “It was deliberate obfuscation,” Crystal said.

For the most part, it isn’t like that anymore. In the mid-2000s, the SEC passed rules forcing companies to place all the compensation information for top executives in one place. There were people who thought that this effort at pay “transparency” would help get CEO compensation under control — in effect shaming compensation committees and chief executives from letting executive pay get any more out of hand than it already was.

Not exactly how it turned out, is it?

On Sunday, The New York Times published its annual list of the compensation of the top executives at the 100 largest publicly traded American companies. (The survey is conducted by Equilar for The Times.) Topping the list, as he often has, was Larry Ellison, chief executive of Oracle, who, despite being the world’s fifth-wealthiest person, raked in an additional $78.4 million in 2013, a combination of cash, stock and stock options. That was more than twice as much as the second and third place finishers, Robert Iger of Disney and Rupert Murdoch of 21st Century Fox. Not that they had anything to complain about, at $34.3 million and $26.1 million respectively.

The Times reported that the median compensation for CEOs in 2013 was $13.9 million, a 9 percent increase from 2012. The Wall Street Journal, which did its own, smaller survey a few weeks earlier, described the 2013 pay increases as representing “moderate growth.”

Nell Minow, another longtime critic of corporate governance and executive compensation practices, told me that the last time she harbored hope that executive pay might be brought under control was 1993. That was the year that Congress passed a bill capping cash compensation at $1 million. But the law also exempted pay that was based on “performance.”

Two things resulted. “Immediately, everybody got a raise to $1 million,” said Minow. And, second, company boards began setting performance measures that were easy to clear — and larding pay packages with huge stock option grants. “I hadn’t realized how easy it would be to manipulate performance measures,” Minow said.

Since then, nothing has stopped executive compensation from rising. When the market fell after the financial crisis, many companies gave their chief executives big option grants to “make up for” what they’d lost. When performance measures were toughened, chief executives responded by demanding larger grants because they were taking more “risk.”

It’s a rigged game. When the company’s stock goes up, says Crystal, the chief executive views himself as a hero. And when it goes down, “it’s Janet Yellen’s or Barack Obama’s fault.”

Plus, there’s simple greed. When I asked Crystal about Ellison’s pay package, he laughed. “There are billionaires like Warren Buffett and Larry Page who don’t pig out,” he said. (As the chief executive of Google, co-founder Page takes a $1 annual salary.) “But there are others who can’t keep their hands off the dough. Ellison is in that category.”

Soon enough, the SEC is going to require yet another disclosure. As a result of the Dodd-Frank financial reform law, companies will have to publish a ratio comparing the chief executive’s pay to the median pay of the company’s employees. At most large American corporations, the ratio is likely to be very high, hinting at how corrosive these huge executive pay packages have become, and the degree to which they play a role in furthering income inequality, a point made in “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” the new book by Thomas Piketty, the economist. The ratio is going to make people mad.

But will it reduce executive pay? We already know the answer to that.

New York Times News Service

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Ross Douthat: Diversity and dishonesty

BC-DOUTHAT-COLUMN-NYT/824
Diversity and Dishonesty
By ROSS DOUTHAT

c.2014 New York Times News Service

Earlier this year, a column by a Harvard undergraduate named Sandra Y.L. Korn briefly achieved escape velocity from the Ivy League bubble, thanks to its daring view of how universities should approach academic freedom.

Korn proposed that such freedom was dated and destructive and that a doctrine of “academic justice” should prevail instead. No more, she wrote, should Harvard permit its faculty to engage in “research promoting or justifying oppression” or produce work tainted by “racism, sexism, and heterosexism.” Instead, academic culture should conform to left-wing ideas of the good, beautiful and true, and decline as a matter of principle “to put up with research that counters our goals.”

No higher-up at Harvard endorsed her argument, of course. But its honesty of purpose made an instructive contrast to the institutional statements put out in the immediate aftermath of two recent controversies — the resignation of the Mozilla Foundation’s CEO, Brendan Eich, and the withdrawal, by Brandeis University, of the honorary degree it had promised to the human rights activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali.

In both cases, Mozilla and Brandeis, there was a striking difference between the clarity of what had actually happened and the evasiveness of the official responses to the events. Eich stepped down rather than recant his past support for the view that one man and one woman makes a marriage; Hirsi Ali’s invitation was withdrawn because of her sweeping criticisms of Islamic culture. But neither the phrase “marriage” nor the word “Islam” appeared in the initial statements Mozilla and Brandeis released.

Instead, the Mozilla statement rambled in the language of inclusion: “Our organizational culture reflects diversity and inclusiveness. … Our culture of openness extends to encouraging staff and community to share their beliefs and opinions. …”

The statement on Hirsi Ali was slightly more direct, saying that “her past statements … are inconsistent with Brandeis University’s core values.” But it never specified what those statements or those values might be — and then it fell back, too, on pieties about diversity: “In the spirit of free expression that has defined Brandeis University throughout its history, Ms. Hirsi Ali is welcome to join us on campus in the future to engage in a dialogue about these important issues.”

What both cases illustrate, with their fuzzy rhetoric masking ideological pressure, is a serious moral defect at the heart of elite culture in America.

The defect, crucially, is not this culture’s bias against social conservatives, nor its discomfort with stinging attacks on non-Western religions. Rather, it’s the refusal to admit — to others, and to itself — that these biases fundamentally trump the commitment to “free expression” or “diversity” affirmed in mission statements and news releases.

This refusal, this self-deception, means that we have far too many powerful communities (corporate, academic, journalistic) that are simultaneously dogmatic and dishonest about it — that promise diversity but only as the left defines it, that fill their ranks with ideologues and then claim to stand athwart bias and misinformation, that speak the language of pluralism while presiding over communities that resemble the beau ideal of Sandra Y.L. Korn.

Harvard itself is a perfect example of this pattern: As Patrick Deneen of Notre Dame pointed out when the column was making waves, Korn could only come up with one contemporary example of a Harvardian voice that ought to be silenced — “a single conservative octogenarian,” the political philosophy professor Harvey Mansfield. Her call for censorship, Deneen concluded, “is at this point almost wholly unnecessary, since there are nearly no conservatives to be found at Harvard.”

I am (or try to be) a partisan of pluralism, which requires respecting Mozilla’s right to have a CEO whose politics fit the climate of Silicon Valley, and Brandeis’ right to rescind degrees as it sees fit, and Harvard’s freedom to be essentially a two-worldview community, with a campus shared uneasily by progressives and corporate neoliberals, and a small corner reserved for token reactionary cranks.

But this respect is difficult to maintain when these institutions will not admit that this is what is going on. Instead, we have the pretense of universality — the insistence that the post-Eich Mozilla is open to all ideas, the invocations of the “spirit of free expression” from a school that’s kicking a controversial speaker off the stage.

And with the pretense, increasingly, comes a dismissive attitude toward those institutions — mostly religious — that do acknowledge their own dogmas and commitments and ask for the freedom to embody them and live them out.

It would be a far, far better thing if Harvard and Brandeis and Mozilla would simply say, explicitly, that they are as ideologically progressive as Notre Dame is Catholic or BYU is Mormon or Chick-fil-A is evangelical, and that they intend to run their institution according to those lights.

I can live with the progressivism. It’s the lying that gets toxic.

New York Times News Service

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Libertarians award scholarships 5/31

By
April 17, 2014 | Leave Comment

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE…

Woodland, CA – [April 15th, *2014]* – The Libertarian Party of Yolo County is pleased to announce the recipients of the Liberty Scholarship for the Fall of 2014. This year’s winners are Rehan Shafqat (Pioneer High) and Dianne Cervantez (WCC). They will officially award the scholarships at the Libertarian Party of Yolo County’s Annual Banquet on May 31st at 6:30 p.m. at Spring Garden Restaurant in Woodland.

The Liberty Scholarship is a $1,000 dollar scholarship offered by the Libertarian Party of Yolo County to encourage Yolo County students in their pursuit of higher education. These funds may be used by students to help pay the costs of tuition, books or other school expenses in one of Yolo County’s institutions of higher learning or a nearby Sacramento college.

The Libertarian Party of Yolo County is dedicated to promoting peaceful change of our County and local government that fulfills the principles of individual freedom, free-market economics, and limited government. More information about the Libertarian Party of Yolo County can be found at www.yololp.com

————————————————————————————————————————————
For additional information contact: Eric Osborn at ericosborneo@gmail.com or Ph.# 530-402-1489

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Talk circle 5/17

By
April 17, 2014 | Leave Comment

Dear Debbie -
Here is the basic info. / Briefly that we spoke of attaching to the article I wrote and sent to you. Let me know if this works? Thanks Debbie! – Gregory

The next Community Men’s Talk Circle will meet on Wednesday, May 14th, from 7:00 – 9:15 pm, at the Davis International House (10 College Park & Russell Blvd). All men 18 years and older are welcome, and there is no charge for these monthly events. For more information, call (530) 758-2794. We can be followed on Facebook, (search under: Community Men’s Talk Circle). All men are welcome!

P. Gregory Guss, LCSW
Community Men’s Talk Circle

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Thank you, from Tuleyome

By
April 16, 2014 | Leave Comment

Tuleyome held its annual fundraiser at the Odd Fellows Hall in Davis, CA on March 21st and we want to thank everyone who came out to support our organization and programs.

Silent auction donations were provided by the Berryessa Gap Winery, Big 5 Sporting Goods, Charlie and Logan Schneider, Culler Wine, the Dark Horse Golf Course, Davis Paintball, Dixon Dance, El Pollo Loco, Flying Dolphins, Fungi Perfecti, Hedgerow Farms, photographer Jim Rose, author Kaye Hall, photographer Kevin English, artist Margaret Eldred, the Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens, author Nancy Bauer, Pier 39, Richard and Judy Wydick, Rocknasium, Solar Cookers International, Spotlight Dance and Fitness, Susan Hodgson, the California Academy of Sciences, The Cubby Woman’s Walkabout blog, the San Francisco 49’ers and San Francisco Zoo, the Tallman Hotel in Lake County, and Tributary Whitewater Tours.
We also owe a special thanks to our keynote speaker; author and wilderness expert Doug Scott, along with Good Humus Produce for providing the beautiful flower arrangements, our photographer Stacey DeBono, Chef Jeff Oblinger and Inspiration Point Catering, and the crew at the Davis Odd Fellows Hall.

Lastly, we want to thank everyone who attended. You made this event really special and we are grateful to have so much support for the work that we do in this amazing region.

Sara Husby-Good, Executive Director, Tuleyome

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Mark Rollins: Republicans are wrong on economics

REPUBLICANS ARE WRONG ON ECONOMICS

Washington Republicans have a sorry record of making economic predictions. They are consistently wrong but that does not stop them from making more wrong predictions.
John Boehner in August of 2010 said that health care costs will skyrocket next year thanks to Obamacare, and in January of 2011 Paul Ryan said that unless this law is repealed it will exacerbate the spiraling costs of healthcare.
Of course, the opposite happened. In fact healthcare cost spending is now increasing at the lowest rate in fifty years.
The mainstream media has failed to call out the totally wrong predictions by Republicans even though those same wrong predictions keep getting repeated.
In 1993 Newt Gringrich said this about Clinton’s proposed tax increases:
“Tax increases will so weaken the economy that jobs will be killed, revenue will go down, and the deficit, instead of decreasing, will increase. I believe that that will in fact kill the current recovery and put us back in a recession.”
Those huge tax increases proposed by Bill Clinton were passed later that year with every single Republican in the House and the Senate voting against the bill.
Every Republican in both bodies of Congress said that the Clinton tax increases, would badly hurt the economy and most of them specifically predicted a recession.
Every one of them was wrong. The economy soared after those tax increases. In fact here is what Tom Brokaw reported on the evening news in January of 1999.” Brokaw: “Think about it. There probably have never been better times than these, when so many people are doing so well in an economy that just gets stronger and stronger. The numbers that are in from the end of 1998 are sensational.”
How much more wrong could the Republicans have been? Well here is an example; How about five years of totally wrong predictions about run-away inflation which was always supposed to happen any day now but never did, according to the Wall Street Journal editorial page and CNBC, and there has not been one inkling of an admission of error, let alone any kind of apology from these ‘respectable sources’.
So instead of apologies the Republicans resort to denials like saying for five years now, that The Recovery Act, or “Stimulus” was a complete failure, never mind that most economists say almost the exact opposite.
Now the big denial is that the seven million who signed up for Obamacare is a fake number. When the numbers were horrible in the beginning of the rollout, then of course the numbers were all too real.
Scholars have reminded us that the Republican Party used to embrace Keynesian economics along with Democrats, as a necessary way to repair the economy in times of recession. They believed in government spending to make up for lack of private spending to boost the economy, during economic slumps.
Tea Partiers don’t seem to understand that science can be counterintuitive. They don’t get that if you pay down debt in a depressed economy it actually increases debt, and they don’t get that most of our debt is money that we owe to ourselves or that it is the ratio of debt to GDP that is much more important than the absolute amount, or that printing money in a depressed economy is not inflationary, or that debt is essential for a capitalist system and is not a dirty word.
The Republican Party has become the anti-science, anti-fact, anti-everything party. They have become the Petty Party. They have been taken over by radicals and radicals have never had any use for facts or for what the majority of the country wants. Therefore fact checkers are a nuisance because they reveal the ugly truth about their predictions.
The radical right has become entrenched in our government even though we the people voted for a democratically controlled federal government in 2012, with more people voting for Democrats in the House while gerrymandered districts in seven states kept Republicans in control. This new radicalism is not conservatism, so the media needs to stop labeling it as such.aYou know they might be radicals when they call an obviously moderate, and reasonable president like Barak Obama, a radical or a dictator and keep shouting ‘Impeach’ without ever naming one law that he broke.
Republicans say Obama’s policies are hurting our economy. I say, what policies? The radicals have kept austerity spending in place for the most part, and have summarily rejected Obama’s big jobs bill. History shows that their theories don’t work and Democratic policies do work. Radical right policies are in place and are causing real pain for millions of real working people, while data shows that the rich are doing better than ever.
The GOP’s economic predictions are always wrong. We do not need to hear debates about the fact that Democratic tax policies in the 90’s created the best boom period in recent memory, (and some of us do remember it), any more than debate about where babies come from.
When some people say; “I don’t talk about politics” it goes much deeper than that. The situation is much more serious than just politics as usual. It is now about one party’s agenda to weaken our very Democracy, and there is nothing political about calling out extremists. It is simply patriotic. We are re-hashing old debates that were settled decades ago, and that includes other things like abortion rights, voting rights and even civil rights.
Rank and file and old fashioned conservatives are way ahead of these institutional Republicans.
We used to have two parties that believed that we all do better when we all do better, that a good economy lifts all boats, but now it seems one party wants a small elite group to have a wild party on one boat and doesn’t care if the rest of us even have water for our little boats to sink in.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Bonner letter

By
April 16, 2014 | Leave Comment

Hi Letter to the Editor Folks,

Would you please get this out when possible. Also, my older computer will not allow me to properly note the accent marks on Cesar Chavez – would you please add them before printing?

Thank you!!

Jill Bonner
530-330-4315

Cesar Chavez Bike Swap Another Success!!

A big, big thanks to all the families who participated in the Cesar Chavez Elementary 2nd Annual Citywide Bike Swap Event which took place on Sunday, April 6th. It was a win-win situation for those who sold their bikes, donated their bikes or bought bikes at the swap.

More than 200 bikes were consigned or donated, the majority of which sold – all for great prices! The Bike Swap was a true community service effort with support from many sources. Business and local organizational support came from Ink Monkey who helped us get the word with colorful, catchy banners that were hung around town. Then we had B & L Bike Shop, Blisworks and Davis Wheelworks all offering bike tuneup discounts to folks that bought bikes at the Swap. Apex Bikes was on site for several hours at the Bike Swap answering bike questions and doing bike adjustments, Green Bike Depot consigned a ton of bikes, bike lights and bike locks for us to sell (which the school got a percentage of), UCD TAPS sold quite a few bike licenses at the Bike Swap and several UCD Iota Phi Theta Fraternity student volunteers came to help out plus City of Davis Street Smarts Program Manager Rachel Hartsough and Bike Coordinator DK provided Street Smart Bike Safety Information to distribute. As for handling the bike intake, bike clean up and bikes sales throughout the Bike Swap, a thank you to Davis Bicycles School Committee volunteers in addition to many Cesar Chavez families plus several independent bike-knowledgeable volunteers.

Lastly, a big Thank You to Debbie Davis with the Davis Enterprise for helping to promote the Bike Swap Event. Since this was a citywide event – we could not have gotten the word out without your publicity assistance.

All profits from this annual event support the Cesar Chavez Elementary Spanish Immersion Parent and Teachers (SIPAT). Thank you again to all who made this continuing event so successful and so fun. Hope to see you again next year!

Jill Bonner & Caroleen Becker
Cesar Chavez SIPAT Bike Committee
Davis

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Arboretum events 4/19

By
March 30, 2014 | Leave Comment

Sign up now!

Camp Shakespeare
July 7 – July 18: Session 1 (Ages 13-17) (Not in Arboretum, location TBD)
July 21 – August 1: Session 2 (Ages 7-12)
August 4 – August 15 Session 3 (Ages 7-12)
9 a.m.-3 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis campus

Sign up today for the best summer camp in Davis! Join the Davis Shakespeare Ensemble for exciting theater games, acting workshops, and a special camp production. This summer campers will play clowns, villains, and soldiers in one of Shakespeare’s most popular comedies: Much Ado About Nothing. There are options for early drop off and late pick up. For more details and online enrollment, visit www.shakespearedavis.com.

PHOTOS:

Camp Shakespeare

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.
________________________________________

Wednesday, May 14 & June 11

Walk with Warren: West-end Gardens
12-1 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis campus

Join Warren Roberts, the Superintendent Emeritus of the Arboretum and famous storyteller and punster for an always-engaging noontime exploration of spring at the UC Davis Arboretum’s west-end gardens. The event is free; limited, free one-hour parking is available along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55 where parking can be paid by meter or by purchase of an $8 daily pass. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

Fridays, April 25; May 9 & 23; June 6 &20

Folk Music Jam Session
12–1 p.m., Wyatt Deck, Arboretum Drive, UC Davis campus
Folk musicians are invited to play together informally during this acoustic jam session at the Wyatt Deck, located on Arboretum Drive (formerly Old Davis Road) next to the redwood grove in the UC Davis Arboretum. Pull out your fiddles, guitars, mandolins, penny whistles, pipes, flutes, squeezeboxes (you name it) and join your fellow musicians for a little bluegrass, old-time, blues, Celtic, klezmer, and world music over the lunch hour. All skill levels welcome. Listeners welcome! The event is free; parking is available for $8 in Visitor Lot 5, at Old Davis Road and Arboretum Drive. For more information, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

PHOTOS:
Past Folk Music Jam Sessions

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.

 

Thursday, April 24
Poetry in the Garden: Heera Kulkarni and Kenya Mitchell (+ Open Mic)
12-1 p.m., Wyatt Deck, UC Davis Arboretum

Heera Kulkarni holds two masters degrees from Asia and North America in Social Work and Education, respectively. She teaches Indian classical music and is director of Raga Academy School of Indian Music. She writes poetry in Hindi, Marathi, and English, and has recorded some of her poems and songs in an album called Shama.

Kenya Mitchell is a Ph.D. candidate at UC Davis. She explores the intersection between race, femininity and class in her poetry and prose. Kenya has published two books, Aftermath of a Sociopath and Blue Line To Wonderland, and has pieces in publications ranging from Harvard School of Education’s ALANA Anthology to New York Magazine.

After the readings there will be an open mic available for other poetry readings.

The event is free; parking is available in Visitor Parking Lot 5 where parking can be paid by purchase of an $8 daily pass. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.
________________________________________

Saturday, April 26
Arboretum Plant Sale
9 a.m.-1 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Teaching Nursery
(Garrod Drive near La Rue Road, across from Vet Med), UC Davis campus

THE NEW FRONT YARD: Prepare your landscape for long-term water conservation with attractive, drought-tolerant, easy-care, region-appropriate plants including a large selection of California natives and Arboretum All-Stars.

Not a member? Join at the door! All members receive 10% off their purchases; new members also receive an additional $10 off as a thank you for joining. The benefits of membership far outweigh your cost! For more information on the benefits of membership visit: http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/join_the_friends.aspx.

The event is free; parking is free and available in nearby. For more information and directions, visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx or call (530) 752-4880.

PHOTOS:
Member Appreciation Plant Sale (Spring 2013)
Public Plant Sale (Spring 2012)

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.
________________________________________

Sunday, April 27
Fun with Food: Eco-friendly Tie-dye
12-2 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis campus

Bring a white item you want to tie-dye: t-shirt, socks, shorts, pillow-case, you name it! The UC Davis Arboretum Ambassadors will help you tie-dye and explain how to make the plant- and food-based, eco-friendly dyes provided. The event is free; parking is available at no charge on the weekends along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum..ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.
________________________________________

Sunday, May 4
Wild Family Day
1-3 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis campus

Join Wild Campus for our 3rd annual Wild Family Day. A UC Davis student organization, Wild Campus is dedicated to the conservation of local flora and fauna. Enjoy games and activities, as well as educational displays and live animals! The event is free; parking is available at no charge on the weekends along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55. For more details, email wildcampus411@gmail.com. Co-sponsored by the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden.
________________________________________

Tuesday, May 6
Big Day of Giving 2014
24 hours; 12 a.m.-12 p.m.

24 hours to give where your heart is! The BIG Day of Giving is a local initiative to inspire philanthropy in the Greater Sacramento region. The UC Davis Arboretum is participating in this one-day online giving event. Donors will have the chance to support an organization they love while leveraging their giving through matches and fun prize challenges. For more information about the Big Day of Giving visit http://givelocalnow.org/; the organizational profile of the UC Davis Arboretum will be available for viewing there soon.

If you are interested in helping our organization spread the word about this one-day event, contact Suzanne Ullensvang, Resource Development Manager, at sullensvang@ucudavis.edu or (530)752-8324.
________________________________________

Saturday, May 17
Arboretum Plant Sale (Clearance Sale)
9 a.m.-1 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Teaching Nursery
(Garrod Drive near La Rue Road, across from Vet Med), UC Davis campus

THE NEW FRONT YARD: Prepare your landscape for long-term water conservation with attractive, drought-tolerant, easy-care, region-appropriate plants including a large selection of California natives and Arboretum All-Stars.

Not a member? Join at the door! All members receive 10% off their purchases; new members also receive an additional $10 off as a thank you for joining. The benefits of membership far outweigh your cost! For more information on the benefits of membership visit: http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/join_the_friends.aspx.

The event is free; parking is free and available in nearby. For more information and directions, visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx or call (530) 752-4880.

PHOTOS:
Member Appreciation Plant Sale (Spring 2013)
Public Plant Sale (Spring 2012)

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.
________________________________________

Sunday, May 18
Storytime Through the Seasons: Under the Tuscan Sun
1-3 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis campus

Explore the natural, cultural, and flavorful world of the Mediterranean in this program for children and families. Take part in readings, tastings, and hands-on activities in the Arboretum’s spectacular Mediterranean Collection. Sponsored by the UC Davis Arboretum Ambassadors. The event is free; parking is available at no charge on the weekends along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55. For more information and directions visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx or call (530) 752-4880.

PHOTOS:
Storytime Through the Seasons: Expedition to Africa (Winter 2013 program)
Storytime Through the Seasons: Under the Redwood Tree (Fall 2013 program)

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.
________________________________________

Thursday, May 29
Poetry in the Garden: Frank Dixon Graham and Tim Kahl (+ Open Mic)
12-1 p.m., Wyatt Deck, UC Davis Arbortetum

Frank Dixon Graham is the author of Out On the Reach and The Infinite In Between. Graham’s work, which consists primarily of observations of art and people, nature and love, is published in over twenty-five journals, including: Hawaii Pacific Review, Evansville Review, Clackamas Literary Review, and Harvard University Scriptorium.

Tim Kahl is the author of Possessing Yourself and The Century of Travel. His work has been published in Prairie Schooner, Indiana Review, Ninth Letter, Notre Dame Review, The Journal, Parthenon West Review, and many other journals. He appears as Victor Schnickelfritz in the poetry and poetics blog The Great American Pinup and the poetry video blog Linebreak Studios.

After the readings there will be an open mic available for other poetry readings.

The event is free; parking is available in Visitor Parking Lot 5 where parking can be paid by purchase of an $8 daily pass. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

________________________________________

Saturday, May 31
Yoga in the Arboretum
1:15 p.m., Grassy area east of Putah Creek Lodge, UC Davis campus

Join us for an hour of yoga appropriate for all skill levels led by certified instructor Loshan Ostrava. Dress comfortably. Please bring a towel or yoga mat and water bottle. Sponsored by the UC Davis Arboretum Ambassadors. The event is free; parking is available at no charge in the Putah Creek Lodge parking lot. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.
________________________________________

Sunday, June 1
Bugtopia 3.0: Discover Everyday Insects
1-3 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis campus

Learn about the hidden insect wonders of the Arboretum from UC Davis Entomology Club members and UC Davis Arboretum Ambassadors. Tour the collections and learn insect names, trapping methods, and ecology.

The event is free; parking is available at no charge on the weekends along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55. For more information and directions visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx or call (530) 752-4880.

PHOTOS:
Bugtopia 2.0 (Spring 2013)

You are welcome to download any of these photos for promotional use. For more download assistance, information, or captions, please contact Katie Hetrick, Director of Marketing and Communications, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, at kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-4134.

________________________________________

Tuesday, June 10
3rd Annual Farewell Reading of the UC Davis Creative Writing Program
7 p.m., Wyatt Deck, UC Davis Arboretum

The Creative Writing MA program and the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden present the 3rd annual student reading on Wyatt Deck. Graduating writers will read selections from their theses. The event is free; parking is available in Visitor Parking Lot 5 where parking can be paid by purchase of an $8 daily pass. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

________________________________________

Katie F. Hetrick
Director, Marketing & Communications

UC Davis Arboretum & Public Garden
One Shields Avenue • Davis, CA • 95616
Tel: 530.754.4134
Fax: 530.752.5796
Email: kfhetrick@ucdavis.edu

Websites:
arboretum.ucdavis.edu
publicgarden.ucdavis.edu

Social Media:

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Paul Krugman: Health care nightmares

By
April 12, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-KRUGMAN-COLUMN-NYT/796
Commentary: Health Care Nightmares
By PAUL KRUGMAN

c.2014 New York Times News Service

When it comes to health reform, Republicans suffer from delusions of disaster. They know, just know, that the Affordable Care Act is doomed to utter failure, so failure is what they see, never mind the facts on the ground.

Thus, on Tuesday, Mitch McConnell, the Senate minority leader, dismissed the push for pay equity as an attempt to “change the subject from the nightmare of Obamacare”; on the same day, the nonpartisan RAND Corp. released a study estimating “a net gain of 9.3 million in the number of American adults with health insurance coverage from September 2013 to mid-March 2014.” Some nightmare. And the overall gain, including children and those who signed up during the late-March enrollment surge, must be considerably larger.

But while Obamacare is looking like anything but a nightmare, there are indeed some nightmarish things happening on the health care front. For it turns out that there’s a startling ugliness of spirit abroad in modern America — and health reform has brought that ugliness out into the open.

Let’s start with the good news about reform, which keeps coming in. First, there was the amazing come-from-behind surge in enrollments. Then there were a series of surveys — from Gallup, the Urban Institute, and RAND — all suggesting large gains in coverage. Taken individually, any one of these indicators might be dismissed as an outlier, but taken together they paint an unmistakable picture of major progress.

But wait: What about all the people who lost their policies thanks to Obamacare? The answer is that this looks more than ever like a relatively small issue hyped by right-wing propaganda. RAND finds that fewer than 1 million people who previously had individual insurance became uninsured — and many of those transitions, one guesses, had nothing to do with Obamacare. It’s worth noting that, so far, not one of the supposed horror stories touted in Koch-backed anti-reform advertisements has stood up to scrutiny, suggesting that real horror stories are rare.

It will be months before we have a full picture, but it’s clear that the number of uninsured Americans has already dropped significantly — not least in McConnell’s home state. It appears that around 40 percent of Kentucky’s uninsured population has gained coverage, and we can expect a lot more people to sign up next year.

Republicans clearly have no idea how to respond to these developments. They can’t offer any real alternative to Obamacare, because you can’t achieve the good stuff in the Affordable Care Act, like coverage for people with pre-existing medical conditions, without also including the stuff they hate, the requirement that everyone buy insurance and the subsidies that make that requirement possible. Their political strategy has been to talk vaguely about replacing reform while waiting for its inevitable collapse. And what if reform doesn’t collapse? They have no idea what to do.

At the state level, however, Republican governors and legislators are still in a position to block the act’s expansion of Medicaid, denying health care to millions of vulnerable Americans. And they have seized that opportunity with gusto: Most Republican-controlled states, totaling half the nation, have rejected Medicaid expansion. And it shows. The number of uninsured Americans is dropping much faster in states accepting Medicaid expansion than in states rejecting it.

What’s amazing about this wave of rejection is that it appears to be motivated by pure spite. The federal government is prepared to pay for Medicaid expansion, so it would cost the states nothing, and would, in fact, provide an inflow of dollars. Health economist Jonathan Gruber, one of the principal architects of health reform — and normally a very mild-mannered guy — recently summed it up: The Medicaid-rejection states “are willing to sacrifice billions of dollars of injections into their economy in order to punish poor people. It really is just almost awesome in its evilness.” Indeed.

And while supposed Obamacare horror stories keep on turning out to be false, it’s already quite easy to find examples of people who died because their states refused to expand Medicaid. According to one recent study, the death toll from Medicaid rejection is likely to run between 7,000 and 17,000 Americans each year.

But nobody expects to see a lot of prominent Republicans declaring that rejecting Medicaid expansion is wrong, that caring for Americans in need is more important than scoring political points against the Obama administration. As I said, there’s an extraordinary ugliness of spirit abroad in today’s America, which health reform has brought out into the open.

And that revelation, not reform itself — which is going pretty well — is the real Obamacare nightmare.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

David Brooks: The moral power of curiosity

By
April 12, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-BROOKS-COLUMN-NYT/844
Commentary: The Moral Power Of Curiosity
By DAVID BROOKS

c.2014 New York Times News Service

Most of us have at one time or another felt ourselves in the grip of the explanatory drive. You’re confronted by some puzzle, confusion or mystery. Your inability to come up with an answer gnaws at you. You’re up at night, turning the problem over in your mind. Then, suddenly: clarity. The pieces click into place. There’s a jolt of pure satisfaction.

We’re all familiar with this drive, but I wasn’t really conscious of the moral force of this longing until I read Michael Lewis’ book, “Flash Boys.”

As you’re probably aware, this book is about how a small number of Wall Street-types figured out that the stock markets were rigged by high-frequency traders who used complex technologies to give themselves a head start on everybody else. It’s nominally a book about finance, but it’s really a morality tale. The core question Lewis forces us to ask is: Why did some people do the right thing while most of their peers did not?

The answer, I think, is that most people on Wall Street are primarily motivated to make money, but a few people are primarily motivated by an intense desire to figure stuff out.

If you are primarily motivated to make money, you just need to get as much information as you need to do your job. You don’t have time for deep dives into abstract matters. You certainly don’t want to let people know how confused you are by something, or how shallow your knowledge is in certain areas. You want to project an image of mastery and omniscience.

On Wall Street, as in other areas of the modern economy, this attitude leads to a culture of knowingness. People learn to bluff their way through, day to day. Executives don’t really understand the complex things going on in their own companies. Traders don’t understand how their technological tools really work. Programmers may know their little piece of code, but they don’t have a broader knowledge of what their work is being used for.

These people are content to possess information, but they don’t seek knowledge. Information is what you need to make money short term. Knowledge is the deeper understanding of how things work. It’s obtained only by long and inefficient study. It’s gained by those who set aside the profit motive and instead possess an intrinsic desire just to know.

The heroes of Lewis’ book have this intrinsic desire. The central figure, Brad Katsuyama, observes that the markets are not working the way they are supposed to. Like thousands of others, he observes that funny things are happening on his screen when he places a trading order. But, unlike those others, this puzzling discrepancy between how things are and how things are supposed to be gnaws at him. He just has to understand what’s going on.

He conducts a long, arduous research project to go beneath the technology and figure things out. At one point he and his superiors at the Royal Bank of Canada conduct a series of trades not to make money but just to test theories.

Another character, Ronan Ryan, taught himself how electronic signals move through the telecommunications system. A third, John Schwall, is an obsessive who buried himself in the library so he could understand the history of a particular form of stock-rigging called front-running.

These people eventually figure out what was happening in the market. They acquire knowledge both of how the markets are actually working and of how they are supposed to work. They become indignant about the discrepancy.

They could have used their knowledge to participate in the very market-rigging they were observing. But remember, the pleasure they derived from satisfying their curiosity surpassed the pleasure they derived from making money. So some of them ended up creating a separate stock exchange that could not be rigged in this way.

One lesson of this tale is that capitalism doesn’t really work when it relies on the profit motive alone. If everybody is just chasing material self-interest, the invisible hand won’t lead to well-functioning markets. It will just lead to arrangements in which market insiders take advantage of everybody else. Capitalism requires the full range of motivation, including the intrinsic drive for knowledge and fairness.

Second, you can’t tame the desire for money with sermons. You can only counteract greed with some superior love, like the love of knowledge.

Third, if market-rigging is defeated, it won’t be by government regulators. It will be through a market innovation in which a good exchange replaces bad exchanges, designed by those who fundamentally understood the old system.

And here’s a phenomenon often true in innovation stories: The people who go to work pursuing knowledge, or because they intrinsically love writing code, sometimes end up making more money than the people who go to work pursuing money as their main purpose.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Big Night a big success

By
April 08, 2014 | Leave Comment

PRESS RELEASE – April 7, 2014

Rotary Club of Davis “Big Night” Huge Success

On February 9th, 2014 the Rotary Club of Davis hosted its most successful Child Abuse Prevention fund raiser ever. The 14th annual “Big Night” gala was held at the El Macero Country Club where approximately 170 people joined together to raise money for this most worthwhile program. The event to date has raised more than $300,000. Bob Dunning, Davis Enterprise columnist of the “Wary I,” served as master of ceremonies and treated the guests to his humorous comments about Davis’ peculiarities. The evening consisted of cocktails and a raffle, a live auction, a gourmet dinner, and desert followed by dancing.

The event raised more than $34,000 to be spent on primary child abuse prevention projects. Several child abuse prevention non-profits in the area were the recipients of the proceeds of last year’s efforts, including Yolo Crisis Nursery, Multi-Disciplinary Interview Center, Yolo County Children’s Alliance, Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Center (now called Empower Yolo), and Yolo Family Services. Additionally, the annual “Have a Heart for Children” award was presented to Ms. Kalyca Seabrook, nominated by the Yolo County Children’s Alliance, as an individual who dedicated countless hours to helping prevent child abuse through direct service, public awareness and education. All and all, everyone had a great time and the Rotary club thanks all of the sponsors and those that donated the auction item, which made this event so successful.

When the program was conceived the plan was to start locally, then move the efforts to a regional basis, and then progress to an International level through Rotary International. We have done that by taking one step at a time. Your support of this program has and will allow us to take bigger steps and thereby save more children from the horrors of child abuse. The International program was expanded by the award of a Rotary International Vocational Training Global grant for $49, 750 to send a team of child abuse experts to Kenya, East Africa to teach Kenyan physicians, medical students and nurses on how to identify abusive head trauma (also knows as Shaken Baby Syndrome). Judy Wolf and Kay Resler, from the Rotary Club of Davis, along with a forensic pediatrician, a forensic nurse, and a social worker spent two weeks visiting hospitals and schools of medicine in Nairobi, Eldoret Kisii, and Mombasa providing training on this devastating act of child abuse.

The Club’s next “Big Night” event will be held on Saturday, February 7, 2015 and we urge all of you to mark that date on your calendars.
* * *

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

elias 5/2: natural gas exports

By
April 12, 2014 | Leave Comment

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: FRIDAY, MAY 2, 2014, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“NATURAL GAS EXPORTS WILL RAISE PRICES, AND SOON”

Because of hydraulic fracturing in states like North Dakota and Wyoming, Californians and other Americans have enjoyed lower natural gas prices over the last two winters than anytime in the last 15 years. That continues right up to this moment.

But if the natural gas industry and the Obama Administration have anything to say about it, today’s relatively low-cost heating and cooking may soon be matters of nostalgia.

That’s the meaning of the three approvals already issued by the Obama-appointed Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for either building new terminals to export liquefied natural gas (LNG) or to convert existing import plants to export facilities. More are likely to be approved soon.

Californians should well remember LNG, natural gas frozen into a fluid state near its source and then shipped around the world for use in places that don’t produce their own. The new American export plants, carrying benign-sounding names like Cove Point and Sabine Pass and Jordan Cove, aim to send LNG to places like Europe, Japan, Korea, China and India. They’ve gotten new impetus from ongoing disputes between Ukraine and Russia, source of most of Europe’s natural gas.

Less than 10 years ago, Californians were battling over whether and where to put plants for importing LNG, the result of a decision by the state Public Utilities Commission to give up some of the state’s reserved space on pipelines bringing gas here from Texas, Oklahoma and Colorado.

The answers were no and nowhere. Proposals for plants near Eureka, Oxnard, Long Beach and Santa Monica all died because companies promoting LNG imports never proved the state would ever need gas imported by sea. The later discovery of vast quantities of gas right in California, available if the massive deposits in the Monterey Shale geologic formation are ever fractured, or fracked, means California may soon need no imported gas at all.

So this state dodged a financial bullet, not getting stuck with hyper-expensive LNG.

But prices here will nevertheless rise because of the export licenses now being handed out for gas the industry has defined as “surplus.”

This likely fact of life emerges in a remarkable letter sent to Alaska’s Republican U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski last fall by a top federal Energy Department official.

Murkowski has pressed for quick approval of an LNG export facility in her state, warning that “The United States has a narrowing window of opportunity to join the global gas trade.” Seeking oil and gas-related profits and jobs for Alaska, Murkowski never acknowledges the certain effect exports will have on domestic gas prices, sure to rise if the current surplus goes overseas.

In California, price effects will probably be immediate with the opening of planned LNG export plants near Coos Bay, Ore., and near Prince Rupert on the coast of British Columbia. Both would take allegedly surplus gas from western Canada fields that now supply California and the Pacific Northwest.

But FERC doesn’t care, according to its letter to Murkowski. “We take very seriously the investment-backed expectations of private parties,” wrote Deputy Assistant Energy Secretary Paula Grant. Would FERC rescind an export license if domestic gas prices rise precipitously because of that permit? No, said Grant. “DOE has no record of having vacated or rescinded an authorization to import or export natural gas over the objections of the authorization holder.”

The Energy Department is also ignoring protests by other U.S. industries whose recession recoveries have partly been fueled by low gas prices.

A group of firms led by Dow Chemical has demanded that FERC – which works hand-in-glove with the Energy Department – slow the rush to sell off America’s energy bonanza.

FERC, the companies say, should “clearly articulate in advance its criteria” for deciding what is in the public interest.

So far, no response. Which indicates that even with a majority of commissioners appointed by an allegedly consumer-oriented Democratic President, FERC is no more responsive to the interests of utility customers than it was during the energy crunch of 2000-2001, when Republican George W. Bush was president and the commission refused to stop predator companies that cheated Californians out of more than $10 billion.

It all assures gas prices here will rise sharply in the next year or two unless California’s congressional delegation unites to put the brakes on LNG exports, and soon.

-30-
Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” now available in an updated third edition. His email address is tdelias@aol.com. For more Elias columns, go to www.californiafocus.net

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Health in all policies

Health in All Policies
By Mark Horton

What is “Health in All Policies” (HiAP) and what are its implications for public health practice and for policymakers in all sectors of the community? HiAP is simply the acknowledgement that virtually all policies, programs, and services put in place that affect the community as a whole will likely have an impact on the health of the community and its constituents. It is obvious that policies, programs and services put into place relating to the health care and public health systems have (or hope to have) a direct impact on health. It is also obvious that many other community services that are put in place to serve society’s interest in maintaining and improving the wellbeing of the community also have a direct or indirect impact on health. Examples include law enforcement, fire and rescue services, waste and sewage management, regulatory programs that monitor air quality and food safety, the design of consumer products, traffic control, etc. Not so obvious is that yet other sectors put in place policies, programs or services that have a direct or indirect impact on the community’s health. Here examples include agricultural policy (what foods are grown, how and where they are grown, and whether they are subsidized); transportation policy (where and how roads are built, how fast automobiles are allowed to travel on the roads, what other vehicles share right-of-way on the roads, who has access to public transportation and how much it costs); education policy (requiring immunization prior to school entry, providing healthful foods in the school cafeteria); zoning policy (where commercial and industrial enterprises are located relative to residential areas, where critical community services like hospitals and schools are located).
HiAP has significant implications for the practice of public health. The public health process typically involves the identification and diagnosis of an acute or chronic health condition or threat to the community (e.g. rising levels of obesity or an outbreak of influenza in the community); the development and implementation of a plan to address the condition or threat, which may involve mobilizing health care (e.g. medications) or preventative health (e.g. immunizations) interventions; and the ongoing monitoring of the condition or threat with an eye to ensuring that everyone is benefitting from the plan that’s been put into place and that the impact of the condition or threat on the community has been reduced or eliminated. This process by its nature focuses on health conditions or outcomes (e.g. deaths from heart disease or HIV/AIDS) and/or risk factors for those conditions or outcomes (e.g. smoking, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity) which lead to the development of programs that are focused on those conditions or threats, funded and carried out by public health entities or agencies at the appropriate jurisdictional level depending on the scope of the condition or threat.
Through a HiAP approach we acknowledge that there are social factors (e.g. poverty, unemployment rate) and environmental factors (e.g. access to parks and transportation, community safety) that play a powerful role in determining the degree of likelihood of citizen exposure to an environmental threat or in influencing human behavior. These social and environmental factors or determinants of health are frequently the result of a broad range of policy decisions, programs or services that have been put into place by many different sectors of the community. This acknowledgement of the health impact of a broad range of social and environmental health determinants leads to an expanded role for Public Health. Public Health must educate the community about the role of social and environmental factors in determining the health of the community and must bring partners in those various community sectors to the table to develop processes for systematically assessing the health impact of policies, programs and services being considered prior to their being implemented. When these assessments are done formally, we call them environmental impact or health impact assessments. All sectors of the community need to be made aware of the potential health impact of the policies, programs and services they put into place and evaluate every policy they are considering putting into place through a health lens. The ultimate goal of a HiAP approach to health, however, is not simply the avoidance of unintended health consequences of policies, programs or services being considered or implemented. Rather, the ultimate goal is for every community sector to be aware of and acknowledge the potential health impact of everything they do, and to adopt as part of its core mission the maintenance and improvement of the health of the community.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

YIIN letter

By
April 12, 2014 | Leave Comment

Yolo Interfaith Immigration Network (YIIN) P.O. Box 74295, Davis, CA 95617
Letter to the Editor The Davis Enterprise
On April 5, 2014, the Yolo Interfaith Immigration Network (YIIN) held its third annual fund raising dinner at Davis Community Church. It was a sold-out event, and we raised more than $9400. Of those proceeds, $5000 will be used to provide financial aid to immigrant college students at UCD and Woodland Community College who struggling to pay for their educations. The rest of the money will be used to support YIIN’s programs.
The success of the event depended on the work and support of many different groups and individuals. YIIN would like to thank Davis Community Church (and its Church and Society Ministry) for allowing us to use their facilities; Mary Philip and her wonderful crew of volunteer cooks for making a delicious Indian feast; and volunteers from several UCD student groups, including Las Hermanas Unidas, Las Mujeres Ayudando la Raza, SPEAK, and the Lamba Theta Phi Latin Fraternity. Youth from Woodland Presbyterian Church and St. Martin’s Episcopal Church helped run the raffle. Mariachi Puente provided wonderful music. YIIN also thanks the following businesses and individuals who donated raffle and silent auction items and who made generous financial contributions: Bogle Winery, Cable Car Wash, Cache Creek Casino Resort, Cindy Davis Photography, Creme de la Creme, Davis Food Co-op, de Luna Jewelers, Dos Coyotes Border Café, f&f multiprint, In-N-Out Burger, Konditorei Austrian Pastry Café, the Mexican American Concilio of Yolo County, Mikuni Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar, Peet’s Coffee & Tea, Regal Davis Stadium 5 Cinemas, Sacramento Coca-Cola Bottling Co., Taqueria Guadalajara (Davis), Teach Your Children, The Paint Chip, The Wardrobe, Trader Joe’s, Tres Hermanas, Yolo Berry Yogurt, Sheila Allen, Cynthia Belgum & Gerrit Platenkamp, Janene Beronio, Robb Davis, Lucas Frerichs, Rick Gonzales, Joe Kravoza, Robin Kulakow & Bill Julian, Janet Lane & Bob Holm, Peter & Marion London, Jesse Ortiz, Susan & Randy Padgett, Don Saylor, Karen Shepard, and Linda Sternberg. In addition, several local artists and artisans contributed their work, including Dick Berry, Betty Betreaux, Dori Marshall, Mary McComb, Jill Van Zanten and Ann Wright.
YIIN is also grateful for the support of all who attended the dinner.
Sincerely, Alison Pease President, Yolo Interfaith Immigration Network

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Thanks from DHS Baroque Ensemble

By
April 11, 2014 | Leave Comment

Last Sunday evening, the Davis community was treated to a Baroque concert of superb caliber. Renowned violinist Rachel Barton Pine performed with the Davis High School Baroque Ensemble, directed by Angelo Moreno, at the DHS Brunelle Performance Hall, which was filled to its 500 person capacity. The opportunity provided to the young musicians and the concert enjoyed by the audience are among the best our students and community have seen. Rachel Barton Pine performed this as a benefit concert, as part of the Sacramento Philharmonic educational outreach program. Admission to the concert was free, but unexpected and exceptionally generous donations from the audience will go a long way to get the DHS Baroque Ensemble, its instruments (violins, violas, cellos, and bass), and its director to Italy this summer for an educational experience of a lifetime. We are very grateful for the support of our community, the Sacramento Philharmonic who arranged for Rachel to be here, and for Rachel Barton Pine for her fine performance, musicality, history of the music, and her amazing energy and talent, and our Director Angelo Moreno for going above and beyond to provide our students with a world class educational concert experience. The students will not forget this experience, and we hope the community will warmly remember the music of Vivaldi’s Summer, as well as other compositions by Vivaldi, Milandre, and JS Bach. If you’ve enjoyed the student’s music and want to hear more or if you want to hear the DHS Baroque Ensemble for the first time, our next fundraising event for their Italy trip is “A Taste of Baroque” to be held on May 10 from 5:00 to 8:00 pm in the Good Life Garden of the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science, under the olive trees, on the UC Davis campus. Tickets: www.brownpapertickets.com/event/578966 and Watermelon Music.

With heartfelt thanks,

DHS Baroque Ensemble students and families

Letters to the Editor

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Pleasants/Hoskins

The Pleasants/Hoskins “Joyful Ranch” will be the site of the May 1 Winters History Symposium. Courtesy photo

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Winters history photo

The picture is from the Vacaville Museum collection, showing the earliest fruit growers in Solano County. The people in the picture have their age following their names, and in parenthesis the year they arrived in this area. The picture was taken April 29th, 1894 at the James M. Pleasants ranch in upper Pleasants Valley to celebrate the 85th birthday of J.M. Pleasants.

Front row, Left to Right, John Reid Wolfskill, 90 (1836); M.R. Miller, 76, (1849); James Madison Pleasants, 85 (1849); J.R. Collins, 67, (1849); and G. W. Thissell, 65, (1850)
Back row, Left to Right, William James Pleasants, 60, (1849); E.R. Thurber, 68, (1850); Richardson Long, 74 (1849); and Edwin C. Rust, founder of the Winters Express in 1884.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Print edition Friday, March 21, 2014

By
April 9, 2014 | Leave Comment

BruceGallaudetW

0425ManzanaresW

UCD running back Gabe Manzanares is coming off of a huge first season for the Aggies, who will showcase their spring growth with an open scrimmage on Saturday at Aggie Stadium. Sue Cockrell/Enterprise photo

SONY DSC

Powerful Panda Kayltin LeBar-Triebke takes a big cut during a recent Davis Youth Softball Association 6U contest. Courtesy photo

0425sacW

Republic FC’s Ivan Mirković dribbles past Mexican legend Adolfo “Bofo” Bautista in a 3-1 victory over Chivas USA Reserves earlier this season. Sacramento's home opener is Saturday at Hughes Stadium. Courtesy photo

JeanJackmanW

SusanLeonardiWineauxW

a1

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Picnic Day Multicultural Children’s Faire

On Hoagland Hall’s lawn from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., kids can make crafts such as:
* African Rainstick
* Aboriginal Australian Dot Art Chinese Paper Lantern Antarctica Snowflakes
* Native American Dream Catchers
* Japanese Carp Kites
* Mexican Pinatas
* South American Maracas
* Ojos De Dios
* North American Floral Headbands
* Peacock of India
* Queen’s Guard Peg Dolls
* Penguin and Orca Masks

Performances at the Multicultural Children’s Faire include:
* Jishin – JASS Yosakoi Team
12:30 – 12:50PM
A high-energy Japanese dance style that mixes traditional and modern elements of dance and is characterized by the use of wooden clappers. Experience Japanese culture!

* Red Maple Cultural Connection
2 – 2:20 p.m.
Two Chinese Ethnic Dance programs:
Flying Horses and Gazelles and Grand Eagle

— Information provided by UC Davis Picnic Day committee

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Frank Bruni: The new gay orthodoxy

BC-BRUNI-COLUMN-NYT/1188
Commentary: The New Gay Orthodoxy
By FRANK BRUNI

c.2014 New York Times News Service

To appreciate how rapidly the ground has shifted, go back just two short years, to April 2012. President Barack Obama didn’t support marriage equality, not formally. Neither did Hillary Clinton. And few people were denouncing them as bigots whose positions rendered them too divisive, offensive and regressive to lead.

But that’s precisely the condemnation that tainted and toppled Brendan Eich after his appointment two weeks ago as the new chief executive of the technology company Mozilla. On Thursday he resigned, clearly under duress and solely because his opposition to gay marriage diverged from the views of too many employees and customers. “Under the present circumstances, I cannot be an effective leader,” he said, and he was right, not just about the climate at Mozilla but also, to a certain degree, about the climate of America.

Something remarkable has happened — something that’s mostly exciting but also a little disturbing (I’ll get to the disturbing part later), and that’s reflected not just in Eich’s ouster at Mozilla, the maker of the web browser Firefox, but in a string of marriage-equality victories in federal courts over recent months, including a statement Friday by a judge who said that he would rule that Ohio must recognize same-sex marriages performed outside the state.

And the development I’m referring to isn’t the broadening support for same-sex marriage, which a clear majority of Americans now favor. No, I’m referring to the fact that in a great many circles, endorsement of same-sex marriage has rather suddenly become nonnegotiable. Expected. Assumed. Proof of a baseline level of enlightenment and humanity. Akin to the understanding that all people, regardless of race or color, warrant the same rights and respect.

Even beyond these circles, the debate is essentially over, in the sense that the trajectory is immutable and the conclusion foregone. Everybody knows it, even the people who still try to stand in the way. The legalization of same-sex marriage from north to south and coast to coast is merely a matter of time, probably not much of it at that.

There will surely be setbacks, holdouts, tantrums like the one in Arizona, whose Legislature in February passed a bill that would have allowed discrimination against gays and lesbians on religious grounds. (Mississippi enacted a vaguely similar measure last week.) Arizona’s governor of course vetoed the legislation, after being pressured by corporate leaders, and their lobbying underscored the larger and more lasting story. At least beyond the offices of Chick-fil-A, it’s widely believed — no, understood — that being pro-gay is better for business than being anti-gay. Hence the inclusion of a same-sex couple in the famous faces-of-America commercial that Coca-Cola unveiled during the Super Bowl. Hence a more recent television spot, part of the Honey Maid food company’s “This is Wholesome” ad campaign. It showed two dads cuddling their newborn.

The Mozilla story fits into this picture. Eich was exiled following not just employee complaints but signs and threats of customer unrest: The online dating site OkCupid was urging its users to boycott Firefox.

The business community has in fact been a consequential supporter of marriage equality. Wall Street firms lined the coffers of the campaign for marriage equality in New York, and 20 major financial service companies pay substantial membership dues to belong to and underwrite Out on the Street, an industry group that advocates LGBT equality.

“You want to talk about a sea change?” Todd Sears, the group’s founder, said to me. “Fourteen financial services companies signed onto an amicus brief in the Edie Windsor case.” That was the one that asked the Supreme Court to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act, which the court essentially did last June.

The language in the high court’s ruling “demolished every argument put forward to justify marriage discrimination,” said Evan Wolfson, the founder and president of the advocacy group Freedom to Marry. And that ruling, he added, helped to pave the way for all the court victories — in Utah, in Oklahoma, in Texas — since. This coming Thursday, the U.S. circuit court in Denver will hear an appeal of the decision by a federal judge in Utah to allow gay and lesbian couples there to wed. The case could have a sweeping effect on a region of the country not typically considered progressive. It could also wind up at the Supreme Court and give the justices a chance to do what they stopped short of last year: decree marriage equality nationwide.

Wolfson noted a fascinating angle of the recent court rulings and of the blessing that Eric Holder gave in February to state-level attorneys general who didn’t want to defend bans on gay marriage. Both invoked racial discrimination in the country’s past, casting bans on same-sex marriage in that context.

Increasingly, opposition to gay marriage is being equated with racism — as indefensible, un-American. “What was once a wedge issue became wrapped in the American flag,” said Jo Becker, a New York Times writer whose sweeping history of the marriage-equality movement, “Forcing the Spring,” will be published this month. Becker mentioned what she called a rebranding of the movement over the last five years, with two important components. First, gay marriage was framed in terms of family values. Second, advocates didn’t shame opponents and instead made sympathetic public acknowledgment of the journey that many Americans needed to complete in order to be comfortable with marriage equality.

There was no such acknowledgment from Mozilla employees and others who took to Twitter to condemn Eich and call for his head. Writing about that wrath in his blog, The DISH, Andrew Sullivan said that it disgusted him, “as it should disgust anyone interested in a tolerant and diverse society.” A leading supporter of gay marriage, Sullivan warned other supporters not to practice “a fanaticism more like the religious right than anyone else.”

I can’t get quite as worked up as he did. For one thing, prominent gay rights groups weren’t part of the Mozilla fray. For another, Mozilla isn’t the first company to make leadership decisions (or reconsiderations) with an eye toward the boss’ cultural mind-meld with the people below him or her. And if you believe that to deny a class of people the right to marry is to deem them less worthy, it’s indeed difficult to chalk up opposition to marriage equality as just another difference of opinion.

But it’s vital to remember how very recently so many of equality’s promoters, like Obama and Clinton, have come around and how relatively new this conversation remains. It’s crucial not to lose sight of how well the movement has been served by the less judgmental posture that Becker pointed out.

Sullivan is right to raise concerns about the public flogging of someone like Eich. Such vilification won’t accelerate the timetable of victory, which is certain. And it doesn’t reflect well on the victors.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Thomas Friedman: Sheldon is Iran’s best friend

By
April 08, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-FRIEDMAN-COLUMN-NYT/892
Commentary: Sheldon: Iran’s Best Friend
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN

c.2014 New York Times News Service

It occurred to me the other day that the zealously pro-Israel billionaire Sheldon Adelson and Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, actually have one big thing in common. They are both trying to destroy Israel. Adelson is doing it by loving Israel to death and Khamenei by hating Israel to death. And now even Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey inadvertently got drawn into this craziness.

What’s the logic? Very simple. Iran’s leaders want Israel destroyed but have no desire, in my view, to use a nuclear bomb to do it. That would expose them to retaliation and sure death. Their real strategy is more subtle: Do everything possible to ensure that Israel remains in the “occupied territory,” as the U.S. State Department refers to the West Bank, won by Israel in the 1967 war.

By supporting Palestinian militants dedicated to destroying any peace process, Tehran hopes to keep Israel permanently mired in the West Bank and occupying 2.7 million Palestinians, denying them any statehood and preventing the emergence of a Palestinian state that might recognize Israel and live in peace alongside it. The more Israel is stuck there, the more Palestinians and the world will demand a “one-state solution,” with Palestinians given the right to vote. The more Israel resists that, the more isolated it becomes.

Iran and its ally Hamas have plenty of evidence that this strategy is working: Israel’s 47-year-old occupation of the West Bank has led it to build more settlements there and in doing so make itself look like the most active colonial power on the planet today. The 350,000 Israeli settlers in the West Bank reinforce that view by claiming their presence in the West Bank is not about security but a divinely inspired project to reunite the Jewish people with their biblical homeland.

The result is a growing movement on college campuses and in international organizations to isolate and delegitimize the Jewish state because of this occupation. This “BDS movement” — to boycott, divest from and sanction Israel — is gaining adherents not only among non-Jews on U.S. campuses but even within some Hillels, campus Jewish centers.

Iran could not be happier. The more Israel sinks into the West Bank, the more it is delegitimized and isolated, the more the world focuses on Israel’s colonialism rather than Iran’s nuclear enrichment, the more people call for a single democratic state in all of historic Palestine.

And now Iran has an ally: Sheldon Adelson — the foolhardy Las Vegas casino magnate and crude right-wing, pro-Israel extremist. Adelson gave away some $100 million in the last presidential campaign to fund Republican candidates, with several priorities in mind: that they delegitimize the Palestinians and that they avoid any reference to the West Bank as “occupied territories” and any notion that the U.S. should pressure Israel to trade land for peace there. Both Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney took the money and played by Sheldon’s rules.

In case you missed it, the RJC, the Republican Jewish Coalition, held a retreat last weekend at an Adelson casino in Las Vegas. It was dubbed “the Sheldon Primary.” Republicans lined up to compete for Adelson’s blessing and money, or as Politico put it: “Adelson summoned (Jeb) Bush and Govs. Chris Christie of New Jersey, John Kasich of Ohio and Scott Walker of Wisconsin to Las Vegas. … The new big-money political landscape — in which a handful of donors can dramatically alter a campaign with just a check or two — explains both the eagerness of busy governors to make pilgrimages to Las Vegas, and the obsession with divining Adelson’s 2016 leanings.”

Adelson personifies everything that is poisoning our democracy and Israel’s today — swaggering oligarchs, using huge sums of money to try to bend each system to their will.

Christie, in his speech, referred to the West Bank as “occupied territories” — as any knowledgeable U.S. leader would. This, Politico said, “set off murmurs in the crowd.” Some Republican Jews explained to Christie after he finished that he had made a terrible faux pas. (He called something by its true name and in the way the U.S. government always has!) The West Bank should be called “disputed territories” or “Judea and Samaria,” the way hard-line Jews prefer.

So, Politico reported, Christie hastily arranged a meeting with Adelson to explain that he misspoke and that he was a true friend of Israel. “The New Jersey governor apologized in a private meeting in the casino mogul’s Venetian office shortly afterward,” Politico reported. It said Adelson “accepted” Christie’s “explanation” and “quick apology.”

Read that sentence over and contemplate it.

I don’t know if Israel has a Palestinian partner for a secure withdrawal from the West Bank, or ever will. But I know this: If Israel wants to remain a Jewish, democratic state, it should be doing everything it can to nurture such a partner or acting unilaterally to get out. Because I’m certain that when reports about the “Adelson primary” reached the desk of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei in Tehran, a big smile crossed his face and he said to his aides: “May Allah grant Sheldon a long life. Everything is going according to plan.”

Thomas Friedman

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Republican endorsements

By
April 08, 2014 | Leave Comment

YOLO COUNTY CALIFORNIA REPUBLICAN ASSEMBLY (CRA) UNIT MAKES ENDORSEMENTS

The Membership of the Yolo County Unit of the California Republican Assembly (CRA) at its Endorsement Convention with presentations by candidates for regional and local elective offices in the upcoming Statewide Primary Election of Tuesday, June 3rd that was recently held on Sunday, April 6th.at the VFW Hall in Esparto made several endorsements in a few regional and local races. The membership voted unanimously to endorse Charlie Schuapp for Member of the State Assembly in the 4th District and Bill Marble for for Member of the Woodland City Council.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

elias 4/25 piecemeal immigration changes

By
April 08, 2014 | Leave Comment

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: FRIDAY, APRIL 25, 2014, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“A FEW PIECEMEAL IMMIGRATION CHANGES LIKELY”

The grand compromise on immigration passed by the U.S. Senate 10 months ago is now all but history, despite talk from President Obama and other Democrats about “comprehensive reform.”

For comprehensive immigration reform, as it’s understood in Washington, D.C., means granting undocumented immigrants some kind of pathway to citizenship. Only a very few Republicans are willing to allow this, no matter how arduous and long the path would be.

Despite the common GOP rhetoric, this has little to do with humane concerns or fairness, and everything to do with politics. Republicans have seen what the 1986 immigration reform bill signed by then-President Ronald Reagan did to their party in California. Legalizing many previously unauthorized residents combined with a sense of threat engendered by the 1994 Proposition 187’s draconian rules for the undocumented – since thrown out by the courts – made California a Democratic stronghold, where previously it was up for grabs in most elections.

Republicans fear the same kind of thing could happen nationally with any new “amnesty” bill, so as long as they hold a majority in either house of Congress, they won’t let it happen.

But that doesn’t mean they couldn’t do other things. A new “guest worker” program a la the old bracero plan that began in World War II and stretched into the late 1960s is a possibility. Concessions are also possible for undocumented immigrants brought here as small children.

Some family unity measures might be okayed, too, so long as they don’t spawn new citizens.

And despite their current obdurate talk about accepting only comprehensive reforms, it would be unrealistic to expect either Obama or Democrats in the Senate to block these moves.

For one thing, they’re all parts of the wider-ranging Senate bill. For another, each of those measures would improve the lives of at least some of the undocumented, essentially legalizing many even if not allowing them citizenship and voting rights.

Many Latinos who have steadily cast ballots for Democrats and against Republicans principally because of immigration would be mightily offended if Democrats suddenly became purists and rejected measures that may not be wide-ranging or comprehensive, but would nevertheless improve the lives of some immigrants.

It’s possible this picture could change a bit as the primary election season moves along and Republicans in “safe” districts whose biggest worry is a primary challenge from the right get past the point where new opponents can emerge.

“For many members, they’d be more comfortable (with immigration bills) when their primaries are over,” observed Republican Congressman Darrell Issa of north San Diego County.

But those same GOP members of Congress also know conservatives often have demonstrated long memories. If they back anything like amnesty today, they realize they may face challenges from their right in 2016.

As with the Democrats, their principal concern is not with what will do the most for America or be the most humane, but what stands the best chance to preserve them in office.

That’s why, for example, a group of 16 House Republicans including ultraconservatives like Michelle Bachman of Minnesota and Lamar Smith of Texas wrote to Obama in late winter rejecting any bill that “would permanently displace American workers.”

Even though there is no proof any guest worker program or other legalization tactic has ever displaced American workers or decreased wages, belief that immigration changes will do this remains strong in many parts of America.

Meanwhile, other Republicans realize that they’ll have to make adjustments on immigration if they ever hope to make inroads on the Democratic domination among Latinos, the fastest-growing bloc of voters.

Democrats, meanwhile, relish watching the GOP sweat over all this. They know that as long as citizenship is off the table, Republicans won’t threaten Latino loyalty to them. They also know that the less the GOP does, the less happens, the better their own electoral prospects.

Which is why it’s unrealistic to expect immigration changes this year other than a few desultory, half-baked measures improving things for businesses wanting to pay low wages.

-30-
Email Thomas Elias at tdelias@aol.com. His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, visit www.californiafocus.net

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

BioConsortia financing

BioConsortia Raises $15M Series B Round from Khosla Ventures and Otter Capital

Additional Capital to Accelerate Product Development and Commercialization

DAVIS, California – April 07, 2014 – BioConsortia, Inc., an agricultural biotechnology company that uses a proprietary method for the selection of beneficial microbial consortia for crop improvement, has raised an additional $15 million in Series B funding. Khosla Ventures and Otter Capital participated equally in the round. This fund-raising round, along with the recent appointment of Marcus Meadows-Smith as the CEO of BioConsortia, accelerates the company’s plans to commercialize the use of microbial consortia as seed treatments and soil additives.

“There is substantial opportunity for BioConsortia to help transform agricultural production around the world,” said Marcus Meadows-Smith, BioConsortia CEO. “It’s gratifying to win the ongoing support of sophisticated investors like Khosla Ventures and Otter Capital.”

BioConsortia has developed a proprietary system that uses accelerated microbial selection and the latest genomic techniques to define products for specific crop improvement traits based on an optimum community of microbes, or consortia, that work together to increase crop yields with no genetic modification required. The system rapidly identifies the right consortia and can apply to both conventional and transgenic crops.

“At Khosla Ventures, we’re investing in companies that can have a systemic impact on food production around the world,” explained Andrew Chung, partner at Khosla Ventures who helped incubate the company out of New Zealand with technical founder Dr. Peter Wigley. “Since providing the seed investment in the BioConsortia technology, we’ve been strong believers in the opportunity to dramatically increase agricultural production with smaller resource requirements. This R&D platform will accelerate innovation in agriculture and enable the industry to operate in even more environmentally sensitive ways.”

“It is a pleasure to invest again in the agricultural microbial industry in support of two former executives of AgraQuest, Marcus Meadows-Smith and Christina Huben,” said John Pasquesi, managing member of Otter Capital LLC and former chairman of the board of AgraQuest. “The combination of a growing industry, BioConsortia’s differentiated technology, and management’s demonstrated record of success make this a compelling opportunity.”

Khosla Ventures and Otter Capital both have strong track records developing leading edge agriculture and food production companies. Khosla Ventures investments include: The Climate Corporation (acquired by Monsanto), big data software platform for agriculture; Blue River Technology, a pioneer in the use of computer vision and robotics in agriculture; Hampton Creek Foods, a food technology company that utilizes plant science to replace egg products; and Granular (formerly known as Solum), a cloud-based farming software and analytics provider. Otter Capital, meanwhile, was an early and consistent investor in AgraQuest, a leading biopesticide company (acquired by Bayer CropScience); and Inguran LLC dba Sexing Technologies, the world’s leading supplier of sexed semen to the dairy and other livestock industries.

In addition to product development and commercialization, BioConsortia will use the funds to invest in the necessary resources to build collaborative partnerships with seed, fertilizer and crop production companies.

About BioConsortia, Inc.
BioConsortia, based in Davis, California, is an agricultural biotechnology company that uses a proprietary method for the selection of beneficial microbial consortia for crop improvement. The company has pipeline products and research projects for: enhanced utilization and substitution of N, P, K and S fertilizers; plant growth improvement including harvestable yield, root mass and accelerated development; other desirable crop traits such as abiotic tolerance, biotic resistance and enhanced metabolite expression. BioConsortia will partner with crop protection, seed and plant breeding companies to bring the benefits of microbial science and biotechnology to sustainable crop production. For more information visit www.bioconsortia.com

About Khosla Ventures
Khosla Ventures offers venture assistance, strategic advice and capital to entrepreneurs. The firm helps entrepreneurs extend the potential of their ideas in breakthrough technologies in clean energy, mobile, IT, cloud, big data, storage, health, food, agriculture and semiconductors. Vinod Khosla founded the firm in 2004 and was formerly a General Partner at Kleiner Perkins and founder of Sun Microsystems. Khosla Ventures is based in Menlo Park, California. More information is available at http://www.khoslaventures.com.

About Otter Capital
Otter Capital is a private equity investment firm based in Palo Alto, California. Otter invests in a wide variety of industries, including agriculture and sustainability. John Pasquesi founded the firm in 2001 and was formerly managing director and member of the executive committee of Hellman & Friedman, a San Francisco based private equity firm.

###

Media Contact: info@bioconsortia.com

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Davis Cruise-In

By
April 03, 2014 | Leave Comment

Once a month dozens of owners drive their out-of-the-ordinary vehicles meet with the public at the Marketplace Shopping Center. There is no entry fee, no judging, no trophies. The first gathering, or rather “Cruise-In” of the year will be held Tuesday, April 15, from 5 to 7 p.m. or longer. On average 45 to 80 participants meet on the third Tuesday of the month until October.

Bruce Risley, his wife Marie, and right hand man Ron Vogel, respective owners of a ’36 Chevrolet, a ’50 Studebaker and a ’69 AMC AMX, started the event in 2009.

Among more than 200 Cruise-in participants include Steve Slinkard, Glen and Leslie Byrns, Ron and Ann Arneson, and Steve Garcia and his son Austin.

Slinkard likes the Davis Cruise-In because of its casual nature. “You just come relax and have fun. There’s no expectations, there’s no politics …. anybody’s welcome, just bring your car and have a good time.
Byrns is an English car guy who has a hankering for American Hot Rods. “Every time I go, something drives up that just knocks me out.”

Like French Citroëns. “They’re something out of the ordinary you don’t see very often,” said Garcia.
Garcia takes his ’56 Mercury Montclair to dozens of large car shows around the state. He likes the Cruise-In for its smaller venue. “You get a more personal touch and you get to know more of the people there,” said Garcia.
Arneson goes to the Cruise-In for the nostalgia where drivers get together and swap stories. “I jumped on board and said ‘this is great.’ There’s no entry fee, and no trophy, but who cares!”
The strength of the Cruise-In lies not in the owners or their cars, but the stories that link them.

STEVE SLINKARD
Steve Slinkard may have had one of the best childhoods one could imagine. Growing up in the southern California Hot Rod culture, he spent vacations in the 50’s and early 60’s watching his father Al and older brother Rex race a pair of family cars at San Gabriel, San Fernando and Saugus speedways, as well as the historic Bonneville Salt Flats in Nevada.
One trophy commemorates his father’s victory in the half-mile driving 107 mph at LOCATION SEE PIC OF TROPHY.
Steve even learned to drive in the 1951 Chevrolet Styleline DeLuxe convertible when he was 14 … on the Flats!
He was too young to race, but he did help them install a HydraMatic transmission that helped it stay competitive.
“They became quite the trick thing for race cars.”

Rex became a crew member of the “Freight Train” dual-engine dragster, owned by John Peters with Bob Muraves as the driver. Because of a “family situation” Muraves went by alias “Floyd Lippencotte Jr.” His father told him he wouldn’t inherit the family Maytag business if he was caught racing.
So, after a race, Rex Slinkard and Muraves would switch places behind the wheel when the car was brought back to the grandstands. Rex was photographed with the winning trophy as Muraves stood at his side in one clipping in Slinkard’s album.

“Freight Train” is currently kept at the NHRA Motorsport Museum in Pomona.
After an incident involving sand in the crankcase, the ’51 Chevy was retired from competitive racing. Al Slinkard drove it to work at Jersey Maid Milk until 1978, wearing a crash helmet with the top down.
“You could say he was a little eccentric,” said Steve.
The car was passed on to Rex when Al died. He nearly restored it completely when it was then passed on to Steve, who completed the job.

Steve’s car has served as carrier of marshall former UC Davis Chancellor Larry Vanderheof for the Picnic Day parade recently. “It’s one of the most fun things I’ve done with the car,” Steve recalled.

At age 65, Steve’s childhood may still be ongoing. He takes it for a spin, up F Street as it turns into County Road 101A. The terrifying power of the Cadillac engine and Hydramatic transmission is still evident.

“I drive this car like my dad and brother are right there with me. It’s such a spiritual thing for me. I find myself talking to them when I’m driving, like ‘Hey dad, what do you think?’”
“I’m sure my dad would be thrilled to see the way it is, that I’m keeping it up. He’d be happy.”

GLEN BYRNS
Southern California racing culture was also alive in RAY “BUD” SMITH, the owner of a promising ’59 Austin Healey “Bugeye” Sprite. He wanted to race and needed help. Across the street was a kid, Glen Byrns, who was eager to help and soaked up the knowledge poured out to him.

He went on to buy unwanted English cars dirt cheap, one after another and traded up to a Triumph Spitfire.
“I blew the engine again and again, racing it through high school.”

Then came an 1959 MGA from a junkyard that he repaired and drove through college.

30 years, his marriage to Leslie, and two daughters later, Byrns was riding the Davis Double Century bike ride. As he crested Cantelow Hill he heard a familiar rumble and waited at the top. A man was pleasure driving a ’59 MGA. The pair took a half-hour break to discuss their automotive passion.

Afterwards, Byrns went on and on to Leslie who later fueled his interest with a Father’s Day gift of a coffee table book of British cars. A “Bugeye” Sprite stood out, sparking a question, “What ever happened to Bud?”

With help from home, Byrns tracked down him down.

“I bet I know what you’re calling about.”

“Yeah.”

“Do you want the Sprite?”

“Yeah.”

With a borrowed truck, Byrns became the owner of his first automotive love. He named it “Bugsy.”

Byrns couldn’t leave his wife without a taste of English conveyance. Leslie nodded her liking of a Morris Minor they saw, so he found a right-hand drive Woody Wagon.

It was painted bright persimmon with an “Unkl Fud” vanity plate. It had been stored in an Oakland garage after being towed off the streets of Berkeley in the ’70’s. Speculation regarding its imaginative history ensues.

After Glen restores it, Leslie renames her Winifred, after her mother.

Winston came from nowhere. Byrns built it from “the best bits fro what it needs to be,” from carrying bicycles to bricks to backpacking in the Sierra. It started with a green Morris cabshell and frame, a Datsun transmission, a Sprite engine and brakes, and wheels from Chevy Vega. A mutt with a fifth gear for good highway mileage and modern electronics.

The next project is a red 1962 Morris Mini that he found on ranch property near Redding.

But before that step forward, came three steps back.

Byrns came home from a weeklong backpacking trip, parked Winston and walked in to take a shower. Leslie drove Winifred into the garage next to Bugsy after a shopping trip.

They soon heard pounding noises in the garage.

A transformer than ran the sprinkler timer died after 37 years and overheated, falling into a box of balsa wood. The garage exploded into fire.

“I ran outside in a bathrobe and it was completely involved.”
Byrns lost fishing poles and a hammer with his dad’s name that he had made during the depression, model airplanes, collectible bikes, car parts.

And there was Bugsy and Winifred.

“It was hideously depressing.”

Bugsy’s upholstery was burned away. Anything rubber or chrome was destroyed. The dash and steering wheel were black. Winston’s hood was burnt and blistered.

Byrns didn’t think he’d have to re-restore them. He did, but better.

“I pulled everything off and started sanding, and kept sanding until it wasn’t black, then varnished it.”
Bugsy went from yellow to blue. The Woody is tighter.

“I did everything but sew together the leather seats. Since the engine ran after the fire, I just scrubbed it clean and repainted it.

Byrns doesn’t care that he has a salvage title for his 55-year-old Sprite.

“We call that a badge of honor.”

Byrns opens the hood and it becomes obvious that it’s not exactly stock. There’s giant turbocharger, a custom manifold added by the previous owner, new intake, a different throttle body, modern fuel injection.

“It’s as modified as it could possibly be, but I like it to look stock on the outside to keep it subtle. I’m sure the previous owner would be proud. In his line of thinking I only added more power.”

Yet still, Byrns doesn’t drive it around town much.

“It’s a go out in the country and blow your hair back kind of car.”

And what the heck, it’s time for hair to blow.

We take a short drive out west on Russell Boulevard down the Avenue of Trees. The sound is deep, loud, rumbling, not unpleasant to anyone who has a hankering for this sort of ride.

Byrns isn’t completely happy with the tuning until Bugsy is good and warmed up.
He has been learning the skill of tuning the car with software. There’s a portal under the dash that provides computer linkage.

“Once you get good at the tuning, it should start and pull away from the curb like a Toyota Corolla.”

As if there’s a need to upgrade the experience Byrns mentions the turbocharge option and apologizes.

“I hardly ever light up the turbo anymore. It just costs me pistons and money.”

Back at the garage we look at the next project. He had restored the Mini’s engine when the fire occurred, but that’ll be a do-over too. He is holding back from a common temptation to convert it to a Mini Cooper, keeping the 848 cc engine with its 45 mpg.

He will be done restoring when the Mini is complete.

“That’ll be a nice little set, then I’ll be finished … unless someone gives me a Jag,” Byrns laughs.

Byrns appreciates the effort that Bruce Risley and Co. has put into the Cruise-In.

“I don’t know where the guy finds them, but he gets people to turn up with curious cars that you’re not going to see at the average show. It’s funny what people have hidden in their garages.”

Or their chicken houses.

DON ARNESON
Don was looking for a birthday present for Ann, his wife. He found it. As well as a family of seven rats. She’s probably not a fan of rats.

Arneson, who specializes in restoration and remodeling of pre-1930 structures, was working on a rural house near Williams. It had been built in the early 1900’s by the owner’s father.

The owner, a woman in her 70’s, told him there was extra trim left over in the barn, a chicken coop. As he opened the doors, he spied a different bird altogether. Covered in pigeon dung was a 1960 Ford Thunderbird. The owner stored it there after her son lost interest in driving it.

Arneson had restored a 1955 Thunderbird years ago, sold it, and was looking for another first-generation model at the time. A second-generation would do. The owner wasn’t quite ready to let go.

After haggling for several months, she finally agreed to sell on the condition that he would give her a ride when he got it running.

He squirted oil in the cylinders and worked them until they moved well enough. He added transmission fluid, got the starter to work, and had the carburetor rebuilt. The engine fired right up. That was just the first of it.

“I had to replace everything rubber,” he said. The rats chewed everything up.

Some folks in Arneson’s generation have asked to sit in the T-Bird. After inhaling the aroma they smile.

“They’ll start telling me these fantastic stories …. That’s when you can bring back those memories of fond times,” he said.

When Arneson first got the T-Bird running, a woman in her eighties walked over to ask if she could touch his car.

“‘My husband that I was married to for 50 years,’ she said. ‘He picked me up for our first date in a 1960 Thunderbird. We married and we went on our honeymoon to Florida.’ She was crying and telling me stories.”

Arneson only takes the car to the Davis Cruise-In.

“It is classified as a work in progress. It’s not in that dependable stage where I want to drive it for a long distance.”

Until recently when the Arneson’s built their house and a garage, he hasn’t had a space to restore it.

“I bought it with the idea of being able to completely tear it apart,” he said.

Arneson plans to retro the T-Bird, meaning that he’ll buy a new engine and transmission which will get better gas mileage.

“I’m going to do 90 percent of the work. I’ll take it to have it painted. I’ll do all the body work myself.”
Until recently, when the Arneson’s built their house and a garage, he hasn’t had a space to restore it.

“I bought it with the idea of being able to completely tear it apart.”

“That’s the thing with this. It’ll always be a work in progress. I want to let my grand-babies ride in it without me freaking out. It will never be perfect. It will be … a car,” said Arneson.
“It’s just for fun,” added Ann.
“Some of these cars are just a labor of love. There are the rare exceptions where they are taking them and preserving them. It’s a part of American history that is rapidly disappearing.They are either doing the “Batman” outrageous stuff, or they are being destroyed in massive quantities.
One of the main reasons Arneson brings his barn-find to the Cruise-In is to introduce the next generation to older cars because they are disappearing.
“Our heart, and Bruce’s heart, is getting these kids interested in doing restoration work or just preservation.”
One inspiring example is the relationship between father and son.

STEVE and AUSTIN GARCIA
Steve Garcia story
“Our heart, and Bruce’s heart, is getting these kids interested in doing restoration work or just preservation.”
One inspiring example is the relationship between a father and son, and his son.
Steve and Austin Garcia

Steve Garcia is a man of work and dedicated to helping others. As a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, he organized consecutive car shows to benefit diabetes research. He recruited several Cruise-In cohorts to participate.
His own car, a yellow and white Mercury Montclair, was passed on to him from his father Benedicto, a concrete layer, when Steve was 14. The car needed work. His father said he’d put up half if Steve put up the rest.
“That inspired me to do a lot of lawn jobs,” said Steve.
His school friends refused to believe his claims of owning such a unique car for lack of evidence. He outside Woodland in the farmland of Yolo. He finally made enough progress and had it running during his senior year in 1984.
“I’ve gone through the front and rear suspension, the engine, transmission and interior. I try to do as much as I can. If it’s beyond me, I’ll try to learn how to do it.” He researches the Internet or will ask others to help out.
“The pride of it is that I can say, ‘I did it.’ I am particular about details.”
That “can do” attitude he received from his father is being passed on to his son Austin, who has his own project — Earl.
While growing up Austin’s mother Suzette had a lifelong friend who grew up with her since elementary school by the name of Giselle Morris.
Giselle’s parents, Woody and Charlotte, drove a 1949 Ford F1 pickup, a.k.a. Earl. They all would often cruise the back roads on the lookout for recyclable cans. The girls would throw the cans into the truck bed as they sat on the Earl’s running boards.
Try that today.
Year’s later Austin and Steve meet Earl in the Morris’s garage where it sat parked for 15 years. The bed was full of stuff as high as the cab. The hood and fend were off. It was painted multiple colors.
“It was pretty much complete but it was in parts,” said Steve.
After seeing pictures of the scene, it is apparent that Austin and Steve (mostly Austin) have been working hard to get Earl running.
“A lot of free time is dedicated to helping him learn,” said Steve.
Austin has been going to car shows with his father since he was little. Recently he came to realize that he wanted an old car for himself.
“Everybody I know has them,” he said. The craftsmanship has him sold.
“They actually took the time to form these,” he said, pointing to the wide fenders and articulate grill.
“Someone took the time to design this and think about every little thing. Nowadays they put it on the computer and draft it all up. You don’t see many cars with chrome. I love chrome,” said Austin who is eager to get it on the road.
The Mercury has been put on the back burner while the guys tackle Earl.
The one problem they are facing is an unfamiliar engine with an overheating problem. The 239 flathead engine is basically two engines that function as one, said Steve. “It has two water pumps and two cooling systems.” It runs on a six-volt battery.
“You see a lot of teenagers that don’t make the initiative to do something like this,” Steve says of his son. “For him to be out there, other people see that and say, ‘If he can do that, why can’t I?”
Inspiration travels to and fro.
Steve recalls meeting people the Cruise-In who recall their early experiences with a Mercury.
“It’s kind of good for them, it’s a flashback and makes me feel good that I can bring some of those memories back to them. I do it for the love of the car, I don’t do it for prizes or none of that. I have won prizes, but that’s not my priority.”

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Lawyer-Wainacht engagement

By
April 01, 2014 | Leave Comment

Emily Lawyer of Pasadena and Andrew Wainacht are engaged to be married.

The bride-to-be is the daughter of Frances and Arthur Lawyer of Davis. She is a 2005 graduate of Davis High School and received her B.M. in trumpet performance and her B.A. in math from Oberlin College. She also graduated from the University of Southern California with an M.M. in trumpet performance.  She is now employed as the special events coordinator for the Los Angeles Opera.

The groom-to-be is the son of Kim and Drew Wainacht of Killingly, Conn. He also graduated from Oberlin College, with a B.M. in trombone performance. He works as a box office and marketing associate for the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra.

The wedding will take place in the garden of the bride’s parents on June 29, 2014.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

county advisory vacancies

By
April 05, 2014 | Leave Comment

Yolo County Advisory Boards Vacancies

(Woodland, CA) – The Yolo County Board of Supervisors believes that effective citizen involvement is essential to good governance, and that a respectful and informed exchange of ideas between the county and citizens will result in the best polices and decisions for Yolo County. To that end, the Board of Supervisors is actively seeking candidates to fill vacancies on the following county advisory bodies. For more information on advisory bodies, specific vacancies, and to submit an application, visit: www.yolocounty.org (go to Residents > Advisory Bodies), call the Clerk of the Board’s office (530) 666-8195 or contact your Yolo County Supervisor.

Board of Supervisors Advisory Committees
Capay Valley General Plan Citizens’ Advisory Board
Childcare & Development Planning Council
Children’s Alliance
Commission on Aging and Adult Services
Community Services Action Board
Dunnigan General Plan Citizens’ Advisory Board
Emergency Medical Care Committee
Esparto General Plan Citizens’ Advisory Board
In-Home Supportive Services Advisory Board
Knights Landing General Plan Citizens’ Advisory Board
Library Advisory Board
Madison General Plan Citizens’ Advisory Board
Maternal, Child & Adolecent Health Advisory Board
Parks, Recreation & Wildlife Advisory Committee
Transportation Advisory Committee
Waste Advisory Committee
Yolo County Housing Commission
Yolo-Zamora General Citizens’ Advisory Board

County Service Areas
North Davis Meadows County Service Area
Snowball County Service Area No. 6
Wild Wings County Service Area
Willowbank County Service Area

Community Service Districts
Esparto Community Service District
Knights Landing Community Service District

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Name droppers add

By
April 05, 2014 | Leave Comment

——– Original Message ——–
Subject: UC Davis News: Honors for UC Davis faculty, staff
Date: Thu, 03 Apr 2014 15:03:47 -0400
From: UC Davis News Service
To: cgolden@davisenterprise.net

University of California, Davis
April 3, 2014

AWARDS, HONORARY DOCTORATES AND MORE AT UC DAVIS

Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, professor emerita at the University of California, Davis, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, has been selected to receive the academy’s 2014 Award for Scientific Reviewing.

Given this year in the category of human-biosocial interactions, the award recognizes Hrdy, an anthropologist, for “rendering a significant service to science and influencing the course of scientific thought.”

Hrdy’s work epitomizes “the creativity and insight that can generate important syntheses of contemporary research and set research agendas for the future,” the academy declares in the award citation. “At the same time, her writing is marked by a clarity and liveliness that makes path-breaking science accessible to the public.”

The award, to be presented at the academy’s 151st annual meeting, April 26-29, comes with a $10,000 prize.

Hrdy has published a series of books and scholarly reviews that have drawn together data and concepts from across the social and biological sciences to synthesize a new understanding of the ways in which natural selection has shaped women’s lives, mother-infant interactions, and the foundations of human sociality.

Her book “Mothers and Others: The Evolutionary Origins of Mutual Understanding,” published in 2011, brought her the following honors the next year: the J.I. Staley Prize (often called the Pulitzer Prize of anthropology, given by the School for Advanced Research) and the W.W. Howells Book Prize in Biological Anthropology (given by the Biological Anthropology Section of the American Anthropological Association).

She joined the faculty of the Department of Anthropology in 1984 and took emeritus status in 1996. She has been elected not only to the National Academy of Sciences, but the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society and the California Academy of Sciences.

***

The American Physical Society will present its Improving Undergraduate Education Award to the Department of Physics at the University of California, Davis, during the society’s April 5-8 meeting in Savannah, Ga.

According to the citation, the department has created “curriculum opportunities involving specializations and multidisciplinary applied degrees coupled with vibrant research options” that emphasize preparing students for careers in science, technology, engineering and math. With 35 bachelor’s degrees awarded in 2012-13, the number of physics majors at UC Davis has doubled in the past decade.

***

Two faculty members at the University of California, Davis, are recent recipients of honorary doctorates:

* Charles Fadley, distinguished professor of physics at UC Davis and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, honored by the Uppsala University, Sweden. “His work, not least his synchrotron-light-based spectroscopic studies of surfaces, magnetic materials and nanostructures, has inspired researchers around the world and at Uppsala,” the citation states.

* Peter Hall, distinguished professor of statistics at UC Davis and the University of Melbourne, Australia, honored by the University of Cantabria, Spain. Hall is known especially for his work on new methods in statistics, including nonparametric statistics and bootstrap analysis.

***

Professor Eduardo Blumwald of the Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, received two prizes on a recent visit to his native Argentina:

* Raices Prize, or Roots Prize — Recognized by the Argentine government for scientific contributions as an Argentine living and developing science in another country. “To be recognized by the country where you were born is nice,” Blumwald said. “Although I am a proud U.S. citizen, there is always a little bit of Argentina in me.”

* REDBIO International Prize — Given by the Technical Cooperation Network on Plant Biotechnology, or REDBIO (Spanish acronym), serving Latin America and the Caribbean, under the auspices of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. The award ceremony took place at a REDBIO meeting in Mar del Plata.

Blumwald’s research focuses on developing crop plants that can be grown with less irrigation water and on marginal lands, which better equips global agriculture for dealing with limited and variable water supplies.

***

The U.S. Agency for International Development recently honored Elana Peach-Fine of the University of California, Davis, for scientific excellence. She received the award in Washington, D.C., from USAID’s chief administrator, Raj Shah.

The award recognizes her work as a graduate student with the university’s Horticulture Collaborative Research Support Program, or Horticulture CRSP, where, among her other duties, she managed the Trellis Fund, which pairs U.S. graduate students with organizations in developing countries to work on fruit and vegetable projects. Horticulture CRSP has funded 37 Trellis projects in 14 countries, through a process largely run by graduate students.

“Graduate students are not only the project participants, but we are also the project planners and evaluators,” Peach-Fine said upon receiving the USAID award. “These students will carry their experiences into their futures in academia, industry and even international development.”

Since being selected for the award, Peach-Fine received master’s degrees in international agricultural development and plant pathology. Now she’s employed by the UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, working in the International Programs unit as an analyst on agricultural projects in Pakistan, China, Afghanistan and Ecuador.

***

Kevin R. Johnson, dean of the School of Law at the University of California, Davis, is once again ranked among the 25 “Most Influential People in Legal Education,” marking the second year in a row he received the designation from National Jurist magazine.

Johnson, the law school’s Mabie-Apallas Professor of Public Interest Law and Chicana/o Studies, is an internationally recognized scholar in the fields of immigration law and policy, refugee law, and civil rights.

The latest rankings, for 2013, emerged from a process that started with a call for nominations from U.S. law schools. The magazine narrowed the list, then asked deans and others of influence in the legal community to rate the nominees.

In his 2013 citation, Johnson is credited with being a “known leader in Latino civil rights and diversity among students and faculty in legal education.”

***

The Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard University recently awarded a composition commission to Kurt Rohde, professor of music composition and theory at the University of California, Davis, where he also serves as co-director of the Empyrean Ensemble, which specializes in new music.

His is one of 12 commissions to U.S. composers in the 2013 award cycle.

The commissions represent one of the principal ways that the Fromm Music Foundation seeks to “strengthen composition and to bring contemporary concert music closer to the public.” Besides the commissioning awards, the foundation offers subsidies to the ensembles that premiere the commissioned works.

The Fromm foundation is the legacy of Paul Fromm (1906-87), one of the most significant patrons of contemporary art music in the United States in the second half of the 20th century.

Rohde plays with the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble (and formerly served as its artistic director) and the New Century Chamber Orchestra.

About UC Davis

For more than 100 years, UC Davis has been one place where people are bettering humanity and our natural world while seeking solutions to some of our most pressing challenges. Located near the state capital, UC Davis has more than 33,000 students, over 2,500 faculty and more than 21,000 staff, an annual research budget of over $750 million, a comprehensive health system and 13 specialized research centers. The university offers interdisciplinary graduate study and more than 100 undergraduate majors in four colleges — Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Biological Sciences, Engineering, and Letters and Science. It also houses six professional schools — Education, Law, Management, Medicine, Veterinary Medicine and the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing.

Media contact:
* Dave Jones, UC Davis News Service, (530) 752-6556, dljones@ucdavis.edu

See all of our news releases at http://www.news.ucdavis.edu.

—————————————————————————-
This message was sent to Cory. If you no longer wish to receive email from us, please follow the link below or copy and paste the entire link into your browser. http://www.xmr3.com/rm/1516638-8008249-2-5-AV1-9159/cgolden@davisenterprise.net/HCS6770

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Immigration reform and business

Enclosed is an op-ed on immigration. The author is MaryAnne Howland, President & CEO of Ibis Communications, Inc., a marketing agency based in Nashville, TN and a board member of the American Sustainable Business Council. Please let us know if you are planning on using the piece. A photo of the author is available and credit to American Forum is appreciated.
Thanks!
Denice Zeck
American Forum
——————–

Immigration Reform: Diversity is Good for Business, the Economy

MaryAnne Howland

When thinking of immigration reform, we must ask ourselves what we want for the country. From a business perspective, important goals to aim for are innovation and entrepreneurship. And although there’s no simple recipe for achieving them, one key ingredient is diversity.

Smart business leaders know this. The most successful corporations strive to be the “Employer of Choice,” looking to recruit the best and brightest in a multicultural marketplace. They know they need the best skills and talent to deliver the innovation that leads to the best products and service in an increasingly competitive economy. They also appreciate that in a dynamic market – be it nationally or locally, understanding and capitalizing on trends starts with a diverse workforce.

Immigration reform, done well, can help achieve all this. And it will deliver broad economic benefits and boost local economies. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimated that immigration reform would increase real Gross Domestic Product relative to current law projections by 3.3 percent in 2023 and 5.4 percent in 2033 – an increase of roughly $700 billion in 2023 and $1.4 trillion in 2033 in today’s dollars.

In business terms, immigration reform would increase America’s value proposition. There are more than 52 million Hispanics in the US. That makes us home to the second largest Hispanic population in the world. And it is our country’s fastest growing market. Fortune 100 companies have already seen this opportunity and have begun investing in ways to turn a profit on changing demographics. In addition, the economy will benefit from the launching of thousands of new companies, run by immigrants who bring with them an intense commitment to a free and open market system. The result: thousands upon thousands of new jobs and billions in new sales and income tax revenues.
A.A. Gill, author of America The Marvelous, in his book describes a critical point when Europe ripe with “ideas and discoveries, philosophies and visions” gave way to the creation of the United States. He worries that the U.S. may be at that point “where the ideas that made us great are being stifled by the conventions and hierarchies that govern us.”

Looking at the issue of immigration through a smart business lens can help us to realize the full potential of the rich resource we have created. We can learn from corporations that have implemented best practices when it comes to diversity and inclusion. They are reaping massive rewards in the form of growth and profits. We can do the same as a country.

America’s rich culture of diversity includes generations of families who have come to be a part of the fabric of our country, who have helped to grow businesses, and who have enriched nearly every aspect of our culture. Our children play together and go to school together. We are co-workers at some of the fastest growing companies in the economy. We pray together in churches all around the country. When we have embraced diversity, it has made us happier, stronger and more prosperous.

Moving forward, what makes the best business sense is to find a way to grant citizenship to those who are now a part of the melting pot that the world has voted the “Best Place to Live.”. The business and economic benefits are striking. We would increase our tax base and workforce pool, spur entrepreneurship, enhance our global standing, and fuel the innovation that has been a trademark of “Made in America.”

By granting legal status to members of our communities, neighbors, fellow church members, business owners and co-workers, we will unleash their contributions of hard work and innovation. The benefit is more prosperity for all of us.

————————————————–
Howland is President & CEO of Ibis Communications, Inc., a marketing agency based in Nashville, TN and a board member of the American Sustainable Business Council.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Sunday, April 6, 2014

By
April 3, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Talk circle oped and box

Davis Community Men’s Talk Circle March 2014
There is a wonderful allegory that describes the difference between heaven and hell. Both have huge bountiful banquet tables, filled with the most exquisite and divine foods and drinks imaginable. And everyone sitting at these glorious and opulent tables are all challenged, as they have no elbows, their arms are locked in straight open positions. The people in hell starve, while the people in heaven thrive, enjoying the grand assortments of foods in front of them. What makes the difference for the folks in heaven versus in hell? The answer is the people in heaven have learned to be communal as they feed one another, an act, if you will, of being relational.
In many ways this story captures the plight of men and their profound struggles with isolation. We know too well how men starve, not knowing how to be relational, denying their own desires for greater connection, for friendships, leaving their hearts and souls emotionally malnourished.
Three years ago, a pilot project, titled the Davis Community Men’s Talk Circle was started in Davis, California, as a free service to address the profound patterns of male isolation that occur for men of all ages. As a Social Work clinician, I have seen first hand the deleterious effects of isolation in men’s lives. Isolation contributes directly to depression, job dissatisfaction and loss, increase in violence, numbing behaviors, and alienation from loved ones. Moreover, isolation fuels male suicide, which is at an all time high for boys, men and our elder males.
Our Community Men’s Talk Circle project draws from the wisdom of a 25 year on-going annual men’s conference, held in Mendocino. The Elders at this conference structure the talk so men can enter the deep and painful ills and the subsequent judgements of themselves, which they have carried alone. The men attending come to feel a great support, a deep trust, a brotherhood and a safety affording them a way to utilize the communal experience. Their vulnerabilities, now shared by others, deepens the possible that they don’t have to go it alone any more! Here the needed healing from years of exiled pain begins.
This has been our model, in bringing the Talk Circle project to the men of our community. Each month we intentionally create a Sacred space, where our Circle, our container for our talking, welcomes men to talk aloud and discover. Men often surprise themselves, as aspects unbeknownst, are revealed which they did not expect to share. But this soon becomes a known and valued process, affording men a communal unfolding, revealing new feelings, new insights, while clarity is advanced. This work requires that Sacred space must be created, drawing a significant distinction from how men typically relate to one another, as in the masked cautionary jokes, or the blind-eye to dismissive behaviors toward others, or the impulse to-fix another man’s experience; all which are recipes for an unsafe environment, prohibiting any deep and important talk to root.
The Talk Circle is designed as a primer, for men who have never done men’s work before. The Circle is larger in number (17 – 22 attendees), in contrast to a traditional men’s group (smaller, 5 – 8, and with greater expectations to share). The Talk Circle intentionally allows for men to ease their way into their held-back experiences; being invited to talk, only as they feel ready. To further underscore emotional safety, this project holds an open-door policy regarding attendance, furthering to lessen the rigors and demands of the intimacy that usually arise from small and weekly men’s group work. The Talk Circle also fosters the option for men to begin their own support group. Contrary to belief, the inherent deep hunger for men to talk communally, once initiated and structured, is almost unstoppable.
The Talk Circle utilizes a five man committee for planning and sharing the duties with each monthly event. Responsibilities include establishing ground-rules, underscoring confidentiality, calling in the five directions including the inward direction (toward our hearts and our truths), providing some music and some poetry, (the language of the heart) and monitoring the group’s process ensuring that men’s voices of their internal experiences will be both heard, seen and witnessed. As men gain both a new familiarity and an emotional safety in this sharing-aloud, they cultivate skills toward new and potentially meaningful friendships for themselves.
The Talk Circle meets monthly, in donated space (Davis International House), it is open for all men, ages 18 years and older. Two licensed clinicians serve on the committee, helping to monitor and assist in the group’s process.
This project is part of a new paradigm of community men’s work. One that is unique, in its structure to create a culture that is relational and non-competitive; a departure from our current known sense of masculinity. Ours is a community project whose intent is to welcome men to know their interiors, thus promoting a maturing of our masculinity from what is described as our current boy psychology, towards a man psychology. Our hope is to afford men a reclamation in their lives of wholeness, of vitality, of tenderness, and of stewardship. We strive to nurture creativity as integral to the aging process, and embrace the honoring of our Elders, whose resources are currently under utilized and often discarded. The Talk Circle fosters a culture of honoring our differences, as our differences lead us into our humanness and our ability to connect.
Creating such Communities is not only very doable, it is teachable, affordable and would be a significant developmental asset for both boys growing-up, and for men throughout the course of their lives. It is a significant antidote to the stark aloneness, (non-relational pattern), that our male culture has inflicted on itself for generations. Men are too often unaccustomed to being in such groups, and do not know that emotional safety is possible, and that deep sharing can be structured, leading men into support as they find their own healing process. Talk Circles foster experiences that welcome men into greater connection with themselves and then with others while factors contributing to isolation are kept in check.
Our hope is to share this model with other social workers or mental health workers who might choose to begin a Talk Circle in their own community.
The Next Davis Community Men’s Talk Circle will meet on Wednesday, May 14th, from 7:00 – 9:15 pm, at the International House (10 College Park, & Russell Blvd). All men 18 years and older are welcome to these monthly gatherings, and there is no charge to attend. All men are welcome!
More information is available regarding this project by calling: (530) 758-2794.
- P. Gregory Guss, LCSW has a psychotherapy practice in West Davis, is on the planning committee for the Redwood Men’s Annual Conference, and has developed and facilitates the Community Men’s Talk Circle.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

PD 2014: Past themes

By
April 03, 2014 | Leave Comment

Every year, the Picnic Day board of directors selects a theme to reflect the mission and vision of that year’s Picnic Day. The theme is incorporated into many of the events at Picnic Day, especially the Picnic Day Parade.

2013 – Snapshot
2012 – Then, Now, Always
2011 – Rewind
2010 – Carpe Davis: Seizing Opportunities
2009 – Reflections: 100 Years of Aggie Legacy
2008 – A Kaleidoscope of Voices
2007 – Making Our Mark
2006 – Celebrate Today
2005 – Live on One Shields Ave.
2004 – Shifting Gears for 90 Years
2003 – Rock The Picnic
2002 – Open Mind, Open Door
2001 – Aggies Shine Together
2000 – Life’s A Picnic
1999 – Moo-ving Into the Future
1998 – Breaking New Ground
1997 – UC Davis Outstanding in It’s Fields
1996 – Carrying the Torch of Tradition
1995 – Down To Earth
1994 – Students Shining Through
1993 – Faces of the Future
1992 – Moovin Ahead
1991 – Catch the Spirit, Building a Better U
1990 – Shaping Our Environment with Diversity, Tradition and Style
1989 – Challenging Our Future Today
1988 – Progress Backed By Tradition
1987 – On The Move
1986 – Reaching New Heights
1985 – Setting The Pace
1984 – Celebrating Excellence: UCD’s Diamond Anniversary
1983 – Meeting the Challenge
1982 -
1981 – ’81 A Vintage Year
1980 – Decade Debut
1979 – Aggie Energy
1978 – Davis Directions
1977 -
1976 – UCDiversity
1975 – Hay Day
1974 – Cycles
1973 – The Farm Mooves
1972 – Remember the First
1971 – Memories of the Past… A Challenge to the Future
1970 – Blowing in the Wind
1969 – Freewheeling & Friendly
1968 – Know Your University and 100 Years Later
1967 – Farm
1966 -
1965 – Aggie Country
1964 – Today’s Aggie Family
1963 – Aggie Jubilee
1962 – Kaleidoscope ’62
1961 – Workshop for the World
1960 – Foundations for the Future
1959 – U-Diversity
1958 – Showcase of Progress
1957 – Campus Cavalcade
1956 – Aggie Milestones
1955 – Future Unlimited
1954 – California Cornucopia
1953 – At Home
1952 – Preview of Progress
1951 – Harvest of Science
1950 – Cavalcade of Agriculture
1949 – Research Makes the Difference
1941 – We Are Still Behind the Plow
1940 – Agriculture, the Nation’s Foundation
1937 – Cal Aggies, Farmer better living, partners in Agricultural progress
1936 – Be entertained
1935 – Agriculture Ahead
1934 – 25 years ago
1933 – A New Day in Agriculture
1930 – Twenty Years Ago in Agriculture
1928 – Look Beneath the Surface
1923 – Follow the Sign

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Davis Resident Wins Scholarship

See Emily Darby

Juniors Emily Darby, Dillon Dong and
Hannah Wyment Steele Win Goldwater Scholarships

Emily Darby, Dillon Dong and Hannah Wyment-Steele, of the Class of 2015, have been awarded Barry M. Goldwater Scholarships, which provide up to $7,500 per year for educational expenses to sophomores and juniors intending to pursue careers in mathematics, natural sciences, or engineering. They were selected from a field of 1,166 students nominated by their colleges.

Emily Darby, a chemistry major with a math minor, has studied atmospheric chemistry with Prof. Frederick Grieman since her sophomore year. She is currently working on an independent research project studying the electronic spectroscopy of molecular ions to better understand the reaction pathways in the atmosphere so that a more comprehensive model of the atmosphere can be developed.

Last summer, Darby conducted solar energy research at Vanderbilt University through a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU). She was the primary researcher and sole undergraduate on a project entitled Photoactive Films of Photosystem I on Transparent Reduced Graphene Oxide Electrodes. The team submitted an article to the journal Langmuir, and, if it is accepted, she will be listed as first author.

In addition to her research, Darby is a mentor with Pomona’s High Achievement Program, a teaching assistant for the organic chemistry lab and a math and chemistry tutor for two to five elementary through high school students each year.

Her future plans include earning a Ph.D. in chemical engineering with an emphasis on alternative energy, then becoming a faculty member at a research university while continuing research in alternative energy that is sustainable and efficient.

Darby is a resident of Davis, Calif, and the daughter of Jeannie Darby. She attributes her early interest in chemistry to her “wonderful high school chemistry teacher, Mr. van Muyden.”

Dillon Dong, a physics and math double major, has conducted astronomy research since the second semester of his freshman year, when he worked with Prof. Phil Choi on the Pomona College Adaptive Optics Instrument. The next summer, with Choi’s help, he became a research assistant at Carnegie Observatories working with Dr. Eric Murphy on the Star Formation in Radio Survey (SFRS).

“My objective,” explains Dong, “was to use Ka band (33GHz) radio data taken with the Very Large Array (VLA) to study star formation in nearby galaxy nuclei and extranuclear HII regions. I presented preliminary results from that work at the American Astronomical Society’s winter conference (Jan. 2013) and at the IPAC/Caltech Gas conference (March 2013).”

This summer he will be working with Murphy characterizing the far-infrared spectral energy distribution of galaxy halos as part of the Herschel Edge on Galaxy Survey (HEDGES). He will also be collaborating with Kristina Nyland, from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, on “a 5GHz observation using the VLA of the likely AGN host galaxy NGC1266 and using that observation along with SFRS data and archival VLA data to make spectral aging, index and curvature maps of NGC1266′s massive molecular outflow.”

For Dong, “Physics is intriguing…because it’s a fundamental bridge between human thought–in the form of physical intuition, abstract mathematical concepts, etc.–and the natural world.”

Post-Pomona, Dong plans to earn a Ph.D. in astrophysics and become a physics/astronomy professor. A resident of San Francisco, he is the son of Allan Dong and Liping Dong. He attended Lowell High School, where he says, his “physics teachers, Mr. Dickerman and Mr. Shapiro, were the first people to really spark my interest in physics. Prof. Phil Choi really helped spark my interest in astronomy in particular.”

Hannah Wayment-Steele, a math and chemistry double major, has been a member of Prof. Mal Johal’s lab since her first year at Pomona, working on projects ranging from biological physics to inorganic materials. She recently submitted a manuscript on dye desorption from semiconductors, “for the purposes of improving the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells,” and is currently using molecular dynamics simulations and the Quartz-Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation instrument (QCM-D) to study the detrimental effects of aluminum ions on lipid membranes.

She has also conducted research with Dr. Sofia Svedhem in the Biological Physics Department of the Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, and will return this summer funded by the Beckman scholarship.

Wayment-Steele credits Johal and Dr. Lewis Johnson, a post-doc in the Johal lab, for providing the rich experiences that made her decide on a research career. “They have been outstanding mentors, providing endless support and helping me gain valuable experience: I’ve given oral presentations on my work at the SPIE Optics & Photonics Conference and the American Vacuum Society National Symposium, traveled internationally to conduct research, and submitted papers on which I am the first author.”

Wayment-Steele plans to earn a Ph.D. in biophysics or materials science. Her ultimate goal is to be a professor with her own research group, using computational techniques to help develop bio-nanomaterials for medical applications. A resident of Flagstaff, Arizona, Wayment-Steele is the daughter of Heidi Wayment and Craig Steele.

# # #

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Roy Bellhorn

By
April 03, 2014 | Leave Comment

obellhorn

Courtesy photo
Roy W. Bellhorn, D.V.M., is the Distinguished Alumnus of the Year Award at Michigan State Veterinary School. He is holding Kermit, clearly a mutual love relationship.

Photo by Margaret Burns
Roy W. Bellhorn, D.V.M. is a Distinguished Alumnus of the Michigan State Veterinary School for his contributions to veterinary medicine.

Photo by Margaret Burns
Roy W. Bellhorn, D.V.M. is the Distinguished Alumnus of the year at Michigan State Veterinary School for his contributions to his profession. He is being wooed by Kermit the Lovable.

Bellhorn receives prestigious veterinary medicine award

By MARGARET BURNS
Staff writer

Roy Bellhorn, a Winters resident for 30 years, and still an “implant” in town, is known locally for his singing in barbershop style (or swing) with Octapella. He can be found delivering meals to seniors, teaching literacy one-on-one, helping out in the Winters Theatre Company kitchen, dining with the Olde Phartz, or chatting up a lovely lady here and there.
He never brags about what he has done professionally, but his college has recognized it this year. He is the Distinguished Alumnus of the Year of the Michigan State Veterinary School.
This award is given to a graduate of the school who is “held in high esteem by his or her colleagues and who has excelled in practice, teaching, research, service and/or organized veterinary medicine.”
Dr. Roy William Bellhorn has done all of that. And more.
He is one of the five founders of the subspecialty of veterinary ophthalmology. He trained in human ophthalmology and has a master’s degree from New York University in human ophthalmology because there were no veterinary ophthalmology courses in the 1960s. He applied his knowledge to animals, usually dogs and cats, but occasionally horses or apes, parrots or dolphins or whales. He was a consultant to the Bronx Zoo for exotic animal eye diseases.
At the UC Davis Veterinary School, where he was recruited in 1984, he won the Norden Teacher of the Year award.
He is known for his research in animal models of human disease, for which he was mentored by his chairman at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, Paul Henkind. Bellhorn held grants from the National Institutes of Health for many years.
He was president of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology, which he helped found; chaired the board defining their residency programs and proficiency examinations.
Bellhorn is still an active member, as an Emeritus, of the Ophthalmology service at UC Davis Veterinary School.
His contributions are so numerous and longstanding, that it is not surprising when one young veterinary ophthalmology resident was introduced to him, she blurted out, “Dr. Bellhorn, I thought you were dead!”
He is not dead and he lives in Winters.

(Disclaimer: This story was written by Maggie Burns, a sometimes collaborator, critic, and his wife.)

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

David Brooks: The employer’s creed

By
April 03, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-BROOKS-COLUMN-NYT/850
Commentary: The Employer’s Creed
By DAVID BROOKS

c.2014 New York Times News Service

Dear Employers,

You may not realize it, but you have a powerful impact on the culture and the moral ecology of our era. If your human resources bosses decide they want to hire a certain sort of person, then young people begin turning themselves into that sort of person.

Therefore, I’m asking you to think about the following principles, this Employer’s Creed. If you follow these principles in your hiring practices, you’ll be sending a signal about what sort of person gets ahead. You may correct some of the perversities at the upper reaches of our meritocracy. You may even help cultivate deeper, fuller human beings.

Bias hiring decisions against perfectionists. If you work in a white-collar sector that attracts highly educated job applicants, you’ve probably been flooded with résumés from people who are not so much human beings as perfect avatars of success. They got 3.8 grade-point averages in high school and college. They served in the cliché leadership positions on campus. They got all the perfect consultant/investment bank internships. During off-hours they distributed bed nets in Zambia and dug wells in Peru.

When you read these résumés, you have two thoughts. First, this applicant is awesome. Second, there’s something completely flavorless here. This person has followed the cookie-cutter formula for what it means to be successful and you actually have no clue what the person is really like except for a high talent for social conformity. Either they have no desire to chart out an original life course or lack the courage to do so. Shy away from such people.

Bias hiring decisions toward dualists. The people you want to hire should have achieved some measure of conventional success, but they should have also engaged in some desperate lark that made no sense from a career or social status perspective. Maybe a person left a successful banking job to rescue the family dry-cleaning business in Akron. Maybe another had great grades at a fancy East Coast prep school but went off to a Christian college because she wanted a place to explore her values. These peoples have done at least one Deeply Unfashionable Thing. Such people have intrinsic motivation, native curiosity and social courage.

Bias toward truth-tellers. I recently ran into a fellow who hires a lot of people. He said he asks the following question during each interview. “Could you describe a time when you told the truth and it hurt you?” If the interviewee can’t immediately come up with an episode, there may be a problem here.

Don’t mindlessly favor people with high GPAs. Students who get straight A’s have an ability to prudentially master their passions so they can achieve proficiency across a range of subjects. But you probably want employees who are relentlessly dedicated to one subject. In school, those people often got A’s in subjects they were passionate about but got B’s in subjects that did not arouse their imagination.

Reward the ripening virtues, not the blooming virtues. Some virtues bloom forth with youth: being intelligent, energetic, curious and pleasant. Some virtues only ripen over time: other-centeredness, having a sense for how events will flow, being able to discern what’s right in the absence of external affirmation. These virtues usually come with experience, after a person has taken time off to raise children, been fired or learned to cope with having a cruel boss. The blooming virtues are great if you are hiring thousands of consultants to churn out reports. For most other jobs, you want the ripening ones, too.

Reward those who have come by way of sorrow. Job seekers are told to present one linear narrative to the world, one that can easily be read and digested as a series of clean conquests. But if you are stuck in an airport bar with a colleague after a horrible business trip, would you really want to have a drink with a person like that? No, you’d want a real human being, someone who’d experienced setback, suffering and recovery. You’d want someone with obvious holes in his résumé, who has learned the lessons that only suffering teaches, and who got back on track.

Reward cover letter rebels. Job seeking is the second greatest arena of social pretense in modern life — after dating. But some people choose not to spin and exaggerate. They choose not to make each occasion seem more impressive than it really was. You want people who are radically straight, even with superiors.

You could argue that you don’t actually want rich, full personalities for your company. You just want achievement drones who can perform specific tasks. I doubt that’s in your company’s long-term interests. But if you fear leaping out in this way, at least think of the effect you’re having on the deeper sensibilities of the next generation, the kind of souls you are incentivizing and thus fashioning, the legacy you will leave behind.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

A step toward justice in college sports?

By
April 03, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-NOCERA-COLUMN-NYT/828
Commentary: A Step Toward Justice in College Sports?
By JOE NOCERA

c.2014 New York Times News Service

If you were going to hold up a school as being exemplary in the way it puts athletics in, as they say, “the proper perspective,” Northwestern University would certainly be one you’d point to. For instance, although it lacks the kind of winning tradition — at least in the big-time sports — that other schools in the Big Ten can boast of, it proudly points to the 97 percent graduation rate of its athletes.

Yet buried in last week’s decision by Peter Sung Ohr, the regional director of the National Labor Relations Board — in which he said that the Northwestern football team had the right to form a union — was this anecdote about Kain Colter, the former Northwestern quarterback who is leading the union effort. In his sophomore year, dreaming of going to medical school someday, Colter “attempted to take a required chemistry course.” However, “his coaches and advisors discouraged him from taking the course because it conflicted with morning football practices.” Eventually, after falling behind other pre-med students, he wound up switching his major to psychology, “which he believed to be less demanding,” according to Ohr.

Ohr’s essential point was that unlike the rest of the student body at Northwestern, football players had little control over their lives. Their schedules were dictated by the needs of the football team. They had bosses in the form of coaches and other university officials who could fire them. They had to abide by a million petty NCAA rules, and they lacked many of the freedoms and rights taken for granted by students who didn’t play sports. They put in up to 50-hours a week at their sport — vastly more than is supposedly allowed under NCAA rules. But then, every school finds ways to evade those rules, whether they have athletics “in perspective” or not.

Anyone who cares about justice had to be encouraged by Ohr’s ruling. In outlining the many ways that Northwestern’s football players were primarily employees of the university, recruited to the campus to generate revenue, Ohr ignored the idyllic myth of the “student-athlete” and dealt in cold, hard facts. (“Student-athlete,” it’s worth remembering, is a phrase invented by the NCAA in the 1950s precisely to avoid having to grant workers’ compensation to injured college football players on the grounds that they fit the classic definition of employees.)

Having said that, it seems to me that both the fans and the critics of Ohr’s decision have been getting a little ahead of themselves. It is only one team at one school, and while I hear reliably that other teams at other schools are investigating the possibility of forming a union, we are years away from knowing whether a union would necessarily mean that players are eventually paid (as proponents hope) or that their scholarships will be taxed (as critics warn). Given the NCAA’s fierce resistance to anything that might dilute its power — or worse, give power to the athletes themselves — it is a certainty that Ohr’s decision will wind up in a federal appeals court.

The buzz over the union effort has also had the effect, at least temporarily, of distracting attention from other efforts that have the potential to upend the system even more radically. One is a class-action lawsuit that has been active for several years now, the O’Bannon case, named for Ed O’Bannon, the former UCLA basketball star. Although ostensibly about the licensing and image rights of former college athletes, it is aimed directly at the heart of “amateurism” that is the central rationale of the NCAA’s refusal to consider paying players anything beyond their scholarships.

Already, I’m told, the legal team driving the case is devising the means to pay players royalties and other compensation, which they will undoubtedly propose to the judge, assuming it goes to trial.

Meanwhile, lawyers on both coasts have recently filed straightforward antitrust class-action suits against the NCAA, arguing that universities and the NCAA simply lack the legal right to cap players’ compensation. When I asked Jeffrey Kessler, a New York lawyer who has spent years representing professional athletes, why he had taken on this case, he replied, “Our sense is that the world has changed so radically in college sports that even the most casual observers recognize that this is not amateurism. This is a gigantic business.”

Maybe that is what the Ohr decision really represents: a government acknowledgment that college sports is not what it once was and that no amount of NCAA propaganda can hide the money-soaked reality anymore. If judges come to these upcoming cases with the same lack of blinders that Ohr showed last week — if they view the cases strictly through the prism of the law rather than the gauzy sheen of amateurism — well, then, a union will be the least of the NCAA’s worries.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Thomas Friedman: Follow the money

By
April 03, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-FRIEDMAN-COLUMN-NYT/877
Commentary: Follow the Money
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN

c.2014 New York Times News Service

If you follow the debates about Ukraine, you can see three trends: those who use the crisis for humor, those who use it to reinforce preconceived views and those trying to figure out if it’s telling us something new about today’s world.

For humor, I like Seth Meyers’ line: “Despite the fact that the Ukraine has been all over the news for the past few weeks, a survey found that 64 percent of U.S. students still couldn’t find Ukraine on a map. Said Vladimir Putin, ‘Soon nobody will.’”

For self-reinforcement, the op-ed pages are full of the argument that Putin’s seizure of Crimea signals a return of either traditional 19th-century power politics or the Cold War — and anyone who thought globalization had trumped such geopolitics is naïve.

For new thinking, I’m intrigued by an argument made by Masha Gessen, a Russian-American journalist, and Nader Mousavizadeh, a geopolitical consultant and Reuters columnist, in different ways: That Putin represents a new hybrid — leaders who are using the tools, and profits, from globalization to promote, as Mousavizadeh put it, “strategic choices in direct opposition” to Western “values and interests.” Or as Gessen said in The Washington Post: “Russia is remaking itself as the leader of the anti-Western world. … This is exactly how Russians see the events in Ukraine: The West is literally taking over, and only Russian troops can stand between the Slavic country’s unsuspecting citizens and the homosexuals marching in from Brussels.”

My own view is that today’s global economic and technological interdependence can’t, of course, make war obsolete — human beings will always surprise you — but globalization does impose real restraints that shape geopolitics today more than you think. The Associated Press reported from Moscow last week that “recent figures suggest that Russia suffered roughly $70 billion of capital outflow in the first three months of the year, which is more than in all of 2013.” Putin didn’t miss that.

For reinforcement, I’d point to the very original take on this story offered by Michael Mandelbaum, the Johns Hopkins foreign policy expert whose new book, “The Road to Global Prosperity,” argues that while global economics does not eliminate geopolitics, i t does indeed trump global geopolitics today. It’s the key to trumping Putin, too.

As Mandelbaum (my co-author on a previous work) explains in his book, it is not either-or. Geopolitics never went away, even as globalization has become more important. For globalization to thrive, it needs a marketplace stabilized by power. Britain provided that in the 19th century. America does so today and will have to continue to do so even if Putin becomes a vegetarian pacifist.

But get a grip, Mandelbaum said in an interview: “Putin is not some strange creature from the past. He is as much a product of globalization as Davos Man.”

Putin runs a petro state. If it were not for the growth in the global market that globalization created and the energy revenues that it produces for Russia, Putin and the oligarchs who form his power base would be living off exports of vodka and caviar. Putin can’t survive without the revenues globalization provides him to buy off his people and former Soviet republics.

And that tells us how to “end Putinism,” says Mandelbaum, “which would be good not only for the world, but also, and especially, for Russia. The tools are primarily economic: denying Russian oligarchs access to the Western financial system and reducing the energy revenues flowing into Putin’s coffers.”

It is a new kind of containment. When containment was primarily military in the Cold War, America bore a disproportionate share of the Western burden. Now that it’s economic, “the Europeans will have to contribute much more,” argues Mandelbaum. “The Germans will have to be willing to forgo their sales of machine tools and cars to Russia, the French will have to cut back or give up arms sales to the Putin regime, and the British will have to stop the Russian oligarchs from using London as a playground and money-laundering site. Most importantly, the Europeans will have to wean themselves from Russian gas.”

As for Americans, we’ll need to pay higher energy taxes to promote conservation, and safely expand natural gas and renewable energy, which together will lower the demand for oil worldwide and reduce the money Putin has to play with. We can deflate this guy tomorrow without firing a shot if we’re all ready to do something rather than asking the 1 percent in the military to do everything. That is what Putin thinks we don’t have the guts to do.

“In the age of globalization, when the tools of geopolitics are more economic, everyone needs to sacrifice a little — rather than just a few of us giving up a lot — to sustain a global order where our values predominate,” said Mandelbaum. Crimea is not a test of whether globalization is still enormously powerful in shaping today’s world, he added, “that is already clear. It is a test of the West and whether we will use this system to shape events our way.”

Thomas Friedman

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

PD 2014 Campus Rec events (from online newsletter)

By
April 02, 2014 | Leave Comment

PICNIC DAY CENTENNIAL
The 100th Picnic Day is right around the corner on April 12, and Campus Recreation and Unions is ready to celebrate! Here’s a sneak peak at what our units have planned.
Activities and Recreation Center (ARC): Open house, 11 a.m.–4 p.m.
Cal Aggie Marching Band: CAMB will strut their stuff in the Picnic Day parade, 8–10 a.m. Catch them again at the Arboretum during Battle of the Bands, 2–10 p.m.
Craft Center: Open house, noon–3 p.m.
Equestrian Center: Open house, noon–3 p.m.
Games Area: Arcade open 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Bowling and billiards available 5–11 p.m.
Outdoor Adventures: Open house, 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Check out the new facility and learn about the exciting activities and classes offered in spring.
Sport Clubs: Sport Clubs will host the Men’s Waterpolo Alumni Game, 9–10 a.m., and the Women’s Waterpolo Alumni Game, 10–11 a.m., at Hickey Pool.

Enterprise staff

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Using the arts to teach how to prepare for climate crisis

By Richard Pérez-Peña

EUGENE, Ore. — University courses on global warming have become common, and Prof. Stephanie LeMenager’s new class here at the University of Oregon has all the expected, alarming elements: rising oceans, displaced populations, political conflict, endangered animals.

The goal of this class, however, is not to marshal evidence for climate change as a human-caused crisis, or to measure its effects — the reality and severity of it are taken as given — but how to think about it, prepare for it and respond to it. Instead of scientific texts, the class, “The Cultures of Climate Change,” focuses on films, poetry, photography, essays and a heavy dose of the mushrooming subgenre of speculative fiction known as climate fiction, or cli-fi, novels like “Odds Against Tomorrow,” by Nathaniel Rich, and “Solar,” by Ian McEwan.

“Speculative fiction allows a kind of scenario-imagining, not only about the unfolding crisis but also about adaptations and survival strategies,” Professor LeMenager said. “The time isn’t to reflect on the end of the world, but on how to meet it. We want to apply our humanities skills pragmatically to this problem.”

The class reflects a push by universities to meld traditionally separate disciplines; Professor LeMenager joined the university last year to teach both literature and environmental studies.

Her course also shows how broadly most of academia and a younger generation have moved beyond debating global warming to accepting it as one of society’s central challenges. That is especially true in places like Eugene, a verdant and damp city, friendly to the cyclist and inconvenient to the motorist, where ordering coffee in a disposable cup can elicit disapproving looks. Oregon was a pioneer of environmental studies, and Professor LeMenager’s students tend to share her activist bent, eagerly discussing in a recent session the role that the arts and education can play in galvanizing people around an issue.

To some extent, the course is feeding off a larger literary trend. Novels set against a backdrop of ruinous climate change have rapidly gained in number, popularity and critical acclaim over the last few years, works like “The Windup Girl,” by Paolo Bacigalupi; “Finitude,” by Hamish MacDonald; “From Here,” by Daniel Kramb; and “The Carbon Diaries 2015,” by Saci Lloyd. Well-known writers have joined the trend, including Barbara Kingsolver, with “Flight Behavior,” and Mr. McEwan.

And with remarkable speed — Ms. Kingsolver’s and Mr. Rich’s books were published less than a year ago — those works have landed on syllabuses at colleges. They have turned up in courses on literature and on environmental issues, like the one here, or in a similar but broader class, “The Political Ecology of Imagination,” part of a master’s degree program in liberal studies at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

For now, Professor LeMenager’s class is open only to graduate students, with some working on degrees in environmental studies, others in English and one in geography, and it can have the rarefied feel of a literature seminar. Fueled by readings from Susan Sontag and Jacques Derrida, the students discuss the meaning of terms like “spectacle” and “witness,” and debate the drawbacks of cultural media that approach climate change from the developed world’s perspective.

Climate novels fit into a long tradition of speculative fiction that pictures the future after assorted catastrophes. First came external forces like aliens or geological upheaval, and then, in the postwar period, came disasters of our own making.

Novels like “On the Beach,” by Nevil Shute, and “A Canticle for Leibowitz,” by Walter M. Miller Jr., and films like “The Book of Eli,” offered a world after nuclear war. Stephen King’s “The Stand,” Margaret Atwood’s “Oryx and Crake” and “The Year of the Flood,” and films like “12 Monkeys” and “I Am Legend” imagined the aftermath of biological tampering gone horribly wrong.

“You can argue that that is a dominant theme of postwar fiction, trying to grapple with the fragility of our existence, where the world can end at any time,” Mr. Rich said. Before long, most colleges will “have a course on the contemporary novel and the environment,” he said. “It surprises me that even more writers aren’t engaging with it.”

The climate-change canon dates back at least as far as “The Drowned World,” a 1962 novel by J. G. Ballard with a small but ardent following. “The Population Bomb,” Paul Ehrlich’s 1968 nonfiction best seller, mentions the potential dangers of the greenhouse effect, and the 1973 film “Soylent Green,” best remembered for its grisly vision of a world with too many people and too little food, is set in a hotter future.

The recent climate fiction has characters whose concerns extend well beyond the climate, some of it is set in a present or near future when disaster still seems remote, and it can be deeply satirical in tone. In other words, if the authors are aiming for political consciousness-raising, the effort is more veiled than in novels of earlier times like “The Jungle” or “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.”

Professor LeMenager’s syllabus includes extensive nonfiction writing and film, alongside the fiction, and she said she had little interest in truly apocalyptic scenarios or those that are scientifically dubious. She does not, for example, show her students “The Day After Tomorrow,” the 2004 film about an ice age caused by global warming that was a huge hit despite being panned by critics and scientists alike, though she says everyone asks her about it. Stephen Siperstein, one of her students, recalled showing the documentary “Chasing Ice,” about disappearing glaciers, to a class of undergraduates, leaving several of them in tears. Em Jackson talked of leading groups on glacier tours, and the profound effect they had on people. Another student, Shane Hall, noted that people experience the weather, while the notion of climate is a more abstract concept that can often be communicated only through media — from photography to sober scientific articles to futuristic fiction.

“In this sense,” he said, “climate change itself is a form of story we have to tell.”

New York Times News Service

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

elias 4/18 time to fix a law the courts have mucked up

By
April 01, 2014 | Leave Comment

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
1720 OAK STREET, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 90405
FOR RELEASE: FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 2014, OR THEREAFTER

BY THOMAS D. ELIAS
“TIME TO FIX A LAW THE COURTS HAVE MUCKED UP”

Talk to corporate executives and they’ll often say California is a difficult place to do business, in part because consumers can file class action lawsuits willy-nilly, even when their companies haven’t screwed up.

But it ain’t necessarily so. Yes, the Consumers Legal Remedies Act, a 44-year-old law, lets customers sue for damages even after a warranty has expired and even when there’s been no risk to health or safety. They’re supposed to be able to do this if the maker of a product knows it has a major defect but does not reveal it to prospective or existing buyers.

Consumers could sue under those conditions, that is, until a pair of court decisions seriously limited the law and its intentions. For now, state and federal appeals courts have decided, product buyers can only sue manufacturers for post-warranty problems if their health or safety was at risk.

That’s why consumers might benefit from passage of a new bill being carried in the Legislature by Democratic state Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson of Santa Barbara which aims to restore the 1970s-era law to its original broad coverage.

“Consumers have a right to expect a product to last a reasonable length of time, even after a warranty has expired,” says Kristen Law Sagafi, a partner in the San Francisco law firm Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein. “Without it, we return to a caveat emptor (let the buyer beware) marketplace.”

Expect restoration of any rights consumers have lost to be contested strongly by industry lobbyists. “Current California law allows suing during the warranty period of a product if a manufacturer won’t fix it,” said Kimberly Stone, president of the Civil Justice Association of California, an industry lobby representing companies ranging from Allstate and Apple to Chevron, Toyota, Intel, Oracle and many more. “The courts have said people can also sue after a warranty over safety and health. Our fear is that if this is expanded, we will see many more class action lawsuits and that plaintiff lawyers will hold manufacturers to unreasonable time standards.”

In fact, the original law prohibited that. Said Sagafi, who helped craft the Senate proposal, “It would be up to the judge in each case to determine how long is reasonable. You would expect that the time a product can reasonably be expected to last after a warranty expires will be longer for a high-end product that a cheaper one. If someone has defrauded you, your right to sue should not expire with the warranty.”

Under current law, established by courts and not by elected lawmakers, a company could theoretically design products from computers to cars and dishwashers that would fail deliberately the day after their warranty expires. Unless the failure is dangerous – involving risk of accident, injury or fire – consumers would have no recourse if that happened.

“The best industry actors make a fix available to customers when a product is defective,” said Sagafi. “But if they hide a defect and fraud is demonstrated, consumers should be able to ask for punitive damages, just as the original law provided” before the courts emasculated it.

Consumer lawyers still would have a difficult time proving that a company deliberately hid a known defect, unless handed internal documents by a whistleblower. “It’s an incredibly high hurdle,” said Sagafi. “But the only concealed facts we can act on now involve safety, which is not what the law says.”

All of which raises the question of exactly what disclosure or repair obligation a company has when it gets numerous complaints about a single problem. “We have no answer to that question,” said Stone. “But our organization believes California already has too many class-action lawsuits, and this will just make them easier. We have a bunch of crazy class-action lawyers here. Class actions should exist to right tremendous wrongs. If there’s no fruit in Froot Loops or no raisins in raisin bran, that’s just not a tremendous wrong.”

That sort of corporate belittling of class actions doesn’t help, as one example, someone whose cellphone becomes just a paperweight soon after its warranty expires.

Corporations may not like it, but what’s wrong with preventing them from knowingly building products that won’t outlast their warranties?

-30-
Email Thomas Elias at tdelias@aol.com. His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, go to www.californiafocus.net

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Davis Senior Housing grant

March 25, 2014

Fr: Davis Senior Housing Communities, Inc. (DSHC)
RE: Award of another $5.6 million to DSHC
Contact: David Thompson, NP, LLC 530-757-2233

Davis Senior Housing Communities (DSHC) awarded $5.6 million to expand senior housing

Davis Senior Housing Communities, a Davis based senior nonprofit received another boost in March. What started as Eleanor Roosevelt Circle at 675 Cantrill Drive has attracted a lot of attention due to its model of having an on site social services coordinator with numerous services and social activities. A few years ago, a delegation of seniors from the City of Dixon heard about ERC and came to Davis to visit the senior community.

In very quick succession, five acres of land in Dixon (Heritage Commons) was provided to DSHC to replicate ERC. On behalf of Heritage Commons, DSHC won a $1 grant from the Federal Home Loan Bank through First Northern Bank of Dixon. That was soon followed by DSHC winning an award of $6 from the State of California. Heritage Commons Phase 1 (60 units) was opened in July, 2013 and is already 100% occupied.

This March, the 60 unit Phase 2 of Heritage Commons was awarded $5.6 million by the Director of the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development. The application was written by Neighborhood Partners (NP) and submitted by the City of Dixon to the HOME Investments Partnership Program.

From the statewide competition, only five projects were funded. Heritage Commons Phase 2 received one million more dollars than any other project.

Heritage Commons Phase 2 has already received a $1.5 million grant from the Federal Home Loan Bank through First Northern Bank. This is the largest FHLB grant so far in the Sacramento Region.

Heritage Commons Phase 1 & 2 is a partnership of Davis Senior Housing Communities, Neighborhood Partners, LLC and the John Stewart Company.

This is the third time that an NP application to the HOME Investments Partnership Program has won an award. With one project in Woodland and two in Dixon, three out of three winning applications is an excellent record. www.npllc.org/blog
________________________________________________________________________
Additional Information
Occupancy of Heritage Commons Phase 2 should occur in late 2015 or early 2016. If you are in the 30-40% of median income category this is the time to get on the waiting list by calling 707-676-5660.

When finished, the 120 apartments will occupy a five acre senior campus all at one attractive location in Dixon. Within the two senior communities will be two community buildings, meeting rooms with kitchens, laundry rooms, a community shop, a therapy pool, outdoor patios, and extensive community gardens with raised beds, walking trails, and other amenities. Heritage Commons has many solar panels.

Heritage Commons Phase 1 and 2 is a partnership of Davis Senior Housing Communities, Inc, Neighborhood Partners, LLC, and The John Stewart Company.

You can get information about Heritage Commons at 707-676-5660 or about Eleanor Roosevelt Circle at 530-753-3400 or for either by visiting www.npllc.org/projects.

With completion of Phase 2 of Heritage Commons, DSHC will be operating 180 units of independent senior living in Solano and Yolo counties and be home to over 200 seniors.

The John Stewart Company is management agent for all of the DSHC communities.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Julio Gayton, Jesse Tapia photos

By
March 29, 2014 | Leave Comment

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Dodd holds money lead in Assembly race

By
March 29, 2014 | Leave Comment

Napa County Supervisor Bill Dodd

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

PD 2014: Parade marshals from UCD website

Hal & Carol Sconyers
The centennial Picnic Day Board of Directors is pleased to introduce this year’s parade marshals – Hal & Carol Sconyers and Sandy Holman. We believe that these individuals exemplify what it means to have Aggie Pride and spirit through their pivotal contributions and roles on the UC Davis campus. These individuals have helped make Davis what it is today.

For their part, Hal & Carol Sconyers have proven that that they both are true Aggies. Having both graduated from Davis, the Sconyerses now reside at the University Retirement Community just a mile from campus. Hal graduated from UC Davis in 1952 with a degree in Agronomy from the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He initially enrolled at Davis as a veteran using the G.I. Bill to pay for his tuition. When Hal first came to Davis in 1948, he registered as a pre vet major; this was the same year that UC Davis’ School of Veterinary Medicine opened. Carol began her time at Davis in 1951 as a Home Economics major. While at Davis, Hal was a part of the Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity. Hal and his then new wife, Carol, were both on the Alpha Gamma Rho float as a part of the 1952 Picnic Day parade.

Through his studies in agronomy at UC Davis, Hal was able to gain experience in making farm loans at a major bank in Sacramento, which started him on a long career in financial services. This would lead him to becoming the founding CEO and President of the Modesto Banking Company (MBC). After spending many years in the banking industry in Modesto, the Sconyerses made their return back to Davis in 1994. It was at his desk in the the MBC bank that Hal received a call from a UC Davis development officer asking for his financial support of the Alpha Gamma Rho room in the soon-to-be built Walter A. Buehler Alumni Center; it was the building of the Walter A. Buehler Alumni Center that catalyzed his & Carol’s return.

It was during this return that the Sconyerses both fell in love with the Davis community and campus for a second time. Hal was on the California Aggie Alumni Association board for four years, from 1991 to 1995. He also served on the UC Davis Foundation board from 1995 to 2001. It was through such contributions that started the now successful CAAA. The Sconyerses were also very great friends with the fifth chancellor of UC Davis, Larry Vanderhoef. When Chancellor Vanderhoef initially started his tenure, one of his goals included a campaign to create a performing arts center on campus. The goal was to bring world-class performers to Davis students and surrounding communities. After hearing his plans, the Sconyerses became very instrumental in bringing the idea into fruition. They were on the early steering committee and helped raise the initial seed money for what is now the Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts. When the facility was being built, they were able to participate in hardhat tours and were present on the opening night and very first performance at the Mondavi Center. Carol took a particularly large role at the Mondavi Center. She was the President of “Friends of UC Davis Presents” for a year before it became the “Friends of the Mondavi Center,” which she led for 2 years. To this day, the Sconyers continue to take an active role in the arts. They volunteer as ushers at matinee shows at the Mondavi Center.

In addition to their aforementioned contributions, the Sconyerses have contributed to UC Davis’ Intercollegiate Athletics, the Cal Aggie Marching Band, UC Davis Medical Center, Graduate School of Management, as well as both CAAA and CA&ES scholarship programs. Hal & Carol also still attend UC Davis sport games on a daily basis – always cheering for their favorite Aggie team! It is through such contributions and reasons that the 100th Picnic Day Board of Directors is excited to have them as this year’s parade marshals. Through this nomination, the board feels we are celebrating the Sconyerses for their many contributions to UC Davis as a great institution.

Sandy Holman
Sandy Holman has also proven to display Aggie pride through her admirable work. She graduated from UC Davis in 1987 as a Psychology major. With her degree, Sandy was able to work with the two things that she loved in life – people and writing. All of her experiences would eventually lead to her starting the Culture Co-Op. While at Davis, Sandy took an active role on campus through her multiple jobs, including a job at the Tape Lab, where students could rent out tapes of lectures, as well as was on the volleyball team. While at Davis, Sandy was also able to meet her husband, who is also a fellow Aggie alumnus. Next year, they will have been married for 25 years!

After graduation, Sandy began to write on the side, which eventually culminated to her publishing many books that have been nationally and internationally circulated. She found a great interest in the interactions between people and how that is sometimes manifested through prejudices and biases. It was her goal to fight such prevalent social injustices through her work, which was aided by her experience in dealing with different groups of people. It is Sandy’s goal to counteract these social injustices, which would result in people realizing their fullest potential.

After working several jobs, which included interacting with children, Sandy started the Culture Co-Op in 1991 as a way to fight against hate. It is her hope that she leaves a legacy that “encourage[s] people to love themselves and others and to share power and resources in the world.” In addition to spearheading the Culture Co-Op, Sandy also served on the board at the International House for 3 years. While on the board, Sandy collaborated on the International Festival, which brought three thousand people in its first year. The focus of the festival is to bring different cultures of many countries to the people of Davis for a day as an educational experience.

Through her work in fostering diversity and community at Davis, the 100th Picnic Day Board is very proud to nominate Sandy Holman as the other parade marshal for this centennial celebration. It is our belief that through Sandy’s continued and past work, such feelings of unity are felt throughout the UC Davis campus and in the city of Davis.

Special to The Enterprise

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

Nicholas Kristof: A nation of takers?

By
March 29, 2014 | Leave Comment

BC-KRISTOF-COLUMN-NYT/836
Commentary: A Nation of Takers?
By NICHOLAS KRISTOF

c.2014 New York Times News Service

In the debate about poverty, critics argue that government assistance saps initiative and is unaffordable. After exploring the issue, I must concede that the critics have a point. Here are five public welfare programs that are wasteful and turning us into a nation of “takers.”

First, welfare subsidies for private planes. The United States offers three kinds of subsidies to tycoons with private jets: accelerated tax write-offs, avoidance of personal taxes on the benefit by claiming that private aircraft are for security, and use of air traffic control paid for by chumps flying commercial.

As the leftists in the George W. Bush administration put it when they tried unsuccessfully to end this last boondoggle: “The family of four taking a budget vacation is subsidizing the CEOs flying on a corporate jet.”

I worry about those tycoons sponging off government. Won’t our pampering damage their character? Won’t they become addicted to the entitlement culture, demanding subsidies even for their yachts? Oh, wait …

Second, welfare subsidies for yachts. The mortgage-interest deduction was meant to encourage a home-owning middle class. But it has been extended to provide subsidies for beach homes and even yachts.

In the meantime, money was slashed last year from the public housing program for America’s neediest. Hmm. How about if we house the homeless in these publicly supported yachts?

Third, welfare subsidies for hedge funds and private equity. The single most outrageous tax loophole in the United States is for “carried interest,” allowing people with the highest earnings to pay paltry taxes. They can magically reclassify their earned income as capital gains, because that carries a lower tax rate (a maximum of 23.8 percent this year, compared with a maximum of 39.6 percent for earned income).

Let’s just tax capital gains at earned income rates, as we did under President Ronald Reagan, that notorious scourge of capitalism.

Fourth, welfare subsidies for America’s biggest banks. The too-big-to-fail banks in the United States borrow money unusually cheaply because of an implicit government promise to rescue them. Bloomberg View calculated last year that this amounts to a taxpayer subsidy of $83 billion to our 10 biggest banks annually.

President Barack Obama has proposed a bank tax to curb this subsidy, and this year a top Republican lawmaker, Dave Camp, endorsed the idea as well. Big banks are lobbying like crazy to keep their subsidy.

Fifth, large welfare subsidies for American corporations from cities, counties and states. A bit more than a year ago, Louise Story of The New York Times tallied more than $80 billion a year in subsidies to companies, mostly as incentives to operate locally. (Conflict alert: The New York Times Co. is among those that have received millions of dollars from city and state authorities.)

You see where I’m going. We talk about the unsustainability of government benefit programs and the deleterious effects these can have on human behavior, and these are real issues. Well-meaning programs for supporting single moms can create perverse incentives not to marry, or aid meant for a needy child may be misused to buy drugs. Let’s acknowledge that helping people is a complex, uncertain and imperfect struggle.

But, perhaps because we now have the wealthiest Congress in history, the first in which a majority of members are millionaires, we have a one-sided discussion demanding cuts only in public assistance to the poor, while ignoring public assistance to the rich. And a one-sided discussion leads to a one-sided and myopic policy.

We’re cutting one kind of subsidized food — food stamps — at a time when Gallup finds that almost one-fifth of American families struggled in 2013 to afford food. Meanwhile, we ignore more than $12 billion annually in tax subsidies for corporate meals and entertainment.

Sure, food stamps are occasionally misused, but anyone familiar with business knows that the abuse of food subsidies is far greater in the corporate suite. Every time an executive wines and dines a hot date on the corporate dime, the average taxpayer helps foot the bill.

So let’s get real. To stem abuses, the first target shouldn’t be those avaricious infants in nutrition programs but tycoons in their subsidized Gulfstreams.

However imperfectly, subsidies for the poor do actually reduce hunger, ease suffering and create opportunity, while subsidies for the rich result in more private jets and yachts. Would we rather subsidize opportunity or yachts? Which kind of subsidies deserve more scrutiny?

Some conservatives get this, including Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla. He has urged “scaling back ludicrous handouts to millionaires that expose an entitlement system and tax code that desperately need to be reformed.”

After all, quite apart from the waste, we don’t want to coddle zillionaires and thereby sap their initiative!

Contact Kristof at Facebook.com/Kristof, Twitter.com/NickKristof or by mail at The New York Times, 620 Eighth Ave., New York, NY 10018.

Nicholas Kristof

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the co