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UCD police chief placed on administrative leave

UC Davis Police Lt. John Pike uses pepper spray to move Occupy UC Davis protesters who were blocking officers' attempts to remove arrested protesters from the Quad on Friday afternoon. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

UC Davis Police Lt. John Pike uses a can of pepper spray to move protesters who were blocking officers attempts to remove arrested protestors from the Quad on Friday afternoon. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

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From page A1 | November 20, 2011 | 211 Comments

Updated Monday, Nov. 21, at 7:45 a.m.

UC Davis Police Chief Annette Spicuzza has been placed on administrative leave pending a review of her officers’ use of pepper spray on unarmed protesters Friday. Two of the involved officers also remain on leave.

“As I have gathered more information about the events that took place on our Quad on Friday, it has become clear to me that this is a necessary step toward restoring trust on our campus,” Chancellor Linda Katehi said in a news release issued early this morning.

“I take full responsibility for the events on Friday and am extremely saddened by what occurred,” Katehi added. “I eagerly await the results of the review, and intend to act quickly to implement reforms that will safeguard the rights of our students, faculty and staff to engage in nonviolent protest.”

On Sunday, Katehi also called on the Yolo County District Attorney’s office to investigate the campus police department’s use of force. The district attorney agreed to conduct a review in collaboration with the Yolo County Sheriff’s Department.

In a letter to UCD Police Department staff, Vice Chancellor John Meyer said that the decision to place Spicuzza on administrative leave was necessary to allow “a fact-based review of events, assist in calming the community environment, and allow the department to focus on its current and substantial demands.”

UCD police Lt. Matthew Carmichael will serve as the department’s interim chief.

Katehi said Sunday that, beginning by meeting with protesters on the Quad, she hopes to work with students to avoid a repeat of Friday’s confrontation.

Facing a firestorm of criticism, Katehi has accepted an invitation to take part in Occupy UC Davis’s planned general assembly at noon. She is set to meet with faculty on Monday afternoon and intends to hold a student forum Tuesday.

More discussions will be held after the Thanksgiving holiday, she said.

“My hope is that I’m going to be engaged with students in a dialogue so that we remain safe and we remain calm, as a campus,” Katehi said in an interview Sunday with student-run Aggie TV. “We cannot be a place of learning when there’s no safety for the community, when there’s no calm. I will appeal personally to the students for that.”

Ten students were arrested on misdemeanor charges when police cleared the day-old Occupy UC Davis encampment on Friday.

In a moment viewed more than one million times on Youtube that has now made news worldwide, Lt. John Pike sprayed from close range about a dozen seated protesters with pepper spray. Afterward, 11 were treated by paramedics, while two were treated then released from Sutter Davis Hospital.

Pike and another officer, whom UCD has declined to identify, have been placed on administrative leave while a planned task force of students, faculty and staff completes a 30-day investigation of what happened.

Katehi said that she was “horrified” by videos of what happened. Her goal, she said, was only to have camping equipment removed. She repeated her health and safety concerns about protesters staying on campus overnight.

“The intent was not to remove the people or disperse the crowd, only move the equipment, and that’s where I believe it went wrong at some point,” she said. “I don’t know exactly what happened to go wrong, this way, because of course what you have seen and I have seen on video — it’s horrible. It shows a treatment for the students that we had never wished and I had personally never imagined that it would happen on our campus.

“I will really do everything I can to correct these problems and make sure that in the future we never have a similar event.”

Katehi said that she hoped to work with students in a way that that allows them to express themselves and doesn’t “see students and the police brought into a similar circumstance.”

“We need to spend one year, if not longer, as a campus, to really to ask the very important questions of what happened and how are we going to move forward,” she said. “How are we going to create a university that allows our students to express concern, to express anger, to express frustration, to even, at times, participate in civil disobedience as long as that, for them, is a way to express their frustrations, their fears, their thoughts and their ideas.

“The question that I have, and that all should have, is how can we manage this while at the same time that we, as a community of 60,000 people, remain safe and the students, those who participate in those events, remain safe, as well.”

Asked if she believed police behaved properly, she said, “Technically speaking, the police followed protocol, but … protocol is not appropriate all the time … when you have a gathering of peaceful students.

“As we go forward, we’ll be asking some serious questions about what happened. We also have to ask very serious questions about how to deal with situations like that in the future. Are there changes that needed to be considered on these protocols?”

The board of the Davis Faculty Association has called for the third-year chancellor’s  resignation. As of Sunday night, more than 43,000 people have signed an online petition calling for the same.

A video of Katehi’s walk to her car with protesters looking on silence has also gone viral, attracting more than 350,000 hits on Youtube.

“I have thought very carefully about all the messages that came to me,” Katehi said. “I have to say, I am committed to staying at this university. I have made the commitment to really make this university a better place from what it is right now, a great place, as a matter of fact, in terms of providing a learning environment for our students.

“There is a lot of work that needs to be done and I have made the commitment to work very hard to … really make our campus the place we want it to be.”

Updated Sunday, Nov. 20, 4:01 p.m.:

Saying he was “appalled” by video of a UC Davis police officer pepper-spraying seated, unarmed protesters, UC President Mark Yudof announced Sunday he would convene a meeting of chancellors to discuss how police handle nonviolent protests.

Yudof has asked for each of the 10 campuses to forward to him policies related to protests, including mutual-aid agreements with outside agencies.

A panel of experts and stakeholders will also “conduct a thorough, far-reaching and urgent assessment of campus police procedures involving use of force, including post-incident review processes,” he said.

Ten protesters were arrested as police cleared the Occupy UC Davis camp from the Quad on Friday. Eleven people were treated after being hit with pepper spray. Two were taken to the hospital, where they were treated and released.

Yudof said he did not wish to “micromanage” chancellors — “They are the leaders of our campuses and they have my full trust and confidence,” he said — or campus police.

“Nonetheless, the recent incidents make clear the time has come to take strong action to recommit to the ideal of peaceful protest,” he said. “As I have said before, free speech is part of the DNA of this university, and nonviolent protest has long been central to our history. It is a value we must protect with vigilance.

“I implore students who wish to demonstrate to do so in a peaceful and lawful fashion. I expect campus authorities to honor that right.”

Yudof’s statement also referenced footage of UC Berkeley police striking protesters with batons more than a week ago. In a New York times opinion piece published Sunday, former U.S. poet Robert Hass, a faculty member there who was protesting alongside students, described being hit in the ribs.

Both the Berkeley and Davis campuses plan reviews of police actions.

Updated Sunday, Nov. 20, 11:16 a.m.:

UC Davis on Sunday placed two police officers on administrative leave for their use of pepper spray in a Friday confrontation with Occupy UC Davis protesters.

Chancellor Linda Katehi said that she also would speed up the timetable for a faculty, student and staff task force to complete an investigation of the incident.

“I spoke with students this weekend, and I feel their outrage,” Katehi said in a statement. “I have also heard from an overwhelming number of students, faculty, staff and alumni from around the country. I am deeply saddened that this happened on our campus, and as chancellor, I take full responsibility for the incident.

“However, I pledge to take the actions needed to ensure that this does not happen again. I feel very sorry for the harm our students were subjected to and I vow to work tirelessly to make the campus a more welcoming and safe place.”

UCD has declined to name the officers, but Lt. John Pike, who led the officers during the confrontation, sprayed a group of about a dozen seated, unarmed protesters.

One Youtube video of Pike’s actions, watched more than 340,000 times as of Sunday morning, has drawn international attention. A search for UC Davis at Google News turned up more than 1,200 hits, and an online petition calling for the chancellor’s resignation had reached 25,000 signatures.

UCD paramedics treated 11 protesters who were sprayed. Two were taken to Sutter Davis Hospital, where they were treated and released.

Ten protesters were arrested on suspicion of misdemeanor violations.

UCD is also planning forums with students, faculty and staff. Times and locations have not been announced.

In a video of Katehi leaving a press conference Saturday, with protesters watching her in silence, Katehi said she would meet with students Monday. A UCD spokesperson confirmed Sunday that those are Katehi’s plans.

Protesters are planning a general assembly on the Quad on Monday at noon.

“These past few days our campus has been confronted with serious questions which will challenge us for many months and years to come,” Katehi also said in her statement. “We have created great universities which are challenged in their capacity to accommodate our human needs of expression, anger, frustration and even civil disobedience together with the need to feel safe.

“We need to find a way to change that while at the same time remaining true to our mission of teaching, research and service. We need to think hard and together on how to accomplish this.”

Published Sunday, Nov. 20:

UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi has ordered the creation of a task force to review how police on Friday cleared the Occupy UC Davis encampment, resulting in 10 arrests and the pepper-spraying of about a dozen protesters.

In a letter to the campus, Katehi called videos of Lt. John Pike sweeping a canister of orange pepper spray over seated, unarmed protesters from two or three feet away “chilling.”

Police arrested eight men and two women, on suspicion of disorderly conduct, for lodging without permission, and failure to disperse. They were cited for the misdemeanors and released.

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The chancellor then scheduled a press conference at the Surge II building on campus for 4 p.m. Saturday to address the incident, but the conference was cut short when several hundred protesters surrounded the building demanding her resignation.

Katehi did not leave the building for three hours because, according to Mitchel Benson, associate vice chancellor for university communications, the crowd outside was perceived to be hostile.

Inside, the chancellor addressed the calls for her resignation.

“I don’t believe it would be appropriate for me to resign at this point,” Katehi said. “I don’t think I have violated the process of this institution. As a matter of fact I believe I have worked very had to make this campus a safe campus for all.”

The chancellor also expressed her sadness for the events at the press conference.

“The events of yesterday have been very hard for me personally and for the whole campus,” Katehi said.

Videos went viral

Photos and videos of the pepper-spraying went viral, passed on through social media and posted on left-leaning websites like the Huffington Post, Daily Kos and The Nation, then on news sites like that of Time magazine.

On his website, filmmaker Michael Moore echoed a call by Nathan Brown, an assistant professor of English at UCD, who called for Katehi’s resignation.

“You are unfit to ensure the safety of students at UC Davis,” Brown wrote in a blog post. “In fact: you are the primary threat to the safety of students at UC Davis.”

Later, the The UC Davis Faculty Association Board posted a letter on its blog calling for the chancellor to step down.

The letter cites that “The Chancellor’s authorization of the use of police force to suppress the protests by students and community members speaking out on behalf of our university and public higher education generally represents a gross failure of leadership.”

In addition to the faculty board, Attorney Natalie Wormeli said Saturday that the Yolo County chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union “is quite concerned by what appears to be excessive force used on the students who were exercising their First Amendment rights and were peaceably assembled.”

“As the footage shows, the campus police, dressed in their dramatic helmets, which are designed to protect them from their noxious chemicals and any other non-lethal weaponry they were prepared to use, set the stage for a nonpeaceful ending to a student protest,” Wormeli said.

Police called in

The confrontation took place after UCD held off on enforcing a camping ban overnight Thursday. On Friday morning, a Student Affairs representative delivered a letter from Katehi asking the protesters to take down their tents by 3 p.m.

The bulk of the protesters chose not to budge.

Ugliness followed.

Protesters “(offered) us no option but to ask the police to assist in their removal,” Katehi wrote in a letter Friday night.

“We deeply regret that many of the protesters today chose not to work with our campus staff and police to remove the encampment as requested. We are even more saddened by the events that subsequently transpired to facilitate their removal,” she added.

As the Quad emptied in a light rain afterward, protester Eric Lee said that the administration and police were “shooting themselves in the foot.”

“What they’re doing is taking off their masks. They’re making it blatant that social equality is not something that they want,” said Lee, who graduated from UCD in June with a bachelor’s degree in political science.

“It also shows that the First Amendment is worthless. Here we are addressing government grievances — tuition has gone up 300 percent in the last decade — and this is how we get treated when we sit down and peacefully protest.”

At 3:30 p.m., about 35 officers wearing helmets and carrying batons on their hips, some with guns filled with pepper balls, crossed the Quad as about 60 protesters chanted “Shame on you!”

“We’re fighting for your children’s education!” yelled one.

Shouting into the crowd noise, Pike three times ordered them to clear out under section 409 of the California penal code. The law requires that those taking part in an unlawful assembly disperse.

By the time Pike ordered the police skirmish line forward, the crowd of onlookers had swelled to perhaps 150, many recording the slow-motion confrontation on cell phones.

Officers almost immediately dragged three protesters to the ground and pinned them. Many in the ring sat down, arms locked, chanting, while supporters pulled away the tents.

Police took down more protesters, tightening plastic restraints around their wrists.

Some onlookers joined the protesters, chanting “Set them free!” They rose as a group, then, slowly moved to surround the officers, who drew their batons.

Having at least once ordered the sidewalk cleared, so that those arrested could be taken away, Pike then pepper-sprayed seated protesters blocking the officer’s path.

Officer must file report for review

At the news conference Saturday, Police Chief Annette Spicuzza explained the process of review that Pike will go through for taking the action that he did.

“The officer who made that decision, we need to know why he made it,” Spicuzza said. “He’s going to be required to make a report and then it will be reviewed and it will be looked at through this task force.”

Pike has served the UCD Police Department for 10 years and according to Spicuzza, is a “very good officer.”

The incident “raises many questions about how best to handle situations like this,” Katehi wrote Saturday.

She called for a task force made up of faculty, students and staff to review the incident within 90 days to “ensure our strategies to gain compliance are fair and reasonable and do not lead to mistreatment.”

She also ordered a review of policies banning encampments: “If our policies do not allow our students enough flexibility to express themselves, then we need to find a way to improve these policies and make them more effective and appropriate.”

Administrators and police are unlikely to have 90 days to make their decisions, as protesters have vowed to return to the Quad on Monday at noon.

On Friday, protesters were taken to Sutter Davis Hospital, where they were later treated and released.

UCD paramedics treated with saline the eyes of 11 protesters. One young woman sat on her knees, crying with her eyes shut and pink streaks of Pepto-Bismol and water running down her cheeks.

‘Horrified’

Kristin Koster, a post-doctoral lecturer, used a scarf dipped in another home remedy, Maalox and water, to help Dominic Gutierrez, who was barely able to open his eyes.

He was sprayed, he said, when he tried to shield others with his jacket.

Koster said that she was “horrified” by both the actions of police and the inaction of staff and administrators standing nearby who did not seek medical assistance for those hurt until asked.

“In a way it’s very abstract to be protesting about money or debt,” Koster said. “There’s really nothing like the moment when they find out that the university — and all these smiling ladies, who are supposed to be there to protect you — will protect the university from you, with pepper spray and guns. They will injure you and injure your friends.

“When you protect the things you believe in with your body, it changes you for good. It radicalizes you for good.”

Tuition hikes are one protest issue

Gutierrez, a junior mechanical engineering major from Sacramento, had never been much of a protester until he saw the video of Berkeley police striking students and professors.

That and a UC proposal to increase tuition by another 8 to 16 percent each year from 2012 to 2016 pushed him to take action.

During a rally, an overnight occupation of the campus administration building and marches through campus this week, other UCD protesters echoed the Occupy Wall Street movement, railing against the financial and political power wielded by corporations and the rich.

“When they see us on the quad, a student might think that maybe there are weird people camping on the Quad,” Gutierrez said. “Once they see this, all they see is cops hitting students. They might have thought, ‘Those are people different than me, I would never (protest).’

“Now they see this is awful, and they’ll come out for the same reason I came out.”

In her letter to protesters Friday morning, Katehi wrote that she sympathized “with the profound frustration” expressed by protesters in trying difficult economic times.

However, she continued, the administration is responsible for ensuring all “can live, learn and work in a safe, secure environment without disruption.”

“We take this responsibility seriously,” Katehi wrote. “We are accountable for what occurs on our campus. Campus policies generously support free speech, but do included limited time, place and manner regulations to protect health, safety and the ability of students, staff and faculty to accomplish the university mission.”

Liability concerns

The chancellor wrote that while she appreciated the peaceful nature of recent protests, liability concerns and limited staffing to supervise protesters meant the encampment must come down.

“Our resources must support our core mission to educate all students,” she added.

At about 2:30 p.m., Spicuzza delivered to about 60 to 70 protesters an order to take down the remaining 29 tents. Those who did not would risk losing their possessions and arrest.

In the final minutes before the deadline, a few among protesters assured the group that those arrested would have legal backing and would not lose their financial aid.

Some tents were packed up. About a dozen were pushed into a tight circle ringed by the protesters, who locked arms before police moved in.

“The camping was really a priority for us,” Spicuzza said later. “I appreciate that the tents are gone, and now we (the police) are gone.”

Spicuzza, who observed the chaotic events on the Quad, said immediately afterward that she was “very proud” of her officers.

“This was a tough scene to walk into,” she said. “This was 50 people and before you knew it, it probably grew close to 200. When you encircle a group of officers that are just trying to do their jobs, it’s kinda scary, but they did a great job.”

In contrast to other campuses, protests at UCD sometimes have been disruptive, but largely peaceful affairs since the UC Board of Regents began approving of series of tuition hikes aimed at backfilling slashed state funding.

Friday’s confrontation led to the largest number of arrests since 53 tuition-hike protesters were arrested at a Mrak Hall sit-in, in November 2009.

— Reach Cory Golden at cgolden@davisenterprise.net or (530) 747-8046. Track him at http://twitter.com/cory_golden. Enterprise staff writer Tom Sakash contributed to this article.

Cory Golden

Cory Golden

The Enterprise's higher-education and congressional reporter. http://about.me/cory_golden
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Discussion | 211 comments

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  • Elizabeth SaftNovember 18, 2011 - 7:12 pm

    These are chilling photos. Was this show of force and pepper spray necessary to remove peaceful protesters from a university campus? I'm really disappointed in the University's decision.

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  • KimNovember 18, 2011 - 9:45 pm

    Do you think the pepper spray was warranted? Watch for yourself: www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WmJmmnMkuEM#!

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  • Sasha AbramskyNovember 18, 2011 - 10:06 pm

    These images are horrifying. The students were protesting peacefully, in a manner that would have been familiar to civil rights protestors throughout the past decades of American history. The police response, as captured in these images, was utterly extreme. How this is compatible with the notion of a democracy is beyond me. One expects to see such images in dictatorships, not in countries in which dissent is supposedly allowed and even encouraged. We certainly do not expect to see such images on a campus that prides itself on its tolerance, its sense of inclusiveness, and its encouragement of critical thinking.

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  • MarcyNovember 19, 2011 - 5:53 am

    I did NOT mean to hit report! I completely agree with the comment!!

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  • Edward WintersNovember 18, 2011 - 10:24 pm

    The abuse of these students engaging in peaceful protest activities is sickening. The administration must be held accountable. Their actions led to this abuse. Please read and support Professor Nathan Brown’s call for the resignation of Chancellor Katehi. http://bicyclebarricade.wordpress.com/2011/11/19/open-letter-to-chancellor-linda-p-b-katehi/

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  • Johnny D.November 18, 2011 - 10:27 pm

    I don't see any problem with the UCD admin and police. The protesters were simply asked not to camp out on campus, and they chose not to obey. They could have protested just as effectively without "occupying" the quad overnight. If something were to happen at those camps on quad overnight, it is the university who may be legally held liable. It is perfectly reasonable for the university to enforce the rules to protect everyone in the community. It is so odd that 9 out of 10 arrested were not even students. Who the hell are they? Those disorderly protesters are draining the already thinning university resources, giving the UC a bit more financial pressure to further raise the tuition and fees, for god's sake. If you want to protest, do it during the day when people notice you. Better yet, go protest at Sacramento where the state funding for UC is decided. I don't see the point of sleeping on the frigid campus just to piss everyone off.

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  • JessNovember 18, 2011 - 11:36 pm

    Johnny D. If the reasoning was "for the safety and health of the students in their encampment", /peaceful/ measures should have been taken yesterday when the tents were first put up and when they spent the night last night. Also, these protests have been occurring at least the past two years. We have protested at Sacramento, we have protested at the administrative building, we have protested at Berkeley, San Francisco, and throughout the state. We have been noticed, yet ignored. We have offered discussions, yet been unheard. We have been peaceful and are responded to with incredible maliciousness. Those students injured today are part of the community. They are included in the University's goals "to protect /everyone/ in the community." They are also not just a few students - they are the hundreds or thousands that have protested these past couple of years.

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  • Sean MinerNovember 19, 2011 - 5:35 pm

    Nothing wrong? How about this? California Penal Code Section 12403.7 "(g) Any person who uses tear gas or tear gas weapons except in self-defense is guilty of a public offense and is punishable by imprisonment in a state prison for 16 months, or two or three years or in a county jail not to exceed one year or by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000), or by both the fine and imprisonment..."

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  • Joseph BNovember 19, 2011 - 9:15 am

    Johnny, reading comprehension please. 9 of 10 WERE students. Read carefully. While I agree that the protesters would do better in Sacramento, this does not justify using weapons (pepper spray) against kids who are sitting. The police alienate the people they are supposed to protect.

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  • Johnny D.November 19, 2011 - 9:29 am

    I stand corrected on the number of students arrested (already did so yesterday). The police may alienate the people who protest supporters, but the protesters that don't follow reasonable rules and orders (don't put tents up and camp out on a public university campus overnight) alienate me as a law-abiding citizen and a taxpayer who fully supports freedom of speech.

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  • Jason PotterNovember 19, 2011 - 1:57 pm

    Alienating you is part of the point of nonviolent direct action, insofar as you are only interested in enforcement of laws concerning the use of public spaces, and the right of free speech, and are happy to ignore those 'unmoral enactments' that are the real target of disruptive, nonviolent direct action of this kind. The *point* of such action is, as Martin Luther King said in his "Letter from the Birmingham Jail", to "create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue." In this case, there is the further concern roused by your state of alienation, which is that apparently it does not bother you that violence was used to enforce laws that are supposed to protect public health and safety, and civil order. That you are unable to see the direct conflict between the purpose of promoting civil order, and this kind of violent police action, shows you to be sensitive to the wrong moral issues this event raises. That constitutes one way in which someone who objects to conditions in a civil society like ours discovers their efforts to 'negotiate' with their fellow citizens have failed. This is the last step before direct nonviolent action is required, according to King's approach to deciding when and where nonviolent direct action is warranted. Your response will only keep those who support the changes in our civil society that this group of protesters are promoting more convinced than ever that decent, ordinary citizens like yourself *don't get it*...there are terrible conditions in our common life that you would apparently prefer to ignore, focussing instead of keeping parks, streets, and common areas at universities cleared of any signs of peaceful unrest in the populace. Good luck with that.

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  • Jason PotterNovember 19, 2011 - 1:59 pm

    That should read "focussing instead ON keeping parks....". Sry.

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  • MichaelNovember 19, 2011 - 10:02 am

    Johnny, I completely agree with you. People who break the law should be arrested. The students broke the law, they were arrested. The officer who sprayed people in the face broke the law, he should be arrested. Whoever ordered peaceful people to be sprayed in the face with a toxic chemical should also be arrested. I think we all agree the protesters shouldn't be shot and killed. It seems obvious to me they also shouldn't be sprayed in the face with toxic chemicals.

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  • KurtNovember 19, 2011 - 10:42 am

    Police training manuals specify an appropriate level of force. That was not it.

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  • tom BurtonwoodNovember 19, 2011 - 10:50 am

    while u might not see an issue with the Admin + cops doing their duty to clear the "public way" - why the pepper spray. Cops are meant to work within a threat matrix. escalation to pepper spray is meant to come with a clear and obvious threat to the officers. At what point did these cops lose their ability to forcibly separate the protestors and take them away one by one. Or is the new manner of arrest to be - pepper spray, then cuffs. just to make sure. and what does this casual use of offensive weaponry by police departments mean for everyone else. next time u get stopped for a moving violation maybe the officer will mace u then ask to see your license. at what point do they switch to live ammo. if using chemical weapons is considered the appropriate response to "violators" sitting on the sidewalk, what about angry crowds, bena bag round, oh wait they do that too, CS gas... .no they do that too, sounds cannons... no that's kosher as well.... stun grenades... no that's in the playbook.... what is next..? this is what a police state looks like.

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  • NKNovember 18, 2011 - 10:50 pm

    Johnny D, that's "all but one." 1/10 was not a student. And the problem here is not that they were arrested. After reading the article, I'm pretty sure the problem is the use of excessive force. They could've simply carried off/cited the students participating in civil disobedience, but instead, they took pepper spray to their faces. Anyone with asthma could have died. This is reckless endangerment.

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  • Johnny D.November 18, 2011 - 11:52 pm

    My mistake on the number of the arrested student protesters. In my opinion, the protesters put themselves in danger (if any) by not following the order to evacuate. It is no longer "peaceful" protest at that point. The quad space and the campus is for the whole campus community to use and share. I have no problem with the students peacefully protesting during the day and go home at night. Camping out overnight and putting the university at risk (of potential liability) is over the line, and for that, they deserved to be forcefully removed.

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  • HannahNovember 19, 2011 - 3:16 am

    Let's weigh things equally, shall we? "putting the university at risk (of potential liability" vs. pepper spray to the face, brutal arrests, attacks which required hospitalization. Do you really think that the "risk" justified the reaction?

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  • Cary WilsonNovember 19, 2011 - 7:30 am

    You are wrong on a couple of counts, Johnny D. It absolutely IS still a peaceful protest. Sitting that way in contradiction of police orders crosses over into civil disobedience, but it still constitutes peaceful protest. And the police are assuredly in constitutional violation of excessive use of force with regards to pepper spray according to a previous California ruling. The police had other options: http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=439x2342461

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  • Johnny D.November 19, 2011 - 8:39 am

    Squatting on the public space 24/7, excluding others to use or enjoy, for who knows how long, while putting the university in a potentially liable position for any accidents or damages (which WE taxpayers will pay for), is not tolerable. They were warned in writing and given enough time to dissolve. I am sympathetic with the financial strain that the students are coping with, but this kind of irrational behavior by few students actually turn me off. I am sure there are many voters who feel the same way about these "occupy" wannabe's in general. They are squatting on properties paid for by taxpayers AND forcing unnecessary expenditures (public safety, sanitation, etc) to be paid, again, by taxpayers in this financially challenging time. If anything, they are just exacerbating the financial shapes of the university and governments.

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  • Cuffy MeigsNovember 19, 2011 - 8:59 am

    Or in other words, Johnny: "Waaah! People expressing their freedom of speech and assembly is too inconvenient to me and expensive! Gosh, I have to pay for all that pepper-spray!" How does it feel to place concern for money over concern for basic First Amendment freedoms, tough guy?

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  • HannahNovember 19, 2011 - 9:08 am

    Johnny, if what you're really concerned about is financial liability, surely all measures to insure that the police officers are behaving in a LEGAL manner is of the utmost importance. These officers did not. Their actions were illegal, and physically harmed students. Surely damages in this case, harmed students rather than harmed property, will be a higher cost to taxpayers.

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  • Johnny D.November 19, 2011 - 9:10 am

    >Cuffy Meigs >Or in other words, Johnny: “Waaah! People expressing > their freedom of speech and assembly is too inconvenient > to me and expensive! No, I'm saying you can express your freedom of speech WITHOUT squatting on campus 24/7 prohibiting other people from using that space and have taxpayers pay for unnecessary expenses. As a taxpayer, I am alienated by their tactics even though I'd have been sympathetic to their cause otherwise.

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  • Johnny D.November 19, 2011 - 9:24 am

    >Hanna I would leave the legality of the use of the pepper spray in this particular incident to the judicial system. We don't have enough information to judge except for the one-sided youtube videos. Even if it were technically illegal, or even if it ends up to be legal but still this mess gets carried to the courts and the university have to pay stupid legal fees, I blame the protesters for wasting tax money because they could just as well have protested without violating the encampment regulation to begin with.

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  • HannahNovember 19, 2011 - 9:32 am

    My name is right there. Spell it right if you want me to take you seriously. Right now I'm pretty inclined to write off everything you say as the ravings of a dense, insensitive person with no clout whatsoever. That, or you're a stooge planted by the Davis police department. Additionally, "we don't have enough information to judge?" then why do you seem to have already made up your mind? I've reviewed many other videos, from different angles, and my sister was among those in the line of fire. I have enough information to know that this wasn't a proportionate response. Also--it's a quad in the middle of a university. It's for student use. I'd be shocked if the student body doesn't come back with a tenfold increase of support. They're the ones paying to attend. They should be able to determine how to appropriately use common space.

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  • Johnny D.November 19, 2011 - 9:44 am

    Hannah, The only thing I am saying is that I blame the protesters for the mess that led to pepper spray to begin with. They broke the regulation first, ignored the warning, and still persisted on squatting on the public property. Was the use of pepper spray at this particular incident technically legal? I am not here to judge and I don't think your views are any less unbiased than mine. I am all for freedom of speech and protesting for what you believe in, but within reason. Immature tactics of the "occupy" copy cats is just going to alienate me even if I had some sympathy to their cause.

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  • Scott SupakNovember 19, 2011 - 11:52 am

    They could have been handcuffed and hauled off. There was no need to spray them. But Republicans like you just love punching hippies, don't you? Exacerbating? Really? The costs of policing these protests is miniscule compared to what Wall Street and George W. Bush cost us. Got any more right wing talking points for us?

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  • Johnny D.November 19, 2011 - 1:28 pm

    >Scott Just for the record, I voted for Obama in 2008 and I plan to again in 2012. I just don't have high tolerance for people who waste our tax money through unlawful tactics while asking for more tax-paid subsidy for their education.

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  • Alan R.November 19, 2011 - 9:57 am

    “ By not following the order to evacuate. It is no longer “peaceful” protest at that point.” In other words, the police can do what they want despite the first amendment rights to free speech AND ASSEMBLY? When the government disagrees with us, we can be beaten? How is being hit with pepper spray somehow kinder than being hit with a baton? We live in a police state. We no longer have rights to free speech and assembly. This wasn’t a group occupying a business or an office—they were camping out in a small area in the center of huge public space on university grounds that we, the taxpayers, have paid for. Our tax dollars is paying for the salaries of the police that are attacking these peaceful students. What’s next? Will they come after me for writing this? If there is ever a time to speak up and defend your rights, this is it, because if we allow this sort of thing to happen our 'democracy', what little we have left, will be gone.

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  • Chris LarsonNovember 19, 2011 - 12:31 am

    That was a disgusting over-exertion of force. Subjecting peaceful protesters to physical assault is an outrage, no matter what ordinance is being violated. Campus police have demonstrated on multiple occasions that they respond in the manner of a gang of thugs, with neither reason nor reasonable force apparent when engaging the public. I for one will be speaking with my vote and vow not to support a cent of future funding to the University of California or its Police Departments. I know for a fact from working at the UCD Mail Division while attending the University as a student that a large number of UCD PD officers and officials do not reside in Davis but commute here from other cities and towns. This, coupled with my observations of repeat offenses by UCD PD officers, leads me in my personal opinion to infer that the UCD police force does not share the values of the community of Davis, and furthermore view their relationship with the student body not as guardians of tomorrow's leaders but wardens keeping criminals in check. These "officers" acted in a horrific manner, as animals not people. No wonder such scumbags are referred to as pigs.

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  • Susan B.November 19, 2011 - 12:35 am

    This is truly Orwellian logic: that the students put themselves in danger because they should have expected that the UCD police were dangerous (well, perhaps they should have known that - in any case, now we all do); and that someone sitting is not "peaceful" if you simply don't like what they're doing. Why not go all the way and call them terrorists?

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  • Jason PotterNovember 19, 2011 - 2:02 pm

    Grade "A" for 'reading comprehension', Susan B!

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  • Jamie HallNovember 19, 2011 - 1:02 am

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuWEx6Cfn-I

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  • Linda N.November 19, 2011 - 1:02 am

    Johnny D. SO because the protesters did not obey what authority figures told them, they were "putting themselves in danger"? If protesters always listened to what other people told them to do where would right's movements be? Yes, the quad is a place for the whole campus community but how is the protest harmful to the community? During the whole earth festival students and visitors are invited to spend the night ON THE QUAD, is there a significant difference to what has happened with the protest? Also, there's a difference between forcefully removing and brutality. The protesters were not resisting the police officers so the officers could have disbanded the remaining tents and forcefully escort the protesters from the premises. While the use of pepper spray is questionable, the use of a baton is definitely uncalled for. However you are entitled to your own opinions, just think about what it means when you say that police are entitled to pepper spray and hit someone who does not follow "orders."

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  • JCFNovember 19, 2011 - 1:19 am

    What was hyperbole even 24 hours ago is becoming a simple fact, USA 2011: "This is what a Police State looks like!" BA, 1984. Ashamed of my alma mater's authorities...

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  • IanNovember 19, 2011 - 1:27 am

    The legal precedent surrounding pepper spraying nonviolent, non-resisting protesters is pretty clear. It was decided by the 9th circuit years ago after the Headwaters protest, and has been reinforced since. Here's a nice summary of the relevant cases: http://www.llrmi.com/articles/legal_update/pepperspray.shtml

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  • IanNovember 19, 2011 - 1:29 am

    Oh, if you don't want to follow the link, here's a quick summary: it's illegal.

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  • MikeNovember 19, 2011 - 1:28 am

    By claiming that the officers felt threatened--which is utterly absurd if you watch any of the dozens of videos--the police chief is covering for lack of preparedness by her department for this type of situation. If you wanted to incite a riot, generate mistrust and fear, induce 10x as many to come back the next day, go on national news with blatant police brutality ("excessive force"), become the poster child of the police state, you couldn't have come up with a better scenario. Bravo to the UCD students (of my hometown Davis) for your bravery and strength in nonviolence. You are true heroes. You make me so proud that there are such strong people willing to stand up for freedom of expression!

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  • Edward WintersNovember 19, 2011 - 3:29 am

    Here is a significant Ninth Circuit case regarding the constitutionality of pepper spraying peaceful protesters: HEADWATERS FOREST DEFENSE v. COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT: Characterizing the protestors' activities as “active resistance” is contrary to the facts of the case, viewing them, as we must, in the light most favorable to the protestors:  the protestors were sitting peacefully, were easily moved by the police, and did not threaten or harm the officers. In sum, it would be clear to a reasonable officer that it was excessive to use pepper spray against the nonviolent protestors under these circumstances. http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-9th-circuit/1332957.html

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  • Give me a breakNovember 19, 2011 - 3:48 am

    Give me a break. They would not leave after being ordered to leave. What is the officer supposed to do next? The state doesn't owe you a heap education folks. Time to aim the blame where I should be aimed, the US government. If we're outta money, we gotta raise tuition. All your crying about it isn't going to change diddly squat. Grow up.

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  • It's that Easy, Huh?November 19, 2011 - 4:02 am

    And at the same time raise the new-ish Chancellor's salary? "As chancellor of UC Davis, Katehi will receive an annual salary of $400,000. This is a 12.4 percent increase above her current salary of $356,000 at the University of Illinois. Vanderhoef currently earns $315,000 as UC Davis chancellor." http://chancellorsearch.ucdavis.edu/archive/new_chancellor.html

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  • Please... continue with your statisticsNovember 19, 2011 - 4:16 am

    what else is on that page? Think big picture.

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  • Greg KuperbergNovember 19, 2011 - 7:48 am

    Yeah, she makes 2/5 as much as Joe Paterno, and that's really a lot of money.

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  • Rich RifkinNovember 19, 2011 - 12:19 pm

    She gets to live in a big house on College Park for free. Joe Paterno lives in a much smaller house, owned by his wife: http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2011/11/16/your-money/16bucks-paterno/16bucks-paterno-blog480.jpg

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  • Give me a breakNovember 19, 2011 - 8:29 am

    Not worried. I don't protest stuff that's out of my control and the UC's control.

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  • concerned in PANovember 19, 2011 - 10:20 am

    "Not worried. I don’t protest stuff that’s out of my control " you sound like a coward

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  • clydeNovember 19, 2011 - 1:47 pm

    sounds? sounds like a coward? i don't hear anything. i read the words of a coward. but remember "majority rule?" cowards have an insurmountable lead.

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  • DayleNovember 21, 2011 - 10:46 am

    "majority rule" funny that's what you tea partiers and right wing nuts say when you have the government protecting You...If they were protecting the people you would call us communists!! Yeah you have insurmountable lead because of scum like Ruppert Murdoch, Glen Beck. Karl Rove and Rush Limbaugh. Something is really wrong with a country that the rich and ugly runs things!! Next thing you know we all we be rushed to prison camps and forced to work for free or die!! Well, I'm not a coward and I will protest for freedom for myself and others!!

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  • DonnaNovember 20, 2011 - 7:47 pm

    I think Abraham Lincoln said something to the effect that if you see something wrong, and you know it's wrong, to not stand up and defend it is "cowardice." You are straddling a fence and need to decide which side to hop off on. If you are religious, remember God says, "If you are not hot or cold, I will spit you out of my mouth..." I personally may not agree with some of the protestor's arguments, but I, as an American, will defend to the death, their right to say it. You need to decide....Best wishes.

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  • Cuffy MeigsNovember 19, 2011 - 9:11 am

    Gosh, yes, how are police supposed to proceed when confronted with people who don't want to move and are practicing civil disobedience. Hmmm, let's see. How about like this: http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6083/6097305846_12f6a712c3_b.jpg and this: http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4124/5179941090_e3aae1edc0_b.jpg Both photos show how the US Park Police in Washington, DC peacefully remove protesters from the sidewalk in front of the White House; in the second photo, the protesters had actually handcuffed themselves to the fence. In both protests, zero protesters were pepper-sprayed, beaten or otherwise molested by officers. There were no injuries and the sidewalk was cleared of protesters in an hour or two. That you have to play dumb and ask "What else could the officer do?" without thinking of many alternate strategies for removing the protesters aside from pepper-spraying them point-blank in the face shows either a lack of intelligence, a lack of knowledge of actual safe police tactics, or a authoritarian impulse on your part. Whether you agree with a protest or not, you should always agree that our police officers should adhere to using non-violent means when dealing with non-violent protesters. Full stop.

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  • tom BurtonwoodNovember 19, 2011 - 10:59 am

    once they have been ordered to leave. the officer and several of his or her colleagues approach the violators, separate them, cuff them and take them away one by one. it's been done like this for hundreds of years. not sure why incapacitating the "Violator" has suddenly become SOP. i'd like to see this method of policing applied evenly to all the accused from now on. i'd like to see everyone in the USA maced first and cuffed later. let's see how long this policy lasts. this is what a police state looks like. if we let them get away with this as their SOP. what is next?

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  • Chris LarsonNovember 19, 2011 - 5:09 am

    In response to "Give me a break" Give me a break indeed. "They would not leave after being ordered to leave. What is the officer supposed to do next?" - As the protesters offered no physical resistance, officers would have been free to simply cuff them for the violation rather than violently assault them first. "The state doesn't owe you a heap education folks." - Again, incorrect, as one of the primary tenets of both the UC and CSU systems is to provide superior education to all qualifying students, regardless of income. The exponential fee increases started in the early 2000s, if continued, will keep an entire generation of bright minds from the education they deserve. Please give myself and all the other readers a break, and educate yourself before making future posts.

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  • Colin BowersNovember 19, 2011 - 6:47 am

    "Fanned and faved", Chris Larson: Great response to the most typical of anti-progressive sentiments.

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  • Give me a breakNovember 19, 2011 - 7:29 am

    Uh, Chris? No we don't owe them a cheap education if the state is broke. I'd bet the moon I am more educated than you.

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  • dougNovember 19, 2011 - 5:41 am

    Give me a break They have a First Amendment right to peacefully assemble and protest, what is it about the US constitution you do not understand ? There is a policing tactic called measured response, you treat a problem you do not escalate it. Pepper spray does not defuse a situation it inflames it. And the US government is NOT out of money, America is the richest country in the world and in the history of the world. You are not broke you are unbelievably wealthy. If you want to share the wealth then free education is one of the best ways to do this. It is the greedy selfish self centered pigs who want everything for themselves and want to share nothing with others that are the problem. Stop your bellyaching and get a life, go out and help someone less fortunate than yourself . Make a change other people are.

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  • Give me a breakNovember 19, 2011 - 7:36 am

    Doug, read better. Isaid the state is broke. We can't print money like the Feds.

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  • Give me a breakNovember 19, 2011 - 7:37 am

    And Doug, do you know what time manner place rules are?

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  • BrianNovember 19, 2011 - 7:24 am

    This is terrible and terrifying. These officers used extraordinarily poor judgment. They are overweight, out-of-shape, and clearly incompetent. They cannot be trusted to protect and serve our students. Every single one of these thugs should lose their jobs. Save some of that UC money that way.

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  • Police Brutality and Lies at UC Davis « Student ActivismNovember 19, 2011 - 7:41 am

    [...] burns,” while another said that eleven students were treated by paramedics at the scene and two were transported to a local hospital. (That second report also notes that university staff and administrators watching the protest [...]

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  • ajtNovember 19, 2011 - 8:11 am

    I love how the chief of police says "I hope none of the students were injured.” THEY WERE SPRAYED IN THE FACE WITH A CHEMICAL WEAPON.

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  • JaneNovember 19, 2011 - 8:15 am

    The police were correct to corral students in small groups, but from there they should have been removed from the property or taken to the police station or wherever they felt was appropriate. There was ABSOLUTELY NOTHING here that merited the use of pepper spray. The kids were on the ground! They weren't doing a thing! What was that supposed to do, teach the others a lesson? Somebody needs to do jail time and it's not the kids.

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  • GregNovember 19, 2011 - 8:33 am

    Shame on UC Davis for using these violent tactics. Shame on anyone that supports their violent actions.

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  • JohnNovember 19, 2011 - 8:58 am

    The Chancellor was so concerned about the protester's "health and safety" she had them pepper-sprayed. That was the only option an institution of higher education could come up with? Shame on UCD. I'd demand my tuition back if I was enrolled there.

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  • KeefNovember 19, 2011 - 9:36 am

    This is truly disgusting - so much for "Land of the free". The representatives of those students attacked will be well within their rights to press charges of criminal assault against Lt John Pike. Dismissal alone is insufficient - this thug needs to account for his behavior in front of a court of law.

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  • concerned in PANovember 19, 2011 - 10:02 am

    You need to have UC Davis Police Lt. John Pike's badge.

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  • Police StateNovember 19, 2011 - 10:18 am

    Welcome to the Police States of America!

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  • clydeNovember 19, 2011 - 10:22 am

    images rule. uc davis will be forever remembered as the place where an orange cloud of something nasty washed over students at the hands of stormtroopers. the cops should've considered that possibility, just as bush should've disallowed cameras if he planned to stick his tongue down a sheik's throat, just like obama should've perhaps shaken chavez's hand instead of turbo-puckering for all the photogrphers. uc davis loses, both the cops and the school. the cops earned the loss. the school, not so much. this is another propogandizing gift for the occupy movement, and it appears the occupiers are earning their points, albeit with chemically induced tears.

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  • DanalaNovember 19, 2011 - 10:46 am

    If these students were camping out for concert or football tickets they could have remained there indefinitely. If the protestors in NYC on 11/17 where blocking the sidewalks while in line for Black Friday sales they would have been totally ignored by the authorities.

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  • SactownConnectionNovember 19, 2011 - 11:07 am

    Oh, they don't have to wait until Black Friday, the new Zelda Wii game is coming out tonight! I bet there will be a large amount of students blocking the sidewalks next to the GameStops around town... better get the cops and the red canisters... ...oh wait, they are buying something to feed a large corporation. On second thought, leave them alone. ...oh wait, Nintendo's a Japanese corporation. Spray them, and that goes for those Sony PlayStation traitors too! They all should've bought an 'Merican Microsoft Xbox.

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  • Support songNovember 19, 2011 - 10:59 am

    Song for support of the Occupiers http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=xqBjx8kQmFU

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  • ShroudNovember 19, 2011 - 12:10 pm

    What angers me most about this incident of cops pepper spraying peoples faces for no reason is the people defending it. This is oppression. You have the freedom to do whatever we say. You have the freedom to be tortured if you don't. Is this a democracy? Do you have any control over our taxes or foreign policies? No, but you could vote for someone who could. Do you have any say whatsoever in it's armed conflicts? No, but you could vote for someone who could. Do you help choose it's leaders? Or did you just vote for the one of two like-minded imperialists? In short, getting to pick 1 dictator over another by proxy is not democracy and sure ain't freedom.

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  • RichardNovember 19, 2011 - 12:38 pm

    I agree 100%. If you voice your democratic opinion in this country, you face the threat of violent police action and an arrest record, which will make getting a job even harder. I'm glad police have toned their actions down a bit since Kent State but hospitalizing students is still way too far over the line. The Davis PD should be reprimanded for their poor actions; no matter how you want to look at the situation, they lost control. Unfortunately, there will always be people so hopelessly engrained in the system that they will defend it for all their worth. They look up to Big Brother... He makes things all right.

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  • Michael HarringtonNovember 19, 2011 - 1:30 pm

    Dear Chancellor Katehi: I am a 1984 graduate from UCD. I just want you to know how ashamed I am of your decision to pepper spray those peaceful protesters who were seated on the ground and not threatening anyone. I also want you to know that I just doubled the check I was going to send to the ACLU for annual renewal. I hope the ACLU uses my extra funds to sue the heck out of all of you for what those copes did. Best, Michael Harrington, former member, Davis CC.

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  • C MeissnerNovember 19, 2011 - 1:52 pm

    This is a truly pathetic response by the police and administration here at UC Davis just as it was at UC Berkeley. Shame on the them!

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  • C MeissnerNovember 19, 2011 - 1:53 pm

    Shame on the UC Davis administration and shame on the UC Davis police.

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  • Guy FawkesNovember 19, 2011 - 2:08 pm

    Katehi is lying. Go out and observe these actions. They make it sound like the only way out for these "surrounded" police was to pepper spray those students. The crowd only became more agitated when the police assaulted the students. Katehi should resign and go back to school to learn about our constitution and how America was formed. The people had a revolution, and America came to be.

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  • MikeNovember 19, 2011 - 2:40 pm

    Katehi was in an executive faculty meeting just prior to the incident and assured when questioned by the faculty about the possibility of police violence that the police were "well trained." Not. 9th Circuit Ct. of appeals clearly states that OC spray is "limited to controlling hostile or violent subjects.” (http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-9th-circuit/1332957.html) In this ruling, 9th Circuit Ct. also ruled that officers were "not entitled to qualified immunity because the use of pepper spray on the protesters' eyes and faces was plainly in excess of the force necessary under the circumstances, and no reasonable officer could have concluded otherwise."

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  • D. WoodNovember 19, 2011 - 3:11 pm

    And it is all clearly recorded on the many video tapes. Hope the authorities in this shameful incident, from Katehi to the police involved are served with appropriate consequences for the needless harm they inflicted.

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  • vicNovember 19, 2011 - 2:57 pm

    soo how do you go about getting the police that did this and those who condoned it (chief of police) fired??!! Thats the next step!! HOLD THEM ACCOUNTABLE!!!

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  • D. WoodNovember 19, 2011 - 3:07 pm

    @clyde: "Cowards have an insurmountable lead." So says clyde.

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  • jdNovember 19, 2011 - 3:40 pm

    One of the most orderly way of breaking up a large crowd.....KUDOS TO YOU.... job well done police!!!!

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  • PFHNovember 19, 2011 - 4:15 pm

    @ JD: Try watching the end of the extended video ( Salon has it) before claiming the police did a good job. They retreat in obvious fear, bewilderment and confusion before a crowd that's doing nothing more than chanting " You can go now!" at them. The crowd literally chants them out of the Quad... So, "Good Job" my ass! Not to mention blatantly illegal use of force. Save your congratulations for the police officers who really deserve them, not paid thugs like Lt Pike. Way to go UCD! Your actions have set a stellar example of what can be done without any recourse to violence.

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  • howard reynoldsNovember 19, 2011 - 4:28 pm

    wow. i lived in davis for years, and attended ucd for two years. i now live in nyc, and i have joined in the fun downtown with OWS when my work allows. i own my family home in davis, and pay local taxes. i had been disheartened by the general flow of economic events here in new york city, and specifically by the police state tactics of mayor bloomberg. for the first time in decades, i gave some serious thought to packing up and returning to davis. i see this, and i am tempted to start packing. because this stuff is intolerable. so much more unacceptable than when we sat on the railroad tracks to try to halt the vietnam-bound bombs being transported through our little enclave of all things right and relevant. yeah, i was all of 13yo that time around, but i knew what was the right thing to do. still do. no one in nyc will pay me any mind unless i invest a million in a hedge fund or donate five figures to a politician's purse. and putting my middle-aged soft body on the line here only to be swept away by the riot squad doesn't sound productive. but this stuff will continue only if the students on campus and the citizenry, starting with you folks in davis, allow it to continue. and just as surely, it will not take many individuals to express their intolerance to the chancellor, the administration members who are your neighbors, the campus police officials who have forgotten their job description is to protect students, not assault them. and i mean intolerance for a cop committing multiple felonies. as evidenced by video images. if you davisites need any help or direction, it won't take much more of this crap for me to show up and offer y'all some. straight outta the vietnam era. peace howard reynolds, new york original davis since 1967

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  • TedNovember 19, 2011 - 5:27 pm

    Howard, I assume I'm just a bit younger than you (was born in '59), too young back then to understand the stories of turbulence I was hearing about on America's campuses, but close enough to it to hear the reports from older brothers in college. I'm a father of three young children, living on the other side of the nation. My wife and I spend our frazzled hours, like so many millions of other Americans, struggling to raise healthy kids and bring a basic subsistence income into the house; we do not have the time or inclination [yet] to protest anything, whether it's rising tuition or Wall Street greed. I'm too preoccupied with those tasks, and too complacent, to put my own "middle-aged soft body" on the protest line [yet]. I kind of doubt Lt. Pike and his superiors were thinking about the symbolic image they were creating as he calmly walked back and forth spraying students point-blank with pepper spray....but they've got a real Bull Connor, Birmingham firehose image out there now....and I doubt I'm the only complacent, middle-aged soft-bodied guy who's starting to take notice. What we may very well be witnessing is one of the defining moments in a huge new populist movement. And this time around, we have the internet, and YouTube, and Twitter.

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  • JayNovember 19, 2011 - 4:29 pm

    It is very clear from the video that the protesters sitting on the ground were not a threat to the police. Why use pepper spray when the police could have easily picked them up and taken them to their paddy wagon. As soon as I hear of which non-profit organization is going to represent the protesters in a lawsuit against the UCD Police department and Chancellor Katehi, I will be sending in my donation in support of the suit. How these police officers can look at themselves in the mirror is beyond me.

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  • deuceNovember 19, 2011 - 7:17 pm

    "...easily picked them up...."? Perhaps not. Looked like they spend more time with donuts than workouts. Maybe that's why the pepper spray - too much exertion will be required if protestors haven't first literally been disable. Pathetic. What a bunch of "I was just following orders" blue-shirts. A disgrace to their profession and uniforms.

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  • Jonathan GlassNovember 19, 2011 - 4:42 pm

    Chancellor Katehi, As an alumnus of UC Davis and a citizen of the United States of America, I was deeply disturbed and ashamed by the graphic images of police brutality I have seen in the media. Students should have the right to peacefully express their grievances - the UC Davis quad is both public enough and large enough for them to do this in a way that is both public and non-harmful to others. It is your job and duty to protect the rights of these students. In this case, not only did you fail to protect their rights, you ordered armed officers (yes, rubber bullets and tear gas pellets count as armaments) to do harm to these students. They should be allowed to remain in their protest as long as they desire. They should be asked to comply with basic laws of health and human safety, but should not be asked to disperse. In addition, the administration (including, and especially you) and the UC Davis police should be reprimanded for their actions on Friday. Lt. John Pike should be fired for breach of protocol. Fired. End of story. You personally should make a public apology to students, faculty, and alumni. Your task force should review and update policies related to students' peaceful expression of free speech on campus. This is truly a black mark on your watch. Only you have the power to make it better. Jonathan Glass Class of 2000

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  • Richard EstesNovember 19, 2011 - 5:11 pm

    What a pathetic liar Katehi is. She releases a statement after the incident implicitly defending the cops, now that she's thought about it, she's horrified. How much more dishonest can you get.

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  • Pam BakerNovember 19, 2011 - 5:20 pm

    This made me cry... What happened to the Davis I used to live in? This is the last place I would have imagined this could have happend. I'm so upset that a country that purports to value free speech and the right to protest has resorted to this kind of action. Those students weren't hurting anyone...they were peacefully protesting against a system that they find to be unfair. It reminds me a little of the fire hoses used during the Civil Rights Movement of the 60's. The UCDavis chancellor who allowed this to happen should step down -- she has obviously lost sight of the higher purpose of the university -- to create an informed citizenry capable of governing itself (to paraphrase Jefferson). Shame on her...and shame on those police officers.

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  • Johnny LawNovember 19, 2011 - 5:32 pm

    Linda Katehi's proposed remedy of creating a task force and a 90-day investigation period is simply mealy-mouthed, pathetic, ineffective, and infuriating. Even more infuriating is that her true aim is to pick a timeframe that she hopes will just make this whole sordid episode go away and be forgotten in the larger public consciousness. Her comments that the video was "chilling" are totally inadequate because it is not backed by the action of suspending (or firing) Pike during the 90-day review period. Instead, it's business as usual with no real change likely. She sucks, but she is Greek and probably has never bothered to read (or understand) the 1st Amendment. She may have a big brain--pity she doesn't use it.

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  • An Open Letter to Chancellor Katehi from a UC Davis Postdoctoral Scientist « AliquotsNovember 19, 2011 - 6:26 pm

    [...] to learn more about the incident from one or more of the following sources: The Huffington Post, The Davis Enterprise, BoingBoing and Forbes.  In the wake of very public criticism, Chancellor Katehi has issued two [...]

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  • Jaime AguilaNovember 19, 2011 - 6:27 pm

    Fire that thug cop. That is not the UC Davis I graduated from in 91 and 94.

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  • Jaime AguilaNovember 19, 2011 - 6:28 pm

    Fire that thug cop!

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  • ArianaNovember 19, 2011 - 6:38 pm

    Contact Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi and tell her how you feel about what you just saw! She is supporting what the Lt. John Pike did and was the original person who ordered these cops to do this to our youth! Tell her to step down!!! Let her know how you feel!! Please help our voice be heard!!! http://chancellor.ucdavis.edu/contact.php

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  • U.C. Davis Calls for Investigation After Pepper Spraying - NYTimes.comNovember 19, 2011 - 6:43 pm

    [...] hospitalized afterward, according to local reports. Ten were arrested. Interviewed at a hospital by a local newspaper, The Davis Enterprise, one of the protesters, Dominic Gutierrez, said that he had been sprayed while trying to shield [...]

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  • UC Davis police casually pepper sprays students | The University LifestyleNovember 19, 2011 - 6:49 pm

    [...] [Davis Enterprise, The New Civil Rights Movement] /* [...]

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  • Jennifer BallNovember 20, 2011 - 2:37 pm

    Just tried to call. Mailbox is full. I hope he gets the message that the obvious enjoyment that he had while torturing others is unacceptable in 2011.

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  • ShawnNovember 21, 2011 - 10:22 am

    The UCDavis polic officer Lt. John Pike who paper sprayed the seated students should be fired and sent to courtroom!!!

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  • HeatherNovember 19, 2011 - 6:51 pm

    Oh, hey, good job--you made Mother Jones, too, BTW. Also, in that letter demanding resignation, the professor alleged that the cops sprayed pepper spray directly into the mouths of students, not just into their faces, and that one of the protesters was spitting up blood a long time afterward and remains hospitalized.. That's a little more direct action that a picture of a cop spraying from six feet away. That is not a measured, appropriate response. And actually, tactically speaking in a busy riot scene, it's incompetent. Pepper-spraying somebody before you haul them away passively actually makes your job more dangerous, because you'll get it on yourself, too. Exactly like Mayor Quan of Oakland, Katehi's response sounds like somebody who was lied to by her police authorities, and believed it without bothering to check anything before speaking, and then had to eat by saying she "regretted" it. Can't admit fault, the lawyers won't have that--but it really doesn't matter. What part of "unacceptable litigation costs" do these authoritarians fail to understand?

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  • UC Davis Brutality; Greenway Letter; etc. - Dollars & Sense BlogNovember 19, 2011 - 6:58 pm

    [...] Good coverage at the Davis Enterprise. [...]

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  • robmNovember 19, 2011 - 7:38 pm

    Are you aware of the rules for using pepper spray against non-violent protestors? In California, the judiciary has given this issue much more rational thought than you.

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  • yepNovember 19, 2011 - 10:55 pm

    http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-9th-circuit/1332957.html

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  • DNovember 20, 2011 - 11:56 am

    hopefully that was robm that posted tht link not anthony bc that would be really ironic.

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  • Mark CNovember 19, 2011 - 7:54 pm

    "If these kids are our future then we are all screwed because they can’t follow simple directions." I'm suring "following simple directions" is your highest value, and probably also your highest accomplishment. Not true for everyone.

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  • Jim HNovember 21, 2011 - 11:23 am

    Mark C if we all had your mentality there would be no United States. This country was founded on protest. If we had followed the rules we never would have kicked the British out.

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  • Liveblogging the November 18 UC Davis Pepper Spray Incident – Student Activism « shiftingtheparadigmNovember 19, 2011 - 7:59 pm

    [...] another said that eleven students were treated by paramedics at the scene and that two were transported to a local hospital. (That second report also notes that university staff and administrators watching the protest [...]

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  • UC Davis chief won’t quit over pepper spray » 99dzhNovember 19, 2011 - 8:01 pm

    [...] Brown was referring to an incident Friday in which UC Davis police arrested 10 protesters and pepper-sprayed about a dozen more while trying to clear an Occupy encampment on campus, according to the Davis Enterprise. [...]

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  • Contact the ChancellorNovember 19, 2011 - 8:06 pm

    Let good old Linda know how you feel: http://chancellor.ucdavis.edu/contact.php

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  • UC Davis Calls for Investigation After Pepper Spraying – New York Times (blog) | News OnlineNovember 19, 2011 - 8:06 pm

    [...] hospitalized afterward, according to local reports. Ten were arrested. Interviewed at a hospital by a local newspaper, The Davis Enterprise, one of the protesters, Dominic Gutierrez, said that he had been sprayed while trying to shield [...]

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  • GeorgeNovember 19, 2011 - 8:08 pm

    The Chancellor needs to step down tomorrow. Outrage!!!!!!!

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  • Mike P.November 19, 2011 - 9:25 pm

    The Chancellor needs to step down TODAY!

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  • CooperNovember 20, 2011 - 3:37 am

    All chancellors need to be fired. It is just another usless waste of tuition. Chancellors or someone's buddy that can't do anything else. Wake up and smell the tuition hikes.

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  • DudeNovember 19, 2011 - 8:15 pm

    In the 60s, the rules also said things like no "negroes" at lunch counters or in white bathrooms, and they had fire hoses instead of pepper spray. Prior to that, the rules said no women may vote. I for one am glad these students are using their intellect and their conscience in disobeying rules. This country was founded on disobeying rules one doesn't believe in - ever hear of the Boston Tea Party?

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  • CooperNovember 20, 2011 - 3:33 am

    This country was also founded by putting you life on the line not yelling "No fair". If you want to compare this to the Boston Tea Party then these guys got off light.

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  • obispanNovember 20, 2011 - 4:39 pm

    You ever hear of the current "Tea Party"? You're descending to their level.

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  • BarbaraNovember 19, 2011 - 8:25 pm

    The Chancellor, nor anyone from the University, contacted the pepper spray victims. Not only that.... their emergency contacts ( parents!) were not notified. A "task force" to investigate themselves will be, of course, nothing more than a prolonged whitewash. Kathehi ordered the police there, and she owns it. Quit or be fired!

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  • School task force to look into police response to Occupy protesters | My BlogNovember 19, 2011 - 9:03 pm

    [...] Brown was referring to an incident Friday in which UC Davis police arrested 10 protesters and pepper-sprayed about a dozen more while trying to clear an Occupy encampment on campus, according to the Davis Enterprise. [...]

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  • The Lede Blog: U.C. Davis Calls for Investigation After Pepper Spraying | Up2dateNewsNovember 19, 2011 - 9:53 pm

    [...] hospitalized afterward, according to local reports. Ten were arrested. Interviewed at a hospital by a local newspaper, The Davis Enterprise, one of the protesters, Dominic Gutierrez, said that he had been sprayed while trying to shield [...]

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  • HSNovember 19, 2011 - 10:24 pm

    The pepper spray was in no way necessary to secure the safety of anyone involved as they were sitting still on the ground. The only reason I can see is to punish those involved. A civilized society does not inflict pain and injuries requiring hospitalization as punishment. A civilized society does not dish out punishment without trial. A civilized society has punishments that fit the crime. Do you disagree with any of these claims? Unless you are going to disagree with all of them, you must stop claiming that whatever the authorities do to someone who breaks any rule is justified.

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  • Eric JaffaNovember 19, 2011 - 10:32 pm

    Telling college students they must "disperse" from their own campus is a bad idea. If the chancellor asked Lt. John Pike to remove the tents, then he should have done so without a dispersal order and without pepper spray. And if possible, without arrests.

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  • JuliaNovember 19, 2011 - 10:34 pm

    Am I the only one wondering what cowards these police are if they feel "endangered" by something like 150 students, circling them in a line no more than two deep, and doing nothing more aggressive than chanting at them? The students are the heroes here.

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  • MikeNovember 20, 2011 - 11:09 pm

    Everyone's ignoring that ridiculous statement, as it is so patently obvious in all the videos that the students *and* the police are all calm until Lt. Pike starts shaking his spray can. The police were asked to do something unwise and unwarranted. I'm waiting for an unbiased evaluation of all the facts, but I can see no way that Pike should not avoid jail time. There is clear legal precedence that pepper spray must be limited to "hostile or violent" subject (http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-9th-circuit/1332957.html). Ironically, the only justifiable use of the pepper spray here would have been against Lt. Pike.

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  • I will neverNovember 19, 2011 - 10:40 pm

    give another dime to UC Davis until Katehi is no longer Chancellor. She came here with the stench of scandal on her from her prior position, and with a huge salary increase and $100K "relocation" bonus. She is busy pimping for out-of-state, full-fee students and now this police fascism.

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  • MattNovember 19, 2011 - 11:30 pm

    The rules used to say no black people on the front of the bus. The rules used to say women couldn't vote. The rules used to say you could ignore the rules if you were powerful. Not anymore.

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  • MikeNovember 20, 2011 - 10:56 pm

    Word.

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  • UC Davis chancellor says she won’t step down over pepper-spraying | USEC IM USA EditionNovember 20, 2011 - 12:56 am

    [...] Brown was referring to an incident Friday in which UC Davis police arrested 10 protesters and pepper-sprayed about a dozen more while trying to clear an Occupy encampment on campus, according to the Davis Enterprise. [...]

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  • Too Much Violence and Pepper Spray at the OWS Protests | B.logNovember 20, 2011 - 1:17 am

    [...] sue the pants off this guy and win.” The U.C. Davis police department has, not surprisingly, defended its actions. Ten students were arrested — eight men and to women — and about a dozen others were [...]

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  • Cindy LarimoreNovember 20, 2011 - 1:28 am

    I'm sorry, but some of this article is blatantly biased and completely untrue. For instance, the protesters did NOT 'surround' the police, at least not until after they sprayed those students (which is clearly evident in the video). Second, the protesters were not blocking the police officer's way. If they were then why did the police leave in the opposite direction of where the students were sitting? And where were the arrested people while this was happening? I don't see them in the video, which makes me believe they were already taken away somewhere and booked, which would not have been possible if the students were truly in the officer's way. Also, there is clearly plenty of room for the officers to go around those seated students. So the arrested students were not present, the cops left in a different direction (which looks like the direction they originally came from) than the students were 'blocking', and the students weren't even blocking them (as you can see in the video). I think that shows that your article is inaccurate in those regards, and it really sounds like pro police propaganda to be honest. I'm not saying that's the case, but that is how it sounds to me.

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  • DinieNovember 20, 2011 - 3:21 am

    Consequences children. Please explain what did they expected to happen? Didn't they do this so they could be pepper sprayed? They acted just like my 2 year old, when she doesn't get her way (without the head pounding on the floor) when I say "no" you may not eat all the candy. Tough love.

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  • markNovember 20, 2011 - 6:09 am

    You're a monster.

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  • TraNovember 20, 2011 - 10:28 am

    I would like to see her pepper spray her 2 yr old in the grocery store next time she has a tantrum. I bet CPS would be called real quick

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  • JoeNovember 20, 2011 - 8:04 am

    You should pepper spray that little brat in the mouth next time she pulls a stunt like that! Candy?! The nerve of some people.

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  • Donna MillerNovember 20, 2011 - 2:41 pm

    You're a sorry excuse for an American. You sound like one of the people who would have justified Bull Connor turning the firehoses on Black ministers and their wives protesting against Jim Crowe

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  • Smarter than youNovember 20, 2011 - 2:52 pm

    Please learn to use commas.

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  • DayleNovember 21, 2011 - 10:53 am

    this is what you say when you cannot converse? That's typical of a republican!!

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  • DayleNovember 21, 2011 - 11:19 am

    tough love? I guess you believe water boarding is not torture also? Violence begats violence!! Maybe you as a parent need to be investigated? I'm worried about any child you would raise after your comment! You would let a stranger treat your child this way? No wonder this country is declining so bad!

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  • Jim HNovember 21, 2011 - 11:30 am

    So you would pepper spray your child for have a tantrum? I sure am glad your not my parent.

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  • pamela whitesideNovember 21, 2011 - 10:11 pm

    what is wrong with you? you obviously are part of the soulless,consiousless 1% If you have a 2 yr old she should be taken away from you because you are certainly not able to raise a child with a soul

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  • The Lede Blog: U.C. Davis Calls for Investigation After Pepper Spraying | Articles BlogNovember 20, 2011 - 5:13 am

    [...] hospitalized afterward, according to local reports. Ten were arrested. Interviewed at a hospital by a local newspaper, The Davis Enterprise, one of the protesters, Dominic Gutierrez, said that he had been sprayed while trying to shield [...]

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  • Spray With Dave. Correction, Spray With Davis « Trade With DaveNovember 20, 2011 - 6:11 am

    [...] http://www.davisenterprise.com/local-news/crime-fire-courts/protests-again-gathering-steam-on-campus... [...]

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  • VIDEO: UC Davis Students' Silent Protest After Pepper Spray | HyperVocalNovember 20, 2011 - 8:47 am

    [...] UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi scheduled a press conference on Saturday to address the pepper spray incident heard ’round the world, where she pledged to review the police actions and said defiantly she would not resign. She also refused to leave the building for three hours afterward because, as The Davis Enterprise notes, “the crowd outside was perceived to be hostile.” [...]

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  • Anne van MuijenNovember 20, 2011 - 11:43 am

    Next time you will be ticketed for speeding I suggest that you will be pepper sprayed first, based on your own logics.

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  • VIDEO: After Pepper-Spraying, A Powerfully Silent Protest At UC Davis : The Two-Way : NPR « Un opportun en cavaleNovember 20, 2011 - 12:56 pm

    [...] ET: Two campus police officers have been placed on administrative leave, the university says. And, according to The Davis Enterprise, Katehi today issued a statement saying she wants to speed up the timetable for an inquiry into the [...]

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  • Liveblogging the November 18 UC Davis Pepper Spray Incident | 100wizard News SiteNovember 20, 2011 - 2:30 pm

    [...] were treated by paramedics at the scene and that two were transported to a local hospital. (That second report also notes that university [...]

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  • smhNovember 20, 2011 - 2:45 pm

    idiot

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  • An Occupation of Accusations « Logical ParadigmNovember 20, 2011 - 3:31 pm

    [...] haste, article after assault after report over the police "attack" hit the news. Because of this public outcry, a mob mentality has struck [...]

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  • Dysfunctional family photos: not just for Thanksgiving. « Philosopher Mouse of the HedgeNovember 20, 2011 - 3:45 pm

    [...] (Click the Davis Enterprise for a bunch of pictures,THE video, video of “The Silence” later, and comments by Katehi, the faculty, the university, police, and others) [...]

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  • Common SenseNovember 20, 2011 - 3:48 pm

    Anthony said "If they didn’t want to be pepper sprayed then maybe they should have followed the rules." You mean, we should all just follow the rules. Like the people followed the rules in Germany backing the 1930s, right? USA is fast becoming a fascist police state, G.W. started it all. The police and intelligence communities have complete immunity. Freedom of speech and the right to assemble has become a joke in the USA.

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  • xxOccupyxxNovember 20, 2011 - 5:15 pm

    The bottom line: incidents like this are illustrating a growing problem with this countries police forces. They have been increasingly militarized, they get advice from a private non-government corporation, their training obviously focuses more on how to harm people than knowing the laws, and their immunity from most consequences makes them dangerous. That some states have even passed laws preventing a citizen from defending himself against police -under ANY circumstance- should have the entire nation outraged. This is criminal assault, plain and simple. I'm left wondering how many other bad behaviors these officers may have been involved in. A good person could not have done what Pike did. Since Pike and his supervisor are in charge of the Police Dept that hires, trains, sets 'professional standards (?!)' AND handles all complaints about campus behavior cops - it is quite possible that many other incidents have never come to light. The National lawyer Guild will represent any of these victims for free. They also strongly encourage civil lawsuits to be filed against the individual officers for damages, punitive and material. Only by enforcing repurcussions against abusive officers will there be any chance of slowing this sort of behavior. Contact info: http://www.nlg.org/occupy/ Kateri is in the wrong from the jump: the first words out of her mouth should have been that two wanna-be campus cops violated State law and were immediately suspended without pay, and subject to arrest.

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  • MikeNovember 20, 2011 - 11:23 pm

    The law (http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-9th-circuit/1332957.html) clearly states that OC spray is "limited to controlling hostile or violent subjects.” 9th Circuit Ct. also stated that officers were "not entitled to qualified immunity because the use of pepper spray on the protestors' eyes and faces was plainly in excess of the force necessary under the circumstances, and no reasonable officer could have concluded otherwise." To supply these police officers with these chemical agents without proper training as to when it's use is allowed is the height of irresponsibility. This goes way above Lt. Pike, tho he was clearly acting far beyond any reasonable standard. Pepper spray should be completely disallowed until all police agencies do a thorough review and re-training. This is indeed a sign of a decline from a nation of laws to a police state.

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  • Civil Engineering Companies | Civil Engineering CompaniesNovember 20, 2011 - 5:17 pm

    [...] search term: civil engineering companiesCivil engineering companies utilize civil engineers to ensure they might make the most of their awar...engineering sector. The infrastructural development of a country is largely dependent on these civil [...]

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  • RyanNovember 20, 2011 - 5:33 pm

    What the police have done cannot be justified by citing whatever rules students were breaking. Any reasoning which attempts to place onus for this incident on the students is erroneous. This is true for two reasons: - Police actions were grossly disproportionate to whatever offences or threats existed. - If financial laws were enforced the way park laws were enforced, there would be no protest movement in the first place. No further debate on this subject is necessary.

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  • David PendragonNovember 20, 2011 - 5:38 pm

    What you seem to fail to understand is that these young people are NOT breaking the law by gathering peacefully to protest. I am not an American, I am an Australian and I know that you Constitution proclaims your citizens the right to 'peaceful assembly'. I stood in front of that document on a recent visit, I believe it is inspired wording that stands as strongly today as the day it was written. Do YOU believe that, because that is the issue here.

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  • WinterNovember 20, 2011 - 5:53 pm

    Directly spraying pepper-spray on peaceful protestors is delivering a form of punishment. The police are not given the power to punish -- it is NOT their directive to punish but to enforce the law. Therefore, those law enforcement officers who gave the order to use punitive actions on the protestors and those law enforcement officers who directly punished the protestors with a painful substance should be released from their duty in law enforcement and fired. They have failed to protect the public and have failed in their job. Moreover, the violated protestors have full legal rights to bring the entire Police Department into court and demand remuneration for the punitive acts put upon them.

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  • MarkNovember 20, 2011 - 7:27 pm

    John Pike needs to go to jail for a long time. He's obviously a threat to a civilized society. I hope every one of those students presses charges against him.

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  • DonnaNovember 20, 2011 - 7:41 pm

    I agree with you mark, this guy is a psycho.

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  • AnonymousNovember 20, 2011 - 8:28 pm

    It's such a nasty spectacle to watch him take his time, gain composure, take even more time, a deep breath, turn around and even joke and wink at a colleague, shake the pepper bottle, then take even more time, adopt an alpha macho position ready to attack and coldly direct the spray at passive people, while tripping on the joy of torture. This man needs to pay.

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  • UC Davis Students’ Eerie, Powerful Protest Against Pepper-Spray Chancellor [Video] | People In The NewsNovember 20, 2011 - 9:20 pm

    [...] to chant and protest outside the building; Katehi refused to leave for three hours, because “the crowd outside was perceived to be hostile.” It was. But it wasn’t violent: Here’s Katehi leaving the building, finally, [...]

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  • Psilokan.com » One day after pepper-spraying, UC Davis students silently, peacefully confront Chancellor KatehiNovember 20, 2011 - 9:41 pm

    [...] Times: Some protesters were hospitalized afterward, according to local reports. Ten were arrested. Interviewed at a hospital by a local newspaper, The Davis Enterprise, one of the protesters, Dominic Gutierrez, said that he had been sprayed while trying to shield [...]

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  • Frederick GraftonNovember 21, 2011 - 12:24 am

    If Ms. Katehi indeed wants calm, she had best realize that there will not be calm until she resigns Not now, not tomorrow, not ever. As the students chanted so eloquently, "You can go."

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  • UC Davis Calls for Investigation After Pepper Spraying | New York InvestmentNovember 21, 2011 - 12:57 am

    [...] Koster, who helped one of a protesters, Dominic Gutierrez, told The Davis Enterprise that she was “horrified” by what took place. “When we strengthen a things we trust in with [...]

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  • | I Tech PressNovember 21, 2011 - 3:25 am

    [...] Koster, who helped one of the protesters, Dominic Gutierrez, told The Davis Enterprise that she was “horrified” by what took place. “When you protect the things you believe in with [...]

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  • Mark KraftNovember 21, 2011 - 3:45 am

    "“We need to spend one year, if not longer, as a campus, to really to ask the very important questions of what happened and how are we going to move forward,” True. But you would think that someone as booksmart as Katehi would realize that she is the wrong person to ask those important questions, and precisely the wrong person for UC Davis to move forward with. I'm sorry, but she's going to have to lose her $400K-a-year job. Thems the breaks.

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  • Mike McNuttNovember 21, 2011 - 3:50 am

    America can be proud of the Davis students, your community can share that pride and most of all those magnificent young people should always know, that if they are right, they will win, and they shall. Sadly as ever there two sides to every story and the incompetence of the College Chancellor and the breathtaking brutality of the police involved bring shame not only upon America, but all of humanity. Katehi has no option but to resign, if she did not know that when she took that walk of shame, then she clearly has none of the communication skills required for her position. I am from Liverpool UK, and I feel the shame that these people have brought upon humanity. Those who ordered the deployment of the spray and those who used the spray, must be brought to Justice and account for their violence!

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  • About Pepper Spray — Risk Science BlogNovember 21, 2011 - 4:09 am

    [...] the University of California-Davis announced that it was suspending two of the police officers who pepper-sprayed protesting students. Eleven of those students were [...]

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  • anonymousNovember 21, 2011 - 5:03 am

    I add my voice to the many condemning the UC Davis police and the chancellor. The University of california system has a very long history of brutality and violence towards dissent. It is time that students, faculty and alumni join together to starve the UC system of donations until it changes.

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  • LucyNovember 21, 2011 - 5:28 am

    Katehi said, “We cannot be a place of learning when there’s no safety for the community, when there’s no calm. I will appeal personally to the students for that.” However, I do not understand why she does not seem to acknowledge that the lack of calm stems not from their actions but from hers. The students protesting at UCD have shown time and time again their amazing ability to be forces of calm, even when being sprayed at with chemicals by the police or when waiting for hours for her to leave the Saturday news conference. The appeal to calm should go to the administration and the campus police, not to the students.

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  • UC Davis Calls for Investigation After Pepper Spraying | My BlogNovember 21, 2011 - 5:59 am

    [...] Koster, who helped one of the protesters, Dominic Gutierrez, told The Davis Enterprise that she was “horrified” by what took place. “When you protect the things you believe in with [...]

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  • Sherman AdamsNovember 21, 2011 - 6:22 am

    Linda Katehi needs to find another job, one better suited for her talents. Surely there is a sandwich shop somewhere that needs a new manager.

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  • UC Davis Pepper Spray Incident on Video | CilaneNior Daily NewsNovember 21, 2011 - 7:08 am

    [...] The Davis Enterprise reports that Katehi plans to meet with Occupy UC Davis protesters today at noon PT (3 p.m ET). This afternoon, she’s due to speak with members of the school’s faculty (some of whom have called for her resignation). [...]

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  • Liveblogging the November 18 UC Davis Pepper Spray Incident | My BlogNovember 21, 2011 - 7:34 am

    [...] another pronounced that eleven students were treated by paramedics during a stage and that two were ecstatic to a internal hospital. (That second news also records that university staff and administrators examination a criticism [...]

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  • ml1999November 21, 2011 - 8:13 am

    Newt Gingrich says protesters should get a job after they take a bath. Yikes.

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  • DayleNovember 21, 2011 - 11:01 am

    Newt Gingrich probably should feel like he's the one who needs the bath with all the screwing he's done in his carreer. I feel the need to shower just to think of what he has done over the years...by the way...has that guy ever had a REAL job? It seems to me that all he does is chase money skirts!

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  • Links for the Day- 11/21 « The Lost Generation PodcastNovember 21, 2011 - 8:42 am

    [...] University of California Davis Police Chief Placed on Administrative Leave (via The Davis Enterprise) Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:LikeBe the first to like this post. [...]

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  • GCNovember 21, 2011 - 9:00 am

    “I take full responsibility for the events on Friday and am extremely saddened by what occurred,” If this is true then RESIGN!!! Actions speak much louder than words...

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  • Kelly WilkersonNovember 21, 2011 - 9:10 am

    For more great LOCAL coverage of this story, check out the high school website, which has articles, photos, and two videos (one featured on the Today Show this morning). bluedevilhub.com

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  • G HaleNovember 21, 2011 - 10:21 am

    “My hope is that I’m going to be engaged with students in a dialogue so that we remain safe and we remain calm, as a campus,” Katehi said in an interview Sunday with student-run Aggie TV. “We cannot be a place of learning when there’s no safety for the community, when there’s no calm. I will appeal personally to the students for that.” Perhaps Katehi should appeal to the people who are actually making the situation unsafe - the cops.

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  • Richard EvansNovember 21, 2011 - 11:07 am

    Chancellor Katehi says she takes full responsibility for the events on Friday, so she has formed a task force to find out who is responsible. Huh? Take responsibility, Chancellor Katehi!

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  • CharlieNovember 21, 2011 - 12:32 pm

    If she really meant that she's taking "full responsibility"; she'd fire all the peace officers present at the demo (criminal conspiracy is what it's called when cops close ranks) and then resign herself. What have here is a case of Crocodile Tears from someone who is way out of her depth, like Jean Kuan in Oakland.

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  • KeithNovember 21, 2011 - 11:15 am

    While I am appalled by the police actions here I was astounded by the calm and maturity of the student demonstrators in the face of police violence. When I watched the videos I felt enraged and my first reaction would have been to at least yell vile and hateful things at the police if not throw anything available at them. But the students at UC Davis did not do that. They chanted shame on you. I am very impressed by the maturity and restraint shown by the students.

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  • Police Pepper Spraying at UC Davis (videos, photos, story) « OCCUPYNovember 21, 2011 - 11:44 am

    [...] Koster, who helped one of the protesters, Dominic Gutierrez, told The Davis Enterprise that she was “horrified” by what took place. “When you protect the things you believe in with [...]

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  • UC Davis Pepper Spray Victims May Sue Police | Top Legal NewsNovember 21, 2011 - 1:18 pm

    [...] UCD police chief placed on administrative leave (The Davis Enterprise) [...]

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  • j williamsNovember 21, 2011 - 2:07 pm

    Look closely! Davis PD were there too at the Quad. Disgusting.

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  • The Banality of Evil> Reflections on UCDavis Incident and the Occupy Movement « WAMMTodayNovember 21, 2011 - 4:09 pm

    [...] of California (UC) President Mark Yudof, former president of the University of Minnesota, has spoken up loud and clear against the violence, as has the UCDavis Chancellor herself, with vows to assure the safety of students, etc.  There is nothing wrong with this, except, of [...]

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  • UC president “appalled” by pepper-spraying incident at UC Davis | The University LifestyleNovember 21, 2011 - 5:58 pm

    [...] handling of Friday’s events, criticizing her “gross failure of leadership.” She is supposed to meet with both students and faculty this afternoon at separate meetings and host a student forum on [...]

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  • JenniferNovember 21, 2011 - 8:20 pm

    I see no link on this page to send an email to the Chancellor, so I will write it here and rely on the paper to get it to her: Dear Chancellor: What I heard from Chuck Wexler, director of the Police Executive Research Forum the other day: http://www.democracynow.org/2011/11/17/paramilitary_policing_of_occupy_wall_street ...was that the police, in general, do NOT want to be put into this situation. They are being forced to be The Bad Guys when most people in the Occupy movement are clearly aware that Police are part of the 99% and that we are fighting for their survival as well. I am glad to hear that you are now willing to bear some of the stress that Occupy is demanding that American Institutions and Systems take on, and are no longer willing to rely on the Police to simply handle it for you. Thank you. I'm not sure why it is difficult to negotiate with Protesters over a space in such a way that everybody wins - except the 1%, of course. Example: If "health and safety" are truly a concern, supply them with what they ask for to make the camp "healthy and safe". Worried about dirty sidewalks? Why not negotiate with them to clear the space once a month for a power-wash? It's not that hard. If this goes against rules that have been put in place in the past, as yourself why this battle must be won, when you could so easily give these people what they need to win the war - on your behalf! If you're too busy to deal with it, give them what they need to do it. It's called delegation. They have all the energy that will be needed to win this war. Let them do it! Civil disobedience is exactly what it sounds like. If you find yourself on the "wrong side", you must lose. Lose gracefully. Better yet: get on the "right side". Let their victory strengthen the movement so that they can get their work done. They work for all of us. Unless, of course, you are part of the 1% in which case you are going to lose anyway. And it won't be pretty. THE 1% MUST BE STOPPED! THEY ARE CRASHING THE WORLD! LET US DO IT!! Sincerely, Jennifer Grove Ukiah, Ca

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  • We need to talk about “Pepper Spray” otherwise known as Oleoresin Capsicum. – #UCDavis #OWS #OO « SW9RedNovember 22, 2011 - 11:19 am

    [...] the University of California-Davis announced that it was suspending two of the police officers who pepper-sprayed protesting students. Eleven of those students were [...]

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  • Pepper-spraying Peaceful Pothead Protestors, Publicly - Page 2 - Grasscity.com ForumsNovember 22, 2011 - 12:18 pm

    [...] Pepper-spraying Peaceful Pothead Protestors, Publicly Placed on Administrative leave: UCD police chief placed on administrative leave | Davis Enterprise __________________ Truth, without a champion, is [...]

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  • UC Davis Police Chief on Admin Leave After Pepper Spray - Grasscity.com ForumsNovember 22, 2011 - 12:24 pm

    [...] Davis Police Chief on Admin Leave After Pepper Spray UCD police chief placed on administrative leave | Davis Enterprise __________________ Truth, without a champion, is [...]

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  • GLI INFAMI SBIRRI AMERICANI | La Padova BeneNovember 22, 2011 - 1:52 pm

    [...] stampa ha condannato duramente il comportamento degli agenti. Il dipartimento di polizia del campus ha difeso il comportamento dei propri agenti e del tenente John Pike, l’agente che nella foto spruzza lo [...]

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  • Fergus Ray MurrayNovember 23, 2011 - 6:15 am

    I'm confused by the claim that 'the police followed protocol'. The UC's own Universitywide Police Policies and Administrative Procedures state: “Chemical agents are weapons used to minimize the potential for injury to officers, offenders, or other persons. They should only be used in situations where such force reasonably appears justified and necessary.” It seems perfectly clear that doesn't apply here. And the courts have previously ruled that police had acted illegally by hitting protesters with pepper spray when there was no threat of immediate violence.

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  • Utrolig protest | Hennings blogNovember 23, 2011 - 11:03 am

    [...] større end denne lille protest; startende langt før en tilsyneladende helt overdrevent brug af peberspray mod studerende henover denne protest til Katehi’s officielle undskyldning. For Katehi er det også specielt [...]

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  • Violencia contra Occupy Wall Street: Acerca del spray de pimienta | COLAREBO.ORGNovember 23, 2011 - 9:55 pm

    [...] la Universidad de California-Davis anunció la suspensión de dos de los policías que rociaron gas pimienta a los estudiantes que protestaban. Once de los estudiantes fueron [...]

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  • Jonathan OdneNovember 24, 2011 - 2:14 am

    I don't get it; why didn't the protesters move out of the way? The police were getting rid of the trouble-makers (hopefully), and here these protesters were giving them even more hassle, not moving out of the way.

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  • Eric JaffaNovember 24, 2011 - 7:59 am

    The protesters didn't want their three friends who were under arrest to be taken to jail. They were hoping that if they made that inconvenient, the cops would release their three friends.

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  • Too Much Violence and Pepper Spray at the OWS Protests | AppenheimerNovember 24, 2011 - 8:15 am

    [...] U.C. Davis police department has, not surprisingly, defended its actions. Ten students were arrested — eight men and to women — and about a dozen others were [...]

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  • Students creepily protest UC Davis chancellor | The University LifestyleNovember 25, 2011 - 5:29 am

    [...] to chant and protest outside the building. Katehi refused to leave for three hours, because “the crowd outside was perceived to be hostile.” The crowd was for sure hostile, but they were the furthest thing from violent. As Katehi [...]

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  • UC Davis police casually pepper sprays students | The University LifestyleNovember 25, 2011 - 5:34 am

    [...] [Davis Enterprise, The New Civil Rights Movement] [...]

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  • Pepper Spray Can Kill | The [Occupy] 2012 ScenarioNovember 26, 2011 - 12:50 am

    [...] the University of California-Davis announced that it was suspending two of the police officers who pepper-sprayed protesting students. Eleven of those students were [...]

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  • Pepper Spray Can Kill | The [Occupy] 2012 Scenario « 2012 Indy Info – LRCNovember 26, 2011 - 1:15 am

    [...] the University of California-Davis announced that it was suspending two of the police officers who pepper-sprayed protesting students. Eleven of those students were [...]

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  • The Lede Blog: U.C. Davis Calls for Investigation After Pepper Spraying - World Bad News : World Bad NewsNovember 29, 2011 - 11:14 pm

    [...] afterward, according to internal reports. Ten were arrested. Interviewed during a sanatorium by a internal newspaper, The Davis Enterprise, one of a protesters, Dominic Gutierrez, pronounced that he had been sprayed while perplexing to [...]

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  • Larry DDecember 01, 2011 - 1:37 am

    Police brutality in California is nothing new. Sometimes it gets into the media. Usually it doesn't. I have never been able to grasp how it can continue decade after decade, without getting more public attention. Many people have experienced violence - and esp. the threat of violence that hangs in the air when being "serviced" by California "peace" officers. Hopefully, mobile phone cameras and the Internet will help expose and alleviate the police violence and intimidation which infects the US. I am a 59 y.o., white, middle class guy who has seen - and physically experienced - only a small piece of the top of the police-violence iceberg in Ca. AND the rest of the US. I hope for the best and expect the worst from the future of my country.

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  • GeneDecember 03, 2011 - 1:24 pm

    They should of just got off the sidewalk and kept protesting. This whole movement is getting annoying with no focus or clear cut agenda.

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  • The unseen iconic images of 2011 | Scrapper DuncanDecember 27, 2011 - 4:00 am

    [...] all familiar with the image of John Pike calmly spraying the aphids on his rose bushes administering pepper spray into the eyes of people [...]

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  • UC students follow retreating Regents to SF financial district, shut down Bank of America « Teach the BudgetJanuary 08, 2012 - 1:16 pm

    [...] Davis Enterprise Coverage [...]

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  • About Pepper Spray | Wired Science | Wired.comMay 11, 2012 - 9:23 am

    [...] the University of California-Davis announced that it was suspending two of the police officers who pepper-sprayed protesting students. Eleven of those students were [...]

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  • Administrative Leave Practices Can Hit Taxpayers HardSeptember 11, 2012 - 6:04 am

    [...] full responsibility for the events on Friday and am extremely saddened by what occurred,” school Chancellor Linda Katehi said. “I eagerly await the results of the review, and intend to act quickly to implement reforms that [...]

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  • Occupy Wall Street bestaat een jaar en probeert initiatief te nemen « George KnightSeptember 25, 2012 - 6:22 am

    [...] UC Davis Police Lt. John Pike uses pepper spray to move Occupy UC Davis protesters who were blocking officers’ attempts to remove arrested [...]

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  • What are the US and Israel partners in? « northup newsOctober 25, 2012 - 6:16 pm

    [...] (Left, Israeli police attacking an Israeli-Arab family during an eviction last year. Right, pepper spray of illegal strength being used on protesting UC Davis students by US police. Photos from here and here.) [...]

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  • Occupy-basic information and Links worldwide | occupyafricaNovember 03, 2012 - 12:18 pm

    [...] ^ “UCD police chief placed on administrative leave”. Davis Enterprise. 2011-11-20. Retrieved 2011-11-24. [...]

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  • Give Peace a Chance!: Police Brutality in an Occupy Wall Street World | New LogicalAugust 27, 2013 - 10:50 am

    [...] images of police violence have become iconic, with the protestors pepper-sprayed in Portland and at UC Davis as prime examples. In those and similar cases, police officers were suspended, media outlets worked [...]

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