Sunday, May 3, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
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Get some zzz’s for you and your family

sleepW

Thomas Witten, 4, sleeps peacefully during a typical 10-hour night of rest. Courtesy photo

By
From page A3 | February 14, 2014 |

Sleep is important to children for many reasons, from restoring energy to building brain connections — not to mention giving Mom and Dad a break.

“Young children need a lot of sleep. In fact, they’ll spend 40 percent of their childhood sleeping,” said Julie Gallelo, executive director of First 5 Yolo.

The earlier parents start helping kids establish good sleeping habits, the sooner the whole family will get some rest.

Here are some tips for parents and caretakers from First 5 Yolo:

Give brains a rest: Not only is sleep necessary for a child’s body, it’s important for their brains, too. In fact, sleep is the brain’s primary activity during early development. It’s during sleep that the brain sorts through and stores information, replaces chemicals, and solves problems.

Studies show just one hour less of sleep a night during early childhood has long-lasting effects on proper language and cognitive development. Lack of sleep also can lead to behavioral problems, like hyperactivity, trouble managing emotions and poor concentration skills.

* Know sleep guidelines: Every child is different, but there are basic guidelines as to how much sleep kids need.

According to the National Sleep Foundation, newborns sleep up to 20 hours a day. By 6 months of age, babies will sleep up to 16 hours a day and may sleep through the night. But sleeping “through the night” may be only be a stretch of five to six hours in a row.
Toddlers need 12 to 14 hours of sleep a day between nighttime sleep and naps. Preschoolers need nearly as much, about 10 to 13 hours a day. And kids ages 5 and up still need about 10 hours a day.

You may notice that your child has difficulty sleeping when reaching major development milestones such as walking or talking; when they’re teething; when they’re sick; or when they’re experiencing separation anxiety. This is normal and eventually will pass.

* Establish bedtime routine: The most important tip for developing good sleeping habits is to establish a nightly routine. Young children thrive on consistency, so routines make it easier for them to relax and fall asleep.
Routines will differ based on what your child likes, but could include taking a bath, reading a story, singing a lullaby, breast-feeding or bottle-feeding, and giving a goodnight kiss.
Don’t let your child go to sleep with a TV on. A child’s room should be quiet and dark. And once you’ve established a routine that is enjoyable for both of you, stick to it closely.
As soon as you spot signs of sleepiness, try placing your child down to sleep. Look for signs such as sucking their thumb, rubbing their eyes, pulling their ears or even dark circles under their eyes.

* Sleep safely: Sudden infant death syndrome is the leading cause of death for infants under 1 years of age. Nobody knows exactly what causes SIDS, but there are steps parents and caregivers can take to reduce risks.

Place babies on their back — not on their tummies — when putting them down to sleep. Buy a safety-approved crib and a firm mattress. Don’t place pillows, blankets or stuffed animals in the crib and never use infant sleep positioners.
Keep the bedroom at a temperature that’s comfortable, not hot — around 70 degrees — then dress your baby for bed in whatever you’re comfortable in plus one layer. Overheating is a risk factor for SIDS as well.
Never smoke in your baby’s room. Secondhand smoke has been linked to an increased risk of SIDS.

For more information on early learning and development, go to First 5 Yolo at www.First5yolo.org or visit www.first5california.com/parents.

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