Friday, April 24, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Grand jury inspects Yolo County Jail, Juvenile Hall

By
April 2, 2011 |

Despite ongoing overcrowding issues, the Yolo County Jail is a clean, well-maintained facility where inmates enjoy access to medical care and educational programs designed to help them transition back into society, the Yolo County grand jury wrote in its final report released Friday.

The panel was similarly impressed with the Yolo County Juvenile Detention Facility — also known as Juvenile Hall — which is adjacent to the jail.

The grand jury’s inspections of the facilities did not stem from any complaints, according to the report, but rather was mandated under the state Penal Code.

No recommendations stemmed from either inspection, and no responses were requested from the Sheriff’s Department.

“Inmate overcrowding continues as an operational way of life at the jail,” says the report. Budget reductions last fall led to the closure of 30 beds at the county’s Leinberger Center —which is separate from the main jail — lowering the jail’s maximum capacity from 452 to 422.

As a result, the jail administrators have been forced to release low-risk inmates from the jail to make room for arrivals who pose a greater risk to public safety. Most misdemeanor bookings never see the housing area of the jail before being released.

Sheriff Ed Prieto said the problem could worsen if the jail is forced to shutter the Leinberger Center, a possible scenario if the county is required to make further budget cuts.

“That’s going to make a bigger impact,” Prieto said Friday. “We’re going to have to release another 100 inmates.”

The grand jury report made note of two suicides at the jail in 2010 — hangings that occurred in May and December — but said jail staff appeared to follow policy and procedures in both incidents.

“Neither inmate displayed or expressed any suicidal tendencies at the time of their booking into the facility nor did they show any such evidence while incarcerated,” the report says.

The grand jury also lauded a solar panel project adjacent to the jail that is expected to provide 80 percent of the electrical power used by both the jail and Juvenile Hall facilities, calling it “an innovative and creative effort to significantly reduce electricity costs throughout the justice complex.”

Two inspections of the Juvenile Hall facility also found it to be clean and well-run, with enthusiastic staff who “appeared highly motivated to improve the lives of minors,” the report says. “It is one of the most secure juvenile detention facilities on the West Coast.”

Like the county jail, Juvenile Hall offers education and literacy services and relies on volunteers or grant funding for additional programs in drug and alcohol recovery, teen parenting and anger management, the report says.

The grand jury report highlighted the juvenile facility’s contract with the Department of Homeland Security to house young offenders from across the country who are awaiting resolution of immigration issues. Last year, one of the minors became the first in the nation to obtain a general-education degree while under immigration detention.

Based on a citizen complaint, the grand jury also examined the Woodland Police Department’s vehicle towing dispatch procedures but found the agency follows “applicable laws and rules” and issued no recommendations.

— Reach Lauren Keene at [email protected] or (530) 747-8048.

Comments

comments

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

     
    Water and power have a troubling interdependency

    By New York Times News Service | From Page: A1 | Gallery

    New design submitted for conference center

    By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    Los Angeles march to commemorate Armenian killings

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

    Hostage deaths a reminder of risk of ‘deadly mistakes’

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    Bob Dunning: Fairness is an afterthought for them

    By Bob Dunning | From Page: A2

    Walkers head out three times weekly

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4Comments are off for this post

     
    Got bikes? Donate ‘em!

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Need a new best friend?

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

    Beginning tai chi classes start May 5

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    College Night set April 30 at DHS

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Tour of co-ops precedes Sacramento conference

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

     
    School board hears report on health services

    By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A5

    Mamajowali will perform at benefit house concert

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A6 | Gallery

     
    Explorit: Celebrate International Astronomy Day

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

    Learn basics of composting in Woodland

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

     
    Take a peek at region’s past at Tremont Mite Society’s social

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8 | Gallery

    BeerFest expands to include cider

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

     
    Winkler Dinner raises funds for enology, viticulture activities

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8 | Gallery

    Raptor Center welcomes visitors at May 2 open house

    By Trina Wood | From Page: A8 | Gallery

     
    Mapping where human action is causing earthquakes

    By New York Times News Service | From Page: A9

    Hummingbird health: Appreciating the little things

    By Kat Kerlin | From Page: A12 | Gallery

     
    .

    Forum

    Tom Meyer cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: B4

     
    The fight for gender pay equity

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B4

     
    Thanks for supporting the arts

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

    Bike Swap another success

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

     
    Drink is a tasteless insult

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

    It’s a depressing beat

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    .

    Sports

    Reeling Blue Devils stop skid against Sheldon

    By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Aggie Spring Game environment will up the gridiron fun factor

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Rare DHS track loss still full of highlights

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

     
    Lehner talks about the UCD student-athlete experience

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1

     
    DYSA roundup: Lester, Osborne lead Storm over Dixon

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

    Lady Demons’ fundraiser a smash hit

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

     
    Pro baseball roundup: River Cats lose their fourth straight

    By Staff and wire reports | From Page: B12

    .

    Features

    .

    Arts

     
    ‘Ex Machina': The perils of playing God

    By Derrick Bang | From Page: A10 | Gallery

    Ceramicist works will be featured at The Artery

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11 | Gallery

     
    .

    Business

    Chamber expands Korean sister-city opportunities

    By Felicia Alvarez | From Page: A5 | Gallery

     
    Car Care: Tips for buying your first ATV

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B6

    Subaru goes rear-wheel drive with sporty BRZ coupe

    By Ann M. Job | From Page: B7 | Gallery

     
    .

    Obituaries

    .

    Comics

    Comics: Friday, April 24, 2015

    By Creator | From Page: B5