Thursday, December 25, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
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Holocaust tale focuses on search for art

Moshe Rynecki, who perished in the Holocaust, painted "The Water Carriers" in 1930. Courtesy photo

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From page A1 | April 05, 2013 |

Elizabeth Rynecki will describe her quest to recover the remaining scattered paintings of her great-grandfather, Moshe Rynecki, at a Holocaust commemoration event Sunday at Congregation Bet Haverim in Davis.

Moshe Rynecki painted the Polish-Jewish community in the 1920s and ’30s. Before he was forcibly exiled to the Warsaw Ghetto and subsequently sent to his death in a concentration camp, Rynecki and his family hid more than 800 of his paintings in small bundles with non-Jewish friends in the hope of retrieving them after the war. Only one bundle was found.

In her search, Elizabeth Rynecki has uncovered part of another surviving bundle in Canada and individual paintings in Israel, Italy and Polish museums, and in auction house notices from around the world. She is making a documentary film about her project.

Elizabeth Rynecki, who earned a master’s degree in rhetoric and speech communication at UC Davis and now lives in Oakland, will talk about her great-grandfather, her search to find the missing art and where her family’s story rests within the larger story of Holocaust art restitution. Her talk will run from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Social Hall at Congregation Bet Haverim, 1715 Anderson Road. It is free and open to the public.

To preview art online and find out more about the Ryneckis, visit www.rynecki.org. For more information, contact Nancy Lazarus at nancyblazarus@gmail.com.

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