Thursday, July 24, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Latinos set to surpass whites in California in March

latino1w

Janeth Cruz, 23, the owner of Destenny's Ice Cream, chops up peaches for toppings this week. The Richmond shop has been around since 2009 and Cruz took it over two years ago. According to latest demographic data, Latinos are expected to soon replace Caucasians as the biggest ethnic group in California. Leah Millis/San Francisco Chronicle photo

By
From page A5 | January 17, 2014 |

By Melody Gutierrez
SACRAMENTO — California is growing older and more diverse.

The Latino population is projected to surpass that of whites in California in March to become the single largest race or ethnic group, according to a report on shifting demographics in Gov. Jerry Brown’s 2014-15 budget proposal. Also, the number of residents 65 and older will jump by 20.7 percent over the next five years, the report said.

State demographers expected Latinos to surpass the non-Hispanic white population seven months earlier, but Latino birth rates were lower than anticipated. Now, officials say, by March Latinos will make up 39 percent of California’s population, edging out non-Hispanic whites at 38.8 percent. Nearly 25 years ago, non-Hispanic whites made up 57 percent of the state, while Latinos made up 26 percent.

The state’s Department of Finance includes the projections in the governor’s budget proposal because of the potential economic impact, such as the increase in retirees affecting the scope of services needed for an aging population, or income disparities among minority groups increasing the need for social or educational programs.

“Demographic changes that are coming will reshape the electorate, and in turn that will likely have impacts on policies and issues that decision makers focus on in the coming decades,” said Mindy Romero, director of the California Civic Engagement Project at the UC Davis Center for Regional Change.

Geographic data for the state’s 58 counties show the Bay Area is leading the state in economic and population growth, said Bill Schooling, chief demographer for the state Department of Finance. Statewide, coastal cities are growing faster than the Central Valley.

As a state, California experienced modest growth in the past fiscal year, with estimates pegging the population at 38.2 million residents. By July, demographers anticipate the state’s population will grow by 300,000 people.

Growth rates vary drastically between age groups, with retiring baby boomers projected to reshape the labor force in the next 15 years as more than 1,000 Californians will turn 65 years old each day. At the same time, lower birth rates have resulted in fewer young people, with the 18- to 24-year-old group experiencing a 4.5 percent decline and 5- to 17-year-olds increasing just 0.2 percent.

“A big question mark is about what that means for policy for youth,” Romero said. “Older voters often aren’t as supportive of youth-specific policies.”

Schooling said the median age for Latinos — 28 — shows many are in their childbearing years, which will drive future growth among the group.

“Considerably more births are Latino, even though the birth rate is not particularly high,” he said.

Schooling said new data suggest the current trend won’t continue to the point of Latino groups becoming a majority. State demographers previously projected the Latino population to reach more than 50 percent in 2042.

“In our projections, they get higher and higher, but not reaching a majority,” Schooling said.

Asian groups, which currently make up 13 percent of the state, are also projected to see strong growth, mostly through immigration.

“It’s less about one group being a couple tenths more of the population than another group, but more about a continuing trend for California being a majority-minority state,” said Bruce Mirken, spokesman for the Greenlining Institute, a Berkeley nonprofit that advocates for communities of color. “Everything that government does, that private industry does, needs to react to that reality.”

— Reach Melody Gutierrez at mgutierrez@sfchronicle.com

San Francisco Chronicle

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

.

News

 
Ag officials predict bumper almond crop

By Elizabeth Case | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Teens lead the way in fight against cancer

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1 | Gallery

Victim of fatal crash identified

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

 
Official: Air Algerie flight ‘probably crashed’

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
New-home sales plummet in June

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
CSU pumps brakes on enrollment growth

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

Diplomas all around for professor and sons

By Dave Jones | From Page: A3, 1 Comment | Gallery

 
Consumption guidelines for Cache Creek fish updated

By Elizabeth Case | From Page: A3

 
Local singer/songwriter will perform Friday on KDRT

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

Davis Flea hosts night market Sunday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Free technology help offered to seniors

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Contestants sought for Yolo County Fair Queen contest

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Parents can learn all about IEPs

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Museum sells market bags as fundraiser

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
City of Davis recruits for its advisory commissions

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Colleges woo Native Americans with new programs

By The Associated Press | From Page: A5 | Gallery

 
Zip Book: Request it, read it, return it

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

.

Forum

Battle lines are drawn

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
Don’t tell me I can’t help him

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Water trains through Davis

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6, 3 Comments

 
Water storage must be a priority

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6, 1 Comment

 
Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

Act now to support middle school students

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

 
.

Sports

UCD coach has navigated a Maze of experiences

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Lethargic and roster-thin, Post 77 loses Area 1 opener

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1

Pence outscores Phillies

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Quincy Amarikwa: years in the making

By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Area sports briefs: Nelson earns All-Academic honors

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3

 
Youth roundup: Aftershock finishes second in tournament

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3

Majka makes winning look easy

By The Associated Press | From Page: B10 | Gallery

 
.

Features

Name Droppers: Transportation fellowship goes to Aggie

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
.

Arts

 
‘South Pacific’ storyline still making waves

By Bev Sykes | From Page: A7 | Gallery

‘The Miracle Worker’ auditions set for WOH

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

 
.

Business

.

Obituaries

Death notice: James Thomas Feather

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A2

 
.

Comics

Comics: Thursday, July 24, 2014

By Creator | From Page: B8