Thursday, May 7, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Mothers can now donate, bank umbilical cord blood

By
From page A4 | March 19, 2014 |

Mothers giving birth at UC Davis Medical Center will now have the chance to store away their newborn’s umbilical cord blood as part of a state program to collect and store the cells for their disease-fighting properties.

Created by state legislation in 2010, California’s Umbilical Cord Blood Collection Program is a state-funded system designed to broaden the diversity of umbilical cord blood for public banking and use in unrelated transplants as well as provide a source of high-quality cord blood units for qualified researchers, according to a press release from UCD.

UCD Health System administers the program, which is funded by a $2 fee on birth certificate copies.

The service has been available for several years through private companies that charge several thousands of dollars per year and often have less stringent collection standards, according to Suzanne Pontow, Ph.D., co-director of the umbilical cord blood collecting program for the state of California.
Now several hospitals around the state will offer it and the cells will be cryopreserved at a location in San Diego.

Cord blood cells can be used to treat more than 80 diseases like leukemia, lymphoma and anemia.

They also have less potential for rejection than bone marrow cells during a transplant to a recipient, Pontow said.

“This program enables new mothers to be both life-givers and lifesavers,” said Laurel Finta, medical director for Maternity Services at UCD Medical Center. “Parents now have the opportunity to donate to a publicly funded cord blood collection program that costs them nothing and can provide benefits to so many others.”

The donation of cord blood cells is voluntary for mothers, who would be allowed to participate if they do not have blood-related diseases like HIV or have not recently traveled abroad — similar to qualifications that apply when donating blood, Pontow said.

While a newborn’s cord blood is saved by his or her name in the system, if that child goes on to develop a disease like leukemia, his or her cells most likely could not be used for self-treatment as they would also have the characteristics for developing leukemia, said Pontow, who also studies neonatal stem cells in umbilical cord blood and the placenta UCD Institute for Regenerative Cures in Sacramento.

Such cells could have a 1-in-4 chance of helping a sibling, however, she added, and could help any matching patient in need of a blood transplant.

Having a larger bank of cord blood cells is very important for fighting diseases in people of mixed races, who have less common cell-surface structures that are involved in rejection or acceptance by immune cells.

“The main goal of this program is to expand the diversity of publicly available cord blood by making it easy and convenient for new mothers to donate,” said Pontow. “Only a tiny fraction of cord blood is collected and preserved right now, so this is the beginning of an important effort to enable parents around the state to voluntarily and easily donate cord blood at no cost.”

– Reach Jason McAlister at [email protected]

Comments

comments

Jason McAlister

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

    Whole Earth Festival honors ‘Rooted Living’

    By Tanya Perez | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    Colleges move to expand services for immigrant students

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A1 | Gallery

    Internationally known musician Butterscotch brings it home for Whole Earth

    By Landon Christensen | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    May’s ArtAbout is a wheely big show

    By Sandy Thai | From Page: A1 | Gallery

    Fourth of July concessionaires solicited

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3Comments are off for this post

     
    Per Capita Davis: A shout-out to Cool Davis

    By John Mott-Smith | From Page: A3

    Learn all about bats on a Putah Creek night tour

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3 | Gallery

     
    U.S. gives farmers approval to spray crops from drones

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A3 | Gallery

    Concert aims to fund wheelchair-accessible van

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

     
    Nesbitt speaks at Senior Health and Fitness Day

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

     
    Davis Bicycles! members always step up

    By Bob Schultz | From Page: A4

    Don’t forget STEAC’s food drive Saturday

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Sudwerk celebration marks debut of new mural

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4 | Gallery

     
    Awards recognize work with special-needs students

    By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A6

    Independent study enrollment underway

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A6

     
    Tour de Cluck tickets on sale now

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7 | Gallery

    .

    Forum

    The Davis I knew is gone …

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A8

     
    Recruit blacks for police jobs

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A8

    Thank you, Davis pet community

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A8

     
    The big problem with the new SAT

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

     
    .

    Sports

    UCD’s Vivolo is league’s top linkster

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Hot-shooting Aggie women open NCAA golf regionals

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    UCD hoopsters honored for community outreach

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Tour of California to speed through Davis

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Devils end regular season with a bang

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Sports briefs: Aggie Nixon wins BW weekly award

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2

    Youth roundup: Diamonds rock Regionals in Long Beach

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

     
    Junior wrestlers and their coaches compete in Natomas

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3

     
    Pro baseball roundup: Aces double down on River Cats, 6-3

    By Staff and wire reports | From Page: B10

    .

    Features

    Young journalists have Birch Lane covered

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: B4 | Gallery

     
    Rec Report: May is Water Safety Month

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B4

    What’s happening

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: B4

     
    DHS journalism students auctioning variety of services

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B4

    SHED, a modern grange in Healdsburg

    By Ann Evans | From Page: A10 | Gallery

     
    A century of life, love and happiness

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

    .

    Arts

    ‘The Art of Being an Aggie’ extended to May 22

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

     
    The Show Ponies to perform at Davis Bike Collective

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

     
    Disco dance party set Sunday at I-House

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

    Choral concert to present ‘Songs of Peace’

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

     
    Local boys return with band KALYDE for Whole Earth Fesitval

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9

    The question is: Is there craft beer?

    By Michael Lewis | From Page: A9

     
    Winners of Student Writing Contest featured at Stories on Stage Davis

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9 | Gallery

     
    .

    Business

    .

    Obituaries

    .

    Comics

    Comics: Thursday, May 7, 2015

    By Creator | From Page: B8