Tuesday, January 27, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Are we there yet: It’s funny how? Funny like a clown?

TanyaPereznewW

By
From page A4 | November 29, 2012 |

You often hear older folks complaining about trying to watch a movie in a theater among a crowd of other people who don’t always hold the same values when sharing space. The talking! The texting! The candy wrapper-crinkling!

I wholeheartedly agree that these things are very annoying. But I think as a veteran of many years of children’s movies — my younger son is 12, so I’m not much beyond theaters loaded with toddlers and loud kids — that stuff doesn’t faze me much. Sure, I’ve tried to teach our kids to unwrap candy only during noisy parts of a movie, and only whisper a question if they need some plot clarification, but I’ve been guilty of looking at texts during movies to see one if our children needs me.

Having said that, a recent trip to the movies could be the end of me ever again seeing a new release in a theater. It’s all thanks to our seat-neighbors.

I hate to give away the punch line too soon, but since there are a couple of different surprises, I’ll leak one here: These movie disrupters were 50-something-year-olds. Not the disrespectful youths who talk loudly to each other, nor the parents who stupidly bring very young children to a movie that is way too mature for them. Nope, this couple was the most generic of moviegoers. Or so they wanted us to think!

Here’s the basic plot: My husband, our younger son and I went to see “Skyfall” the weekend it came out. We didn’t arrive early enough to the theater, so we found three seats toward the front.

The previews came and went without incident, which in retrospect seems surprising. Why didn’t the scenes in the advertised movies solicit the same reaction from our seat-neighbors?

Is the suspense killing you? What could these people have done to have forever ruined movie theaters for us?

They laughed. A lot.

Let me set the scene: The opening of “Skyfall” has James Bond in an intense chase to recover something important.
Something about this struck our neighbors funny. I know this because of their loud guffawing. (“Guffaw” says Merriam Webster, is “a loud or boisterous burst of laughter.” Word!)

And it continued. Ooh, how riotous that James got hit in the face! What hilarity that they almost fell off the top of a train! So side-splitting that our hero appears to have died!

What. The. %#&@?!

At the first laughing incident, the three of us smiled a little at each other, as if to say, “Maybe that was funny but I just didn’t see the humor in it.”

A few more cackles later, we realized it was them, not us. And it appeared they were not going to settle down and laugh only when laughing was warranted.

As mentioned, this was opening weekend for “Skyfall,” so changing seats was not an option unless we were willing to sit in the absolute front row of the theater. We were trapped.

Our poor 12-year-old was right next to the couple. The most amusing thing about the whole un-amusing situation was how our son perceived all this. He would turn toward me and mouth, “OH MY GOD!” when the distinguished man next to him loudly chortled. As a child, he hasn’t seen quite as much idiocy from grown-ups as my husband and I have. My husband gallantly switched seats with him partway through the movie, which seemed to quiet the howling a bit.

I’m sure you’ll think I’m exaggerating, but over the past few weeks, I have asked my husband and son to imitate how they remember the laughing. In my mind it has faded a bit, and I’m worried that I might be remembering it more boisterously than it was. Nope. It was really loud and obnoxious.

So, how to explain this phenomenon? I didn’t smell any reefer on them, so that excuse was shot down. I’ve also considered that we were part of a sociological experiment by this couple, or that they confused this movie with “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” assuming it was a crowd-participation event. But I really don’t have an answer.

I do believe that this situation highlights one of the disadvantages of living in a small town, though. We couldn’t think of anything to say that wouldn’t make us all extremely uncomfortable, and we certainly couldn’t storm away in disgust for fear that we know people who know them or their kids or whatever. So we just bit our tongues and raged inside while making a hasty exit as the credits started to roll.

I wish I had thought of the perfect thing to say, but even three weeks later, I come up blank.

It is worth noting, however, that we did venture to the movie theater again the following week to see “Wreck-It Ralph.” The crowd was far better-behaved, crinkling candy wrappers and all.

— Tanya Perez is an associate editor at The Enterprise. Her column publishes every other week on Wednesdays or Thursdays. Reach her at tperez@davisenterprise.net. Follow her on Twitter at @enterprisetanya

Comments

comments

.

News

Interfaith event focuses on justice

By Fred Gladdis | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
In vino veritas: A criminal case and intrigue in Napa Valley

By New York Times News Service | From Page: A1 | Gallery

Parking lawsuit may be more than meets the eye

By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1

 
Crash leads to DUI, hit-run arrest

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

 
Senate Dems block GOP effort to wind down pipeline debate

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

New-home sales jump 11.6% in December

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Blizzard howls its way into Boston

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2 | Gallery

 
Share your love (story) with us

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Pets of the week

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3 | Gallery

 
Workshop offers tips on GoPro cameras

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Sutter Davis Hospital seeks volunteer doulas

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

 
Winter produce, treats available at Wednesday market

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Have a ‘Heart to Heart’ with Dr. G

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Apply now for Soroptimist service grants

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Storyteller relies on nature as his subject on Saturday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Vote for your favorites in Readers’ Choice poll

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Learn nature photography from an expert

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

 
Thorp receives UCD’s Distinguished Emeritus Award

By Kathy Keatley Garvey | From Page: A4 | Gallery

Innovation opportunities on the agenda

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Apply now to be on Davis’ coop crawl

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Seed swap set Friday at Davis Cemetery

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
VFW post plans Valentine’s Day Heroes Breakfast

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

Sutter auxiliary seeks volunteers

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
A winemaker’s downfall

By New York Times News Service | From Page: A7

Gerber nominations open now

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A10

 
.

Forum

Wife’s attitude costs her friends

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
Taking turns as the halfway house

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

It’s foggy? Turn on your headlights

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Damage done to democracy

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

A family was torn apart, but we survived

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6 | Gallery

 
Locals will join march for climate change

By Michelle Millet | From Page: A6

.

Sports

Anatomy of a hoops collapse: Can Aggie men handle the pressure?

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Four DHS wrestlers soar at McClellan Air Force Base

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

Aggie women almost get a sweep of Portland tennis teams

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
UCD women need to get in gear for a basketball road trip

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

UCD swims past Santa Barbara

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

 
Sports briefs: Eat ribs for the Davis Aquadarts

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B8

.

Features

Name Droppers: Lea Rosenberg leads Odd Fellows

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
.

Arts

DHS Idol finals will be a tough competition

By Krystal Lau | From Page: A9

 
Wynonna Judd will perform Feb. 13 in Vacaville

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
‘Ideation’ a funny, dark, thrilling farce — and more

By Bev Sykes | From Page: A9 | Gallery

.

Business

.

Obituaries

Death notice: Lorraine Bernice DeGraff

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A2

 
.

Comics

Comics: Tuesday, January 27, 2015 (set 1)

By Creator | From Page: B5

 
Comics: Tuesday, January 27, 2015 (set 2)

By Creator | From Page: B7