Sunday, April 19, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Are we there yet: It’s funny how? Funny like a clown?

TanyaPereznewW

By
From page A4 | November 29, 2012 |

You often hear older folks complaining about trying to watch a movie in a theater among a crowd of other people who don’t always hold the same values when sharing space. The talking! The texting! The candy wrapper-crinkling!

I wholeheartedly agree that these things are very annoying. But I think as a veteran of many years of children’s movies — my younger son is 12, so I’m not much beyond theaters loaded with toddlers and loud kids — that stuff doesn’t faze me much. Sure, I’ve tried to teach our kids to unwrap candy only during noisy parts of a movie, and only whisper a question if they need some plot clarification, but I’ve been guilty of looking at texts during movies to see one if our children needs me.

Having said that, a recent trip to the movies could be the end of me ever again seeing a new release in a theater. It’s all thanks to our seat-neighbors.

I hate to give away the punch line too soon, but since there are a couple of different surprises, I’ll leak one here: These movie disrupters were 50-something-year-olds. Not the disrespectful youths who talk loudly to each other, nor the parents who stupidly bring very young children to a movie that is way too mature for them. Nope, this couple was the most generic of moviegoers. Or so they wanted us to think!

Here’s the basic plot: My husband, our younger son and I went to see “Skyfall” the weekend it came out. We didn’t arrive early enough to the theater, so we found three seats toward the front.

The previews came and went without incident, which in retrospect seems surprising. Why didn’t the scenes in the advertised movies solicit the same reaction from our seat-neighbors?

Is the suspense killing you? What could these people have done to have forever ruined movie theaters for us?

They laughed. A lot.

Let me set the scene: The opening of “Skyfall” has James Bond in an intense chase to recover something important.
Something about this struck our neighbors funny. I know this because of their loud guffawing. (“Guffaw” says Merriam Webster, is “a loud or boisterous burst of laughter.” Word!)

And it continued. Ooh, how riotous that James got hit in the face! What hilarity that they almost fell off the top of a train! So side-splitting that our hero appears to have died!

What. The. %#&@?!

At the first laughing incident, the three of us smiled a little at each other, as if to say, “Maybe that was funny but I just didn’t see the humor in it.”

A few more cackles later, we realized it was them, not us. And it appeared they were not going to settle down and laugh only when laughing was warranted.

As mentioned, this was opening weekend for “Skyfall,” so changing seats was not an option unless we were willing to sit in the absolute front row of the theater. We were trapped.

Our poor 12-year-old was right next to the couple. The most amusing thing about the whole un-amusing situation was how our son perceived all this. He would turn toward me and mouth, “OH MY GOD!” when the distinguished man next to him loudly chortled. As a child, he hasn’t seen quite as much idiocy from grown-ups as my husband and I have. My husband gallantly switched seats with him partway through the movie, which seemed to quiet the howling a bit.

I’m sure you’ll think I’m exaggerating, but over the past few weeks, I have asked my husband and son to imitate how they remember the laughing. In my mind it has faded a bit, and I’m worried that I might be remembering it more boisterously than it was. Nope. It was really loud and obnoxious.

So, how to explain this phenomenon? I didn’t smell any reefer on them, so that excuse was shot down. I’ve also considered that we were part of a sociological experiment by this couple, or that they confused this movie with “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” assuming it was a crowd-participation event. But I really don’t have an answer.

I do believe that this situation highlights one of the disadvantages of living in a small town, though. We couldn’t think of anything to say that wouldn’t make us all extremely uncomfortable, and we certainly couldn’t storm away in disgust for fear that we know people who know them or their kids or whatever. So we just bit our tongues and raged inside while making a hasty exit as the credits started to roll.

I wish I had thought of the perfect thing to say, but even three weeks later, I come up blank.

It is worth noting, however, that we did venture to the movie theater again the following week to see “Wreck-It Ralph.” The crowd was far better-behaved, crinkling candy wrappers and all.

— Tanya Perez is an associate editor at The Enterprise. Her column publishes every other week on Wednesdays or Thursdays. Reach her at [email protected] Follow her on Twitter at @enterprisetanya

Comments

comments

.

News

Aggie Pride on parade at UC Davis Picnic Day

By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
City wants a study of sewer rates

By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1

Hard-of-hearing student needs community’s help

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
KDVS fund drive includes on-air pledging, plus parties and food

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
 
Art helped sell California’s agriculture

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3 | Gallery

 
Sign up now for Celebrate Davis!

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4Comments are off for this post

Students, families can get after-hours Internet access

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Lawyers seek resolution to Davis molest case

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A4

Garamendi hosts conference for women

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

 
‘Invaluable public servant’ retires after 20 years

By Tanya Perez | From Page: A5 | Gallery

Your brain’s aging and a new report urges ways to stay sharp

By The Associated Press | From Page: B5

 
Injury-proof yourself for effective exercise

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

Understanding risks can help women prevent leading health threats

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

 
Get some advice at Connections Café

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

Eyewitness speaks about Israel’s election

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

 
Free gardening advice offered

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
Grad Night tickets on sale online

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

Schenker speaks about ‘Magical Mexico’

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
Yolo County DA honors crime victims at annual tribute

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

Holman offers Publishing 101 seminar

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
Radio-controlled airplanes will race April 25-26

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

Vote with your dollars at Davis Food Co-op

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

 
Woodland bike rides set every Saturday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8

Join the 10,000-vegetable challenge!

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9Comments are off for this post

 
NAMI group offers family support

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

Birding tour will benefit Putah Creek Council

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10 | Gallery

 
Watershed Wonders activities return to Putah Creek

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

Yolo County Neighborhood Court seeks new volunteers

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

 
UCD looks at building a better brain as we age

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

‘Vault’ highlights ‘Kathak’

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

 
Two drought-preparedness water bills pass out of Senate committees

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11

Picnic Day favorites: dogs, bikes science

By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A13 | Gallery

 
Strike up the band, and the bubbles!

By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A14 | Gallery

.

Forum

 
John Cole cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: B6

 
Yolo Crisis Nursery still needs help

By Our View | From Page: B6

Drink up, kids, but make your choice a healthy one

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B6

 
Leash your dogs; it’s the law

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B6

Speak out

By Debbie Davis | From Page: B7

 
Let’s not turn our backs on the Earth

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B7

This Earth Day, make a pledge to cool your home

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B7

 
.

Sports

Fast Aggie start negated by 14-0 USC lacrosse run

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Stagnant second-half offense sinks Devil girls

By Thomas Oide | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Over the hump? DHS baseball team wins late

By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Lambdin, Marshall lead Aggies at Mt. SAC

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

Republic FC gets another win at Bonney

By Evan Ream | From Page: B2

 
UCD roundup: Aggies sweep a water polo double dip

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

Busy Clancy, Hall spark Devil tracksters at Mt. SAC

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

 
Former DHS star Drexel returns to create havoc for Aggies

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B4 | Gallery

Sports briefs: Blue Devils split a pair of tennis matches

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B14 | Gallery

 
Pro baseball roundup: Oakland blanks Kansas City

By The Associated Press | From Page: B14

.

Features

.

Arts

.

Business

Marrone Bio Innovations strengthens its sales team

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A12

 
New phase opens at Brookfield Cottages

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A12

Tucos closes; new Japanese, pizza, subs debut

By Wendy Weitzel | From Page: A12 | Gallery

 
WISH grant funds available to eligible homebuyers

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A12

.

Obituaries

Jody Zewe

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Ruth Rodenbeck Stumpf

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

Herman Timm

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Robert Leigh Cordrey

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

Alice Catherine Micheltorena

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
.

Comics

Comics: Sunday, April 19, 2015

By Creator | From Page: B8