Wednesday, January 28, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Paws for Thought: What will happen to your pets when you die?

Mojito & Sadie with RickW

Sadie, left, and Mojito enjoy a quiet moment with attorney Rick Amorose. Their previous owner died and left instructions for them to be euthanized. Fortunately, Hopalong and Second Chance Animal Rescue in Oakland was contacted and Rick and his wife, Nan Guevara, adopted them. Courtesy photo

By
From page A5 | February 18, 2014 |

Americans love their pets, so is it surprising that we spend $61 billion-plus every year on pets? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Americans spend an average of $500 per household on their pets. Topping the list are married people without children at home who spend an average of $698.

Much as we love our pets, we often forget about their care should we go over the “rainbow bridge” before them. Not possible? Too young to die? You only need to read the obituaries to know that’s not true.

So what to do? Here are a few tips and online resources to get you started.

* Short-term care: Find two or more responsible people who will provide temporary emergency care for your pet. Give them keys to your home, feeding and care instructions and your veterinarian’s contact information. These emergency pet caregivers should know how to contact each other.

Keep an “alert card” in your wallet listing contact information for pet caregivers. Post removable emergency notices on doors or windows to alert emergency-response people about your pets and the names and phone numbers of these caregivers.

* Long-term or permanent care: Have an estate attorney help you create a will, trust or other document to transfer pet ownership and the money required to care for your pet. If you have more than one pet, determine whether the pets go to one or more people. Be sure to authorize your executor to expend estate funds for temporary pet care and the transport of your pet to its new home.

Wills only take effect when you die, not when you are incapacitated. Also, it can take weeks or much longer for probate and formal recognition by a court to execute a will. Trusts can provide immediate pet care whether you die or become ill or incapacitated.

Wills and trusts can be complex, so be sure to consult an attorney who knows how to include pets in wills and trusts to see what options are best for you and your pet.

Online resources: “Providing for Your Pet’s Future Without You,” Pet Trust Primer, In Pets We Trust, California Pet Trust Probate § 15212: http://www.animallaw.info/statutes/stuscaprob15212.htm

Happy Tails: German shepherd Maico, aka Mojito, and Rottweiler/Lab mix Sadie are two bonded senior dogs whose owner died with instructions for them to be euthanized upon his death. Fortunately, Hopalong and Second Chance Animal Rescue in Oakland was contacted instead. Within 24 hours of sending out an appeal, attorney Rick Amorose and his wife Nan Guevara had adopted the dogs.

As an estate attorney who specializes in pet wills and trusts, Rick is familiar with the plight of pets whose owners have died. After losing their 14-year-old Lab last summer, Rick and Nan were ready for some canine companionship. Rick writes, “A friend of Nan’s at work told her about two dogs whose owner left instructions for them to be put down and cremated upon his death. It didn’t take long for us to agree that these two could fill the dog deficiency in our house.”

Hopalong arranged a “meet and greet” at Rick and Nan’s house. Rick reports, “The dogs made themselves at home. … We have a single-family house in Elk Grove with a grassy and fenced back yard. … It didn’t take the dogs long to figure out the dog door and pretty soon they were going back and forth.

“We are getting to know one another and have found out that they both love riding in the car. They bark at every doorbell but leave off on command.”

— Evelyn Dale of Davis is a volunteer and advocate for shelter animal welfare. Contact her at pawsforthought@sbcglobal.net. This column publishes monthly.

Comments

comments

.

News

 
Shrem Art Museum is a work of art itself

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Police ID suspect in South Davis hit-and-run crash

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1

 
Thieves swipe Gold Rush-era nuggets

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Blizzard-stricken East digs out amid second-guessing

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2 | Gallery

UC Davis doctors strike

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
CASA seeks volunteers to advocate for kids

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Community invited to Fenocchio memorial

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

 
Teens Take Charge program accepting applications

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

SHE to lead Center for Spiritual Living in sound healing

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

 
Take a hike with Tuleyome on Feb. 7

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

 
The Soup’s On for NAMI-Yolo

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Sip wines at St. James’ annual tasting

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Kiwanis Crab, Pasta Feed benefits local charities

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Registration open for PSA Day at Davis Media Access

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Brick sales will benefit Hattie Weber Museum

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

Capay Valley Almond Festival will tempt your taste buds

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

 
State fails to track billions in mental health funds

By The Associated Press | From Page: A7

Rebekahs’ crab feed benefits local families

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

 
Covered California enrollment events planned

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

Learn pattern darning tips at guild meeting

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

 
Suds for a bug: Contest is over

By Kathy Keatley Garvey | From Page: A7

CSU chancellor calls for increasing graduation rates

By The Associated Press | From Page: A7

 
.

Forum

Family feels cut off here

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
It’s the final freedom

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

Move past the stereotypes

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
A stunning contradiction here

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Let’s speak with accuracy

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Think again on euthanasia

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

.

Sports

Devil snowboarders place second in short and slushy GS

By Margo Roeckl | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Williams-less Gauchos will test Aggie men

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1

 
Davis club ruggers open with nationally celebrated Jesuit on Friday

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Lady Blue Devils take care of business

By Thomas Oide | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
DHS ski team takes second on a déjà vu day

By Tanya Perez | From Page: B8 | Gallery

.

Features

Name droppers: Arboretum director wins leadership award

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Lemon tree, very pretty: Our most local fruit?

By Dan Kennedy | From Page: A10 | Gallery

.

Arts

Granger Smith to play at The Davis Graduate

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

 
Young musicians to perform Winter Concerto Concert

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

Art science speaker series event set for Feb. 5

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
Red Meat, Deke Dickerson bring rockabilly honky-tonk twang to The Palms

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9 | Gallery

.

Business

.

Obituaries

Death notice: Betty J. Cogburn

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Mary Beth Warzecka

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

.

Comics

Comics: Wednesday, January 28, 2015

By Creator | From Page: B6