Friday, October 24, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

What’s a Watsu? Benefits of aquatic massage therapy extolled

By Laurie Loving

Are your joints — especially your hips, elbows and hands — aching with the throbbing pain of arthritis? Is your body stiff and contorted with the muscular contractions of Parkinson’s disease? Are you feeling stressed and overwhelmed from juggling children and a busy career? If you are experiencing chronic pain or stress, you many be an ideal candidate for the warm-water massage therapy known as Watsu.

What’s a Watsu?
WATer-shiatSU is a form of aquatic bodywork in which the “provider” supports and gently moves the “receiver” through warm water in graceful, fluid movements combined with gentle stretches, massage and finger-tip pressure to points in the face, torso and back (shiatsu therapy). Watsu promotes a deep state of relaxation with dramatic changes in quieting the autonomic nervous system, resulting in a profound effect on the neuromuscular system.

How can aquatic massage help me?
Varying levels of relief from pain and stress may be realized following a Watsu session. Watsu is being incorporated into aquatic programs for clients with chronic pain, strokes, fibromyalgia, post-mastectomy, traumatic stress disorder and more in hospitals, clinics, and rehabilitation centers from around the world. Therapists report the following benefits in their clients

Immediate benefits reported after first session:
* increased range of motion
* increased muscle relaxation
* decreased muscle spasm
* decreased spasticity
* decreased pain

Long-term benefits reported after multiple sessions:
* improved sleep patterns
* improved digestion
* improved healing and immune system response
* greater decreases in physical and emotional pain
* decreased anxiety
(Source: Physical therapist Peggy Schoedinger, http://www.tantsuyoga.com/watsu/benefits.html):

Research on the benefits of Watsu is underway on an international level. An 18-month self-assessment study of 16 residents at a retirement center receiving 30-minute sessions twice monthly concluded that 73 to 100 percent of the clients reported end-of-session no-to-minimal pain and stress and a much greater level of body flexibility and the ability to relax. Even more importantly, the majority (60 to 78 percent) reported diminished pain and stress up to three days or longer following the session.
(Source: William A. Vogel, http://www.waba.edu/SpecialNeeds/watsu%20with%20elderly.pdf)

Comments from receivers:
“This is the most wholesome activity I can experience because it treats my whole body, mind and spirit. It helps my aches and pains, calms my mind and lifts my spirit.”

“I am profoundly relaxed at the conclusion, much more so than at the end of having a table massage, having had table massages for 32 years.”

“Not pain-free at the end of a session but feeling so much better and knowing that I will sleep better than any other time.”

“Let me count the ways that it has helped me: Watsu has improved my quality of life. There is a euphoria that lingers and as it fades it is replaced by a feeling of well-being and a sense of peace that is delicious.”

What will happen during a Watsu session?
Watsu is provided in a shallow pool heated to near body temperature (95-97 degrees) to avoid chilling. If needed, floats are wrapped around the receiver’s legs to provide buoyancy.

Held securely by the provider, the receiver floats on his or her back, eyes, nose and mouth always above the surface of the water; ears below, and eyes closed. Guiding the body through the water, the provider gently stretches, bends and twists the body, rotating shoulders and hips to carefully maximize joint movement.

Mild to moderate massage is added to enhance the experience. Periods of stillness are included so that the subconscious and physical effects can integrate. Muscle tension is released, diminishing many physical pains, creating emotional calming and centeredness.

— Laurie Loving, MSW and Watsu practitioner, is the owner of Loving Aquatic Massage in Davis, and an expert in tranquility and nurturing touch. For information and appointments, contact Loving at 530-756-7335, LLoving@dcn.org or www.LovingAquaticMassage.com.

Comments

comments

Special to The Enterprise

.

News

A-Z: Downtown Davis is the place to celebrate

By Kimberly Yarris | From Page: C1

 
Courageous Thompson tapped for cycling shrine

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
UC researchers: How low-water can our landscapes go?

By Katie F. Hetrick | From Page: A1 | Gallery

Testimony begins in Winters murder trial

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Hong Kong protesters to vote on staying in streets

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Cloud business lifts Microsoft’s quarterly results

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Yoga and chanting workshop planned

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Downtown menu: coffee, boba tea, dessert

By Wendy Weitzel | From Page: C3

 
Can you give them a home?

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3 | Gallery

Scientists work to save endangered desert mammal

By Kat Kerlin | From Page: A3 | Gallery

 
Host families needed for students and teachers from Mexico

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

Halloween Dance set Friday for teens

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Day of the Dead folk art class set

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Flea Market planned Sunday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Enjoy A Taste of Capay at historic ranch

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Red-hot tunes set at Blues Harvest

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Learn how to fill a cornucopia with flowers

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Video highlights Props. 1 and 2

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
‘Homeopathy at Home’ program planned

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Celebrate origami at Davis library

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Garden sale and open house features water-wise demos

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: C4

Meet Poppenga at dog park Sunday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Bay Bridge art project needs $4 million to keep shining

By San Francisco Chronicle | From Page: A5 | Gallery

Weir honored, a year early

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
For a good cause

By Fred Gladdis | From Page: A6

Americans, internationals make connections

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A6

 
Explorit: Poison-proof your home with free lecture

By Lisa Justice | From Page: A6

Sutter auxiliary seeks volunteers

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

 
School board hopefuls discuss homework policy

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A7

Walkers welcome to join Sierra Club outings

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
Project Linus seeks donations

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

.

Forum

The magic is long gone

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
What’s next with Ebola?

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

More theories on the abstention

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

 
Rights beget responsibilities

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

Water returns to its source

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

 
A solution to the drought

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

Experience nature’s treasures

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

 
Subs have other concerns

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

 
Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A10

.

Sports

DHS footballers take on Pleasant Grove

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

 
Bye No. 2 comes at perfect time for nicked-up UCD

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Shhh. Are Aggie women BWC’s best-kept secret?

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1

 
Bump, set, playoffs: Blue Devil girls clinch spot in postseason

By Thomas Oide | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Aggies expect a bonny meeting in Sacramento

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1

 
UCD roundup: Preseason awards roll in for Aggie hoopster Hawkins

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

 
Sharks suffer from road woes

By The Associated Press | From Page: B12

.

Features

.

Arts

DMTC plans ‘My Fair Lady’

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11

 
Czech Philharmonic Orchestra to perform

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

Calling all artists for upcoming show

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

 
‘St. Vincent:’ Quite a character

By Derrick Bang | From Page: A11 | Gallery

Rumpledethumps to play at Village Homes Performers’ Circle

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11 | Gallery

 
.

Business

 
Car Care: Five things to ask yourself when shopping for a new vehicle

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B7

.

Obituaries

Lewis Melvin Dudman

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Ann Foley Scheuring

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

.

Comics

Comics: Friday, October 24, 2014

By Creator | From Page: B3