Thursday, April 24, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Business start-up life begins at 50

Brian O'Neal, Don Browning and Matt Key place stainless-steel letters on a pan sign at SighCraft soultions. Bob McEwen started the business after he was laid off.    Scripps Howard News Service photo

SH13C04350PLUSBIZSTARTS March 6, 2013 -- SignCraft Solutions employees (from left) Brian O'Neal, Don Browning and Matt Key place stainless-steel letters on a pan sign at . Bob McEwen started the business more than three years ago after he was laid off. He now employs six people. (SHNS photo by Takaaki Iwabu / Raleigh News & Observer)SH13C04350PLUSBIZSTARTS March 6, 2013 -- SignCraft Solutions employees (from left) Brian O'Neal, Don Browning and Matt Key place stainless-steel letters on a pan sign. Bob McEwen started the business more than three years ago after he was laid off. He now employs six people. (SHNS photo by Takaaki Iwabu / Raleigh News & Observer)

By Virginia Bridges
Raleigh News and Observer

At 52, corporate veteran Bob McEwen and his wife sold their home and moved into a friend’s basement so they could cover payroll for their young commercial sign company.

“It’s very humbling,” McEwen said.

A year earlier, McEwen had lost his six-figure salary after being laid off, ending a 22-year career that included working with missile systems and mortgage products.

During his frustrating and unsuccessful job search, McEwen attended a franchise expo and decided to invest in a Signworld business. He opened SignCraft Solutions in Wake Forest in August 2009. “It just felt right,” said McEwen, now 54.

McEwen is among a growing number of baby boomers — people born between the years 1946 to 1964 — who are turning to small business opportunities as a way to build a new career, supplement retirement, or give them a way to spend their time.

Research conducted by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation indicates that the percentage of firms created by Americans ages 55 to 64 grew more than any other age demographic, up 6.6 percent to 20.9 percent in 2011 compared to 14.3 percent in 1996. Firms created by entrepreneurs ages 45 to 54 rose 3.8 percent since 1996.

The trend is somewhat predictable considering the number of baby boomers reaching retirement age mixed with an economy that has limped through the past six years, said Michele Markey, vice president of Kauffman FastTrac, an arm of the Kauffman Foundation that provides training and resources to prospective and current entrepreneurs.

Some boomers are turning to franchising, while others use existing skills to start a business from scratch. Regardless of the motivation, Markey said, starting a business requires consideration and planning, especially for boomers.

“Their (business) on-ramp and off-ramp are much closer together,” Markey said. “The biggest mistake is not spending adequate time planning.”

New boomer entrepreneurs need to understand how much money they are willing to invest, how long it will take to reap financial benefits, and when they’ll be able to exit the business, she said.

They also need to be realistic about the level of commitment a new business will take, surround themselves with resources and mentors, and build a network of support, Markey said. Solid financial advice is also critical, she said.

Jane Bryant Quinn, AARP Bulletin columnist and author of “Making The Most of Your Money Now,” said that training and an excellent business plan are key for boomers who are starting a business because of a need to build or supplement their income.

“At your age, you are going to be spending significant money to buy yourself a job and if that fails, if that doesn’t go well, you are going to be very hard-put 10 years from now,” Quinn said.

Kerry Dyer, who has 25 years of accounting management experience, decided to start her own firm in July 2010 after being laid off twice in three years.

Dyer, 54, initially started applying for jobs, but was told she was overqualified or the employer wouldn’t believe her when she said she would take less pay, she said.

“Finally I said, ‘If I am going to make that little pay, I might as well work for myself and do something I enjoy doing,’ ” said Dyer, whose certified public accountant firm caters to businesses making less than $3 million in revenue and have up to 10 employees. She obtained one client after she sent letters to friends and family. She met her second through her church. Then she joined a networking group.

“That was probably the best move I ever made,” Dyer said.

The advantages of building her own firm include working with other business owners who are passionate about their business, and being able to control every aspect of her business, Dyer said.

Back at SignCraft Solutions, “there were days we didn’t know how we were going to cover payroll,” McEwen said. “We ended up going more and more in debt.”

McEwen worked 65-hour weeks, and didn’t earn a paycheck for two years. But now, finances have become stable, and the business has continued to expand.

“Within the next couple of years, we expect our business to be grossing a million dollars or more,” McEwen said.

Recently, a friend reached out to McEwen and said there was an open position at a regional bank.

“I had to think about that for a second,” McEwen said. “I felt like no, I don’t want to do that. I am committed to this. This is my lifestyle. This is where I want to be.”

Scripps Howard News Service

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