Wednesday, July 23, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Drought spurs mini gold rush in Sierra

California Drought-Gold Prospectors

Tim Amavisca, 38, and his daughter Hailey, 15, use a sluice box to trap gold flakes on a textured rubber mat as they search for gold March 4 along the Bear River near Colfax. Amavisca is among the amateur prospectors who have flocked to the Sierra Nevada foothills and are taking advantage of the lower water levels to search for gold in riverbeds that have been unreachable for decades. Rich Pedroncelli/AP Photo

By
From page A1 | March 30, 2014 |

By Terence Chea

There’s gold in them dry hills!

Or gold seekers anyway. And they see a historic opportunity in California’s historic drought.

Low water levels have led to a mini gold rush in the same Sierra Nevada foothills that drew legions of fortune seekers from around the world in the mid-1800s, as amateur prospectors dig for riverbed riches in spots that have been out of reach for decades.

“With the drought going on, we’re able to dig in more locations that wouldn’t be accessible at later times,” said Tim Amavisca, who wore waterproof overalls as he panned in the Bear River near Colfax with his teenage daughter on a recent Friday afternoon.

Amavisca, a 38-year-old from Sacramento who recently left the military, has been prospecting several times a week this winter — a time when it’s usually raining and river levels are too high for gold panning.

Leaning over a bed of rocks, Amavisca reached into the river and scooped shovelfuls of sand into a plastic bucket. He and his daughter then poured the sand into a sluice box that’s used to trap gold flakes on textured rubber mats.

“If you see a good-sized flake, that’s when you get excited,” said Amavisca, as he looked for gold in one of the sluice box trays.

Rudy Price walked along the dry rocks of the Bear River with a shovel and pan, surveying the riverbed for good spots for prospecting.

“I do understand that it’s a dramatic impact on everybody during a drought that’s this severe, but at the same token I’m taking advantage of it,” said Price, 39, an amateur prospector who lives in the Colfax area.

One of the worst droughts in California history has prompted the state and federal governments to severely cut water supplies to farms and cities. It’s also left rivers and streams at dangerously low levels, imperiling fish and wildlife.

“You’re seeing flows that are either at or near record lows,” said Jeff Kitchen, a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s California Water Science Center. “If this drought were to continue into future years, there could be some severe consequences.”

The drought has exposed old roads, bridges, railway lines and junked cars that are usually submerged in lakes and reservoirs. At the Folsom Lake reservoir, the water’s retreat revealed the remnants of a Gold Rush mining town called Mormon Island, which was flooded when the dam was built in the 1950s.

In mountain rivers and streams, the record-low flows have uncovered new chances to earn some extra money.

The warm, dry winter is bringing in many first-time prospectors to Pioneer Mining Supplies in the Gold Rush-era town of Auburn. The store sells shovels, buckets, pans, rubber boots, maps and mining books, as well as more advanced prospecting equipment such as sluice boxes and gold concentrators.

With good jobs in short supply and gold selling for more than $1,300 an ounce, many local residents are prospecting to supplement their incomes, said store manager Heather Willis.

Her father, Frank Sullivan, who opened the mining store nearly 40 years ago, said business has increased 20 to 25 percent because of the drought. But he’s concerned about the lack of rain because he lives in the mountains and worries about forest fires.

“It’s great for business, but I’d rather see no drought and a lot of rain,” Sullivan said.

Sullivan sold a 4-foot metal sluice box to amateur prospector Trevor Whitehead and his friend.

“The word is definitely out,” Whitehead said. “We’ve seen more people prospecting than usual.”

He said water levels at the North Fork of the American River are about 2 feet below normal, which has opened up new areas for gold panning.

“It’s more of a hobby,” Whitehead said, “but obviously if we hit a nice pocket, then yeah, I would love to make some money.”
=========
Sidebar
Hints for gold prospectors
The search for gold still offers a special excitement for many people. They hope to “strike it rich” by panning gold. What they do not realize is that most placer deposits have been thoroughly reworked at least twice — first by those who entered immediately after the initial boom periods of the late 19th century to glean the lower grade deposits and tailings; and later by prospectors during the Great Depression. During the “rush” of the 1970s and ’80s, when the price of gold was at an all-time high, many of these areas were worked again.

Nevertheless, a chance for success may still remain if you choose favorable areas after a careful study of their geology and mining records. If you are prepared to undergo a certain amount of hardship, possess a vehicle capable of traveling the roughest and steepest roads, and are not discouraged by repeated disappointments, a prospecting trip may prove to be interesting.

The search itself is often its own reward, but there are things you should consider before setting out on a prospecting expedition.

* It is a conservative estimate that about 1 in 1,000 people who have prospected in the western United States ever made a “strike.” Most of the gold mining districts in the west were located by pioneers, many of whom were experienced gold miners from Alabama and Georgia. Even in those pioneering times however, only a small number of prospectors found valuable deposits. However, the best chances of success are in known productive areas, rather than in unknown areas.

* Lode gold is gold within solid rock. The areas that are likely to contain valuable lode deposits of gold have already been explored carefully and thoroughly. These days the inexperienced prospector without ample capital has very little chance of discovering a lode rich enough to develop. Such known areas in California are the Mother Lode, Grass Valley-Nevada City, and Alleghany districts.

* A placer deposit is a concentration of natural material that has accumulated in the unconsolidated sediments of a stream bed. Heaviness and resistance to corrosion make gold an ideal substance to accumulate in placer deposits. Panning is the simplest method of separating the gold from the silt, sand and gravel of the stream deposits. It is the method most commonly used by the beginning prospector.

* The gold pan, and indispensable prospecting tools, is versatile, efficient, inexpensive and portable. With some practice, even an inexperienced panner should be able to recover most of the gold from the sand and gravel. Gold is much heavier than the minerals that make up the sand and gravel; when the water is shaken and swirled, the grains and flakes of gold sink and collect on the bottom of the pan. As the lighter materials are winnowed from the gold, they are removed from the pan.

Many placer districts in California were mined on a large scale in the mid-1950s and as recently as the mid-1980s. The streams that drain the rich Mother Lode include the Feather, Mokelumne, Sacramento, American, Cosumnes, Calaveras, Yuba and Trinity rivers.

You must always obtain permission from the owner to prospect on private property. Before prospecting on federal land, contact the U.S. Bureau of Land Management at 916-978-4400.

— Courtesy of the California Geological Survey

The Associated Press

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Davis Enterprise does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

     
    Second Mellon grant supports Mondavi events

    By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

    Are arachnids awesome or awful? Visit Bohart Museum to find out

    By Kathy Keatley Garvey | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    One hundred years at the State Fair for local shorthorn cow herd

    By Elizabeth Case | From Page: A1 | Gallery

    Police arrest suspect in robbery spree

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

     
    Madhavi Sunder joins Davis school board race

    By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A2

     
    Crews make gains on massive Washington wildfire

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

    New safety rules proposed to curb oil train fires

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    Kaiser awards grants to Yolo nonprofits

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

     
    NAMI program offers mental illness information, support

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

     
    Backpacks for Kids launches annual donation drive

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

    Architecture in Davis, on ‘Davisville’

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

     
    Speaker will spin some fishing tales at Davis meeting

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3 | Gallery

    Kids can paint their own Breyer horses at Davis store

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

     
    Grandparents support group meets weekly

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

    Exchange program seeks host families

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    Wine-tastings will benefit YCCC

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Pedro party will benefit Yolo Hospice

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Car lovers will speak Sunday at gallery

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Racial diversity crucial to drug trials, treatments

    By San Francisco Chronicle | From Page: A4

     
    Enterprise is focus of Davis Roots talk

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

    Quaff a beer and watch the bats

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5 | Gallery

     
    .

    Forum

    They’re pickier than she is

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    U.S. is complicit in attack

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6, 2 Comments

    Extinguish extremism for peace

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6, 2 Comments

     
    With profound gratitude

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    Someday, there will be peace

    By Rich Rifkin | From Page: A6

    Tom Meyer cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

     
    .

    Sports

    Former Davis man at crossroads: biking or artwork?

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Aggie golfer headed to men’s U.S. Amateur Championship

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Giants outlast Phillies

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    River Cats nip dogs

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

    A’s fall in extra innings

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Blue Jays hitting upends Red Sox

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

    Pyrenees please Nibali, Rogers in Tour Stage 16

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B3

     
    Albergotti to discuss Armstrong’s doping scandal

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B8

    .

    Features

    Field to Fork: Skyelark Ranch, not a lark at all

    By Dan Kennedy | From Page: A8 | Gallery

     
    Name droppers: ASUCD hands out awards

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A8 | Gallery

    .

    Arts

    Tomato Festival makes call for young artists

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

     
    Additional casting notice for ‘Hello Dolly’

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

    Hear Los Tres de Winters on Thursday

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

     
    Picott to play at The Palms Playhouse

    By Kate Laddish | From Page: A7

    Fairy-tale romance in Barnyard Theatre’s ‘Pinky’

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

     
    Soar to Neverland with DMTC’s ‘Peter Pan’

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7 | Gallery

    Village Homes to host Rita Hosking Trio

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7 | Gallery

     
    .

    Business

    .

    Obituaries

    .

    Comics

    Comics: Wednesday, July 23, 2014

    By Creator | From Page: B6