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YOLO COUNTY NEWS
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The Big Read delves into human genomics

Misha Angrist, an assistant professor of genetics at Duke University, will visit Davis in March to discuss his book, "Here is a Human Being," the subject of Yolo County's Big Read: Open Access Science book for winter 2011-12. Courtesy photo

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From page A4 | January 19, 2012 |

“Here is a Human Being,” by Duke University assistant professor Misha Angrist, has been selected as the Big Read: Open Access Science book for winter 2011-12.

The Big Read is intended to be a community book club in which everyone is a member, reading the same book and joining in discussions of its themes and conclusions.

The Big Read is sponsored by the UC Davis department of evolution and ecology and the Center for Population Biology, in partnership with the Yolo County Library. The library has purchased multiple copies of the book for all branches.

UCD has arranged for a public appearance by the author at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 7, at the Stephens Branch Library, 315 E. 14th St. in Davis.

Additionally, graduate students from UCD will lead public discussions of the book at the Turner Branch Library in West Sacramento at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31; at the Esparto Branch Library at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 8; at the Stephens Branch Library in Davis at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 15; at the Winters Community Library at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23; and again at the Stephens Branch in Davis at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 14.

For branch locations, visit www.yolocountylibrary.org.

Angrist was among the first humans to have his complete genome decoded. His book, “Here is a Human Being,” written for a general audience rather than geneticists, details many of the personal and public policy issues created by human DNA research, such as the possibility of predicting and treating genetic disorders, the commercialization of DNA-based treatments and property/privacy rights related to personal DNA information.

Angrist holds a doctorate in genetics from Case Western Reserve University, a master’s in genetic counseling from the University of Cincinnati, and a master of fine arts degree from the Bennington Writing Seminars.

“I suspect that most of our children will have genome scans as a routine part of their health care, to say nothing of their social lives,” Angrist said in a news release. “I want to understand what that world might look like.”

For more information about Big Read: Open Access Science, contact [email protected] or visit sciencenovels.wordpress.com.

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