Tuesday, September 30, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Award to boost UCD’s early childhood autism research

Autism research by Sally Rogers, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at UC Davis, got a boost this week with receipt of a $13 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. UC Davis/Courtesy photo

By
From page A1 | April 03, 2013 |

UC Davis MIND Institute researchers have received a $13 million award from the National Institutes of Health to establish an Autism Center of Excellence and Treatment Network, making the MIND Institute one of only nine such centers in the United States.

Announced Tuesday — World Autism Awareness Day — the ACE award underwrites a research program aimed at advancing the quality, pace and coordination of autism research and is led by Sally Rogers, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

The award will support two separate treatment studies designed to provide the most up-to-date data possible on the most effective methods of treating very young children with autism spectrum disorder. Rogers will collaborate with scientists at Vanderbilt University, the University of Washington and Harvard University.

“While progress in research on (autism spectrum disorders) has been rapid, complex questions remain about the causes of these disorders, how to detect them very early and how to intervene most effectively,” said National Institute of Mental Health Director Thomas Insel.

Rogers said that supporting and improving the outcomes of young children with autism and other disabilities is a national commitment and health priority, and a community and family necessity.

“The number of children who develop autism now overshadows all other early childhood disabilities and represents more than 1 percent of all the children in our country,” she said. “The funds from the National Institutes of Health, and the support of the MIND Institute and UC Davis, will allow us to identify the best treatments for autism early in life and mitigate as much as possible the disabling effects of this all-too-prevalent and lifelong condition.”

The efficacy of early intervention for improving children’s functioning may be the biggest treatment success story in autism.

The most widely used therapy is an approach called applied behavioral analysis, or ABA, pioneered by O. Ivar Lovaas during the 1980s. A highly successful alternative therapy uses play as the treatment context.

Rogers, with her colleague Geraldine Dawson of the University of North Carolina and Autism Speaks, created the Early Start Denver Model method of early autism intervention, a form of therapy that fuses play-based, developmental, relationship-based approaches with the teaching methods of applied behavioral analysis.

ESDM has been found to result in IQ, language and adaptive behavioral gains that equal those of discrete-trial approaches.

The federal award will fund a new study that will include 108 very young, diverse, male and female children at three different study sites, 36 at the MIND Institute, 36 at the University of Washington and 36 at Vanderbilt.

The study’s participants will at the outset range in age from 15 to 30 months. Each child will receive either 15 or 25 hours per week of either ESDM or discrete-trial training. The therapies will be by delivered one-on-one by trained interventionists in the children’s homes for one year.

In addition, the children’s parents also will receive 1½ hours of monthly coaching in the methodologies; parent-delivered intervention will be measured via a small camera, about the size and weight of a finger, which they will wear as they interact with their children.

“This study will provide answers to two critical questions that parents and interventionists ask: ‘How many hours of intervention are necessary for my child?’ and ‘What type of early intervention should my young child with autism receive for the best possible outcome?’ Up until this point, no study has been designed to directly answer these questions,” Rogers said.

The second study will continue Rogers’ earlier ACE Treatment Network research on the long-term effects of the efficacy of the ESDM play-based approach to autism early intervention.

In an earlier trial, toddlers receiving the intervention showed major improvements in IQ, language, adaptive behavior, and severity of their diagnosis over the two-year study period. The current study will follow participants up to 6 to 7 years of age.

— UC Davis Health News Office

Comments

comments

.

News

Man on a mission: transform Davis

By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Poppenga outlines ambitious agenda

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

Cool Davis Festival is très chill

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Sanity phase begins in Daniel Marsh trial

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1

Council looks at granny-flat revision

By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1

 
Find the perfect club or organization to join

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C2 | Gallery

California becomes first state to ban plastic bags

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Standing In: Is the therapy for them, or me?

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A2

California exhausts initial firefighting budget

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Brown allows new local development financing tools

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Forum examines Props. 1 and 2 on November ballot

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Register to vote by Oct. 20

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Assembly candidates will be at Woodland forum

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Pets of the week

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

California approves landmark ‘yes means yes’ law

By The Associated Press | From Page: A4

 
Try out basic yoga on Thursday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

DCC welcomes students with free lunch

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Gibson House hosts plant sale and garden event

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

UCD, University College Dublin will cooperate on food, health

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

 
Accessibility technology on exhibit at fair

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Covell Gardens breakfast benefits Komen Foundation

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
Put your hoes down and celebrate the harvest

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5 | Gallery

Panelists discuss raising children with special needs

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

 
DCC hosts fair-trade gift sale on Oct. 11

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Number of wheels: How many bicycles do you have in your household?

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C5 | Gallery

 
Emerson gives away old textbooks

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

Downtown history tour planned in October

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
Fraud Awareness Fair set Oct. 15 in West Sac

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
Woodland PD seeks volunteers for ViP program

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

DMTC makes musical theater accessible to everyone

By Bev Sykes | From Page: C9 | Gallery

 
Take home a wreath from Davis Flower Arrangers’ meeting

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

Snapshot: A night out with the neighbors

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C10

 
Davis school names reflect interesting history

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: C12

Snapshot: Plenty of places to park it

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C14

 
Snapshot: Dive into Davis fun

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C15

Snapshot: Kick garbage to the curb

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C16

 
Snapshot: Sounds like a party

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C17

.

Forum

It takes two to lambada

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
He seems happy at home

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

Marsh case shows need for ‘Maupin’s Law’

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

 
The great bedtime conspiracy

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

They’re best-prepared to lead

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Vibrant and hard-working

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Archer has the right stuff

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

Get on your bikes to meet Davis’ greenhouse gas goals

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

 
.

Sports

‘Playoff game’ or missed chance? Either way the Aggies move on

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Devils move atop league standings with win

By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Only 15 months out of UCD, Runas off to LPGA Tour

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Davis golfers get teaching moments in forfeit win

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

 
Two Junior Blue Devil squads emerge victorious

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2

 
.

Features

.

Arts

I-House film series continues with ‘Monsieur Lazhar’

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

 
‘Art Farm’ exhibition will open in Woodland

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

Pleasant Valley Boys cool down Picnic in the Park

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9 | Gallery

 
Acclaimed guitarist Peppino D’Agostino to play The Palms

By Landon Christensen | From Page: A9

 
Woodland artist hosts event at her new studio

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

.

Business

.

Obituaries

Danelle Evelyn Watson

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Michael Allen Hanks Baxter

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

Anne Elizabeth Elbrecht

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
.

Comics

Comics: Tuesday, September 30, 2014 (set 1)

By Creator | From Page: B5

 
Comics: Tuesday, September 30, 2014 (set 2)

By Creator | From Page: B7