Sunday, August 31, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Personalized chemotherapy technology wins honors at UCD

By
May 21, 2011 |

By Karen Nikos

A technology that could allow cancer specialists to better determine the most effective chemotherapy treatment for a given patient won the $10,000 first prize in the 11th annual Big Bang! Business Plan Competition at UC Davis.

A money-saving innovation that decreases the amount of rare and expensive platinum needed to make fuel cells won both the second-place $3,000 prize and the audience-selected People’s Choice
award of $2,000.

MBA students in the Graduate School of Management run the contest.

“This personalizes chemotherapy,” said Paul Henderson, an assistant adjunct professor of hematology and oncology at UC Davis Cancer Center and CEO of the winning company, Accelerated Medical Diagnostics.

About 70 percent of lung cancer patients, for example, get no benefit from chemotherapy, he explained in his presentation, “and they endure these terrible side-effects.”

The innovation, based on a technology called accelerator mass spectrometry, can trace a small dose of an anti-cancer drug in a patient prior to treatment, enabling doctors to determine if the treatment will work before administering a full dose. The approach could save billions of dollars in medical costs for ineffective treatments, and spare patients unnecessary side-effects.

“Our goal is to get the right therapy for the right tumor,” Henderson said. The procedure is now in early clinical testing in bladder and lung cancer patients.

Students helped Henderson obtain patents and develop a business plan. He said the technology could be on the market in two to four years, pending regulatory approval. He estimates that each test would cost the insurer or patient about $4,000 each.

ECO Catalytics, which has developed a nearly platinum-free fuel-cell catalyst material, won not only second prize, but the People’s Choice award, selected by a vote of the audience of about 120 at the final awards presentation. The presentation took place Thursday evening at the UCD Conference Center.

The ECO Catalytics technology reduces by 95 percent the amount of high-cost platinum used in electricity-generating fuel cells, potentially reducing fuel cell costs by a third. Fuel cells are used
in various industries, including as back-up power for cell phone towers, in forklifts used by retailer Walmart and others, and in the U.S. military, explained John-Paul Farsight, the UCD MBA student who delivered the presentation.

The team of MBA students and campus researchers also recently won third place in the 2011 Walmart Better Living Business Plan Challenge, which honors student entrepreneurship in environmental sustainability. That prize was worth $5,000 in seed funding.

Steven Currall, dean of the UCD School of Management, said the competition epitomizes what the school teaches its entrepreneurial students.

“Students learn to solicit funding, market their product nd engage customers,” he said. “The Big Bang! exemplifies what happens when you mix cutting-edge technology, a solid business plan
and prize money.

“It is the confluence of our students’ ingenuity, campuswide partnerships and the region’s business community.”

The competition brings together interdisciplinary teams of students, university researchers and faculty, with mentors from the region’s business community. Some of Northern California’s largest employers, venture capitalists and law firms provide the prize money, coaching and volunteer judges.

The Big Bang! has produced many teams that have become successful start-ups since its founding in 2000.

This is the second year Big Bang! organizers welcomed top teams from the Sacramento State College of Business Administration, which had a student on the winning team, and the Sacramento Entrepreneurship Academy.

Farsight said he and his team are excited to develop something that is both economically solid and ecological.

Although developing the fuel-cell technology commercially will cost millions at the outset, there is a promising market for the product, Farsight said.

“The amount of platinum in the world would only fill an Olympic-size swimming pool up to a little above your ankles. And that’s all there is. That is not sustainable,” he said.

Other final-round presenters included KardiaGenics, a biotech company developing a therapeutic treatment for heart failure using a proprietary screening technology; Fliksense, a company that licenses software technology to online video providers that enables them to offer better searches of video content; and Zinapt, which has developed a platform that could accurately detect infectious diseases for faster diagnosis at a lower price.

— UC Davis News Service

Comments

comments

Special to The Enterprise

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

     
    Davis audience hears from civil-rights hero

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    Legislators wrap up with water, ethics, guns bills

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2 | Gallery

     
    Bob Dunning: This new kid might have a future

    By Bob Dunning | From Page: A2

    Five U.S. airstrikes target Islamic State fighters

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    EU threatens Russia with more sanctions

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

    Rotary clubs offer Davis High students some life lessons

    By Evan Arnold-Gordon | From Page: A3 | Gallery

     
    Robbery, pursuit in Central Davis lead to one arrest

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A3

    Dinner will raise funds to help farmers in Burkina Faso

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Walkers welcome to join Sierra Club outings

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Beamer Park featured at Stroll Through History

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Yolo Federal to hold photo contest

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Katehi will speak at Chamber’s community luncheon

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Bean Feed supports for Yolo Democrats’ activities

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

     
    Bauer garden marks one year

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

    Tuleyome Tales: Be safe on wilderness trails

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5 | Gallery

     
    Small wineries suffer big losses in quake

    By San Francisco Chronicle | From Page: A6 | Gallery

    Grande site has been a convoluted saga

    By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A7

     
    Say goodbye to summer with a ‘Final Blast’ at Explorit

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

     
    Bay Bridge project’s rainy-day money is nearly gone

    By San Francisco Chronicle | From Page: A15 | Gallery

    .

    Forum

    Already made herself at home

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    Keep our green waste piles

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

    How to make a good living

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A10

     
    Nate Beeler cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A10

    Changing local election dates benefits Democrats

    By Tom Elias | From Page: A10

     
    Ad-free email? You can still find it at Davis Community Network

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

    City panel working to tighten scrutiny of taxpayer dollars

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11

     
    Try round-robin storytelling at crafts fair

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A11

    Speak out

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

     
    Health problems mean he’s checked out

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: A14

    Marriage doesn’t mean we agree on everything

    By Marion Franck | From Page: A14

     
    This epidemic should scare us

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A14

    .

    Sports

    New coach, new tougher league for DHS football

    By Thomas Oide | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Coach likes what she sees from Devil field hockey squad

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    UCD notebook: Coaches positive about FCS schools ‘playing up’

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Devils open with an impressive volleyball victory

    By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Stanford scores early, often in opener versus UCD

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Sports briefs: Aggie harriers secure season-opening sweep

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

    Baseball roundup: Cats win late to pull even with Aces

    By Staff and wire reports | From Page: B8

     
    .

    Features

    .

    Arts

    .

    Business

    Comings and Goings: Is fro-yo craze melting?

    By Wendy Weitzel | From Page: A13 | Gallery

     
    Sutter Davis Hospital honored again as a ‘best place to work’

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A13

    Community pools its purchasing power to reduce the cost of solar

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A20

     
    Engage3 attracts investment for shopping app

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A20

    California growers can use MBI’s new bioinsecticide

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A20

     
    Sudwerk, Davis Food Co-op join for ‘co-hop-eration’ brew

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A20 | Gallery

    .

    Obituaries

    Wanda P. Daley

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    .

    Comics

    Comics: Sunday, August 31, 2014

    By Creator | From Page: B8