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YOLO COUNTY NEWS
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Study: Countries could slow obesity by controlling fast food

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From page A1 | February 06, 2014 |

Governments could slow — and even reverse — the growing epidemic of obesity by taking measures to counter fast-food consumption, according to a new study led by a UC Davis researcher.

 The study showed that fast-food purchases were independent predictors of increases in the average body mass index (BMI) in the United States and 24 other wealthy nations from 1999 to 2008.

Nations with stronger government regulations — such as producer protection, price controls and stronger intervention on competition and taxes — experienced slower increases in fast-food purchases and average BMIs.

The study was published Feb. 2 in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization.

The research by Roberto De Vogli, an associate professor in the UCD department of public health sciences, is the first to look at the effects of deregulation in the economy, including the agricultural and food sectors, and the resulting increase in fast-food transactions and BMIs over time.

It suggests that if governments take action to control food industries, they can help prevent overweight and obesity and its serious health consequences, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, stroke and diet-related cancers.

“Unless governments take steps to regulate their economies, the ‘invisible hand of the market’ will continue to promote obesity worldwide with disastrous consequences for future public health and economic productivity,” De Vogli said.

Rather than looking at the density of fast-food outlets or self-reported fast-food consumption as researchers have done in the past, De Vogli and his colleagues compared data on fast-food transactions per capita with figures on BMI, which is a standard measure of body fat based on height and weight.

A person with a BMI of 25 to 29.9 is considered overweight, while a BMI of 30 or more is considered obese.

The study focused on high-income countries, but the findings are also relevant to developing countries, as “virtually all nations have undergone a process of market deregulation and globalization — especially in the last three decades,” De Vogli said.

The authors of the study found that while the average number of annual fast-food transactions per capita increased from 26.61 to 32.76, average BMI increased from 25.8 to 26.4.

The BMI figures revealed that the problem of unhealthy weight is widespread; people living in the all 25 countries included in the study were, on average, overweight.

The average number of annual fast-food transactions per capita increased in all 25 countries. The sharpest increases were in Canada (by 16.6 transactions per capita), Australia (14.7), Ireland (12.3), New Zealand (10.1), Norway (9.0) and the United States (8.6).

The lowest increases were in Italy (1.5), the Netherlands (1.8), Greece (1.9), Belgium (2.1), Portugal (2.6) and Spain (3.4).

“It’s not by chance that countries with the highest average BMIs and fast-food purchases are those in the forefront of market liberalization,” De Vogli said,  “whereas countries with lower average BMIs and fewer fast-food transactions have some of the tightest controls on food economies.”

Added Francesco Branca, director of the Department of Nutrition for Health and Development at the World Health Organization, “This study shows how important public policies are for addressing the epidemic of obesity. Policies targeting food and nutrition are needed across several sectors, including agriculture, industry, health, social welfare and education. Countries need to take action to align the food supply with the health needs of the population.”

The study authors also found that increases in BMIs could not be explained by increases in animal fat consumption or total calories, which remained close to constant over the course of the study.

“This was surprising,” De Vogli said. “Fast food tends to be high in animal fats, which have been linked to unhealthy weight. The only factor that can partially explain the BMI increases is soft drink purchases.”

De Vogli recommends that future research focus on categorizing food items according to levels of processing instead of fats and calories, which could help identify the specific determinants of overweight and obesity.

“The next step will be to study in detail what is done with food and how those processes alter calorie and nutrient content along with health,” he said.

— UC Davis News

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