Wednesday, August 27, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Study links tax credit to infant health

By
From page A5 | February 26, 2013 |

The Earned Income Tax Credit is known to reduce poverty, but according to a new UC Davis study it also is linked to reduced rates of low birth weight and increased average birth weight — key factors in measuring infant health.

Pregnant mothers who received the credit also showed lower smoking and drinking rates, possibly because the tax credit put more money in their pockets to pay for doctor visits where they received prenatal care, the researchers said.

“The EITC reduces poverty, it increases the number of women in the workforce, and it may generate health benefits we have not quantified before,” said Hilary Hoynes, professor of economics, the study’s primary author and a  National Bureau of Economics Research affiliate who studies poverty, inequality and the impacts of government tax and transfer programs on low-income families.

“This adds to a small, but growing, literature on the potential health benefits of nonhealth programs in the safety net.”

The EITC is a federal tax credit for low- and moderate-income working people. It’s designed to reduce poverty, encourage and reward work, as well as offset payroll and income taxes. It’s also “refundable,” which means that if the credit exceeds the amount of federal taxes owed by a low-wage worker, the IRS will send that extra amount as a refund check. About 26 million families receive these refunds annually.

Among the findings published in a working paper, researchers found that $1,000 of federal tax credit income resulted in reduced rates of low birth weight by 7 percent overall. African-Americans showed an 8.2 percent reduction in rates of low birth weight.

Hoynes and co-authors Douglas L. Miller, associate professor of economics, and David Simon, a doctoral candidate in economics — all affiliated with the UCD Center for Poverty Research — used United States Vital Statistics data in the study. They looked at statistics covering the full census of births from 1984 to 1998. Expansions of the federal tax credit occurred during that period, in both 1986 and 1993.

Researchers focused on single women between 18 and 45 with less than a high school education — a highly affected group in which 42 percent who gave birth were eligible for the tax credit in 1998.

By 1996, the phased-in expansions to the tax credit meant that a working parent or family with two children would still be eligible with annual income levels of almost $30,000.

Hoynes said the tax credit reduces poverty by increasing income immediately with a cash credit, but it also creates incentives for people to stay in jobs to get the tax credit.

Currently, 23 states and the District of Columbia have tax credits that supplement the federal credit at rates that range from 3.5 percent of the federal rate in Louisiana to 50 percent in Maryland. In the past year, nine states, including California, have introduced legislation or other proposals that either establish a state supplemental tax credit or alter programs already in existence.

— UC Davis News Service

Comments

comments

.

News

True Blue Devil Arnold gave back starting in high school

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Mr. Dolcini goes to Washington

By Tanya Perez | From Page: A1

Yolo grows sunflower seeds for the world

By Margaret Burns | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Chat with Poppenga at coffee shop

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Give blood and get a free movie ticket

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Sunder campaign distributes signs

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Dinner, auction benefit Yolo County CASA

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Farmworkers’ son wins prestigious NIH scholarship

By Julia Ann Easley | From Page: A3 | Gallery

Interested in Portuguese? Drop by I-House

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Play groups offered by Center for Families

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Solar-cooking workshop set at Food Co-op

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
A sweet reward for turning in cash

By Kathy Keatley Garvey | From Page: A4

Try yoga, meditation at Holistic Health Center

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Yolo Federal to hold photo contest

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Troops get ‘Hugs From Home’

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Raley’s pays $1.6 million to settle hazardous-waste lawsuit

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

Back-to-school party benefits Archer campaign

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Breast cancer program examines surgery

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Crisis nursery bill on governor’s desk

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Global warming on group’s agenda

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Documentary reveals ‘The Village Under the Forest’

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

 
UCD West Village gets an electric Zipcar

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

Little Rock hero featured at reunion

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

 
UCD ranks No. 16 for serving the public interest

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

Wolk’s infrastructure bill clears state Senate

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9

 
.

Forum

Obama risks alienating Latinos

By Tom Elias | From Page: A6

 
A water plan for all of California

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

 
MRAP sends the wrong message

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Play structure idea endorsed

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Thanks for firearms info

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

.

Sports

Shaw respects Aggies, while is Gould happy to get a shot at Stanford

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Devils prep for tough 2014 volleyball schedule

By Chris Saur | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Bumgarner deals as Giants blank Rockies

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Buschman, Cats mute the Sounds

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

New coach eager to see his Aggie charges hit the courses

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Carter’s blast send Astros past A’s

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Sports briefs: Online registration ends Friday for Labor Day Races

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B8 | Gallery

 
.

Features

Field to fork: Play catch-up with summer’s produce

By Dan Kennedy | From Page: A10 | Gallery

 
.

Arts

.

Business

.

Obituaries

Franco M. Navazio, M.D.

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
.

Comics

Comics: Wednesday, August 27, 2014

By Creator | From Page: B6