Tuesday, September 23, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

UCD finds DDT linked to slow metabolism, obesity, diabetes

By
From page A5 | August 01, 2014 |

Exposure of pregnant mice to the pesticide DDT is linked to an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol and related conditions in female offspring later in life, according to a study led by UC Davis.

The study, published online July 30 in the journal PLOS ONE, is the first to show that developmental exposure to DDT increases the risk of females later developing metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions that include increased body fat, blood glucose and cholesterol.

DDT was banned in the United States in the 1970s but continues to be used for malaria control in countries including India and South Africa.

Scientists gave mice doses of DDT comparable to exposures of people living in malaria-infested regions where it is regularly sprayed, as well as of pregnant mothers of U.S. adults who are now in their 50s.

“The women and men this study is most applicable to in the United States are currently at the age when they’re more likely to develop metabolic syndrome, because these are diseases of middle- to late adulthood,” said lead author Michele La Merrill, assistant professor of environmental toxicology at UCD.

The scientists found that exposure to DDT before birth slowed the metabolism of female mice and lowered their tolerance of cold temperature. This increased their likelihood of developing metabolic syndrome and its host of related conditions.

“As mammals, we have to regulate our body temperature in order to live,” La Merrill said. “We found that DDT reduced female mice’s ability to generate heat. If you’re not generating as much heat as the next guy, instead of burning calories, you’re storing them.”

The study found stark gender differences in the mice’s response to DDT. Females were at higher risk of obesity, Type 2 diabetes and cholesterol, but in males, DDT exposure did not affect obesity or cholesterol levels and caused only a minor increase in glucose levels.

A high fat diet also caused female mice to have more problems with glucose, insulin and cholesterol but was not a risk factor for males. The sex differences require further research, the authors said.

The study was funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Co-authors include Emma Karey and Michael La Frano of UCD; John Newman of UCD and the U.S. Department of Agriculture; and Erin Moshier, Claudia Lindtner and Christoph Buettner of Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

To read the complete study, visit http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0103337

— UC Davis News

Comments

comments

.

News

UC joins U.N.-supported Principles for Responsible Investment

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A1

 
Nature’s beauty is in our own back yard

By Charlotte Orr | From Page: A1 | Gallery

Jury finds Dixon man guilty of mortgage fraud

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A1

 
 
U.S., Arab allies hit Islamists in Syria, Iraq

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2 | Gallery

Bob Dunning: These are the tanks we get

By Bob Dunning | From Page: A2 | Gallery

 
Wind threatens firefighting effort

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

Harmony Award nominations sought

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Unscheduled landing

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

Free community yard sale Saturday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Street Food Rodeo rolls into West Davis

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Wolk kicks off ‘Morning with the Mayor’

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
So you want to be an entomologist?

By Kathy Keatley Garvey | From Page: A4

Sheriff’s Office honored for safe-driving initiative

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
Baha’is celebrate 50th anniversary in Davis

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

Downtown gift cards get a new perk

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Pets of the week

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5 | Gallery

 
Forum will answer questions about new license law

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Applications open for Biberstein grants

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A10

 
.

Forum

Brother’s drinking out of control

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
Daughter has her own opinions

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

We must not stand for perpetual war

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

 
Don’t cut all the trees

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

A great Day in the Country

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Donors support school matinees

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

A big Explorit thanks!

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Teacher tenure becomes key campaign issue

By Tom Elias | From Page: A6

Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

 
.

Sports

Running game powered Devils in first football win

By Thomas Oide | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Davis field hockey team rights ship at Lassen

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

Devil golfers soar past Sheldon

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

 
Blue Devils bounce back against Pleasant Grove

By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

UCD roundup: Aggie women reach finals of East/West golf tourney

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2Comments are off for this post | Gallery

 
U11s get a win in an eventful weekend of youth football

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

A’s support Samardzija in a win over Angels

By The Associated Press | From Page: B8

 
.

Features

.

Business

.

Obituaries

Carol L. Walsh

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
.

Comics

Comics: Tuesday, September 23, 2014 (set 1)

By Creator | From Page: B5

 
Comics: Tuesday, September 23, 2014 (set 2)

By Creator | From Page: B7